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Dhi DSi C



77



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



http://www.archive.org/details/phipsicli1977elon



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V



i Elon College

Elon College, N.C. 27244



a Dv our surrounaings. Ail oi tne msii

tions we come in contact with seem large and impersonal a
many people yearn for something small and down-to-earth. A smi
college is the answer for many.

Elon College falls into the small college category with twenty-t^
hundred students and a campus which covers three square blocks
Elon College, North Carolina. So why do people come here and wl
are they seeking?

Elon, like other small institutions of higher learning, posses|
the standard advantages and disadvantages. The students are t
absorbed into the system as in larger institutions where they becoi
mere statistics. Classes are small enough for students and professc
to become personally acquainted here. The tempo of life is slow aj
easy at Elon in comparison with larger schools. Almost everyq
knows everyone else or something about them. Students gather at i
standard locations, Varsity Grill, Union lobby, and Alamance, t
tween classes each day just to shoot the breeze. A personal tou
exists within the student body and between them and the facul'

Elon's small, rural location limits the entertainment faciliti
available to students. Therefore they revert back to the camp'^
which strengthens the closeknit student atmosphere. However many
students leave campus and go elsewhere seeking social activity. This
is a drawback to attending any Small college. Another disadvantage
to a small campus is the lack of privacy which each student is afford-
ed .. . there are no secrets at Elon.

Students here are often faced with rules and situations which i
blown out of proportion yet would not be given a second thought;
larger universities. Controls are much tighter at Elon due to its smj
size.

Elon has its pros and cons. But whatever the reason behind ea(
student's choice of attending Elon, the reason he or she stays is t|
people they've acquired as friends and have come to love. Tl
people are Elon.



1977 — Phi Psi Cli



CONTENTS



Spring. 1977, Volume 62
Cover design by Kevin Cea



3 Features



Snow, elections.

Carolina Dorm Fire, Winter Term



11 Organizations



Music, Majorettes,
Choir, Communications.
Honor Societies, Who's Who,
SUB,LAF,
SAM.BSCC,
Athletics, Civinettes.
Panhellenic, Greeks,
Student Government




64 Potpourri



Credits on page 190,



Founders Day. Greek Week,
Commencement, Homecoming,
Leaving, Social,
Overview, Fashion,
Spring Weekend



81 Sports



Baseball, Track,
Tennis, Golf.
Football, Soccer,
Cheerleading, Basketball,
Wrestling. Intramurals,
Volleyball







117 People



classes. Faculty.
Administration



Phi Psi Cli is published yearly by Delmar
Publishing Company, Charlotte, North
Carolina. Elon Phi Psi Cli office. Long
Student Center, Second Floor. Editor,
Kathy L. Bowman. Contrary lo popular
belief student SGA funds do not pay for
this yearbook.



® 1977 Phi Psi Cli, All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.







./"%.






Snow broughl out the

children in all of us —

childhood delights.

tranquil momenls.

beautiful landscapes!






A New Face in
The White House



When October of last year rolled around one could always
find some discussion about one of the major issues of the
day. The biggest issue on campus at this time was the up-
coming election. Everyone had an opinion though reasons
varied; some had no opinion and their reasons are always
the same.

For some strange reason a larger percentage of students
on campus were voting in this election than in past elec-
tions. All had their own reasons; some wanted to bring
about a change in the country, some to keep the country
on the same path, others just felt that it was time to change
the statistics of all the people who never voted.

Many people had firm reasons for voting for their par-
ticular candidate. All these would be shared at most any
time with anyone who cared to listen or could be cornered
into listening. Many voted for the man, many for his record,
and many because their parents were voting one way or the
other.
The intensity of the elections increased until the second
night of November when at 3:45 A.M. on the
morning of November 3rd it was projected by the
television announcers that Jimmy Carter had been
elected the thirty-ninth president of the United
States.



Below: Dean Rliodes exercises his basic right lo freedom — the

right lo vote.

Upper left; Some people didn't decide on whom to vote for until

they were in the booth.

Left: Self-explanatory!






Above: The polls were not always as slow
as is shown; heavy voter turnout was
reported.

Upper right; Peanutmania swept the
country!

Right; Many rooms had as many dif-
ferent opinions as there were occupants.



^



%



i





Who Got Burned?




Spring evenings at Elon are usually rather laid back and
quiet. Such was the case Thursday evening April 6, 1976 until
a fire broke out in a room on the third floor of Carolina
Dormitory. What started as a routine night ended up as one of
the most memorable on our campus.

Several students remained on the hall to help fight the fire
and make sure everyone exited safely. These were the only
students to suffer from smoke inhalation. One boy panicked
and jumped from a third floor window, breaking a leg.
However, many students left the third floor safely after the
student jumped. There was never any immediate danger to
the students' lives.

Several area volunteer fire departments responded to the
call and even those as far away as Burlington were on the
scene. There was some confusion in finding the dormitory but
the firefighters managed to contain the fire to one small
section of the hall. Many rumors have floated about
concerning the late arrival of the fire departments and their
performance. But the truth is they handled the situation very
well considering the state of confusion they faced.

After it was over all of the residents were asked to
assemble in Whitley Auditorium. Dr. Young took over and
conducted all of the proceedings of the evening. The original
plan was to provide accommodations for the students in local
motels. But upon hearing about the boys homelessness,
members of the community volunteered their homes for the
night. There was enough support from the neighbors of the
college to make the motel plans un necessary. Students who
slept in cars or on floors did so by choice.
The next day students went back into the dorm and col-
lected their undamaged belongings and arranged to move to new, crowded rooms for the
remainder of the year. There was much smoke and water damage on the third floor of the
dormitory. Therefore there was much repair work to be done. Some of the students requested
to be housed in a school-owned house which was scheduled to be a fraternity house in the
fall. This request was denied due to zoning negotiations which were being carried out between
the school and the Town Council.

The local media distorted some of the events surrounding the fire. It was reported that the
school reneged on its promise to provide motel accommodations for the students when in fact
the change in plans came about because of community people volunteering their homes to
house students for the night. There were also articles falsely maligning fire departments on the
scene and student behavior was unfairly criticized. It was due to these unresearched stories
which were printed that false rumors cropped up.

The fire was thought to have been set by overturned candles in a student's room, though the
exact cause has never been verified. We do know that since that time the school has taken
additional precautionary fire measures and implemented fire escape plans. Students and
school officials alike learned some valuable lessons from the incident. Many students joined
the local fire department and students and administrators alike realized the importance of
cooperation and organization.





Above: Maintenance men and fire marshals surveyed the damage after

the fire.

Below; The flames drew fire units from as far away as Altamahaw-

Ossippee as firemen attempted lo quench the blaze.

Below Right: Dejectedly, residents stood by as the fire was finally

extinguished.






Winter Term
Break Away





Right: Instructor helps a beginner get balanced on his skiis
after falling.

10




Winter term at Elon gives students a chance to get away
from the traditional subjects into a more specialized field of
interest. Two courses offered allowed students to study off
campus: Snow Skiing, and the Studies Abroad Program in
England. For the eighty-seven students and faculty who toured
England, the journey was a trip back into history. They ex-
perienced and visited such places and events as Westminister
Cathedral, the Crown jewels, Picadilly Circus, and the chang-
ing of the guard. Entertainment at night included plays,
concerts, traditional English pubs and nightclubs. Half of the
group went by train to Edinburgh, Scotland.

The snow skiing course was taught on Apinilachian Mountain
in Boone, N.C. The cold weather and plenty of snow made
conditions generally good for learning. The thirty-two students
participating spent the days on the slopes and relaxed during
the chilly evenings at parties given by the ski college. Coach
Don Kelly provided moral support to those who took some un-
expected downhill slides! The learning experience is well worth
the money for those prospective "snowbunnies."








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Emanons of Elon — 1977


Pro. Jack O.White


director and trumpet soloist


Dr. Dav


d Bragg


associate director


and lead alto sax


TimBuffington-


-stage manager


Sax Section


Trumpet Section


Mark Payne,


Mark Given,


David Christianson.


Chris Christopher,


Steve Morris,


David Hodge,


Jeff Holland.


Keith Griffin,




Tim Bartolomeo.


Trombone Section


Rhythm Section


Robbie Hunt,


Rick Murray,


Nancy Woodell,


Malvin Artley,


Sandy Griffin.


Rick Peery,


Rusty Miller,


Dennis Lanstedt,


Russ Barden.


Jerry Johnson.


Vocalist




April Wood


all


Mike Taylor |


Ronnie Farin


gton 1


Chuck Hutaff |








Above: Pregame show during Parent's
Weekend.

Left: Guest trumpet soloist performs
under the direction of Jack White.
Below: Jack White directs Emanons
for spectator's pleasure during pre-
game show.




12





Emanons Of Elon



The Emanons of Elon College per-
formed for the pleasure of many
across the eastern United States dur-
ing their 1976-77 season. They showed
their talents at the second annual Pops
Concert, an early seasonal success.
During January of 1977. the Emanons
were the guest band for the National
Brass Conference for Scholarships in
New York. During this performance,
four of the United States' top Jazz
artists performed with the Emanons
in a salute to the late Bobby Hackett.
The Emanons plan to compete in the
College Jazz Festival at Chapel Hill
in the spring.




Upper: Sandy Griffin solos during Parent's Weekend.

Lower: Vocalists with backup from the Emanons provide a good sound.



13




Most



No one could dis-
pute that the Elon
showband is the
most colorful, cre-
ative band in the Carolinas. Led by the
talented and innovative Jack White the band
never ceases to come up with a new, unique
show for every home game halftime show.
Lots of time, hard work, and dedication
goes into each band performance. In addi-
tion to the band's halftime shows it is also
one of the leading cheering sections at each
game. The band members present a formal
concert each year also.



The Elon band is renowned for its versatile and original performances. The reason
for their excellence lies in one and a half hour practices every Monday, Wednesday,
Friday which the band members attend. Band members are pushed to perfection by
Jack O.'s perseverance and temperance. Band musicians also become accustomed to
Saturday morning practices whenever a new halftime show is to be displayed. The
marching band leaves for home football games at 12:30, much earlier than most spec-
tators.

They march onto the field in very untraditional uniforms made up of checkered
pants, berets, and windbreakers. That is unless of course they decide to put on a
costume party for the fans which they did at the last regular season home game. On
that occasion the band entertained spectators by playing kazooes and having band
director White arrested for murder before everyone's eyes. The band succeeded in
gaining spectator attention and thoroughly entertaining the crowd that day.

But the band assumes a different air once a semester by having a concert. It is
during the concert that the band really shows its musical talent and ability. Mr.
White draws the professionalism from his band members on these occasions. The
band concerts are well received by the community and students.





1


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Band Members: jane Jeffress, Cattiy Rhodes. Meri Ford, Jill Bennett. Carol Chudina, Sally Peacti, Peggy Gray, Mike Reed, Terry Walton,
Mark Payne, Lvnn Weatheringlon. Susan Brown, David Haddad, Martha Clark. Betty Hilliard, Robert Nazlian, Cindy Phillips, lo Suter.
Jeffrey Hollancf, David Christianson, Steven Morris. |im Gray. Mark Given. David Hodge, Chris Christopher, Tom Smith, Keith Griffin. Karen
Baulding. Gary Brant, Brenda Brantley, Chris Bridgers. Bryan Dalton. Mike Gilliam. Gregory Glass, Pat McDowell. Paul Marshall, Tim
Bartholomeow, Edwina Haddad, Joseph May, Ann Gayle Hounshell. Robbie Hunt, Nancy Woodell. Sandy Griffin, Russ Harden, Danny
Buchanan, Matt Miller, Rusty Miller, Toney Brewer, Tim Buffington. Diane Costa, Perry Beale, Douglas Browne, Kevin Holland. Gary Gen-
try, Terry Morris, Giles Fowler, Jeffrey Golian, John Holloway. Donna Holmes, Elaine A'bles, Kathy Brown, Wilberl Farrish, Jennifer Hunter,
Kathleen Jacobs, Jerry Johnson. Sharon Kavanaugh, Rick Murray. Betsy Richards, Patrick Robertson, John Watts, Arleen Pate, Mary Wikle,
Kathy WoDus, April Woodall.



Colorful Band in the Carolinas



Upper left: Jack O. directs a reg-
ular afternoon practice.
Below: Band members performing
at their fall concert under the di-
rection of Mr. White.
Right: Band Members Jo Suter and
Sally Peach were decked out for
the costume halftime show given
at the last home game.




Above: Mr. White displays another of his
originals from his personal millinery while
directing at a football game.




Left: Sax players step in time
during a halftime performance.
Above: A band member's view
of the crowd while performing.
Right: Tensions of the band
prove a little too much for some
members.





High-Stepping



tiv:^



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iict^Tii^



Twirlers



K.I






1



The Elon College Majorettes enjoyed a vic-
torious football season, leading the Fighting
Christian Band and providing the spectators
with many excellent halftime shows. The
1976-77 Elon College Majorettes are Head
Majorette Hope Amick, Martha Beasley,
Sharon Clark. Trish Moorefield. and Neil
Teague. The Drum Major for this season,
directing the band on the field, was Ann
Gavle Hownshell.




Upper Left: Majorettes don't give just a twirling
routine anymore as demonstrated by Head Major-
ette Hope Amick.

Upper Right: The 1976-77 Majorettes.
Lower Left: Ann Gayle Hownshell, field director,
leads the band in games and during practice on hot
afternoons.

Lower Right: Martha Beasley doesn't quite make it
as a football player in the band's costume parly.




Choir
Performs
Traditional
yv Messiah




Choir Members: Barbara Abies, John Ale, [ane Andrew. Karen Baulding, Jeffery Bowling, Brenda Brantley, Deborah Brock, Betty Burton,
Donna Butts, Donna Causey, Rickey Edwards, Sherry Evans, Wayne Everhart. Lennel Fotta, Fredda Fuqua, Karen Genaway, Mike
Gilliam, Margaret Gray, David Haddad, Kevin Hamlett, Dana Hardy, Annette Hayden, Kimberiy Hicks, Donny Hinton, Donna Holmes.
John Hinkle. Terry Hutchens. jane jeffress, Jerry Johnson, Randy Johnson, Sharon Kavanaugh, Linda Kent, Evelynn Kuykendall, Pat
Lanning, Pat McDowell, Marilee McPherson, Arthur Manchester. Joseph Martin, Freida Matkins, Tina Morgenson, Steven Morris,
Lu Ann Morris, Ron Nixon, Gary Parrish, Arleene Pate, Martha Ramseur, Tommy Smith. Jo Stanley, Mike Taylor, Pat Temple, Anita Thiel.
Paul Thompson, Maryjane Walker, Mary Wikle, April Woodall, Kyle Younger, Donna Lee Peters.



17



Who Cares?




Phi Psi Cli



The Phi Psi Cli. as you

know by now, is your year-
book. The people you see pic-
tured here are the ones who
worked diligently to bring you
this sixty-second edition.
These people have sjjent
sleepless nights working on
this book, cut classes, run er-
rands, and racked their brains
in order to assemble this work
of art.

We have a little corner of-
fice off the lounge in the
Student Union, which by the
way has the best view of any
office on campus. It was in
that office with a television
set, a stereo, a large box of
albums, a hot pot, a radio, a
pillow, a quilt, an alarm clock,
four artificial plants, and the
tools necessary to write a book
that we worked, struggled, and
often times went insane. But,
here it is, and yes we did care!



Above: Kathy L. Bowman — Editor-in-Chief
Right: Anne Coble — Staff Assistant




Lillie Tobash & Mary Ann Florance



18



We Did . . .*




Above; Robert House — Photographer & Staff Assistant
Right: Tim Moore — Assistant Editor, Sports Editor
Below: Linda Bartlett — Assistant Editor
Lower right: Caryn Van Pelt — Assistant



■^*"%-




Sim ... but we don't anymore!



colonnades



literary



odyssey through the wastelands
the entrance of forgotten works:
be careful! you may get lost.



the microcosm of words, pictures —
worth one-thousand mute expressions,
ice-cream melting charmers,
omniscient routes to salvation,
black humour and epic fairy tales —
"tombstone blues."



magazme



editor marybeth glynn. assistant
editor rick spicer. prose
david macmillan, chris j arret,
faculty advisor mr. michael gaspeny.
gazing through a glass darkly . . .




The Colonnades is the college
literary magazine. It is published
by students interested in creative
expression. Any student can submit
his works in prose or verse for
possible publication. The magazine
comes out annually each spring.




The Pendulum



The Pendulum is Elon's student news-
paper. It is published every two weeks,
interested in the functions of the college
community, and always willing and want-
ing suggestions and articles for publishing
from the entire community.
Co-editors — Doug Durante & Kay Raskin
Asst. Editor & Sports Editor — Gary Spitler
Advisor — Dr. M.E. Priestly
Reporter — Kemp Liles



c^







Upper Left: Co-edilor Kay Raskin types up another article for the next

addition of the Pendulum.

Middle Left: Faculty advisor Mary Ellen Priestly looks over an issue

of the newspaper.

Middle right: Doug Durante rushes to meet a deadline.

Lower left: Sports Editor Gary Spitler gets information from "Red"

Wilson.

Lower right: Pendulum staff gets together for their regular Monday

night meetings.



21




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T-^ia




22



iiffliiiinii|iiiiiiiii«n]iiiif|i|iii|iii] iii(lHiiiiii ^BiSsaEaBiKgsrg



MW?;51^5ga5f;^^'^s?;55^3KW^P;




Russell Airington. Chris Angel. Rhonda Apple. Mona Bareford, Paul Boyles, Krnie byricler. 1 erry uharlton,
Anne Coble, Andrew Conover. Sleven Dunn, Edward Guerrin, Andy Hall. Wade Harris, William Holdren,
George House, Caroline Hunlcr. Robin Huntley. David joyner, Carl Lykes. Roderic McCaskill, Keith Mason.
Tim Moore. Caswell Mullins, William Odom, David Payne, Kirk Puckett — Station Manager, Dale
Sherrill. Judy Simpson, William Spigle, P.|. Siratos, Wally Vinson, Bill Zint, Dennis Lavvson, Bob Walker,
Ansis Armalis, Doug Bradburn, Mike Brown, Coy Kirby, Jim Lail, Chris Jernigan. Sleven Sonbert, Eric Wood,
[ohn White, Charles Levin, [ennifer Hunter, Barry Staton, [im Lail, Lynn Walker, Wendy Walker. Marjorie
Long — Program Advisor, Barry Simmons — Technical Advisor.

In 1923, the first and most power-
ful radio station in North Carolina
was owned and operated by Elon
College. Now, fifty-four years later,
and four years of frustration and


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