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Scribner's magazine



Making of America Project



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SCRIBNER'S
MAGAZINE

PUBLISHED MONTHD^
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS



VOLUME XLV
JANUARY-JUNE



CHARLES SCRIKflEKS SONS NEW^iORK

TEMPLE HOUSE. TAUIS STREECLOtOOflUBja



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CoPTRiQHT, 1909, BT Charles Scribner's Sons.



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CONTENTS



OF



SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE

Volume XLV January-June, 1909.



PAGE

ABOLITION OF POVERTY. THE, J. Laurence Lauqhlin, . . 752

ADAMS. MINNIE BARBOUR. Wedding or Funeral, 107

ADOPTED AMERICANISM, AN. Point of View '. . 378

AFTERWARD Virginia Yeaman Remnitz, 622

ALEXANDER'S DECORATIONS, Wiluam Walton, ... 45

IN THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTE. PITTSBURG.
Illustrations from Mr. Alexander's Mural Paintings.

"AMATEUR SPIRIT, THE." Point of View 377

AMERICAN CONCERT OF THE POWERS, AN. . Theodore S. Woolsey, . . 364 .

Professor of International Law
' * In Yale University.

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.

MURAL DECORATIONS IN THE Wiluam Walton, ... 253

Illustrations from paintings by F. W. Stokes.

" AUTHORITY," OF. Point of View 123

AUTOGRAPH LETTERS OF AUTHORS, AS TO.

. Point of View 379

BABBLE OF OLD BEAUX Mary Hbaton Vorbe, . 369

niustrations by Armand Both.

BAUDELAIRE LEGEND, THE James Huneker, . .240

With a portrait.

BLAKE, WARREN BARTON. The Humanneas of the

French Streets 548

BOLTED DOOR, THE Edith Wharton, .288

The First of "Tales of Men."

BOYS' SIDE, ON THE. Point of View 631

BREAKS. Point of View, 508

BRINTON, CHRISTIAN. German Painting of To-day 129

BROWN. ALICE. The Lantern 177

BROWNELL, W. C. Poe. 69



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iv CONTENTS

PAOB

CARROLL, FREDERIC, MONOGAMIST, .... Jbssb Lynoh Williamb. . . 416
Illustrations by W. Sherman Potts.

CARROLLS' FAMILY PARTY, THE JxssB Ltnch Williams, . . 570

Illustration (frontispiece) by W. Sherman Potts.

CARROLLS' MILLIONAIRE TENANT, THE, . Jesse Lynch Williams. . .712

Illustrations by W. Sherman Potts.

CLIFFORD, MRS. W. K. Oeraldine in SuriUeriand 224

COLLIER, PRICE. England and the English from an

American Point of View, 97, 186, 342, 491

COMING OF NIGHT, THE Rebecca Harding Davis. . . 68

Illustrations by Jay Hambidge

CURTIS. EDWARD S.i'?5f*^'"£.i^«^i^^^«»'; • 161

< Village Tribes of the Desert Land 275

DANCING MAN. THE. Charles Belmont Davis. . .441

Illustrations by A. I. Keller.

DAVIS, CHARLES BELMONT. The Dancing Man, 441

DAVIS. REBECCA HARDING. The Coming of Night 68

DAYS A-FISHING. Pictures by Oliver Kemp, .676

Reproduced in colors. Decorations by Franklin Booth.

DWIGHT. H. G. A Turkish Village, . 701

ENGLAND AND THE ENGLISH FROM AN AMERI-
CAN POINT OF VIEW Price Collier.

I.— FIRST IMPRESSIONS 97

II— WHO ARE THE ENGLISH? 186

III.— SPORT 342

IV.— AN ENGLISH COUNTRY TOWN 491

ENGLISH IN SINGING. THE USE OF Francis Rogers 41

ENGLISH SCHOOL, THE. AT THE METROPOLITAN
MUSEUM OF ART. SOME EXAMPLES OF (Frank
Fowler). Field of Art 125

ENGLISH SCHOOL, THE, AT THE METROPOLITAN
MUSEUM OF ART. MORE EXAMPLES OF (Frank
Fowler). Field of Art 381

EVOLUTION OF AN EQUESTRIAN STATUE, THE, . Charles Noel Flaog, . 809

Illustrations from models and sketches for the Lafayette
Monument by Paul Wayland Bartlett.

FIELD OF ART. THE.

American Museum of Natural History, Mural Deco-
rations in the (William Walton). Illustrations from

paintings by F. W. Stokes, 268

English School at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Some

Examples of the (Frank Fowler). Illustrated, 125

English School at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, More

Examples of the (Frank Fowler). Illustrated, 881

Gainsborough, Thomas (Reginald Cleveland Coxe).

Illustrated 600

German Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum, Some

(Frank Fowler). Illustrated 766

Sturgis. Russell (Montgomery Schuyler). Andrew

O'Connor. Sculptor (William Walton). Illustrated 686



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CONTENTS V

PAQB

FLAGG, CHARLES NOEL. The EvduHon of an Equestrian

Statue 309

FOWLER. FRANK. The Portraiture of Ingres, 643

FRENCH STREETS. THE HUMANNESS OF THE, . Warren Barton Blaks. . . 648
Illustrations from the pages of George Wright's sketch-
book. Reproduced in color.

GAINSBOROUGH, THOMAS (Reginald Qeveland Coxe).

Field of Art 509

GERALDINE IN SWITZERLAND, Mrs. W. K. Cuptord, . 224

Illustrations by James Montgomery Flagg.

GERMAN PAINTING OF TO-DAY Christian Brinton, ... 129

Illustrations form the works of contemporary painters.

GERMAN PAINTINGS, SOME, AT THE METROPOLI-
TAN MUSEUM (Frank Fowler) 765

GIBBON. EDWARD Jamsb Ford Rhodes, . 724

GOLF. See Ideal Golf Links.

GOVERNMENT VS. BANK ISSUES J. Laurence Laughun, . . 265

GREAT PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF ENGLAND, THE. . Everett T; Tomunson, . . 515

Illustrations from photographs.

HATS AND HEADGEAR. Point of View 606

HENDERSON. VICTOR. The Strike at the LitUe Maggie 86

HERRICK'S HOME IN DEVON. AT, .... Edna Bourne Holman, . . 257
Illustrations by Louis A. Hoiman.

HIS FATHER'S SON Edith Wharton, . . 657

The Second of "Tales of Men."

"HOBBIES." OF. Point of View 762

HOLMAN, EDNA BOURNE. At Merrick's Home in Devon 267

HUARD, FRANCES WILSON. The He St. Louis, 1

HUNEKER. JAMES. The Baudelaire Legend, 240

IDEAL GOLF LINKS, THE H.3. Whioham 585

Illustrations by Franklin Booth.

ILE ST. LOUIS, THE, Frances Wilson Huard. . 1

Illustrations by Charles Huard.

INDIANS OF THE STONE HOUSES Edward S. Curtw, ... 161

Illustrations from photographs by the author, re-
produced in tint.

INGRES. THE PORTRAITURE OF Frank Fowler 643

Illustrations from paintings by Ingres.

JOHN MARVEL, ASSISTANT Thomas Nelson Page, 25, 209. 317,

(Chapters I-XXI. (To be continued.) 475, 598, 685

Illustrations by James Montgomery Flagg.

KEMP, OLIVER. Days A-Fishing 676

LANTERN, THE Alice Brown 177

Illustrations by F. C. Yohn.



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vi CONTENTS

PAGE

/ Government V8. Bank Issues, 266

V(Uu€Uion of Railways 434

LAUGHLIN, J. LAURENCE. { Socialism a Philosophy of

Failure 613

{ The Abolition of Poverty 752

LAUT, AGNES C. Fifteen Hundred Miles Down the Sas-
katchewan, 459

MAARTENS, MAARTEN. Nobody's Child 198

MALE AMERICAN, THE. Point of View 378

MATTHEWS, BRANDER. The Playwright and His

Players, 116

MIDNIGHT CONFERENCE, A: and Other PAflSAGES

FROM THE Papers of Secretary Salmon P. Chase, . Ellis Paxson Oberholtker, . 144
niustrations from photographs.

MISFFT FACES. Point of View . 250

MODERN DISENCHANTMENT, A. Point of View 632

MODERNISM. Newman Smyth 162

NOBODY'S CHILD Maartbn Maartens, . .198

Illustrations by H. G. Williams.

OBERHOLTZER, ELLIS PAXSON. A Midnight Confer-
ence 144

O'CONNOR, ANDREW, SCULPTOR (WUliam Walton).

Field of Art 637

OLD LAMP, THE Catalina Paez 560

Illustrations by W. J. Glackens.

OLIVER, ELIZABETH SHAW. Pascal RochetU's Penance 356

PAEZ, CATALINA. The Old Lamp 560

PAGE. THOMAS NELSON. John Marvd, Assistant 26, 209. 317, 475, 598, 685

PARTHENON BY WAY OF PAPENDRECHT, THE, . F. Hopkinson Smith, . 385

Illustrations from paintings by the author. Repro-
duced in colors, and black and white.

PASCAL ROCHETTE'S PENANCE, Euzabeth Shaw Oliver, . . 365

Illustrations by Walter H. Everett.

PLAYWRIGHT AND HIS PLAYERS, THE, . Brander Matthews, . .116

POE, W. C. Brownell, ... 69

POINT OF VIEW. THE.

Adopted Americanism, An, 378. Misfit Faces, 250.

"Amateur Spirit, The." 377. Modem Disenchantment. A, 632.

"Authority," Of, 123. Portmanteau Words. More, 764.

Autograph Letters of Authors. As to. 379. Receiving. The Di^ult Art of, 634

Boys' Side, On the, 631. Regulating Tips, 251.

Breaks, 508. Suggestions for Housekeepers, 121.

Hats and Headgear, 506. Swapping Martyrdoms, 761.

"Hobbies," Of, 762. What New Iconoclasm? 506.

Male American. The. 378.

PORTMANTEAU WORDS. MORE. Point of View 764

RECEIVING, THE DIFFICULT ART OF. Point of View 634

REMNITZ, VIRGINIA YEAMAN. Afterward, 622



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CONTENTS vii

PAGE

REGULATING TIPS. Point of View 251

RHODES. JAMES FORD. Edward OiMnm, 724

ROGERS. FRANCIS. The Use of EnglUh in Singing 41

SASKATCHEWAN, FIFTEEN HUNDRED MILES

DOWN THE AONES C. Laut, . . .459

Illustrated from photographs.

SHEEP-HERDER OF THE SOUTH-WEST. A. . . N. C. Wybth 17

Illustrations by the author, reproduced In tint.

SHERMAN'S, GENERAL. LETTERS HOME. . William T. Sherman, . 397. 532, 737

Edited by M. A. DeWolpb Howe.

Illustrated.

SINGMASTER. ELSIE. The Third OeneraHon 334

SMITH, F. HOPKINSON. The Parthenon by Way of

Papendrecht, 385

SMYTH, NEWMAN. Modemitm 152

SOCIALISM A PHILOSOPHY OF FAILURE, ... J. Laurence Lauohlin, .' .613

STEVENS, ETHEL STEFAN A. Zohara of the FltUes 655

STRIKE AT THE LITTLE MAGGIE, THE, . Victor Henderson. ... 85

Illustrations by W. T. Benda.

STURGIS, RUSSELL (Montgomery Schuyler). Field of

Art 635

SUGGESTIONS FOR HOUSEKEEPERS. Point of

View 121

SWAPPING MARTYRDOMS. Point of View 761

TALES OF MEN. See Wharton. Edith.

THIRD GENERATION. THE Elsie Singmastbr. . .334

Illustrations by F. C. Yohn.

TOMLINSON, EVERETT T. The Great Public Schoole of

England, 515

TURKISH VILLAGE, A H. G. Dwight, .... 701

Illustrated from photographs.

VALUATION OF RAILWAYS J. Laurence Lauohlin, . . 434

VILLAGE TRIBES OF THE DESERT LAND, Edward S. Curtis, ... 275

Illustrations from photographs by the author, repro-
duced in tint.

VORSE, MARY HEATON. Babble of Old Beaux 369

WALTON, WILLIAM. Alexander's Decoratiana in the

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburg 45

"WAR CLOUDS, THE." Frontispiece. Drawing by N. C. Wteth, Facing 257

Reproduced in colors.

WEDDING OR FUNERAL Minnie Barbour Adams, . . 107

Illustrations by RoUin Kirby.

WHARTON. EDITH. {l?j|*|^.f-;;, I ] ] [ ] ] [ ] ] [ [ [ Z

WHAT NEW ICONOCLASM? Point of View 506

WHIGHAM, H. J. The Ideal Oolf Links 585



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viu' CONTENTS

PAGB

/Frederic Carroll, Monog-

I amiit 416

WILLIAMS, JESSE LYNCH. ^^</^.^\ ^"""^^^^ 570

The CarroUa* Millionaire
V. Tenant, 712

WOOLSEY, THEODORE S. An American Concert of

the Powere, 364

wvT?TH M r- i ^ Sheep-Herder of the South-Weet, 17

^^'^'^^''^- ^- I * War aouda. The. "FToniispiece. Facing 257

ZOHARA OF THE FLUTES, Ethel Stefana Stevenb, . . 666

lUuBtrations by Arthur Schneider.



POETRY



ALL SOULS

Decoration by Franklin Booth.



Edith Wbarton,



PAGE

22



AT PARTING,
DREAM. A. .
EASTER, .



HORIZON AND THE WOOD, THE,
Illustration by Franklin Booth.

IN THE OASIS



C. A. Price, .
Margakbt Sherwood,
Sophie Jewett, .
William H. Hatne, .



368
736
505
666



LOST GUIDE, THE

MAN WHO CAME, THE

(Supposed to have been written not long after the
avil War.)

MAN'S PRAYER. A

MILTON

MOONRISE IN A WOOD

Illustration by Franklin Booth, reproduced in tint.

"O KNIGHTLY HEARTl"

PIPER, THE

ROSE AND JASMINE



G. E. WOODBERRT. . . 658

C. A. Price 150

Edward Arlington Robinson, 150



SHEPHERD DAY, THE,

Illustration by F. Walter Taylor.



Grace S. H. Tttus. .


. . 355


Henrt van Dtke,


. 160


Theodora Taylor, .


. 176


Julia C. R. Dorr,


. 621


Olive Tilford Daroan,


. 700


Madison Cawein,


. 711


Edith Wyatt,


. 272



SLEEPERS THE.
STRANGER, THE.



TURN OF THE ROAD, THE. .
Illustration by Franklin Booth.



TYLWYTH TEG, . . . .
Illustrations by Blanche Greer.



James B. Kenton, 490

Grace Fallow Norton,
Alice Rollit Coe,

Helen Kimberly McElhone, 530



ULTIMU8 LABOR VOCAT.
WAVES



C. A. Price, .
John B. Tabb.



723
308



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ScRiBNER's Magazine



VOL. XLV



JANUARY, 1909



NO. 1



THE ILE ST. LOUIS
By Frances Wilson Huard

Illustrations by Charles Huard




iCH succeeding year, as the
invasion of our compatriots
augments, the French capi-
tal is changing its physiog-
nomy. Paris is fast becom-
ing Americanized. There
are now certain quarters such as Passy and
the Etoile, in fact, the whole Western section,
, where I feel as if I were in the neighborhood
of Central Park. The signs on the avenue
de rOp^ra and the rue de Rivoli bear more
American than French names and an old
Parisian tells me that he can now hardly
recognize the Grand Boulevards.

If you wish to find the Paris of olden
times, the Paris of Balzac, the Paris of the
Revolution, the Paris of the seventeenth
and eighteenth centuries, you must fre-
quent the populous quarters, at present
abandoned by the gentay, and seek out the
glorious mansions of the past now trans-
formed into work-houses and factories.
There are many of them, and all through
the quartier Saint Mem and near the
Pantheon, you will constantly come upon
ancestral dwellings now the homes of hun-
dreds of petUs metiers parisiens.

But there yet remains a spot in the me-
tropolis which, on account of its privileged
situation, the ravages of time and progress
have left untouched. It is the "He St.
Louis," the tiny island back of Notre Dame.
Discreet little comer, silent little province in
the heart of the mighty city, it still bears its
haughty mien and continues its reticent ex-
istence like those aged persons we have
sometimes met, who linger so long that
Death seems to have forgotten them, and
whose rare conversations interest and as-
tonish us.



When we decided on Paris as a perma-
nent place of residence, we chose our home
on St. Louis Isle. As time went by, we
became fonder and fonder of its history,
more and more interested in its past, un-
til at length we have come to regard it as
belonging, in a measure, to us. And if to-
day we wish to show you about the island,
it is with something of the pride of a land-
holder who escorts his guests around his
estate.

Here each house has its distinct person-
ality, its own style of architecture and, above
all, that sympathetic and attractive air pos-
sessed so often by things that have lived
long and could relate much. A glance at
the high colorless walls, the dingy little
streets, and even the sunlit, tree-bordered
quays sufl&ces to transport me into the past.
Everything seems fiUeid with a kind of mel-
ancholy poesy; to breathe forth the per-
fume of history. As I pass each comer I
should not be surprised to see a Sedan chair
stop before one of those huge iron grills, and
a charming powdered lady step out. Or
farther on, from under the massive porte-
cochere of that Louis XIV mansion, is
not a gilded coach with pompous and in-
solent out-riders going to issue forth and
clatter over the cobbles?

Unfortunately the only vestige of these
" good old times " is the water-carrier, for in
the interior of the island there are certain
houses so old that their landlord dares not
touch their masonry to install modern con-
veniences. So every moming the porteur
d^eau of tradition, his pails suspended
from a wooden shoulder-piece, mounts the
stairs and supplies each apartment with
sufficient water to last the day.



Copyright, 1908, by Charles Scribner's Sons. All rights reserved.



Vol. XLV.— I



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The He St Louis



One of the oldest oil suspension street lamps in Paris.

But here we are at the extremity of the
island.

At the point where the Quai d*Anjou and
the rue St. Louis-en-llle meet, the "Hotel
Lambert'' rises majestically behind its high
stone walls which screen a charming garden
from public view. Built
in 1640 for President
Nicholas Lambert, it is,
perhaps, one of the best
examples of seventeenth-
century architecture now
standing in Paris.

Its exterior decoration
was entrusted to Lepau-
tre, and the interior was
admirably ornamented
by a legion of famous
painters. A story goes
that President Lambert,
an extremely cunning
man, simultaneously en-
gaged Lebrun and Les-
ueur to do some mural
decorating. He then
cleverly animated the
jealousy of the two ri-
vals, who did their best
to exceed each other,
and in consequence the
works done by the mas-



ters while in the H6tel Lambert are now
considered their chejs-iVxuvres, Lebrun
painted " Les Travauxd'Hercule," Lesueur
"Some Episodes in the history of Love,"
consigned to a small chamber called " Le
Cabinet de I'Amour." At the same time
he executed his remarkable " Phaeton and
Ganymede" that hangs in the Louvre
gallery.

In the next century the house came into
the possession of the Marquise du Chitelet,
"la divine Emilie" of Voltaire, and the au-
thor of the "Encyclopaedia" passed much
of his time there. There are certain manu-
scripts of his still extant, dated from that
place of residence.

Later on the La Haye family became the
owners of the Hotel Lambert (for through-
out all centuries it has preserved the name
of its founder) . They generously gave part
of the treasures it contained to Louis
XVI for his collection in the Louvre.
After that the place became the successive
property of the Count de Montolivet, the
Dowager Duchess of Orleans, and finally
fell into the hands of the Czartoryski fam-
ily, who still own it. Thus you see that dur-
ing nearly three centuries the highest French
society has frequented that sombre little
corner of our island.

Just across the street stands the Hotel de
Bretonvilliers, which, if
less richly decorated than
its neighbor, rejoices in a
more favorable situation,
being well exposed to the
sun and shaded by many
fine trees. " This house,"
says a contemporary
writer, " has a grand and
sage allure that enables
one to distinguish it at a
very great distance, and
gives a splendid idea of
the grandeur of Paris, to
persons arriving from the
Charenton side."

Following the Quai
d'Anjou for a short dis-
tance we come upon a
dark, stately looking
mansion still known by
its old name, the Hotel
de Lauzun. It is here
that Mademoiselle de

The water-carrier. Moutpensicr, Id gratldc



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The He St. Louis



Mademoiselle, cousin of Louis XIV and
grand-daughter of Henry IV, lived, suffered
and finally died of a broken heart.

History tells us that if at forty years of



her to think of marr^'ing the King of
Spain or, perhaps, the Prince of Wales,
future Charles II of England. None but
a royal suitor need seek her hand.



Rue dc Bretonvillicrs.



age she was still a maiden, it was because
she had found no suitor of sufficiently noble
blood with whom she might be allied. She
was a Grande Dame of histor\', the hero-
ine of the Fronde, whose birth permitted



What was it, then, that at this late day
inspired her infatuation for Lauzun, a sim-
ple captain of the Guards, a man many
years her junior and *'one of the most inso-
lent and capricious individuals at court"?



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The He St. Louis



Her diary tells us that up until the time of
their meeting the flame of love had never
burned within her breast, and that Lauzun
charmed her by " The distinction of his con-
duct in comparison with other peoples'; by
the elevation of his soul above those of
others; by his agreeable conversation and
a million other singularities."

Dandy of the court, he was not long
guessing the secret of this proud demoiselle,
who essayed every possible ruse to draw
forth a proposal from her chosen admirer.
But the rascal, knowing he could not rise to
her station, resolved to see how far he could
humble her pride, and unlike the situations
in the fairy stories, in this case it was the
princess who sought the hand of her vassal.
Nor was he any too willing. He pretended
to misunderstand her intentions, coquetted
with her, tormented her until the very day
she went to the king to ask his consent to
their immediate marriage.

Louis XIV, taken unawares, saw nothing
to prevent the union, and preparations for
the event were immediately set afoot. But



Hotel de Lauzun.



the scandal caused when it was noised
abroad that a daughter of the house of Bour-
bon was enamored of a simple guardsman,
and that the king approved of the match,
threatened to render the monarch unpopu-
lar, and counselled by the various members
of his family, he withdrew his consent three
days later, on the very eve of the ceremony.
Furious to see his royal prey thus escape
him, Lauzun, in his anger, let slip some
imprudent phrases, and he was shortly dis-
patched on a mission to the North. While
on his way thence he was captured and im-
prisoned by royal command.

Mademoiselle was inconsolable, and for
fourteen long years she lived, loved and
waited, finally succeeding in buying her
lover's deliverance. But at what a price!
Almost all her property was forfeited to ac-
cumulate the tremendous sum the king
asked for ransom, and even then she was
only permitted a secret marriage with the
man of her choice.

Lauzun and his white-haired bride took
refuge in their island home, and shortly we
see the real character of the
man coming to the surface.
Debauched and embittered,
this beau chevalier seems to
have left his polished man-
ners within the prison gates,
and he brutally accused his
wife of being the cause of his
misfortunes, captivity and
exile. Other and more hu-
miliating scenes followed and
soon the great house rang
with cries of dissension.

The grande demoiselle bore
it all with mild submission,
her flamme d^ amour as yet too
strong to be quenched by
mere ill-treatment. Lauzun
triumphed in her abasement,
and one day in the presence
of a brilliant assembly, com-
manded his royal help-mate:
**Henriette de Bourbon,
make haste, remove my
boots!" Then, at length, the
princess rose above the
woman and drove the scoun-
drel from her presence never
to lay eyes on him again.

How she passed the re-



Online LibraryEdward L. (Edward Livermore) BurlingameScribner's magazine → online text (page 1 of 115)