Edwin Orin Wood.

History of Genesee county Michigan; her people, industries and institutions, with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families online

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Online LibraryEdwin Orin WoodHistory of Genesee county Michigan; her people, industries and institutions, with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families → online text (page 38 of 89)
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of Swartz Creek, where they lived, developing a fine property, until their
retirement from the active labors of the farm on March 13, 1912, when
they moved to the village of Swartz Creek, where they built a fine steam-
heated house, into which they moved in September of that year, and where
they since have made their home, being very pleasantly and comfortably
situated. They have five children, Carrie E., George E., Howard M., Dale
B. and Gladys R. Carrie E. Houghton received her schooling in the Swartz
Creek schools and in the State Normal School at Ypsilanti and for some
time taught school. She married Arthur J. Holden, proprietor of a com-
mercial school at Laurium, this state, and is now an instructor in her hus-
band's school. George E. Houghton was graduated from the Swartz Creek
schools, later attended the normal school at Mt. Pleasant and then taught
school for a time. He married Stella M. Root, of Swartz Creek, and is now
living at Detroit, where he is employed as a passenger conductor on the
Grand Trunk railroad. He and his wife had a daughter, Dorothy E., born
on March i, 1907, who died on March 25, 1916. Howard M. Houghton,
who also was graduated from the Swartz Creek schools, married Elizabeth
LaCass, of Clayton township, and is now the owner of a farm in that town-
ship. Dale B. Houghton was graduated from the Swartz Creek schools and
is now a machinist, living in Detroit. He married Dorenza Wendell, of
Muskegon, and has two children, Alene M., born on May 11, 1912, and



364 GENESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN.

Dale B., Jr., June 28, 191 6. Gladys R. Houghton was graduated from the
Schwartz Creek schools and from the county normal and then for six
years was engaged as a school teacher. She married Don H. Carmichael,
of Clayton township.

Mrs. Houghton is a member of the Baptist church at Vernon and a
member of the Order of the Eastern Star, associate matron of the local
chapter of that order. Mr. Houghton is a Democrat and for years has
taken an active part in local political affairs, having served the first Genesee
district in the lower House of the Michigan Legislature and having served
for five years as supervisor of Clayton township.



HERBERT FRUTCHEY.



Herbert Frutchey, manager and one of the proprietors of the elevators
of the Swartz Creek Grain Company at Swartz Creek, this county, and for
years prominently identified with the grain business in this part of the state,
is a native of the great Keystone state but has lived in Michigan since he was
a child. He was born in Northampton county, Pennsylvania, on May 17,
1875, son of A. and Lydia (Ettinger) Frutchey, both of whom were bom
and reared in that state, married there and continued to live there until 1878,
when they came to Michigan with their family and settled in Tuscola county,
later locating at Deford, in that county, where they still live and where A.
Frutchey has for years been actively engaged in the grain, live-stock and gen-
eral mercantile business, head of a string of grain elevators throughout this
part of the state, including the towns of Swartz Creek, Cass City, Kingston,
Decker and Deford, each one of which is individually incorporated under the
laws of the state. The business at Swartz Creek is incorporated mider the
name of the Swartz Creek Grain Company, A. Frutchey, president, and Her-
bert Frutchey, secretary-treasurer. To A. Frutchey and wife three children
have been born, those besides the subject of this sketch being Alice, wife of
Frank Nettleton, and Joseph Frutchey, secretary-treasurer of the Cass City
Grain Company at Cass City.

Herbert Frutchey was about three years old when he came to Michigan
with his parents. He completed the course in the grade schools of Cass City
when seventeen years old and then took a course in a business college, after
which, in 1893, he became associated with his father in the grain business and
has ever since been thus engaged, having been manager of the elevator at



GENESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 365

Swartz Creek and secretary-treasurer of the company operating the same
since 1913. In addition to his extensive grain interests, Mr. Frutchey is
interested quite heavily in the great Alpena Ranch Company, incorporated,
which is operating a ranch of something like five or six thousand acres, most
of which is given over to the raising of live stock. Mr. Frutchey is a Demo-
crat, but has never been an office seeker. He is a member of the lodge of
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Bay City and takes a warm
interest in the affairs of that order.

Herbert Frutchey married Elsie Murphy, of Cass City, and to this union
one child has been born, a daughter, Elizabeth L., born in November, 1909.
Mr. and Mrs. Frutchey have a very pleasant home at Swartz Creek and take
a proper interest in the various social activities of their home town.



ABRAM MELVIN TRUMBLE.

Abram Melvin Trumble, a well-known and well-to-do retired farmer
of Davison township, this county, now living at Davison, where for some
time he has been actively engaged in the buying and selling of live stock,
is a native son of Michigan, and has lived in this state all his life. He was
born on a farm in Hadley township, in the neighboring county of Lapeer,
December 29, 1855, son of Stewart and Deborah E. (Tryon) Trumble, natives
of New York state, the former of whom was killed in battle while serving
as a soldier of the Union during the Civil War, and the latter of whom spent
her last days in the village of Goodrich, this county.

Stewart Trumble was but a lad when he came from New York with his
parents, David Trumble and wife, who settled in the vicinity of the village
of Hadley, in Lapeer county, where he grew to manhood and where he
married Deborah Eliza Tryon, who was born at Ransomville, New York,
daughter of Thomas S. and Wealthy (Church) Tryon, who became pio-
neers in Lapeer county, the latter of whom was a member of the extensive
church family, which traces back through John, Simon, Samuel and Edward
Church to Richard Church and through the latter on back to John Church, of
Sussex, England, in 1355. Some time after his marriage Stewart Trumble
moved to Iowa and was living there when the Civil War broke out. He
enlisted as a private in Company I, Fourth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer
Infantry, and served with that command until he met with a soldier's fate
at the battle of Pea Ridge. His widow returned to Michigan with her son.



366 GENESEE COl'NTY, MICHIGAN.

the suljject of this sketch, and married WilHam Cole, of Elba township, and
after the latter "s death on January 31, 1867, married, in 1869, Peter Lang-
land, of Davison, this county, who died in 1871. She survived until January
9, 1889, her death occurring at Goodrich, this county. By her first marriage
she was the mother of one child, a son, the subject of this review; by her
second marriage she was the mother of one child, a daughter, Lucretia Cole,
who married Mark Hoard, and is now living at Leonard, this state, and
bv her last marriage was the mother of two children, both of whom died
in infancy.

Abraham M. Trumble was aI)out three )ears of age when his parents
moved from Hadley to Iowa and after the death of his soldier father, he
returned to this state with his mother and grew to manhood in this county,
starting out for himself as a farmer in Davison township. He completed
his schooling in the high school at Goodrich and presently bought a farm of
one hundred and twenty acres in the southern part of Davison township,
where his mother and his sister, Lucretia, lived with him until 1881, when
they moved to the village of Goodrich, where his mother spent her last days.
For more than twenty years Mr. Trumble has been engaged in the buying
and selling of live stock, making his shipments from the village of Davison,
and in 1904 moved to that village, where he since has made his home and
where he and his wife are very pleasantl\- situated. He continues his live-
stock business and is one of the best-known shippers in the county. Mr.
Trumble is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd
Fellows, of the Ancient Order of Gleaners, and of the Loyal Guard, in the
affairs of which organizations he takes a warm interest.

On May 24, 1877, Abram M. Trumble was married to Lillian M. Ball,
who was born in Davison township, this county, daughter of Henry and
Elizabeth (Pettis) Ball, natives of New York, early residents of this county
and for many years prominent in the life of the southeastern part of the
county. Henry Ball was born in Newstead, New York, August 18, i8-'6,
son of John and Sarah (Ayres) Ball, the former of whom homesteaded a
tract of land in the vicinity of Akron, Erie county. New York. He became
a school teacher and about 1848, came to Michigan, settling at Grand Blanc,
for several years teaching in the schools of that vicinity; and in that neigh-
borhood, on January i. 1851, married Elizabeth Pettis, who was born at East
Pembroke, New York, August 21, 1833, daughter of Charles and Rachel
(Tracy) Pettis, who came to Michigan in the latter part of that same year
and settled in Grand Blanc township, this county. .Vfter Henry Ball's mar-
riage he engaged in farming in Davison town,ship, buying a quarter of a



GKNESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 367

section of land on the Irish road, une-half mile north of the line of .\tlas
township, and there spent the rest of his life, adding to his original tract until
he became the owner of two hundred and twenty acres of choice land, beino-
accounted one of the nK)st substantial farmers in that section of the county.
About 1870 he started a cheese factory, which some years later he leased
to a stock compau}- which operated it until it was destroyed by fire. Mr.
Ball took an active part in civic affairs, and for some time served as justice
of the peace in and for his home township. He died in 1877 and his widow
survival until January 7, 1906. They were the parents of eight children, of
whom Mrs. Trumble was the ftjurth in order of birth, the others being as
follows: Charles H., who died in infancy; Ella J., who died in infancy:
Flora E., who married George Taylor and lives at Argentine, this county:
Charles N., deceased: Fred H., deceased: Jennie R., who lives in Davison
township, widow of William H. Howe, and Cora D., wife of James Trollope,
of Goodrich, this count}-. To Mr. and Mrs. Trumble two sons and one
daughter have been born, Oscar Stewart, born on Septeml:>er 30, 1878;
Charles Henry, August 30, 1882, and Myrtle Estelle, February 11, 1881,
who died on May 13, 1884. Oscar S. Trumble early devoted himself to an
educational career, and is now a teacher in the high school at Jackson. On
June 2j, 1905, he married Jessie Blanche Harbison, of Bath, this state, and
has two children, Donald Charles and Melvin Joseph. Charles H. Trumble
early turned his attention to a mercantile career, and was engaged in the drug
business at Brown City until 19 15, since which time he has given his atten-
tion to the manufacturing and automobile business, owner of a large garage
at that place, local agent there for two popular makes of automobiles and a
partner in the Brown City Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of plows,
sleighs and the like. On September 24, 1907, he was married to Minnie E.
Roonev. and has two children, Eleanor Fa\e and Charles Stewart.



ARTHUR G. CARRIER.



Arthur G. Carrier, postmaster of Duffield, this county, and a well-
known and progressive merchant of that village, is a native of Genesee
county and has li\'ed here all his life. He was born on a farm in Gaines
township, July 26, 1869, son of Lyman and Maria (Warner) Carrier, the
former a native of the state of New York and the latter of Vermont, who
came to ?^lichigan with their respective parents in the days of their youth
and grew up in Genesee county, where they married and afterward estab-



368 GENESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN.

lished tlieir home on a farm in section 7 of Gaines township, where they
spent 'the remainder of their hves. Lyman Carrier was a substantial farmer
and a useful citizen. He and his wife were were the parents of five children,
of whom four are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being
as follow : Adelbert, a farmer in Clayton township, this county ; Fred, a resi-
dent of San Francisco, California, and Lyman, who was graduated from
the Michigan Agricultural College and is now employed in the office of the
agricultural department at Washington, D. C.

Arthur G. Carrier was reared on the home farm in Gaines township,
receiving his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood, and remained
on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age, a valued assistant in the
labor of developing and improving the same. When of age he started out
on his own account, but after his marriage in 1901 established his home on
the old home place and there remained for twelve years, the active manager
of the farm. He then bought a stock of merchandise in the village of
Duffield and has ever since been engaged in business there, having built up a
large trade throughout that part of the county. Mr. Carrier is a Repub-
lican and has served his township in the capacity of treasurer and as high-
way commissioner. In 191 2 he was appointed postmaster of Duffield and is
still serving in that important public capacity, conducting the postoffice in his
store.

It was in 1901 that Arthur G. Carrier was united in marriage to Ora
Barker, who was reared at B3'ron, and who died on February 24, 1916.
Mr. Carrier is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as was
his wife, and he has long been a member of the board of trustees of the
same, taking an earnest interest in church work and in the general good
works of the community. He is a Royal Arch Mason and takes a warm
interest in Masonic affairs.



HARRY C. PIER SON.



Harry C. Pierson, one of the best-known and most progressive farmers
of Clayton township, this county, and the proprietor of "Plain View Stock
Farm," a well-kept place of one hundred and fifty-one acres in section 2 of
that township, situated one mile east and one mile south of Flushing, is a
native son of Genesee county and has lived here all his life. He was bom
on a pioneer farm in Mt. Morris township on December 11, 1877, the son of




-/^6m^^ /,AJtAA^cry<:>



GENESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 369

James L. and Sophia (C>ocker) Pierson. The father was born on that
same farm and in the same house, December 19, 1846, the son of William
Pierson, one of the best known among the early settlers in that part of Gen-
esee county. The mother died in January, 1878, when her son, the subject
of this .sketch, was three weeks of age. James L. Pierson married again,
about four years later, and continued to make his home in this county, a
substantial resident of the JVIt. Morris neighborhood, the rest of his life, his
death occurring on December 19, 1886.

As noted above, Harry C. Pierson was but an infant when his mother
died and he was cared for during his early childhood by his aunts, resum-
ing his place in the household of his father after the latter's second mar-
riage. He received his schooling in the district school in the neighborhood
of his home, in the high school at Flint and in tlie normal college, continuing
working as a farmer during school vacations. About the time of his mar-
riage, in the fall of 1899, he then being not quite twenty-two years of age,
he bought the farm on which lie is now living and where he has lived ever
since, he and his wife lieing ^-ery pleasantly situated there. Mr. Pierson is
a progressive farmer, carrying on his farming operations in accordance with
modern methods, and has done ^•ery well. He is a Republican, taking an
active interest in local political affairs, but is not an office holder.

On October 11, 1899, Harry C. Pierson was united in marriage to
Florence A. Hussey, who was born in New York state and who came to
Michigan with her tmcle when she was thirteen years old. They located in
this county and her schooling was completed in Genesee and Flint. Mr. and
Mrs. Pierson are attendants at the Baptist church, contributing to the sup-
port of the same, and take a warm interest in all neighborhood good works
and in the general social acti\ities of the community in which they live.



SETH W. HOWES.

Seth W. Howes, president of the Lennon Creamery Company at Lennon
and one of the best-known and most substantial farmers of Clayton township,
this county, proprietor of "Lindenvvood Farm," a well-kept and profitably
cultivated place of ninety-five acres in section 28, situated on the Lennon
road, rural route No. 2, out of Swartz Creek, is a native son of Genesee'
county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Gaines
(24a)



370 GENKSEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN.

township, March 22, 1854, son of Henry D. and Harriet M. (Wheeler)
Howes, the former a native of the state of Vermont and the latter of the
state of New York, who were married in this county and spent their last
days here, honored and influential residents of the community in which
they lived for many years.

Henry D. Howes was born in Vermont on June 20, 1827, and when
a young man came to Michigan, settling in Genesee county, where, on August
4, 1850, he married Harriet M. Wheeler, who was born in New York state
on November 21, 1832, and who had come to this county with her parents
in the days of her youth. After his marriage Henry D. Howes located on
a tract in Gaines township, established his home there and proceeded to clear
and develop the place, in time becoming one of the most substantial farmers
in that section. At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted for service
in the Fifth Michigan Cavalry and served for three years, being mustered
out as a corporal. Upon the completion of his military service he returned
to the farm and lived there until 1872, when he moved to the farm in
Clayton township on which his son, the subject of this sketch, now lives,
and there he and his wife spent their last days, both dying on the same day,
December 26, 191 5, and were buried in the same grave. They were the
parents of seven children, six of whom are still living, those besides the sub-
iect of this sketch being as follow: David, a resident of the state of Wash-
ington; Wheeler, a resident of Fhnt, this county; Charles, a resident of
Nebraska; Zaide, who married G. V. Pixley, of Richmond, this state, and
Mollie, who married O. C. Swayze, of Holly, this state.

Seth W. Howes was reared on the home farm, receiving his schooling
in the district school in the neighborhood of the same and in the high school
at Flint. Being the eldest son he w-as from the days of his boyhood a valued
assistant to his father in the labor of developing and improving the home
'jlace and when the family moved to the new home in Clayton township
in 1872, he then being eighteen years of age, he continued working with
his father and in time relieved the latter from the active labors of the farm,
becoming virtual manager of the same, and helped to bring pretty "Linden-
wood Farm" up to a high state of cultivation. Upon his marriage in 1886 he
established his home there and has ever since continued to make that place
his place of residence, he and his family being very pleasantly situated. Of
recent years he has associated with himself in the management of the farm
his younger son, Frank Howes, as a partner, the affairs of "Lindenwood
Farm" being conducted under the firm name of Seth W. Howes & Son. In
addition to their general farming. Howes & Son give considerable attention



GENESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 37I

to the raising of pure-bred Jersey cattle and their dairy interests have pros-
pered largely. Mr. Howes for years has given close attention to the develop-
ment of the dairy interests of his community and is president of the Lennon
Creamery Company, a very successful concern, in which he is a stockholder.
Mr. Howes also has given considerable attention to local political affairs
and has served the public as clerk of his township and as justice of the peace.
It was in 1886 that Seth W. Howes was united in marriage to Sarah
A. Sutton, of Clayton township, and to this union two sons have been born,
Harry, who married Matilda Knight and is a progressive young farmer in
Clayton township, and Frank, who is associated with his father in the opera-
tion of the home farm. Both Mr. Howes and his sons are members of the
lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Lennon and of the Ancient
Order of Gleaners and Mr. Howes is a member of the order of the Knights
of the Maccabees, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes a
warm interest.



HON. BERT F. CRAPSER.

Hon. Bert F. Crapser, a well-known and substantial fanner of Clayton
township, this county, owner of a fine farm of one hundred and twenty acres
on rural route No. 2, out of Swartz Creek, former representative in the
Legislature from the first Genesee district and for years actively identified
with the work of developing the best interests of the community in which he
lives, is a native son of Genesee county and has lived here all his life, a con-
tinuous resident on the farm on which he now lives and where he was born
on February 11, 1874, son of Charles and Lucretia (Kellecutt) Crapser,
both natives of this state, the former of whom is still living on the farm in
Clayton township, where he has made his home for more than half a century.

Charles Crapser was born on a pioneer farm in the Groveland section
of the neighboring county of Oakland on February 13, 1837, son of Albert
Crapser and wife, who had come to this state in territorial days from the
Cattskill region of New York, locating in Oakland county, whence, in 1839,
they came over into Genesee county and settled on a pioneer farm in Burton
township, where they spent the rest of their lives, useful and influential
pioneers of that part of the county. Albert Crapser and wife were the par-
ents of five children, Charles, Catherine, Amos, John and Laura, of whom
Charles, John and Catherine are still living. Charles Crapser was about two
years old when his parents came to Genesee county in 1839 and he ever since



372 GENESEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN.

has lived here, thus being one of the oldest continuous residents of Genesee
county. He grew to manhood on the homestead farm in Burton township
and married Lucretia Kellecutt, a member of one of the pioneer families of
this county, and in 1864 moved onto the farm on which he now lives and
where he ever since has lived, for many years having been regarded as one
of the leading members of that community. His wife died on April 23,
1887. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are still liv-
ing, the subject of this .sketch have two sisters, Zoa, wife of B'red E. Sutton,
of Little Rock, Arkansas, and Maud, wife of Edwin Da\is. a well-known
resident of Clayton township, this county.

Bert F. Crapser was reared on the old Crapser homestead farm in Clay-
ton township, receiving his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood,
and from the days of his boyhood was a valuable assistant in the work of
developing and improving the same. After his marriage he continued to
make his home there and has continued there to this day, for years past liav-
ing relieved his father of the active management of the place. He is ver\'
successfully farming one hundred and twenty acres of excellent land, in addi-
tion to his general farming giving considerable attention to the raising of
high-grade live stock, and has done very well. Mr. Crapser has for years
given close attention to local political affairs, having served the public in
various local offices, and in 1912, as the nominee of the National Progressive
party, was elected representative from the first Genesee district to the lower
House of the Michigan General Assembly, by a vote of 1,513 to 1,451 for
Ransom L. Ford, 1,432 for Norman A. Morrish, 68 for Herbert F. Bodine
and I for E. T. Middleton, serving in the session of 1913. Dtu-ing his
service in the House Mr. Crapser was a member of a number of important
committees and was chairman of the committee on village corporations.

Mr. Crapser has been twice married. In February, 1908, he was united
in marriage to Rebie Luther, of Swartz Creek, and to that union two chil-
dren were born, daughters both, Mildred and Dorothy. On December 15.
1914, Mr. Crapser married Bernice Morrish, a member of Genesee county's
excellent corps of public school teachers, who was born on a farm in Clay-
ton township, this county, daughter of Hiram and Maria (Hurd) Morrish.



Online LibraryEdwin Orin WoodHistory of Genesee county Michigan; her people, industries and institutions, with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families → online text (page 38 of 89)