Edmund Bogg.

Wensleydale and the lower vale of the Yore, from Ouseburn to Lunds Fell, containing 125 illustrations online

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WENSLEYDALE



AND THE



LOWER VALE OF THE YORE,

From OUSEBURN to LUNDS FELL,
Containing I2§ Illustrations.





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BY



EDMUND BOGG,

Author of " Wharfedai^e," "Edknvai^e," " The Border
Country," "Lakei^and," &c.



Leeds :

KUMUNL) IJOUG, 3, WoOUHOUbK LaNE.






PREFACE.



'"PHIS modest work is the outcome of our many visits
I into Yoredale, extending over several 3'ears ; therefore,
the writer is familiar as well as enamoured with its
varied aspects of beaut}', and also its historical, tradi-
tional, and romantic interest.

Besides the parent stream, this work contains a
descriptive account of all the important tributaries, and
every town and village in the watershed, from Ouseburn
to the source of the river on Lunds Fell. The Vale of
the Yore is very eas}^ of access bj^ rail from most of the
commercial centres in the North of England. This handbook
has not been compiled on the beaten track of Guide Books
(supposed to minutely point out every bye-path, &c., which
only mars the interest of the visit). Our thought is
to create a greater love for all the varied and beautiful
phases of nature, and to make the tour instructive as well as
entertaining; leading the pilgrim, as it were, by the hand,
yet leaving much to his own imagination, reminding the
reader how very much beautiful Wensle3'dale owes to
geological action ; the abundance of shale being more easil}'
denuded and washed awa}', than the limestone scars, which
hold such prominent sway above the deep sweep of the
delightful valley. The man}' villages resting by the river,
framed in the rich luxuriance of pasture land, also remind
lis that Wensleydale is as much renowned for its cheese
as its s:eological series. We trust our efforts mav awaken
a deeper interest in this charming valle}'.

Thanking those who have in any way added to the
success of this work, especialh' G. T. h. and R. A.,

I remain, yours respectfully,

EDMUND BOGG.



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS.



Glen Scene.



.P.^GE

1 itle Pasre



3
6

8
9

lO

II
13
14



Near the Source of the Yore ...
Little Ousshurn ...

Great Ouseburn ...

Moat Hall and Little Oustburn
Church ...

Grafton

The Punch Bowl, Marlon
Low Dunsforth
Akiborough Church

Betrayal of Caractacus

The Cross and Ancient Manor House 16

The Devil's Arrows ... ... 20

Ancient Arch, Boroiighbridge House 23

A Rural Corner, Boroughbridge 24

Boroughbridge Hall ... .. 25

Staveley Village ... ... ... 27

Old Cottage, Kirkby Hill ... 29

A Roman Well 30

Statue of John Sobieski 31

The Tapestry Room, Newby ... 33

A Lowland River 34

Sharow \'illage ... ... -.• 35

In South Tr.insept, W'ath ... 37

Norton ('on>ers ... 39

The Minster, Kipon 40

Map of Western Tributaries .. 41

A Bit of Well Village 41

Kirkby Malzeard 43

Winter Scene, Azerley ... .. 45

The Laver ... ... 4^

Laverton 47

The Laver at ^^'inksley 4Q



P.-VGE

Markenfield Hall ... ... ... 51

The First Shelter, Fountains ... 53

An Ancient Yew, Fountains ... 54

Ruins of Fountains ... ... 56

.Surprise View, Fountains ... 58

Map of Yoredale ... ... ... 60

Fountains Abbey from the Skell 61

Tomb of the Markenfields, Ripon

Minster ... ... ... ... 62

The Old Chapel of St. Mary

Magdalene ... ... ... 63

A Bit of Old Tanfield 66

Tomb of the Marmions, Tanfield

Church ... 68

.\ Peep of Hackfall ... ... 71

The Square, Masham ... ... 74

Remains of Saxon Cross, Masham 75

The Wyville Chapel, Masham... 76

Fragments of Tombs, &c. ... 77

Moorland Farm, Fearby .. 78

Old Farm, Colsterdale ... ... 80

Symbols of War ... 81

Driving Cows to Pasture, Well... 83

Ancient Hospital, Well ... ... 85

\'ale of Mowbray, from Well ... 86

.X. Village Picture ... 87

Snape Castle 88

Bedale Church ... ... ... 91

Bedale, 60 years ago ... ... 93

Kilgrim Bridge ... ... ... 96

Arms of the Abbots of Jervaul.x 97

Lowthorpe ... ... ... ... 98

Ruins of Jervaulx Abbey ... 99

Deep Gill Force ... ... ... 100



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS (Continued).



Cover Bridge ...

Arms of Scropes, Danby-super-
Yore ...



Pagk

. lOI



1 02
103
104
106
107
109



Thornton Stewart Church

The Lower Cover

A Mountain Track

Old Mill, near Charlton, Coverham

Lane Scene, Coverham ...

Entrance Arch, Coverham Abbey 110

Seal of Coverham 11 1

Effigies, Coverham Abbey ... 112

Church and Lych Gate, Coverham 113

Ruins of Middleha'm Castle ... 114

Tomb of Ralph Neville and his
Two Wives, Staindrop Church,
Raby . 115

Badge of the Nevilles ... ... 115

Seal of Richard IIL, Lord of

Middleham ... 116

The North Side of Middleham

Castle and the Boar Cross ... 117

Raby Castle 118

A Distant Peep of Middleham

Church ... 120

I^^yburn ... ... ... ... 123

Denizens of Moor and Forest ... 124

Mary Stuart a prisoner at Bolton

Castle 125

A Stretch of the River ... ... 127

Elm Tree, Weiisley Green ... 128

Moonlight on the Yore nr W'ensley 130

The River flowing through Bolton
Woods ... ... 131

Autumn Skelch — Bolton Woods 132

Redniire Church ... 133

Waterfall on the Yore, near Mill

Farm ... ... ... ... 134

The Old Oalc Tree, Redmiro ... 135

A Picturesque Bit of Redmire ... 136



Oueen Mary at Castle Bolton ...

Castle Bolton

An Old Lane

The Lower Fall, Aysganh

The Lake, Wood Hall ...

Old Wood Hall ...

Aysgarth from the Road

The late Betty Webster and her
Daughter

High Falls, Aysgarth

Arms of Osborne, Duke of Leeds

Village Street, West Witton

Old Mill, West Witton

West Burton Beck

West Burton

Foss Gill and First Bridge

Near Newbiggin, Bishopdale

The Green, Thoralby

A Bit of Worton ...

Askiigg

Askrigg (distant view) ...

.Arms of the Metcalfs

Bow Bridge

Bainbridge

The Horn Blower

Countersett

The Time of Haying

Gayle Beck— Moonlight

Hawes Church from the Beck ...

The Hardraw Falls

Buttertubs Pass

Cotterdale Foss

L\nids Church

l*'irst Bridge near the source of
the Yore

.\rms of the Cliffords

A Bit of Kirkby Stephen



'.\Gh:
137
139
141

143
145
146
148

149

153
T54

158
160
t6i
162

165
167
t68
170

T71
172

173

T75
178
180
182

183
184
t86
187

t88
189
190



LITERARY DIGEST.



Pages
Chapiek I. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... I to 26

Source of the Yore — The Ouseburn Villages : Grafton,
Marton, High and Low Dunsforth, Myton, Aldborough, .
Boroughbridge — The Devil's Arrows — Staveley Beck — The
Brigantes and the Romans, &c.

Ch.M'TEU H. ... ... ... ... ... .. .. 27 to 41

Miiiskip — Roecliffe — Staveley — Copgrove— Brearton — Farn-
ham — Kirkby Hill — Langlhorp — Skelton — Xewby Park —
Givendale — Bridge Hewick — Copt Hewick — Sharow \'illage
— Huiton Conyers — Wath — Howgrave — Middleton-tjuernhovv
— Norton Conyers.

Chai'TEK hi. ... ... ... ... ... ... 42 to 64

Western Tributaries — Kirkby Malzeard — Azerley — Gal-
phoy — Dallowgill — Greygarth — Laverton — \\'iiiKsley — Hun-
gate— High and Low Grantley — Grantley Hall — Alfield —
Markenfield Hall — Fountains Abbey — Ripon, &c.

Chaptkk IY. ... ... ... ... ... ... 65 to 81

Castle iJykes — Stainley — Slenningford Hall — Tanheld —
Castle and Tombs of the Alarmions— Old .Slenningford —
Mickley — Grewelthoipe — Hackfall — Aldborough Hall — Benso
— Barton — Masham— River Burn — Fe.irby — Healey — Colster-
dale — Ilton, «S;c.

CllAPTEK V. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 82 to 96

Ellington — Clifton — Well — \'ale of Mowbray — Snape : its
Castle — Firby : its Hospital — Bedale and Church, &c. —
Bedale Beck — Burton Constable — Finghall — Newton-le-
Willowby — Hau.wvell — Patrick Brompton — Crakehall — Kil-
grim Bridge.



LITERARY DIGEST ( Continued ).



Pages

Chx\pter VI.... ... ... ... ... — ... 96 to 105

Jervaul.x Abbey — East Witton — Cover Bridge — Ulshavv
Bridge — Danby Mill — Danby Hall — Thornton Stewart —
Spennilhorne— ^Harmby.

Chaptkr VII. ... ... ... ... ... ... 106 to 119

Coverdale : Horse House — Svvineside— West Scrafton— East
Scrafton — Carlton^ — Melmerby — Bird's Ridding — Braithwaite
Hal! — Coverliam Abbey and Church — Middleham.

Chapter VIII. ... ... ... ... ... ... 120 to 152

Leyburn — Bellerby — Hart Leap Well — Leyburn Shawl —
Preston-under-Scar — Scarthe Nick — West Witton — Bishop-
dale and Waldon— Wensley — Bolton Hail and Woods —
Redmire — Castle Bolton — Carperby — Thoresby — Bearpark —
Woodhall — Falls of Aysgarth — Aysgarth Church and Village.

Chapter IX. ... ... ... ... ... ... 153 to 190

West Witton — Swinelhwaite — West Burton — Bishopdale :
Foss Gill, Dale Foot House, Devil's Hole, Newbiggin,
Thoralby, Edgley, Heaning Gill — Thornton Rust —
Cubeck — \\'orton— .\skrigg — Nappa Hall — Bowbeck— Bow
Bridge — Bainbridge — Countersett — Seminerwater — Stalling
Busk — Marsett — Gayle — HawL'S — Hardraw — Buttertuhs —
Cotter Foss — Appersett — "The Moorcock"— Lunds — Hell
Gill— High Seat.




WENSLEYDALE,

AND THK

Lower Wale of the Yore



latter
Hear



Chapter I.

HE river Yore rises far up on the
high brow of Luiids Fell, or Lady's
Pillar, 2,166 feet above the sea level.
From this vantage ground can be
discerned a scene of wild magnifi-
cence, range after range of billowy
mountains stretching to the I^ake
Country, whilst to the north-west
and south-east spread the smiling
valleys of the Eden and Yore. The
river, after a course of some 55 miles, joins the Swale
to Low Dunsforth and Myton.




Its name Yore is variously pronounced b\- the natives:
"Yore," 'YHr,'' 'Y'er," "Your," "L^re," and ' Eure," and some
historians say that this river gave its name to the City of
York, — " Yorewick," or " Eureuick," the Cit}- by the Yore.



According to Canideu, the Yore holds sway for some
four miles further than where the two rivers meet, and not
until it receives the tiny rivulet below Aldwark, known as
the Ouseburn Beck, does the Yore yield its prestige to the
Ousebuni. This small stream is barely four miles in length,
and originates in the garden of the Union House, about a mile
and a half north-west of the Ouseburn villages. Camden,
speaking of this rivulet, saj-s — " This little petty rivulet,
which runs into the river below Ouseburn, giving the name
to the Ouse, and robbing the Ure of it."




Ed. Bog^.



Near the Source oi" the Yore.



On opposite sides of this stream, and near to the
Roman road, which passed between Kboracum (York) and
Isurium (Aldborough), stand the two villages, namel}-, Great
and Little Ouseburn ; both places are of great interest and
antiquity.



Towards the end of the 12th century, William de
Stutville, Lord of Knaresborough, was in possession of the
Manor, and it was he who caused the ditch to be cut deep
and wide, for the course of the stream, thus dividing the
Manor, and also a separating line between the two villages.
The same William gave all his lands in Kirkby Ouseburn,
with his body, to the Abbey of Fountains.




Frank De^!>i.



LiTTLF. OUSKBUKN.



The soil in this district is a rich alluvial deposit, on
tl'ie new red sandstone, which abounds in this great plane,
famous for its fertility and agricultural produce. The ditch
previously mentioned was widened, banked, and formed into
a beautiful lake, about the middle of the last centurv. At
the head of the lake there is a populous rookery, and in
nesting time the scene is ver}' animated and rowdy. Added
to the cawing of the rooks is the flute-like call of the swan,
and the cry of numerous wild fowl, which nest amongst the
rush and sedge, on the margin of the lake. The bittern



used to be a regular visitant to this stream, and before the
land was drained will-o'-the-wisps might have almost been
seen nightly flitting and darting about the marsh meadows.

There is much to both charm and interest the stransfer
in this district. The Church of Little Ouseburn stands on
the margin of the lake, and some distance from the village ;
however, a path across the meadows lessens the distance
considerably, 5-et, such was the superstition that existed here
a generation or so ago, that on no account would the women
going to be churched cross the meadow, but always went
the farthest way by the road.

Moat Hall, and I^ittle Ouseburn Church, seen from
the path, form a very charming picture indeed. The Church
is of great interest, as it displays some portions of un-
doubted Saxon work. Dr. Cladius Buchanan, the great
Oriental scholar, dwelt for some years at Moat Hall, and
his memory is still lovingly cherished in this district. It
was at Thorpe, near Iw, that Branwell Bronte, and his
sister Ann. were for some time engaged as tutor and gover-
ness, and it was here that the tragedy of poor Branwell had
its beginning. Crossing to the east side of the lake, the
scene is even more picturesque, for, looking over the red-
tiled roofs of the village, we see rising out of a mass of
large trees, ivy- clad and gre}' with time, the Norman Gothic
tower of Great Ouseburn Church. This Church was rebuilt
in 1824, when nearly all the objects of interest, except the
Tower, were demolished.

A few items, illustrative of the manners and cus-
toms of the people dwelling in this district, 80 to go
years ago, may be of interest. On Sunday mornings the
fanners used to bring their sheep dogs to church with
them, this often led to snarling and quarrelling, thus causing
interruptions to the service, 'i'his state of things came to such
a pass at Great Ousel)urn, that a person named Dick}'
Scarl)(n'()ngh, a village character, was appointed to the office



of " Dog Nawper." His business was to watch near the
entrance, and, with the aid of a long stick, keep all dogs
from invading the sacred precincts. However, soon after
Dicky's piomotion to this office, two dogs managed one
Sunday morning to elude his vigilant eye, and being at deadly
enmity with each other, a furious fight commenced, which
caused a break in the service. Dicky being unable for some
moments to part the brutes, lost his temper, and certain
blasphemous expressions were distinctly heard above the
snarling and barking of the dogs. This conduct necessitated.
Dicky's dismissal from the office of "Dog Nawper" at
Ouseburn.

The writer himself has good reason to remember an
old-time custom in this district, namely, the "Dog Nawper"
or verger parading the aisles during service, armed with
a staff some 7 or 8 feet long, which was used for the
purpose of awakening the sleepers, particularl)' if addicted
to snoring, and also for keeping in subjection and awe the
lads, who, being shut out of sight in the high-boxed pews,
ofttimes amused themselves at the expense of the preacher
and congregation. At such times we were reminded of our
misconduct, by the verger not over gently napping us on
the head with his staif.

Farmers' wives, who came from some distance to
service on the Sabbath, brought their baskets with them
for the week's groceries ; the shopping was generally done
before service, the baskets often being placed behind the
altar tombs, &c., during the sermon. In some out-of-the-
way villages in this district, service once a fortnight, or
every month, was deemed sufficient. There is a stor}' told
by the preacher to whom the following incident occurred.
He was taking duty at one of these out-of-the-world villages,
and on entering the pulpit he was surprised to find a
•' sitting " goose. We may be sure this caused the good man
both anxiety and amusement but on the whole she (the



^«1




you'll come into the vestry, I'll pay you for that seed
Avhcat." One of the parish clerks at Ouseburn, being re-
monstrated with for his drunken habits, made the following
ingenious excuse for his conduct — "'There hesn't been a
sober dark i' t' parish i' t' memory o' man.'' It was he who
was wont to mount one of the altar tombs after service, and
announce to the congregation, on leaving, the arrival of a
large barge, laden with coals, at Aldwark Bridge, which
would be sold at so much a ton, &c.

P'unerals were conducted with somewhat less reverence
than at present. From distant parts of the parish, the
coffin, placed on a little straw, would be brought in an
open cart, with women sitting round it, whilst the men
rode on all kinds of nags, or cart horses, which they
tethered to gates, or fences near, until the ceremony was
over, when they would remount and ride helter-skelter
home again. In this district, there is a gate on a b5^e-
road, which was long known as " Corpse Yat." It derived
its name from the following incident. A funeral was pro-
ceeding towards the Church, and had reached the gate,
when the bearers noticed that the hedges were clustered with
hazel-nuts. So setting down the bier, tliej', and the
mourners, wandered away, gathering nuts, and did not
return for an hour or so, when they found the bier and
coffin gone. A tale arose of the mysterious spiriting away
of the body, which had probably been found by persons
coming to look for the funeral, who had carried it to the
Church. The suppl}- of crockery in the villages was very scant,
and pewter dishes, and plates, and wooden trenchers were
generally used ; rows of the former, kept bright as silver,
being often seen in the kitchens of farm-houses, where
there was proper housewifeh^ pride. The last survivor of
these dishes used to be lent, in the pari.sh generall}', when
a death occurred, and was placed with a handful of salt in it
on the breast of the corpse.



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9 .



A description of "afternoon tea," before tea came
into general use, is interesting. The ladies came at three
o'clock, either walking or mounted on pillions, and after
being regaled with preserve tarts, cakes, and home-
brewed ale and wine, sometimes pancakes would be fried
for them, and the guests left at five.

Proceeding on our journey up the Vale of the Yore,
by the way of High and Low Dunsforth, we see perched
on the extreme watershed of the Nidd and Yore, and a




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•X.ffi'



; -y^



Grakton'.

short distance west from the road, the villages of Marton
and Grafton. Here the land rises and falls in a succession of
gentle ridges and dells, forming, with the red-tiled villages,
orchards and gardens, with much-varied detail of form,
most adaptable to the rich and changing tones of chro-
matic harmonj', choice pictures in a wide encircling sweep.
At the east end of Grafton can be obtained a most glorious
landscape. On my visit, two or three pleasant cottages,



lO

bordered with sw^^et-scented flower gardens, outside of
which au aged iiiaii, of some 90 summers, sat enjo}-ing
the warm sunshine, and an old lane (wdiere some gipsy
wanderers were camped), turning and twining, carried the
eye from the foreground, right into the picture — a subject
worthy of the brush of a Claude Lorraine. Far over the
plain countrs' the vision reaches, until arrested by the




Kd. Doag. Punch Bowl, Marton,

southern range of the Hambletons. A few hundred yards
south of Grafton is the village of Marton, a settlement
in Celtic days, and harried by war a thousand years before
the Scots, under Randolph and Douglas, swept over this
part, and nearly destroyed the Church at this place by
fire, marks of which are still apparent on the stones. Long
before its demolition, the old structure was in a most



1 1



ruinous condition. It has now been entire!)^ rebuilt, and
stands some 150 paces north of the site of the original struc-
ture ; a few relics of the old church are still preserved.

Passins: on our wav High Dunsforth, like the two last
villages, pureh' agricultural and rural, far from the bus}'
haunts of men, how pleasant it is to remember the little
cottages, the gardens and orchards, abundantly laden with
fine fruit, filling the air with sweet perfume on our visit.
It was at this place that a worthy couple lived, man and
wife, for 76 years; they were married at 19. and both
died at the age of 95, within a few weeks of each other.



'v4



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'2^1^^>l*i^i^^'



l.mV DUNSKOKTH.

Yonder, over the river, is the ancient village of Ald-
wark, which had an existence in Roman days, and still
forward, we soon reach Low Dunsforth, a quaint lowland
village ; on our last visit, there were still some thickh'
thatched roofs, and other primitive objects of bygone
generations. The old Church, of Saxon origin, was pulled
down in i860, and the present structure built; portions
of early Norman work are preserved in the vestry, also an
ancient font in the graveyard. When the old Church was



12

destroyed, 30 Saxon coins. mostl\' silver pennies, were
found among the debris, also a clay ring. The coins date
back a thousand years, and go far to prove the antiquity
of the early building. Passing from Dunsforth, and down
the fields to the river, which is here crossed bj- the ferr^ -
boat, a short distance below, where the rivers Yore and Swale
have their meeting. Some half-mile from the ferry, and
on the banks of the Swale, stands the village of Myton,
memorable from the battle, so disastrous to the English,
known in history as the battle of Mj-ton Meadows. It was
here 600 years ago, that Randolph and Douglas, bold and
experienced generals, with 15,000 veteran soldiers, fell
swoop on the English, and made frightful havoc, in re-
taliation for the degradation and humiliation Scotland had
received at the hands of the first Edward.

From the confluence of the two rivers, and forward
to Boroughbridge, the Yore flows in broad sweeps, quite
the reverse of the latter course of the Wharfe and Nidd,
both of which become monotonous and sluggish, as if
weary in their last stage. Here and there are belts of fine
trees, long waving reeds, and patches of sedge, &c., and
here, in most of the deep pools, the larger fish are found,
which, with patience and skilful exercise of the craft, the
angler can ofttimes transfer from the river to his creel,
which, if heavier with the speckled beauties on his return
(for this is not always the case, generally it is lighter), he
becomes a very proud man indeed ; and whatever the out-


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Online LibraryEdmund BoggWensleydale and the lower vale of the Yore, from Ouseburn to Lunds Fell, containing 125 illustrations → online text (page 1 of 12)