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WORDSWORTH COLLECTION

MADE BY

CYNTHIA MORGAN ST. JOHN
ITHACA. N. Y.



''Round thi
Our p^



THE GIFT OF

VICTOR EMANUEL

CLASS OF 1919
1925



Library of

Cynthia Morgan St. John.



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POEMS



BY



E D WAR D Q U I L L I NAN.



WITH A MEMOIR



BY WILLIAM JOHNSTON



LONDON:

EDWAED MOXON, DOVER STEEET.

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1853.

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LONDON:
BRADBURY AND IVAN S, PH INTERS, WHITEFRI A R S .



CONTENTS.



MEMOIR OF EDWARD QUILLINAN



WILD-FLOWERS OF WESTMORELANX)



A FLOWER OF FAIRFIELD



THE HELIOTROPE AND THE SNOWDROP



THE NIGHT-SCENTED STOCK



THE BIRCH OF SILVER-HOW



CHESNUT TREES NEAR BRAGA



THE CANARY GOLDFINCH



WANSFELL



RYDAL-BECK, WESTMORELAND



DALEGARTH FORCE .



A SEA LYRIC



A MOST RICH AND PERFECTLY DEFINED RAINBOW ON
THE OCEAN

A PARTING BENISON TO THE MEDEA STEAMSHIP

CLOUDS . .... ....



Page



XI
1

13



15



16

17

19
20
24
27
29
31

39
42
44



VI



CONTENTS.



ON A PORTRAIT BY COMERFORD



THE MAGDALEN



'^WHAT HA^^E YOU SEEN IN WICKLOW ] '' .



SONNETS —



TO C. S. H.



EMMA .



THE AMERICAN SHIP PAULINA



HERO-WORSHIP — I. IL



MEDUSA — L II. .



THE GAULS AT ROME. A.D. 1S49 — L IL IIL IV.



SONETO DE CAMOENS .



TRANSLATION OF THE FOREGOING SONNET



SONNET SEVENTY-TWO OF CAMOENS



TO A CAGED NIGHTINGALE



FIELD-FOOT CEDAR — L IL III.



FIELD-FOOT — L IL



CAVE OF MEDITATION, FIELD-FOOT



TO ANGUS FLETCHER



SUSPIRIA. — I. WORDSWORTH S HOME .



j>



9}



>9



IL HER HOME ....

III. " JESUS WEPT." (St. John xi. .35)

IV. A REQUEST



STANZAS WRITTEN AT OPORTO



TO D-



TO D. H.



Page

45

47
48

49
50
51
52
54
56

60
61
62
63
64
67
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
84
85



CONTENTS. vii

Page

TO MRS. HARRISON 86

TO A YOUNG LADY 87

LINES TO MRS. DUNLOP, FOR ROTHA .... 88

TO MISS 90

TO MARY, DANCING . 91

MAY LUTTRELL 92

TO A LADY OF SUPERCILIOUS AIR 95

ladies' EYES. TO MISS 98

TO THE POET . . 101



LEE PRIORY, IN MAY 103

CHILD LOST 106

WRITTEN IN THE ALBUM OF EDITH MAY SOUTHEY, WHO

FORBADE COMPLIMENT 108

IN A lady's ALBUM 109

IN AN ALBUM Ill

IN THE ALBUM OF MARGARET . . , .112

IN AN ALBUM GIVEN TO MISS BAY LEY . . . . 113

SONG. — AMBLESIDE VALE 115

SONG ALTERED FROM MOORE 116

LOW WOOD, WINANDERMERE 119

MELANCHOLY 120

NEPTUNE AND MEDUSA 121

STANZAS 122

TENSES 125

THE TWO RINGS 127



viii CONTENTS.

Page

'^HIC JACET MALLEUS SCOTORUM " 129

ADDRESS TO A PONY 135

ON THE REPORTED VISIT OF QUEEN ADELAIDE TO

WORDSWORTH 139

MORALS FROM THE STARS 141

THE SPELL 143

INTERIOR OF CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL, AS SEEN BY

MOONLIGHT, SEPTEMBER 30, 1841 . . . • 145

VERY UNFINISHED VERSES SUGGESTED BY THE SERRA OF

GERES 148

''n'eveillez pas le chat qui DORT'' . . . . 151

THE ROSE-WREATHED HOUR-GLASS 152

THE OLD MAN AND HIS DAUGHTERS 153

FIRST LOVE 156

AT A BALL 157

AVONDALE • . . .158

AGNES OF HOLMGARD 160

THE LEGEND OF ST. MEINRAD 168

VAL DE LUZ ••.-..... 173



DIALOGUE BETWEEN A MOOR OF GRANADA AND HIS
SPANISH PRISONER



ZELINDA

THE ZEGRI LADY TO HER LOVER
SONG OF THE ABENCERRAGE
DISCONTENT ....
CONTENT



175
178

181
183
185
189



CONTEIS^TS. ix

Pag:e

CONFIDENTIAL 192

TRANSLATION OF BORGES DE BARROS VERSES " A FLOR

saudade" 194

''A FLOR SAUDADE" 195

THE DUKE OF ALBA 200

O DUQUE d' ALBA. 201

THE DUKE OF ALBA. SUGGESTED BY THE PORTUGUESE

BALLAD PRECEDING ....... 208

THE GROVES OF ENTRE QUINTAS 213

EPITAPH ON COLONEL GEORGE HOLMES, C.B. . . . 215

EPITAPH ON J. K. E. HOLMES, DROWNED IN THE WYE,

JUNE 16, 1848 216

FUNERAL OF ROBERT SOUTHEY 217

ELEGY ON G. M. B 221

ELEGY ON E. W. G. B. 227

SHORT POEMS IN MEMORY OF JEMIMA A. D. QUILLINAN . 232

IL NEAR LAUFFENBERG 235

III. NEAR SCHAFFHAUSEN — HER FAVOURITE FLOWERS 236

IV. SOCIETY. BERNE 236

V. SCHWYTZ 237

VL THE LAKE OF LAUWERTZ 239

VII. BERNE . .240

VIII. LAUSANNE 241

ELEGY ON THE SAME, WRITTEN TWELVE YEARS LATER . 243

ELEGY ON A YOUNG LADY WHO DIED AT TORQUAY,

FEBRUARY 2, 1833 253



CONTEiSTTS.



Pasre



O'



TO THE CITY OF FLORENCE 255

LINES COMPOSED IN THE ENGLISH BURIAL-GROUND AT

OPORTO 257

DIALOGUE WITH THE DEPARTING SPIRIT OF A FRIEND'S

CHILD 259

A DREAM OF DEATH AT SEA 261

STANZ^.S 262

ALONE ..... . ^ . . . . 266



MEMOIR OF EDWARD QUILLINAN,



BY WILLIAM JOHNSTON.



It was the opinion of the accomplished and
amiable man of whom a brief memoir is now to be
written, that the task of a biographer is a much more
difficult and delicate one than is generally supposed —
that there^ is on the part of candid biographers a
danger that they may tell the public more than the
public have any right to know, and that in the
biography of authors especially, there is no more
reason to acquaint the public with their private
weaknesses, than with their private or pecuniary
affairs. "I have sometimes felt," he said, ^^ that the
epitaph to Grray's elegy rather marred than improved
it, yet the last stanza suggests a good rule for bio-
graphies of students : —

' ' No farther seek his merits to disclose ;

Nor draw his frailties from their dread abode,
(There they aUke in trembling hope repose,)
The bosom of his Father and his Grod."



xii MEMOIR OF EDWAED QUILLUSTAIS'.

Whatever may be thought of the soundness of this
critical canon, no one had less occasion to desire the
practical application of it than himself. Possessed of
a keen and critical ludgment, and of a temperament
con^jaJJitaona lly Jrr itable, he was yet the general
friend. His prudence was trusted, his integrity was
relied on ; and every one who knew him felt that
whatever demand they might make upon his courtesy
and kindness would be willingly and cordially re-
sponded to. Had he indeed been as active for his own
advantage as he was in promoting the wishes of his
friends, he might have achieved more fame as a
literary man, and better fortune as a man of the
world ; but let us not regret that he sacrificed these
things, or rather the better chance of them, for the
sake of being what he was. Let us regret rather that
he was not longer spared in a world wherein men of
his unselfish character are not too abundant.

_By profession a soldier, the passion of his life was
literature. One of tlie probable reasons why be did
not obtain a place in the world of autborsbip com-
mensurate with his abilities has just been hinted at ;
others are pointed out in a letter addressed to himself
by Mr. Wordsworth, long before any family con-
nection subsisted between them. " This very day,"
writes the great poet in 1827, " Dora has read to me
your poem again:* it convinces me, along with your

* The poem here referred to is supposed to be that written at Oporto in
1837. See p. 75.



MEMOIR OF EDWAED QUILLINAN. xiii

other writings, that it is in yonr power to attain a
permanent place among the poets of England. Tour
thoughts, feelings, knowledge, and judgment in style,
and skill in metre, entitle you to it, and if you have
not yet succeeded in gaining it, the cause appears to
me merely to lie in the subjects which you have
chosen. It is worthy of note how much of Gray's
popularity is owing to the happiness with which his
subject is selected in three places, his ' Hymn to
Adversity,' his ' Ode on a distant Prospect of Eton
College,' and his^ ' Elegy.' I ought however, in
justice to you, to add that one cause of your failure
appears to have been thinking too humbly of your-
self, so that you have not reckoned it worth while to
look sufficiently round you for the best subjects, or
to employ as much time in reflecting, condensing,
bringing out, and placing your thoughts and feel-
ings in the best point of view, as is necessary." In
order to give its fair value to this testimony, we
should bear in mind that Mr. Wordsworth was, as
he admitted of himself, ' slow to admire,' and by no
means^'forwamto express approbation even when he
felt it. Not that he morosely withheld praise which
he believed to be deserved, but he was scrupulous
in the expression of his judgment, and he would
scarcely condescend to the language of mere com-
pliment.

In the paper of the " Quarterly Eeview " upon the



xiv MEMOIE or EDWAED QUILLIKAK.

memoirs of Wordsworth* there is honourable mention
made of Mr. Quillinan as ^^an amiable and accom-
plished gentleman, the author of some very elegant
verses, and probably the first Portuguese scholar in
this country.'' The short poems of which the present
volume is made up, will, it is hoped, at least justify
the praise which has been awarded to their author for
elegance of versification. t To his biographer they have
a peculiar interest for the reason which Mr. Q,uillinaii
unconsciously pointed out in his poem upon the pre-
served wild-flowers of the North, which stands first in
this collection —

''Thus sun-dyed fancies, airy reveries,
Freaks of imagination, waking dreams,
Ephemeral fantasies of playful hues.
Fade into nothing if uncropt, and die
Forgotten ; but if seized on while yet fresh
In their rich tints of light, and so consign' d
To the bland pressure of judicious thought,
And chaste constraint of language, they become
Heirlooms for after times ; and when the door
Of life has closed upon their parent mind.
They tell us of the garden where they grew."

All this is strictly applicable to the poems of the
present volume. They will be fonnd of varying
literary merit ; but they are true records of the man
in his diflferent moods of mind, sometimes lighted up
by joy and a playful fancy, more frequently showing

* No. 183, December, 1852. f ^x- gr., see Poems, pp. 185—189.



MEMOIR or EDWAED QTJILLTNAN. xv

him plunged in the deepest gloom of grief, but always
giving evidence of kindliness of heart, or of strong
and tender affections.

^ -K- * * *

Edward Quillinan was born at Oporto on the 12th
of August, 1791. His father was an Irishman of an
ancient but impoverished family, who early in life
settled in Oporto, where his iadustry and talent for
business w^ere such as enabled him to realize a moderate
fortune. His mother, whose maiden name was Mary
E^yan, was also of an Irish family, but was born at
Oporto. She died at the same place while the subject
of this memoir was at school in England. He always
spoke of her with much fondness, describing her as
fair to look on, and good and gentle in disposition.
He could however recollect but little of her, for before
he was seven years of age, he was shipped off for
England to go to school, and he never saw her more.
She died a few years afterwards in the month of May,
and, as he said, still in the May of her youth and
beauty.

Among Mr. Quillinan' s papers were found a few
pages of autobiography, not coming down however
further than 1810, when he w^as only nineteen years of
age. Erom these pages the following passages are
taken : " I have never forgotten my parting with my
mother, who, with my father, accompanied me down



>' '



xvi MEMOIE or EDWAED QUILLINAN.

the river in a boat. My mother was in tears ; I hung
upon her neck at the ship's side, till my father bade
me go, and hurriedly gave me his blessing. I mounted
the ship's side ; the boat pushed off; I watched my
mother till the boat was out of sight, and never saw
her again. I think of her as I last saw her, when she
last saw me, a little boy committed to the winds and
waves, and to the care of a captain of a merchantman
as rough as they, to be landed at Liverpool and
forwarded into Staffordshire to the Catholic school of
Sedgley Park, there to take my chance among a
hundred and fifty schoolboys. I have nothing to say
about this school, except that I made as much progress
as my companions in what I was taught. I became
very devout and religiously scrupulous ; made my
confessTonT with the most painful anxiety, lest I
should omit even a venial sin, though the most mortal
that I could muster on my list was the occasional
abstraction of a turnip from the field to appease
the wolfish hunger of a youth when we walked
abroad. I remember a Mr. R., a mean and teasing
pedagogue, whom we called Mr. Trimmer, from his
constant use of the ferula ; and another usher, who
taught French and Latin, a great surly brute, whose
large ponderous fist would descend vdthout mercy on
our heads.

" After a few years I was removed to Carshalton,
near London, to a Dominican school under the



MEMOIR OF EDWARD QVlLIjlK^liL^^^^^iy^ XVli

superintendence of the Hev. J^^J^jSU^od. Here I was

^^PP7 5 1 was well taken care of — encouraged, not
bullied — and I had not been long in the school before I
was at the head of all the classes. The under masters
all treated me with kindness. The Eev. E. Dios Santos,
a priest who resided in the village, was also exceed-
ingly kind to me. He gave me books, applauded my
verses which I even then had begun to write, and
cheered me on most generously. My verses obtained
play days for my schoolfello\^^s, and never was there a
more popular poet. I occasionally spent my holidays
with Mr. A. of Grower-street, my father's partner, and
there was a family in the village from whom I received
invitations to pass the Sundays and holidaj^s. I was,
upon the whole, very happy at this school.

" At the age of fourteen I was removed from school,
being destined for the counting-house at Oporto.
Being a Catholic^ I was imfortunately not sent to
either of the Universities, which I bave ever since
taniehted. -I- returned to Oporto. The yells of the
Portuguese pilot and sailors, the roaring of the surge
on the bar, the dashing of the waves on the sand, the
foam and the dark rocks, the horrible creaking of the
carts on the shore, astonished me ; and might have
given me the idea of a descent into Tartarus but that
the scene was so fair, the river so gracious, the river-
banks so rich with woods and white buildings, the city
on both sides climbing up so stately. Soon after we






t*.



xviii MEMOIE OF EDWAED QUILLINAN.

anchored, among the numerous boats which came
alongside was one containing mj father, my step-
mother (for he had married again), and my sister.

" The invasion of Portugal by the French drove all
the English families out of Oporto before I had been
there six months, but not before I M^as heartily sick of
the counting-house, for mj43assion was for books
very unlike ledgers. We left for England. My
mother-in-law, a Portuguese, though far advanced in
pregnancy, could not bear to be left behind with a
Portuguese family. This was very natural, but very
unfortunate. It was in winter and we had a long and
rough passage. She was prematurely taken in labour,
and died on the passage.* We went to London, and
after we had been there a year and a half, the accident
of my father's forming an intimate acquaintance with
an officer of the Carabineers, led to my father's asking
me whether I should like to go into the army ? I at
once answered ' yes,' and the affair was soon settled.
Ijyas gazetted, 1808, as a cornet by purchase in the
Queen's Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards) and soon after
joined my regiment at Hastings, and from thence went
to Canterbury. Tli^^llfe suited me extremely well,
and I had plenty of time to read. A boutTwoT years

^ This lady had several children, but only one survived infancy, and he
is still living — John Thomas Quillinan, Esq., who succeeded his father in
business at Oporto. At his house Mr. Quillinan was a guest during the
visits he paid to Portugal ; and since his decease his children have been
much indebted to the kindness of their father's only surviving relative.



MEMOIR or EDWARD QUILLINAlSr, xix

later * a lieutenancy was purchased for me in the 23rd
Light Dragoons, at my own request ; for though I was
very sorry to leave my first regiment, of which all the
officers, from the Colonel (Lord Gr. Beresford), to my
brother cornets, were as kind to me as possible, I was
anxious for promotion, and saw no chance of it then
in the Bays. I was not lucky in the selection of my
regiment, which I joined at Canterbury soon after its
return from its gallant affair at Talavera. It was a
good and brave corps, but there were dissensions
among the officers which were not lessened by the
unlucky wight who now entered it. I had just, very
indiscreetly, published ' The Ball Eoom Votaries,' a
poem by no means flattering to several of the gentry
in the neighbourhood. It ran through two editions
in about a month. The first was exhausted in a
week.

' Blen scandaleux bien bon ; le style n'y fait rien ;
Pourvu qu'il soit mechant, il sera toujours bien :'

— a couplet which I quoted in the preface to the second
edition, for I was even then aware of the great
indecorum of publishing such personal satire at all.
It was not all satire. There was a great deal more
praise than blame, and the object in writing the poem
was to have the opportunity of praising two young

* In the interval Mr. Quillinan went with his regiment upon the
Walcheren expedition, and witnessed the bombardment of Flushing.
His biogi-aphical paper does not however touch upon this.

62



XX MEMOIE OE EDWAED QUILLINAIS'.

ladies of the neiglibourliood, of whom I admired one^
and a friend of mine, a brother officer, another. He
suggested the publication. The poem was written in
three days, and published by Mr. Oolburn in less than
a fortnight after it was commenced. I got into no
difficulty by this foolish achievement, though the name
of the author, which did not appear on the title page,
was far from being a secret, and Colburn told it, with
m}^ consent, to the first person that asked him.

" But another publication now set on foot by
Lieutenant Gr. of the 23rd Dragoons, Captain J. H.
and Mr. "W. of the Bays, and myself, got us all into
trouble. To this thing, called 'The Whim,' it happened
that I was but a very slight contributor. All the
things I wrote were harmless enough, except the first,
which unluckily gave offence to Captain C. of the 23rd
Dragoons, who was foolishly ridiculed in it for his
pompous dealings as stage manager of a theatre, got
up at the expense of the garrison for the amusement
of the neighbourhood. There was some very good
acting by the officers at that theatre, and Captain C.
was unquestionably the best actor of all — our first-
rate tragedian. Captain D., of the 23rd, also was the
best in comedy and farce, and hardly excelled by John
Bannister, who, on one night, acted there for us. But
it was not C. only that was angry, nor was I tlie only
off'ender. My friends H. and G. had amused them-
selves at the expense of some officers, and, to make a



MEMOIE or EDWARD QUILLHSTAIN'. xxi

long and idle story short, we found ourselves with
several duels on our hands. I had three for my share ;
W. had had nothing to do with it, and we insiste.d on
keeping him out of it altogether. H. was absent on
leave, but came down to meet his man, an artillery
officer, when called upon. I was recruiting in Essex
at the time the first challenges came, and Gr. was the
only one of the four editors still in Kent. I joined
him at Stonar barracks, and we agreed to divide the
duels between us. My only personal antagonist was
Captain C. I met him on Barham Downs, Gr. being
my second. We exchanged two shots without eifect,
and C. declared himself satisfied. The next day I

met Captain Co of the 23rd and Captain M. of

the artillery, behind the cavalry barracks of Canter-
bury. I was not the writer of the things that had
brought them into the field, and only met them as
editor, and responsible for things that I had never

seen till they were in print. Co and I exchanged

two shots ; both missed, and he was satisfied. G-. was
here my second again. Then came M., but his second,
an officer of his own corps, and mine. Lieutenant Q.
of the 23rd Dragoons, after loading the pistols,
measuring the ground, and placing us on it, proposed
to each other a compromise. They asked M. to with-
draw an offensive note he had written; he said he
would if I would withdraw my offensive answer. This
was of course, and M., a brave and a good officer, was



xxii MEMOIE OF EDWARD QUILLIlS^AlSr.

quite right, for he could not even pretend to have
been personally offended in the first instance, and had
thrust himself into the quarrel in his zeal for an absent
friend."

Here the autobiographical paper abruptly closes.
Had it been continued we may surmise from Mr.
Quillinan's character in after life, that these latter
passages would have been commented upon in strong
terms of self-condemnation. His excuse liowever was,
that he was little more than a boy, and that the
fashion of duelling was then so prevalent, especially
in military circles, that not only young men but men
of all ages perilled their lives every now and then in
personal quarrels grounded upon very frivolous causes
of offence. The passage of the autobiography has
however been given, not only because such circum-
stances may have had some effect upon the formation
of Mr. Quillinan's character, but that it affords a
rather interesting glimpse of the military manners of
the time. Evils of some kind or another exist at
all times, and the writer of this memoir does not
know enough of the subject to be able to decide
whether, upon the whole, the practice of life in the
British army is more elevated in its moral and intel-
lectual aspects now, than it was forty years ago, but
it is impossible to entertain a rational doubt that a
very great evil was got rid of, in getting rid of the
system of personal rencounter. It was a system which



MEMOIR or EDWARD QUILLINAN. xxiii

encouraged the ebullient impertinence of frivolous
youth, reckless of personal danger, and gave confidence
to the ferocious insolence of mature bullies, who
calculated on their murderous experience. But, worse
than this, it prevented men, who were willing enough
in their hearts to do so, from making reasonable and
frank reparation for ofl:ences hastily and inconsiderately
given. So long as it was open to belief that an
offending person apologised only to save himself from
personal danger, it was at least natural, although
wrong, that apologies weie withheld until after the
danger had been undergone.

Such a circumstance, however, as that of the officers
of the same regiment fighting duels among themselves,
could scarcely, even forty years ago, escape the animad-
version of the higher military powers, and it is not
surprising that we find Mr. Quillinan to have ex-
changed soon after into the 3rd Dragoon Guards. He
joined that regiment in Spain, and was with it through
the latter part of the Peninsular campaign to the end
of the war.

In 1816 we find him — peace being restored — in the
field of literature again, and publishing a poem called
" The Sacrifice of Isabel" Of this performance the
''Critical Eeview" for October, 1816, gives a
lengthened notice, the introduction to which may
fittingly find a place in this brief biography:

" The poem before us deserves considerable praise,



xxiv MEMOIE OE EDWABD QUILLIXAN.

and though not of the highest order in its kind, it
gives evident proofs of talent. The name of the
author is perhaps not unknown to many of our readers
— not indeed as a writer merely, but as a young
officer of a dragoon regiment, who in consequence of
his propensity for the muse was involved in some
disputes in an eastern county of the kingdom, where
his regiment w^as quartered ; from which, however, we
have every reason to believe he extricated himself
with higli honour, in a sense exclusively military, and
with great credit in the ordinary acceptation of the
word. The conduct of Lieutenant Quillinan upon
that occasion, we are informed, introduced him to the
acquaintance and friendship of Sir Egerton Brydges,
to whom the ' Sacrifice of Isabel ' is dedicated by its
author, who says that it is ' an endeavour to describe
with energy and simplicity, natural feelings in trying
situations.' "

These expressions indicate that the Wordsworth-
ianism that was so decided in the poetical sentiment
of Mr. Quillinan' s maturer years, had even then found
its way into his mind, and this appears also in the
praise of the reviewer, who places his avowed design
of following simplicity and nature, in contrast wdth
the Byronic poetry of the day, which had a run of


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