Edward Deacon.

The descent of the family of Deacon of Elstowe and London, with some genealogical, biographical and topographical notes, and sketches of allied families including Reynes of Clifton, and Meres of Kirton online

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Online LibraryEdward DeaconThe descent of the family of Deacon of Elstowe and London, with some genealogical, biographical and topographical notes, and sketches of allied families including Reynes of Clifton, and Meres of Kirton → online text (page 1 of 25)
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DEACON



KLsrowii ANiJ ucjxnoN,



ALLIED KAMI LI KS.



-'RaryI



ASTn .



THE DESCENT



OF THE FAMILY OF



D B AGO N



ELSTOWE AND LONDON.

WITH SOMK

GENEALOGICAL,
niOGRAPIirCAL AND TOPOGRA I'llICAL

NOTES,

AND SKETCH F.S OF

ALLIED FAMILILS



INCLUDING



R E Y N E S

OF

CLIFTON,



M E R E S



KIKIi IN



EDWARD J3EACON,

Hon. Treiis. Fairfir-ld Co. llislorkMl S.iciety. Conn.



Bridgeport, Conn.

1S98.



t • •




12962



TO THE MEMORY

OF MY

FATHER AND MOTHER,



/// this woihl,
Who can do a thing, will not :
And who would do it, cannot,
I perceive :
Yet the ici/l's somcohat "

Hkowning.



PREFACE.



This work being intended for private distribution only, to
members of the family, and possibly to a few societies inter-
ested in genealog-y, no apology is needed for the personal
character of some of its contents.

It has been a labor of love during the past eighteen years
to gather the facts herein presented, and the writer has the
satisfaction of knowing that he has succeeded in bringing
to light from the musty documents of distant centuries, some
interesting material which has never before seen print-

The effort to present the brief personal records of the
loved ones immediately connected with him has been its
own reward ; for the rest, the writer can only hope that the
bringing together of the many facts and items pertaining to
different branches and members of the family, may not be
wholly useless to some future investigator with kindred aims
and the same love for our a''"'-

Doubtless much that may appear irrelevant has been in-
cluded, but it was thought unwise to omit any material
which would cast light upon or add interest to the subject,
though but indirectly pertaining to it; that which is trite
and common place to-day, may be deemed precious to-mor-
row and invaluable fifty years hence.

It will be at once apparent that the make-up of this work
is not scientific. None can be more aware of this than the
writer, and the fault, if fault it be, must be owned. No
doubt the genealogical expert will find much cause for criti-
cism.

But there has been a purpose in this desultory scheme.
The family treated of made no great mark in history, and
it was not the intention to present a hard and dry consensus



of names and dates. For these reasons a discursive and nar-
rative form was given to the notes, in the hope of making
the facts presented more interesting' to the reader. The ped-
igree charts will aid the student in following the descent.

In compiling these pages, the writer has had frequent oc-
casion to trespass upon the kindness of strangers by corre-
spondence, and he desires to record with pleasure the uniform
courtesy with which his communications have been received
and answered.

It was not thought necessary to make direct reference in
every instance to the authority from which quotation was
made, but on another page will be found a list of the sources
from which material was drawn, and of persons to whom
the grateful thanks of the writer are due for cordial and
ready assistance given in his work.

Of course, for the recent biographical notes, family papers
and personal knowledge must be accepted as authority.

The writer only regrets the imperfect manner in which
his labors have necessarily been concluded, arising, not from
any want of interest or enthusiasm in the work, but largely
from inability through distance and lack of opportunity, to
personally pursue the investigation of original records. For
such errors as may have crept into these pages through acci-
dent or ignorance, the writer craves the indulgence of his
readers, and will gladly receive any corrections which may
be forwarded to him.

Grove Cuttiv^c,
l^l/i December, jSgj-



XIV



NOTE TO THE TABLE OF CONTENTS.



The scheme of this volume is to present

1st, The descent of the principal line of the family
from De Akeney to Deacon, Chapters I. to
Vn., inclusive.

2nd, Sketches of some of the immediate ancestors
and alliances of the present generation. Chap-
ters X. to XII.

3rd, Ancestors and alliances of the family in ancient
times. Chapters XUI. and XIV.

4th, Other branches of the family. Chapter XV.

5th, The family of Meres. Chapter XVI. to XVIU.
Addenda, Tables of Descent, Notes, etc.



CONTENTS.



Preface, . - .... |>..,j,i. xi

Table of Contents, - - ... ^v

List of Illustrations, - - - xvii

List of Pedigrees, - . . . . ^yjjj

Coats of Arms, - - . . . ^ix

Introduction, - - - . . ^xi



CHAPTER.

I. De .\keny oi' Xormandy. Dakciiy oi' Norfolk. Dcakeiiey of
Bedfordshire. Ekeney, Co. Bucks. Visitations. Coat
Armor. Changes of Name. pp. 1 — 15.

II. Decons of Bedfordshire. Michael, Bishop of St. .■Vsaph.
Richard of Windruge. Grafton. Stoke Breweme. Hert-
fordshire Family. Thomas of Ruysbank. Royal House-
hold, pp. 17—37.

III. Richard Decons of Marston-Morteyne. Receiver-General,

Custos Brevium. Privy Secretary. Corrodies. Field ol
the Cloth of Gold. Marriages. Reynes. Lynch. Specu-
lations. Will. Ridgemont. Brickhill. Barking. Fitz-
Lewes. pp. 39 — 61.

IV. Decons of Co. Bedford. Thomas of Marston. Chichcley.

Snagg. Inscriptions at Marston. pp. (53 — 70.

V. Decons of Warwickshire. Combe. Shakespeare.

pp. 73—83.

VI. Decons of Elstowe. Nevilles. Stoke Breweme. Norton.
Nunnery. Mansion House. pp. 85 — 99.

VII. Deacon of London. Coat of .\rms. Merchant Taylors'
Company. St. Andrew's Holborn. Mrs. Siddons. Purser.
Bogardus. Marshall. pp. 101—124.

VIII. Origin and Variations of Name. Ouotations. Derivations.

pp. 125—136.



IX. Ciiat Armour and DitTcrcnciii^. pp- 137—14-2.

X. HalVi-y ol Bath ami West Indies. ChikUvall .\l)l)ey.
St. Vincent. Slater Family. SouflTicre Mountain. Grant
of Arms. Jamaica. pp- 14-5 — 161.

XI. Scott of Liverpool. Ilawtrcy. Mrs. Joseph Deacon. Fisher
of Lancashire. Mrs. P. H. Scott. Perrin of Dublin.
Richard Perrin, Esq. pp. 163—177.

XII. Lovctt of Liscomb, Co. Bucks. pp. 179—183.

XIII. Keynes of Clifton and. Marston. Borard. Frowick. Ingle-
ton of Thornton. Inscriptions at Marston. Clifton
Keynes. Effigies. Presentations to Church. High Sher-
iffs. Knights of the Shire. pp. 185—213.

XIW -Morteyne, Family of, at Marston-Morteyne. Tyringham
of Tyringham. Pabenham of Fleet-Marston. Lucy of
Chclmescote. DeClray of Wilton. Peyvreof Toddington.
Maids-Morton Church. Broughtou. Daubeney.

pp. 215—248.

XV. Ile.'icon of Xorthaniptonshire. Early notices. Thomas
Deacon of Peterborough. Wiltshire, Henry of Pewsey.
(Gloucestershire, Deacon of EInistree. Jrnncr. Lincoln-
shire, Dccons of Stamford. Cecil. Glamorgan, Deacon
of Longcross House. Eminent Men, Divines, .Authors.
Printers, etc. Notes of the Civil War. Koyalists and
Puritans. pp. 249—278.

X\l. Meres of Kirtoii, Line. Algarkirk. Bussy. Francis
.Meres, .\uthor. Lutterworth. Kirton Church. Meres
of London. Koyal Navy. pp. 279—320

X\ll. Notes of family of Meres. Guild of Corpus Christi. High
Sheriffs and M. P's. Ecclesiastical .Architecture. Notes of
Sir Thomas Meres and his Son. Admiralty. De la Foun-
taine. Kirby Bcllars. pp. 321—334.

XV 11 1. E.\tracts from Mercs and Early English Newspapers. Hugh
Meres. Kich. .\utt. John Meres. The London Evening
Post. pp, 335—346.

XIX. T,il)les of Descent. Keyncs-Decons. Meres of Kirton.
Stoddard-Dcacon. Bulkley-Bates. ])p. 347—359.

.\ppeM(li.\. Deacon. Will and Inifu Ric. Dccons. Notes of Deacon
and Morteyne. pp. 361—378.



ILLUSTRATIONS.



Grove CottnjjCi ....

Arms of I)c .\kciiy

Site of St. Martin's Cliurcli, liUciicv

Map of Ekeney and Petsoc, .

St. .\saph's Cathedral,

Maj) of Windridjje, Co. Herts,

Marston-AIorteyne Manor, .

Katlierine of .'\ragon,

"The George" Inn, Little Brickliill,

Cluirch of St. Mary, Marston-Morteync,

Tomb of John Combe, Stratford Church,

Residence of John Combe, Stratford,

.\rms of Deacon, of Bedfordshire,

Rectory, Stoke Brewerne,

Elstow Priory and Hall,

Portrait of Joseph Deacon, Esq.,

Portrait of Edward Deacon, .

Arms of Deacon, of London,

Childwall Abbev, ....

St. Vincent, W. I

Plate Presented to Colonel Haffey,
Portrait of Peter Haffey Scott, Esq,,
Portrait of Mrs. Joseph Deacon.
Psalm CXLVL (mnsic).
Portrait of Mrs. P. H. Scott,
Liscombe House, Co. Bucks,
Arms of Reynes, of Clifton-Reynes,
Effigies of Sir Thomas Reynes and

Clifton Church,
Brass of Thomas Reynes and wife, 14-

ton Church, ...

Effigies of Ralph Reynes and wife

Church, ....
Effigv of Sir Thomas Reynes, l-iTl

Church, ....
Church of St. Mary, Clifton-Reynes
Deacon's School, Peterborough, .
Tomb of Thomas Deacon, Peterborough,
Arms of Deacon, of London and ('jlamorgan,
.\rras of Meres of Kirton, ....
Ruins of the Meers, Kirton-Meers,
View of Kirton Church, 18th Century,
Church of St. Peter, Kirby Bellars,
Title Page Historical Register, 1737,
Caricature in Jacobite Journal, 1747,
Fac Simile, London Evening Post, 17-18, .



fc, 13.S9
^1, Mars



Cliftt



Clifton



Pacing Title I'
Facing page



iige

1

t

9

l!t

22

39

44

5.->

KH

77

7!)

.s.'-,

S7

97

113

119

137

147

1 r.3

1 .■)(;

Ifif)
17(1
171
173

LSI
LS,-,



•■ 191.'

199

202

" 206

•• 209

• 253

• 256
•• 268
•' 279
" 285
•• 295

• 302
" 307
•• 342
" 346



PEDIGREES.





I'AGE.




S, 225, 376


Mortoync,






28, 29


Deacon, Co. Hirls






35, 36, 37


l)c .Xkciicv,




Lynch I


48, 58


Hornby J


60
66
76


ritz-lA'wes,


Cliichclcy,


Combe,


Combe, IJccons, 1


81


Hales, Lucy, 1 ' ' '




Blniinl, Combe,!


83


Reynolds, Willis, |






yo


Norton, ...■■•■■■






99


Deacon,




Deacon, Meres,)


124


Hailcy, Scolt, (




Slater, I


1 50


Hey wood, (




Haftey,


160




1.S2, 183


Lovett, ....




Frowick,


200


Keynes, ....


212, 213




228


Tyrin),'liani,




I'abcnhani,


233




Cray, Lucy,)


234


TyrinKliam, (




Lucy


240




I'eyvre,


242


liron>;liton, . . •


246


Danbeney,


248


Deacon, Co. Wills,


258


Deiicoii, Elmstrcc,


2(50


Cecil, Deacons,


264


Hrndcnell, Meres,


290


.\lmon, Faj;"


318


Meres,


. 316-320



COATS OF ARMS.



De Akenj-, colored litli.,

Dakeny, of Uerb3shire,

Deakin and Dak3-ns, of Voikshiri

Deacon, of London,

Deacon, Bedford and Bucks, .

Decons, of Marston-Morteyne,

Decons, Warwickshire,

Decons, of VVasperton,

Decons, Warwickshire,

Deacon, of Bedford, colored liUi.

Deacon, of London. 1630,

Crest of Deacon, of London,

Deacon, of London, colored lith.,

Haftey, of St. Vincent and Bath, .

Keynes, of Clifton Keynes, colored lah

Seal and Arms, Thomas Keynes, 1402,

Morteyne, of Marston-Morteyne,

Tyringham, of Tyringham,

Deacon, of Glamorgan, colored litli.,

Meres, of Kirton, colored lith.,



I'.M'.I!.

1

f'>
12
13

ir>

71

72

K2

S5

100

112

137

1-U

LS;-)

201

216

226

2r>,s

27!)



Autograph of Joseph Deacon, Esq., 11'^

" Peter H. Scott, Esq D>f<

" " Mary J. Deacon, 1""

" " Margaret Scott 1"3

'• Sir Thomas Mercs 300

" Sir lohii Mercs 302



XXI



INTRODUCTION.



Careful and extended investigation has confirmed tlie
fact that there were but two sources or locations in Eng-
land from whence the name now known as Deacon orig-
inated. One was on the border line of the shires of North-
ampton and Cambridge, where in the earliest Norman
period the name appears in various records, and from
whence it soon spread north to Derby and south to Bed-
ford and adjacent counties. The other was in the soiitii-
west of the island in Dorset and Somerset, from whence it
spread into Gloucester and Wilts.

These two races were quite distinct for many centuries,
and there is no doubt they were of entirely different blood ;
the southern family may have come from the Saxon of that
name who is mentioned in Domesday as holding lands in
Gloucester, and who left several descendants, while the
northern race is believed to be derived from Norman stock
who were granted lands by the Conqueror.

Other counties than those mentioned have no trace of
the name. London, the capital and great trading port of
the Kingdom, in every century attracted many from ail
parts of the country to its market, and there the name is
found after the 14th century. From actual records we
know that both families were represented in the city there-
after.

The following pages seek principally to trace one line of
the northern stock from the earliest authentic records
which have come to the notice of the writer.

It may well be deemed impossible to compile an English
family history upon the lines of an American genealogy.
In the first place, the American genealogist has the great



advantage of a definite point of beginning, usually confined
to one ancestor of the name. Further he has the advan-
tage that his point of beginning lies within a comparatively
modern period, with authentic records generally available,
and within a circumscribed area of action.

The spread of his family is normal, and within the
boundaries of the development of his state, making it pos-
sible (as we have seen in numerous instances of admirable
genealogical work) to produce an almost perfect record of
family growth and dispersion.

With rare exceptions (one of which— that of Lovett — is
given in this volume) the English genealogist has no defi-
nite point of beginning. When it has become possible to
gather authentic data concerning his family, the race has
already been spreading for centuries to all parts of the
island, and many bearers of the name have lost any con-
nection they may originally have had.

Numerous families of the same name never were allied
at all, having originated separately under different circum-
stances ; thus it is that the English genealogy is nearly
always the history of one line, instead of the record of a
tribe; and it is so, as much for the reasons just given as
from any supposed influence of the law of primogeniture.

This work will, therefore, not be accepted, as is the
American genealogy, by all connected with the name, its
main interest will be with the few who are descended
from the meagre line here treated of. A somewhat wider,
though still limited circle, may be interested through the
introduction of original material and collections concern-
ing allied families, whose blood is mingled with some of
the best in the nation, hut at most it is felt that the in-
terest will be small, and the writer will not be disappointed
should his readers be confined to those of his own immedi-
ate family, for whom, indeed, this work was originally un-
dertaken and prosecuted.

Regretting that no prominent representative of the fam-
ilj' is found to-day in the county where for so long a period



they bore a part, the following remarks hs- the editor of thr
Visitations of Bedfordshire, published by tlie Marleian
Society, 1884, may be read with interest:

"There is probably scarcely another county in h"nglan<l
where land has changed hands so frequently as in this, and
if the study of genealogy serves no other purpose, it will
at least dispel the illusion so prevalent amongst a certain
class, that the majority of the present owners of land de-
rive their title from ' feudal times.' The frequent changes
that have taken place in the ownership of land in this
county, even as between the years 1566 and 1634, are re-
markably apparent; and still more so in comparing these
Visitations with the new Domesday Book of 1875. In the
latter I do not think twelve land owners can be found
whose names appear in the Visitations."

Another writer, the late William Smith Ellis, remarks:

"The fortunes of families are proverbially fluctuating.
The obscurity of a family a centurj' or half a century ago
is no presumption against 'gentle descent'."

"Of tlie gentry of the nineteenth century few live where
their grandfathers, or even their fathers dwelt; very few,
comparatively, are owners of long-inherited real estate ;
the various professions absorb the great majority, and dis-
perse them throughout the kingdom and the empire ; the
remembrance of descent from even an ancient family in a
few generations becomes traditionally dim, and eventually
dies out; the knowledge of the evidences of such descent
ceases to be handed down from father to son, and is ulti-
mately lost, so that most families thus far removed from
their original habitat know little more of their origin or an-
cestry than what is derived from personal acquaintance.
This rarely goes beyond the grandfather, often not so far,
and the name and circumstances of a remote ancestor are
known only to some member of the family whose unwonted
genealogical curiosity has elicited, and whose family pride.
perchance, has preserved a neglected memorial or an ex-
piring tradition."



At the eleventh hour, when tlie hist lines of the appendix
to this volume were in the press, the transcription of an
Original Roll in the Public Record Office, made specially
for the writer, revealed the curious fact, not before known,
that the manor of Marston-Morteyne, so frequently men-
tioned in these pages, which came by marriage to the pro-
genitor of the Deacons of Elstowe, had previously been
part of the ancient possessions of the family of DeAkeney
of Bedford and Bucks {Sec page 378). This singular coin-
cidence of the recovery of the ancient manor by the de-
scendants of the original owners may be considered an
auspicious omen with which to conclude a work which at-
tempts to trace the descent of the family from

De Akenev

to

Deacon.



Orig'inal Documents have been officially examined and
copies obtained from the following offices:
The Admiralty, London.
The War Office, London.

Kirby BeUars Parish Church, Leicestershire, Re8:isters.

St. Andrew's Church, Holborn, London, "

Bishop of London's Reg:istry, London.
Parish Church, Newport Pagnell, Bucks, - "

St. Martin's, Ludgate, London, - - - - "

St. Mary's Church, Elstow, Bedfordshire, - "

Stationers' Company, London.

Merchant Tailor's Company, London.

Sun Fire Office, London.

St. Sepulchre's Church, London, - . -

British Museum Library, London.

Bristol Central Library, Eng:Iand.

Public Record Office, London.

Greenwich Hospital.

Somerset House, London.

Armag:h Cathedral, Ireland, . - - -

Parish Church of King:ston, Jamaica, W. I.,

St. George the Martyr, London,

Lincoln Cathedral, - - - -

St. Anne's, Blackfriars, London, - - - -

St. Saviour's, Southwark, ^ . . -

St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate, London,
College of Arms, London.
Chetham's Library, Manchester.
Probate Registry, Lincoln.
Chester.
Oxford.

" " Aylesbury.

" " Bedford.

" « Bath.

" " Northampton.

And many others.



Through the courtesy of His Grace, the Duke of Bedford,
and the late Rt. Hon. Edward Stanhope, copies have been
received of manuscripts in the libraries of Woburn Abbey
and Revesby Abbey, respectively.

The following: newspapers in the British Museum and the
Guildhall Library, have been carefully examined :

Historical Register, from I7I6 to 1739.

London Daily Post, from t7J9 to 1746.

British Mercury, from 1712 to 171 7.

London Evening- Post, from 1709 to 1767.

Many hundreds of letters have been written and replies
received from England, Wales, Ireland, France, West Indies
and Australia.

Libraries in the United States have been visited as follows:

Bridgeport, Boston, New York, Buffalo, Chicago, Cleve-
lend, Cincinnati, Syracuse, Detroit, Indianapolis, Toledo, Al-
bany, New Haven, Worcester.

Many voluminous works have been laboriously examined
for extracts and lacls.

Acknowledgment is due to the undernamed gentlemen for
many courtesies and much valuable information:

Sir J. Bernard Burke, Ulster King at Arms.

Rev. F. W. Weaver, Milton-Clevedon.

F. A, Blaydes, Esq., Bedford,

Rev. C. H. Mayo, Long Burton^

Mt. J. C. C.nAl-s, Nrwpnrt P,ignc!l, B'JckE,

Mr. Richard W. Dickinson, Kirton, Lincolnshire,

Herbert E. Cooke, Esq., Berkeley Castle.

J. Foster, Esq., London.

A. Gibbons, Esq., Lincoln.

John H. Hazell, Esq., St. Vincent, W. I.

George W. Marshall, Esq., Heralds' College, London.

Rev. A. R. Maddison, Lincoln.

Rev. John Cartmell, Kirby Bellars, Leic.

Colonel C. T. J. Moore, Frampton Hall, Line.

Mr. Bernard Quaritch, London.

Mr. Richard Savage, Stratford-on-Avon.



P'JBLIC LIBRARY I






1=^




isl






H


^


1





DeA



KENY



CHAPTER I.



De A KE N Y,



Arms of

De Akeney

of

Normandy.

AZf a cross argent, between four lions — or.



— 2

AKENY.

De Acquignv.

From Acquigny near Louviers in Normandy.

" This family was numerous and of great importance in
England as the record shows.

Roll of Battle Abbey by the Duchess of Cleveland.
The knight who came over with the conqueror was

BALDWIN DE AKENY,

and his name is recorded as follows in the celebrated

Roll of Battle Abbey,

From the list published by Andre Duchesne from a charter
in Battle Abbey, {apud script, rer Nor/iiann.)

From another list by Leland,

Collectanea de rebus Britannicis.



1066. Sir baldwyn De AKENY, Knight. Flourished temp.
Conquest and held lands in the county of Norfolk.
Arms — Azure, a cross argent, between four lions, or.

11S9. WILLIAM DEKEN or D'EKENY. Lord of Wrigh-
ton in Norfolk, temp, Richard I, was the grandson of the
foregoing, who is presumed to have been the Norman
Knight whose name occurs in the Roll of Battle Abbey.

Burke's General Armory.



Sir ROGER De AKENY, Knight. Flourished about
1150-1200. Nothing is known of him except that he had
a daughter whom the chroniclers speak of as Ykenai* — or
Hikenai, who was a favorite of King Henry II., (before
Fair Rosamund) and who was probably the mother of
William Longsword, Earl of Salisbury, (stY National Dic-
tionary' Biography — Clifford-Rosamund). It is stated that
the Earl on this ground laid claim to the inheritance of
Sir Roger DeAkeny.

1199-1216. BALDWIN DE AKENI, who flourished in the reign
of King John and possessed lands in Hertfordshire — see
Rotulorum Originaliiim — had a brother named

RALPH DE AKENI, who held Lands in Essex.

1219. BALDWIN DE AKENEY de Whittleford, held lands
in Cambridge, temp. Henry HI.

1238. ROBERTUS DE DEKENE, held lands in Worcester.

1247. ALEXANDER DAKUN, held lands in Warwick-
shire. XXXI. Henry III.

1255. JOHN DAKENY. held lands, XXXVIII Henry
HI, see Rotulorum Originaliuin.

1266. Sir BALDWIN DE AKENEY. Knight, held a lordship
in Holkham, temp. Henry III., and was lord of the Manor
of Whittleford in Cambridge A.D. 1266. Inq. p. m. apud
Bedford. 51 Hy 3. 1267. He left a son.

1275. THOMAS DE HAKENY de Maneres de Holkham,
who died 3 Edw. I. 1275. Inq. p. m. Bedford. 3 Edw. I.
his son was

1287. Sir ROGER DAKENY, Knight, who held one quarter
of the town of Northwold in Norfolk, and who increased
his patrimony by marriage with Johanna, daughter and heir
to Sir William Daubeny. From this great proprietor the
Manor of Dagenys in Norfolk derives its name. Inq.
p. m. apud Bedford. 15 Edw. I. 1287.

Calendarium Genealogicum.



*NoTE.— As late as tht reign of Henry VII., we find the name spelled Yekyn-in
Northamptonshire.



— 4—

Sir BAULDWIN DE EKON. 1278-1285.

Arms — Azure ; a cross patee, argent.

Camilen Roll of Arms.

Henry de Ekon or Ekont.
William de Ekon.

Azure : crusilly of 7 and 3 crescents, argent.

As the family of Norfolk multiplied, they extended into
the adjacent and farther counties of Cambridge, Lincoln
Derby and York, while other branches settled in Bedford-
shire and Buckinghamshire and for several generations
from Ed. I., 1272, to Rich. II., 1390, were lords of one sixth
part of the Great Barony of Cainho in Bedfordshire, and
of Lathbury and Little Filgrave in the County of Bucks.

On the northern border of the Counties of Bedford and
Buckingham : a village or town arose, named from them,
Ekeny or D'Ekf.ney, in which was a church, dedicated to
St. Martin, the patron of soldiers, and evidently erected as
a penance or devotion by one of the early warrior barons
of the family, and to which they held the right of presen-
tation.

At this period these two Counties were under one jurisdic-
tion, and were represented in Parliament by the same Bur-
gesses.

Several of the famil)' were returned as Knights of the
Shire for these counties during the succeeding generations.



Online LibraryEdward DeaconThe descent of the family of Deacon of Elstowe and London, with some genealogical, biographical and topographical notes, and sketches of allied families including Reynes of Clifton, and Meres of Kirton → online text (page 1 of 25)