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Jfantagticfeg

A Romantic Comedy in Three
Acts by E D M o N D Rostand



F reel )■ Done into E 7i g I i s h
re r -f e h y Ci v. o R G E Fleming




ftt\xs iorft R. H. RUSSELL igoo



BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Uniform with this Volume

CYRANO DE BERGEKAC

A Play in Five Acts



• ^ »■■• • t L






Copyright, 1900, by
ROBERT HOWARD RUSSELL



PERSONS OF THE PLAT



Percinet
Straforel
Be Rc; AM IN
Pas (^u IN
Blaise .
Sylvette



A Lover
A Bravo

Father to Percinet
Father to Sylvette

A Gardener

( Daughter of Pasquin
( in love with Percinet



Bravos, Musicians, Negroes, Torch-bearers, a Notary,
Witnesses, Wedding-Guests, etc.



The Scene to take place where one pleasesy provided the
Costumes are pretty enough



ivil01833



THIS VERSION OF

" LES ROMANTIQUES "

WAS FIRST PRODUCED AT THE ROYALTY THEATRE
MAY 29, 1900



THE FANTA^nCKS
ACT I

The stage is divided by an old mossy wall covered with
dimhing plants and vines. To the right a hit
of Bergamin's park ; to the left the park he-
longing to Pasquin. Benches against the wall
on either side.

The curtain rising discloses Percinet seated on the
top of the wall, with a hook on his knee. He is
reading aloud to Sylvette, who listens atten-
tively from the other side of the wall, against
which she leans, standing on the hench L.

Sylvette

[clasping her hands in admiration, and looking at
Percinet].

How beautiful ! how beautiful ! dear Percinet, —
[she checks herself, looks down, and adds shyly]

— dear friend.
Percinet

[with enthusiasm, but absorbed in his hook].

Wait till you hear the lovely, perfect end !
Now, Romeo : [He reads.] ' Look, love, what

envious streaks
A



2 THE FANTASTICKS

' Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east \
' Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
' Stands tiptoe en the misty mountain-top ' :

[ IVitii expression. ]
' I must be gone and live ; or stay and '

Sylvette

\who lias been listening to some imaginary sounds
interrupts him sharply'].

Stop !
Listen ! [She looks about in alarm.]

Percinet

[after listening'].
No ! — nothing to be seen or heard.
[Half tender J half bantering].
Sylvia ! your heart is like a little bird
That flutters from her nest if leaves but stir.
Cease trembling, Faintheart! [Takes up hook.]

Listen now to Her —
That Juliet, whose love could never die.

[He reads.]
* Yon light is not daylight, I know it, I ;
' It is some meteor that the sun exhales
' To be to thee this night a torch-bearer.' . . .
Then He : — * Yon grey is not the morning's eye,
' 'Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia's brow ;
' Nor that is not the lark whose notes do beat



THE FA NTAS TICKS 3

? The vanity heaven so high above our heads :
' I have more care to stay than will to go.'
[He looks up and speaks with emotion.]
' Come, death, and welcome ! Juliet wills it so ! '

Sylvette

[childishly].

No, no ! — not that. Oh ! do not let him die !
If you go on, I '11 — weep.

Percinet

[turning to her with a sudden smile].

I would not have you cry.
And, since my lady's pleasure sits that way,

[He looks at his book, and shuts it.]
Let noble Romeo live another day.
[He looks about him.]
How the leaves rustle ! How those great boughs

seem
Bending and brooding over Shakespeare's dream !

'Sylvette.

Yes ; they are beautiful, enchanted speeches :
/ love them too. And all these waving beeches
Sway to their rhythm in a mood divine.
yes, I, too, have found your Shakespeare fine.
Only, [naively] his verse is finer, Percinet,
When you recite it. For — you have a way



4 THE FANTASTICKS

Percinet

[delighted, hut protesting].
Flatterer !

Sylvette
[nodding her head gravely].
A certain way of saying certain things —
[She sighs.]

But those poor lovers

[Mournfully.]

Ah, what sufferings !
[She sighs.]
They make me think

Percinet

[quickly].

Of whom ^

Sylvette

[blushing, embarrassed].

Oh ! — no one whom one knows.

Percinet

[half teasing].
And is that why your face becomes a rose 1

Sylvette

[putting her hands to her cheeks].
No one !



THE FANTASTICKS 5

Percinet.
Ah, Sylvia !
[Threatening her with his finger.]

Those transparent eyes
Can hide no secrets — save of Paradise.

[Mysteriously.]
Our own two fathers you remembered then.

Sylvette.
Perhaps I did.

Percinet.
Two angry, worthy men,
Whom long hate sunders

Sylvette.

And hate can divide.
When I Ve remembered that [sadly] I 've — very

often — cried.
For when I first grew up — a whole long month ago —
And left my convent's shade to see the great

world's show,
[she waves her hands towards the trees, etc.]
My father brought me here, beside these mossy

stones,
And showed me, over there, the park your father

owns.
'Look, child,' he said, 'yon fair wood is the den
Where lurks my mortal foe, the worst of living

men —



6 THE FANTASTICKS

A certain Master Bergamin, whose son
Must never cross thy path. — I bid thee shun
All sight, all contact with that loathed name.
Thy hate and mine must show an equal flame,
Or I renounce thee. Promise ! — or be cursed ! '

I promised. {Willi a change of voice.'] But I had

not seen you first !

Percinet.
And did I not the same mad oath repeat ?
I swore to hate you. And — I love you, Sweet.

Sylvette

[starting haclc\.
Love me 1

Percinet

[firmly].
I love you.

Sylvette
[faltering].

But — that is a crime.

Percinet

[grandiloguently].
It is. What matter ? Every single time
Love is forbid, love seeks some swifter way.

[Violently.]
I love you. — Kiss me.



THE FANTASTICKS 7

Sylvette.

Fie, fie, Percinet !
[She jumps down from the bench and runs away.]

Percinet

[with reproachful su7-prise].
And yet — you love me.

Sylvette

[scandalised].
Oh!

Percinet.

But, dearest child,
I put your thought in words. We were beguiled
If we still doubted. What I speak, you 've said.
You said it, Sylvia. You compared the dead
Immortal lovers of Verona

Sylvette

[putting her hands to her ears]. '
No!

Percinet.
— To us, my Juliet ! — / am Romeo.

Sylvette.
I never did compare



8 THE FANTASTICKS

Percinet.

Our battling fathers, Sweet,
Eemember them. And see me at thy feet,
fairer Juliet ! — Brother Montagu,
[stretching out his arms]
You had the old love ; have I not the new 1
[With emphasis, turning to Sylvette.]
Well as they loved, I '11 love you better yet,
Eight in the teeth of Father Capulet.

Sylvette
[drawing a little nearer the wall].
But are we lovers 1 Can love t)e so swift ?

Percinet

Love never bargains o'er his royal gift.
I watched you pass my door

Sylvette
[naively].

And I saw too.

Percinet
Our eyes had spoken ere your name I knew.

Sylvette

One day I looked for nuts beside this wall ;
It was by chance



the fantasticks 9

Percinet.
By chance — no plan at all —
I brought my book, and

Sylvette.

Off my ribbon blew.

Percinet.

What man controls his fate % I guessed 'twas

You.
I climbed this bench to seize the precious knot

Sylvette

[getting up on the bench].
I climbed this bench

Percinet.

And by this blessed spot
I wait each day, with beating heart, to hear
The music of your bird-laugh drawing near.
Your laugh — your signal. Then your dear hair

shines,
And your dear face uprises through the vines.

Sylvette.
Since we are lovers, we should plight our troth.

Percinet.
I 've thought of that.



lo THE FANTASTICKS

Sylvette.

I, Sylvette, nothing loath —
Last of the Pasquinots— to you, the last

Of all the Bergamins

[5Ae Iwlds out her hand, which he kisses.']

Percinet.

I '11 hold my treasure fast !

Sylvette.
People will talk of Us in years and years to be.

Percinet.
Two tender blossoms of too harsh a tree !

Sylvette.

And yet, who knows, dear friend 1 The hour may

ring
When Heaven, through us, may soothe their

bickering.

Percinet.
I doubt it !

Sylvette.

But I feel that Fate befriends.
Besides, — I 've thought of half a dozen ends
All possible, and

Percinet.
What^



THE FANTASTICKS ii

Sylvette.

But, dearest, only look !
Suppose — I Ve read of such things in a book —
Suppose a prince — that prince who never fails ! —
Should ride this way, as in the fairy tales %
— I fly to tell him of our hopeless love :
He listens : I beseech. All other men above,
A prince gives orders ; and our fathers' pride
Bends to his will

Percinet.
They give me You for bride — .

Sylvette.
Or, — as in dear old Beauty and the Beast, —
You seem to sicken, — you grow pale, at least—.

Percinet.
My trembling father bids me name my care,

Sylvette.
You say, ' I die, since Sylvia is so fair ! '

Percinet.
His heart must soften !

Sylvette.

Or — another plan : —
Some rich old Duke, some old and wicked man,
Who sees my portrait, sends to me a page
All golden armour, to demand some gage
That I become his Duchess.



12 THE FANTASTICKS

Percinet.

But you answer ' No ! '

Sylvette.
Then, on a night, as is my wont, I go
Deep in the park's dim shade, to dream of Thee.
His minions seize me ; then I shriek

Percinet.

For Me !
I fly — my dagger in my vengeful hand —
And, like a lion, leap upon their band

Sylvette.
Three— four men sink before your flashing blade ;—
Enters my father ; hails you ; unafraid
You tell your noble name ; he bursts in tears of

joy;

And, when he yields his Girl, your father gives

his Boy.
Percinet.
And ever after that, we live in perfect bliss.

Sylvette

Dearest, there 's nothing surely very strange in

this?
Percinet
[hearing a noise].
Somebody coming !



THE FANTASTICKS 13

Sylvette
[losing her head].
Kiss me !



Percinet.



You will return at dusk ^



Till to-night.



Sylvette.

No.

Percinet.

Yes, — my Heart's Delight !

Sylvette

[disappearing behind the wall].
Your father !

[Percinet leaps nimbly down from the wall.]

Bergamin.
[Sylvette is invisible where he stands.]

What ! I find you mooning here ?
Always in this same spot 1

Percinet.

But this spot is so dear !
I love this spot. I love this mossy seat :
See how the wild vines clasp its faithful feet !
See how, in arabesques, their tendrils fall ! —
The air tastes sweeter here.



14 THE FANTASTICKS

Bergamin.

Here 1 By this stifling wall %



Percinet

\mt}i enthusiasm].



I love that wall !



He cannot see.



Bergamin.

I 'm sure I can't see why.

Sylvette

[aside].



Percinet

[mth a touch of fatuity].

But, sir, you won't deny
Its beauty ? See that happy crown of grass ; —
The redd'ning vines mix with the ivy's green ; —
With pale wisteria ; and the paler mass
Of honeyed woodbine and of eglantine.
My fine old wall ! that from its gaping sides
Flings to the sun a strange and ruddy fleece
All starred with gentle flowers ; whose deep moss

hides
This bench, whereon a king might rest at ease.

Bergamin.

Tut ! tut ! young man. — That cock won't fight at

all.—
You 'd have me think you make eyes at a wall 1



THE FANTASTICKS 15

Percinet

\zame manner].
But, father ! when a wall has flower-eyes !
[He turns to tJie wall and addresses Sylvette
out of sight.]
Eyes like blue stars !— Eyes of the right June-blue,
Smiles of pure azure. — Looks of blue surprise.
— As if some flower should learn the way to woo.
[ fVith emotion.] By Heaven ! if e'er I should forget

their power

Bergamin

[shouti7ig].
Walls —have — no — eyes I

Percinet.
What do you call — this flower *?
[Smiling and foppish, he offers Bergamin a
flower he deftly picks from the wall.]

Sylvette

[aside].
Sweet heaven ! how clever !

Bergamin

[with a grunt, after staring at him and his flower].
Son, you are — an Ass.
But well I know what 's brought you to this pass.
[Signs of alarm from Percinet and Sylvette.]



i6 THE FANTAS TICKS

You hide away — to read.

[He snatches the hook from Percinet's pocket,
and looks at it.]

Plays !
[He opens book and lets it fall with hmroi\]

Lord ! — Poetry.
Written in verse, — in verse. Dear Lord ! can

such things be 1

[Pointing each word with his stick on the ground.]

You moon — you hide — ignore your neighbour's

needs ;

You talk of eyes, and walls, pick foolish weeds ; —

Eyes in my wall ! — Good God ! [Mimicking

Percinet.] Eyes ! mosses ! flowers ! Fate !

[Shouting.] Walls — have — no — eyes, my lad.

They need to be built — straight.

[Pointing to wall with stick.]

Who knows what threat'ning breach may lurk

behind that screen 1
I'll send my men, anon, to strip yon silly

green.
To keep a hated neighbour well at bay,
I '11 have that whole side whitewashed. All the

way
I '11 set it thick with sharp and broken glass,
Fragments of bottles, till no fly may pass
My ranked legions



the fantas ticks 17

Percinet.

Father, spare my vines — !

Bergamin.
Not one. All glass. All razor-cutting lines.

Percinet and Sylvette
[overcome with horror'].
Oh!

Bergamin.

But to business. [He sits on the bench B.]

Hm-m 'i [He gets up, looks at
wall suspiciously.]
Though walls can't see,
They 've ears can hear.

[He appears to be about to climb the bench. Alarm of
Percinet. Sylvette, on hearing the noise,
mahes herself as small as possible and crouches
under the wall. But Bergamin, making a
face which shows he is suffering from some old
stiffness, beckons to his son to climb in his stead
and look over. To Percinet.]

You climb, and look for me.
[Percinet scrambles quickly on the bench, leans
over the wall and speaks to Sylvette, who
has immediately risen.]

Percinet

[to Sylvette].
To-night 1— To-night 1



1 8 the fantasticks

Sylvette

[giving him her hand, which he kisses ; in a low voice'].
I '11 come. As soon as darkness nears.

Percinet

[same voice],
I shall be here.

Sylvette
[same voice].
I love you.

Bergamin.

Well ?

Percinet

[jumping down lightly ; aloud].

No sign of — ears !

Bergamin

[reassured, sits down again].
Then business, son. I Ve chosen you a wife.

Sylvette.
Ah!

Bergamin.
What was that 1

Percinet.

That ? Nothing.



THE FANTASTICKS 19

Bergamin.

Ton my life,



I swear I heard a cry.



Percinet

[looking up into the trees].

Some little wounded bird-

Sylvette.



Alas!



Percinet.
I almost think the branch above there stirred — .

Bergamin.
Well then, my only son, with due reflection

ripe
I 've made your choice



Percinet

[moves away up stage, whistling impertinently].
Whew ! Whew !

Bergamin

[after an instant of suffocating indignation
follows him].

Whistle ! you silly snipe !
I am not to be moved.



20 the fantasticks

Percinet

\witli impertinence^ coming down stage'].
Whew-ew !

Bergamin.

You — piping merle !
I say, I 've made your ctoice. I Ve found your

wife. A pearl.

Percinet.
And — if I don't like pearls ?

Bergamin

[stupefied].
'Not— like 1 God bless my soul,
[Jie raises his cane] I '11 teach you what you like



[Percinej wards off the stick with his hand.]

Bergamin.

You scamp ! you

Percinet
[calmly, sentimentally].

Sir, the whole
Green coppice is alive with spring-awakened

song ;
And where young leaves are thick, young birds

woo all day long
By little woodland streams



THE FANTASTICKS 2:

Bergamin.
Indecent !

Percinet

[samg busiTiess, with stick].

It is May
The world is full of laughter. Flies, at play



Bergamin.



Profligate !



Percinet

[same business].
— swarm, in sunny fields, to kiss
The thousand flowers, whose opening makes

their bliss.
For Love

Bergamin.
You— bandit!

Percinet.

— sets all hearts a-quake.
— And you would have me wed for reason's sake 1

Bergamin

[with
You shall, you scoundrel !



22 THE FANTASTICKS

Percinet
[very sweetly].
My — de-ar — father, — no.
Dear wall ! [twming tmoards Sylvette] bear
witness that it is not so.
For when I wed, I '11 wed such high romance
As never yet was seen on sea or land — .
[To Bergamin.]

Before I yield, I '11 lead you such a dance

[Runs off stage. Exit.]

Bergamin.
Wait till I catch you !
[Runs after Percinet, brandishing stick. Exit.]

Sylvette
[looking after Bergamin].

Oh ! I understand
Almost — my papa's hate for this old



Pasquin
[enteiing L.].

And what is Missy doing ?

Sylvette

[quickly].



WelH



I '11 not tell !



[Confused.]
-Nothing ! — I mean — I 'm walking-



THE FANTASTICKS 23

Pasquin.

Tut ! tut ! careless maid,
How came you all alone % And Uere %

Sylvette
\hurnedly\.

I 'm not afraid.

Pasquin.

Alone % Beside this wall % But I forbade you,

child,
Ever to see this wall. — What ! will you drive

me wild ?
Have you forgot this park, this haunt, this horrid

den
Where lurks my oldest foe — the worst of living

men %

Sylvette

\rat)ier bored].
I know, papa.

Pasquin.

And yet you linger by this wall. —
You dare their evil looks. — You take no pains

at all ! —
What if this ruffian's son — fit son of ruffian

sire, —
Should find my daughter here, frail victim to

his ire ?



24 THE FANTASTICKS

The bare thought makes me creep. — Quick,

quick ! with iron nails
Let me beset this wall ;— with sharp and cutting

flails ; —
I '11 turn it to a knife ; a porcupine ; a spear ;
I '11 make my iron bite each mortal thing that 's

near;
I '11 bristle like a boar

Sylvette

Until he counts the cost !
Papa 's no spendthrift.

Pasquin.
Go ! — [Tenderly] Mind that you don't get lost.
[Exit Sylvette. He watches her out of sight
mth affected anger.']
[Enter Bergamin, speaking offstage.]

Bergamin.
This note, post haste, to Master Straforel.

Pasquin

[running to the wall and climbing the bench L.].
Bergamin !

Bergamin
[same business, bench B.].
Pasquin !

[They embrace.]



the fantas ticks 25

Pasquin
[affectionately].

Do I see you well 1

Bergamin.
So, so, old friend.

Pasquin
[solicitous].
That gout 1

Beroamin

[shrugs shotilders]. ' \

Ugh ! But you had a cough %

Pasquin.
I have one. [Ooughs?^ '

Bergamin

, [rubbing his hands].

Well, 'tis done. That marriage will

come off !

Pasquin.
What ?

Bergamin.

Oh, I heard it all. I hid there [pointing]

by those trees.
They 're mad — quite mad — with love.



26 THE FANTAS TICKS

Pasquin.
Hurray !

Bergamin

[same hisiness, rubbing hands].

Mad as you please.
To business now — ha ! ha ! — and that right

speedily.

Two fathers, and two cheery widowers, we ;

I had one son, of a romantic name

Pasquin.
Fantastic !

Bergamin

[toith a shrug].
His poor mother pined for fame — .
You had one daughter — sky-blue — with a

Soul.
— What was our hope 1 What was our daily

goaU

Pasquin.
To overthrow this wall.

Bergamin.

To live here, side by side.

Pasquin.
To join the two estates



THE FANTASTICKS 27

Bergamin.
Like old friends, true and tried



Pasquin.
Like prudent landlords, too-



Bergamin.
For that, what did we plan %

Pasquin.
Our children's marriage ; hey %

Bergamin.

But think, my dear old man :
If they but dreamt of this, if they once guessed

us friends,
Where were our triumph then *? A marriage, for

sane ends.
Is not a very tempting article, I fear,
To fine, fantastic— geese ! So, since they lived

not near.
We hid from them all plans that pointed Hymen's

way.
Till school and college sent them home to stay.
Then, I, — remembering that stolen love
Tastes sweet as stolen fruit, — and that above
All other joys they 'd prize a guilty bliss, —
I planned our deadly hatred. SJIe chuckles.] After

this —
And through my cunning — we, the warring sires,
Need only condescend to our desires.



28 the fantasticks

Pasquin.

But how confess it % how conceal our arts %
Cats let from bags would startle such young

hearts.
I dubbed you Ass — and Eogue, — a very Knave

indeed !

Bergamin.

Ass was sufficient. Man should not exceed.



What pretext ?



Pasquin.



Bergamin.



There you are, old man ! Your girl
Herself suggested — \correcU himself^ — gave, at

least, the twirl
To my Idea, — thus made doubly mine.
Here, and to-night, they planned to meet, in fine.
My youngster will be first. — Just as your girl he

sees.
Ruffians, in masks, shall start from out the trees.
They seize her : — she despairs : and lo ! young

Chanticleer
Darts to her rescue, without pause or fear.
The ruffians fly his flashing, conquering blade : —
They fly. — We show ourselves.— The rescued maid
Sobs in your arms. — You wipe a tear or so,
And bless her hero-saviour. — I relent. — Tableau !



THE FANTASTICKS 29

Pasquin
[with enthusiasm].
I call that genius. Yes, by heaven I do !

Bergamin
[modestly].
Genius 1 Ah well ! old friend, / won't say no !
— But see, who comes — 1 Hush now. — Observe

him well.
That man approaching — that is Straforel, —
[Straforel is seen in the magnificent costume of
a Bravo, slowly and majestically advancing
down stage.]
The famous bravo, freelance, cavalier.
—I wrote to him but now— that 's why he 's here.—
'Tis he abducts your girl.

[Bergamin descends hastily from wall, and
bows to Straforel.]

Bergamin.

Allow me, first of all.
Sir, to present my friend,

Straforel

[bowing].

Sir— ?
[He looks about him, puzzled to see no one.]

Bergamin

[pointing to Pasquin, astraddle the wall].

— Pasquin. On the wall.



30 the fantasticks

Straforel
\amde\
Faith ! a new setting for an ancient fool !

Bergamin

{jpovrfpous]. -
My scheme, sir, would impress

Straforel
\sardonic\.



— an infant school !



Bergamin

Itaken aback\
-Man of experience. — Ha ! you act-



Straforel
\b(ym%g\

— and hold my peace.

Bergamin.

Ha ! an abduction, then ; with fighting, if you

please.

Straforel.
That 's understood.

Bergamin.

Ah ! but with prudent, careful men,
Who will not hurt my boy, \jpomjpous] my Son

and Heir



THE FANTASTICKS 31

Straforel.

Oh, — then,
I '11 take the foils myself,

Bergamin.

Your humble servant, sir.
\Tliey how.']

Pasquin
\to Bergamin].
You ask him what it costs.

Bergamin

\embarfas5ed\

Ahem ! I hope I — er — .
For an abduction, now — what is the usual charge ?

Straforel

\with a swagger].
Sir, that depends. The price is small and

large :
It goes by merit. If I Ve understood.
What you require is something neat and good.
I, in your place, should order — a first-class.
[Bowing, with flourish. ]

Bergamin

[dazzled].
Is there such choice "?



32 THE FANTASTICKS

Straforel.
I 'd rather think there was !
Sir ! we Ve the obvious, open, schoolboy rape.
Which only needs black cloaks, no matter what

their shape ;
The rape by cab ; — 'tis little in request ; —
The rape by day — the rape by night looks best ; —
The pompous rape with coaches of the court,
With powdered lacqueys, wigs of every sort —
(The wigs are extra) — eunuchs, slaves, and mutes.
Blacks, bravos, brigands, musketeers — as suits ;
The rape done with postillions, three or four,
And half a dozen horses, less or more ; —
The decorous rape, in dowager's landau —
It is not popular, a trifle slow ; —
The comic rape : — the lady must be fond ; —
Romantic, in a boat ; — requires a pond ; —
The rape Venetian — wants a blue lagoon ; —
The rape by moonlight, or without a moon —
Moonlight is dear, and always in demand ; —
The rape lugubrious, by blue lightning planned.
With challenge, single combats, clash of arms.
Great flapping hats, dark cloaks, and war's

alarms; —
The rape emphatic, and the rape polite ; —
The rape with torches, that 's a charming sight !
The rape in masks — we call that classical ; —
The rape gallant, done to sweet music's call ; —
The rape in sedan chair, that 's new and gay.
The latest thing of all — and distinguS.



THE FANTASTICKS 33

Bergamin
[scratching his head, to Pasquin],
What do you think 1

Pasquin.
And you ?

Bergamin.

I think that— dash the cost !
I think we should strike hard. Try everything —

almost !
Order a rape

Straforel.
With trimmings 1 As you like.

Bergamin.
Imagination is the thing to strike.
Cloaks — sedan chairs — music — a torch — a mask !

Straforel
[taking notes in a book].
I see, I see. I '11 make it now my task
To group the articles. As extras. With first-
class.

Bergamin.
Good!



34 THE FANTAS TICKS

Straforel.

Soon I shall return. But, that my men

may pass,
This gentleman's park gate [looking at Pasquin]

must stand ajar.

Bergamin.
It shall be opened.

Straforel.

My lords, [hows with flourish] au re voir !


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