Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Foster.

History of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions online

. (page 103 of 104)
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in his boyhood. \\'hen seventeen years of age he came to the United States,



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 102/

arriving- at the port of New York on May 28, 1852, and for two years
thereafter worked in the city of Schnectady, New York, going thence to
Milwankee, Wisconsin, where he began working at the carpenter trade and
which city he presently left, going to St. Louis, seeking work as a journey-
man carpenter. Later he went to Kansas City, where he was offered work
on condition that he accept city lots in part payment of his service. Kansas
City lots at that time did not seem as valuable as they now are and he
declined that offer, going thence to St. Joseph, where he worked a short
time and then came over into Kansas and began working at his trade in
Doniphan county, where he remained three years, at the end of which time
he went to Andrew county, Missouri, where he began working as a car-
penter and where, in i860, he was married. Mr. Bottger was living in
iMissouri when the Civil War broke out and in the spring of 1861 upon
the President's call for volunteers, he enrolled his name for the Missouri
state Lnion ser\-ice. In the fall of 1864 he enlisted as a member of Com-
pany E. Eighteenth Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Lifantry, and served
with that command until he was honorably discharged in Mt. Pleasant hos-
pital at Washington, D. C, in June, 1865. on a physician's certificate of
physical disability. During his military service Mr. Bottger was attached
to the Se\enteenth Army Corps and was in numerous important battles, the
last one of which was the battle of Bentonville. in North Carolina. Shortly
after that engagement he was taken seriously ill and was transferred to the
hospital at Washington, where he presently received his discharge, as noted
above.

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Bottger returned to
St. Joseph, where he rejoined his wife and baby, and presently went back
up into Andrew county, north of there, where he again engaged in con-
struction work and was thus engaged until 1882, when he came over into
Kansas and bought a farm of one hundred and forty-two acres, northwest
of Vliets, ii"! this county. Mr. Bottger improved that farm and lived on
the same until 1894, v.hen he moved to Vliets, later selling his farm, and
in the ^'illage again resumed his old vocation of carpenter and builder, em-
ploying cjuite a force of men and building many of the buildings in that vil-
lage, including the school house and the elevators, as well as a row of houses
which he owns, and has done very well in his operations. Mr. Bottger is a
Republican and for some time after moving to Vliets served as postmaster
of that village. He also has served as justice of the peace.

Henry Bottger has been twice married. It was on December 31, i860,
that he was united in marriage to Alcelia Jane McLaughlin, who died on



I028 MARS?IALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

December 13, 1873, leaving four children, John and George, who are now
lixing in Oklahoma; h'red, who is at home with his father, and Mrs. Mary
St. John, who is living on a farm in Rock township, five miles northwest
of X'liets. On August 24, 1881, Mr. Bottger married Mary Jane Ballard,
who died on November 26, 191 3, without issue. Mr. Bottger is a member
of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Vliets and of the
local lodge of the Free Masons, in the affairs of both of which organiza-
tions he takes a warm interest. He is now the oldest inhabitant of Vliets
and is held in high esteem there and throughout the county generally.



CHARLES H. TARVIN.



Charles H. Tarvin, one of the well-known and successful men of ]\Iarys-
ville township, Alarshall county, was born in Kentucky on November 9, 1863,
being the son of G. W. and .Vnna S. (Hicks) Tarvin.

G. \V. and Anna S. Tarvin were born in Kentucky, he on September
14, 1824, and she on Julv 25, 1828. They received their education in the
common schools of that state and were reared on the farm. After their mar-
riage they established their home on a farm, and there Mr. Tarvin engaged
in agricultural work until A])ril. 1865. when the family immigrated to Kan-
sas. Here he bought one h.undred and sixty acres of land in Marysville
township, Marshall comity, and engaged in general farming and stock rais-
ing until the time of his death on December 11, 1905, his wife survived him
until April 15, 191 5. They were good Christian people and were devout
members of the United Brethren church, of which Mr. Tarvin was a minister
for over fifteen years. He always took much interest in local affairs and
lived a progressive life. He was identified with the Republican party and
served his township for a number of years as a justice of the peace.

G. W. and Anna S. Tarvin were married in their Kentucky home on
October 14. 1850, and there they lived for fifteen years, when they and their
family came to Kansas. They were the parents of seven children as follow :
L. S., who is a minister at Mankato, Kansas; Mattie H. Randolph resides at
Marysville, Kansas, where her husband is city clerk; Willie G. died at the
age of two years; John M. resides at Blue Rapids, Kansas, where he is a
well-known and successful stockman; Charles H., the subject of this sketch;
Sallie H. and George W., now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Tarvin had much
to do with the moral and social development of the communities in which



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. IO29

they lived and \vere held in the highest regard and esteem. Their lives were
devoted to their family and the good that they might do among the people
of their home district. They were strong advocates of the best schools and
the moral training of the young, and their influence had much to do with the
high standard of living in the township.

Charles H. Tar\in was but two years of age, when his parents left
their home in Kentucky and came to Kansas, and located in Marysville town-
ship, where he grew to manhood on the home farm, and received his educa-
tion in the local scliools. At the age of sixteen years, he started out for
himself, and for five years he worked as a farm hand in the states of Wash-
ington, Oregon and Idaho. He then returned to Marshall county and rented
.the farm of his father for two years. He then purchased forty acres of the
place, on which he lived for twenty years. At that time his father died and
Mr. Tarvin came into control of the home place, where he has since lived.
He now owns three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land, which is
well improved. He does little of the active work on the farm, but rents the
place to his son, and devotes his time to his extensive interests in the buying
and the selling of stock.

In 1889 Charles H. Tarvin was united in marriage to Cora C. Tays,
the daughter of Dr. R. L. and Laura (Barnes) Tays. Doctor Tays was
born in North Carolina on October 25, 1850, and was reared on a farm
in that state and received his elementary education in the local schools. He
later studied medicine and was engaged in the practice from the time he was
twenty-one years of age vmtil the time of his death on April 30, 1916. He
practiced for some years in the state of Missouri and in 1883 came to Kansas,
locating in Herkimer, where he died. He was a man of pleasing qualities
and made many friends. He was a member of the Masonic order and became
a past master. Politically, he was identified with the Republican party and
served his county as coroner for some years. Mrs. Tays was a native of
Missouri and grew^ to womanhood on the home farm and received her educa-
tion in the local schools. She was an active member of the Methodist Epis-
copal church and took much interest in all church work, and she and Doctor
Tays were prominent in the social life of the community for many years.
Her death occurred in 1878, where the family w^as living at the time. They
were the parents of three children as follow : Cora, the wife of Charles H.
Tarvin ; William Lee, in the United States army and one that died in infancy.

Cora (Tays) Tarvin was born in the state of Missouri on December 18,
'1872, and received her education in the common schools. Mr. and Mrs.
Tarvin are the parents of six children as follow: Earl D., born on Novem-

• (66)



1030 MARSHALL COUXTY, KAXSAS.

ber 17, 18S9, and is now an electrician at Marysville ; Tays R., January 15,
1891 : Monarie. February 13, 1892; Merle G., April 12, 1896; one that died
in infancy and Teddie McKinley, January 25, 1900. The children are all
at home with the exception of the first named.

Mr. and Mrs. Tarvin are prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal
church, of which they have long been members. They take much interest in
moral and social development of their community and are held in the highest
regard and esteem by all who know them.

Politically, Charles H. Tarvin is identified with the Republican party
and is one of the progressive and prominent men of that organization in Mar-
shall countv. He served for eight years as township trustee of Marysville ■
township, and his official life was one of honor and respect. He is a man
of much ability and the affairs of the township were conducted in a most
business-like and practical manner.



FRANK LARKIN.



Frank Larkin, one of the well-known and successful farmers and stock-
men of Richland township, Marshall county, was born in Will county, Illi-
nois, on August 2, i860, and was the son of Charles and Mary (Austin)
Larkin.

Charles and Mary (Austin) Larkin were born near Kent, England, and
there received their education in the public schools and there grew to maturity.
They later came to America and located in Illinois, where they resided for
many years. Their birthplace was at Kent, the father having been born in
1832 and the mother on April 2, 1830. Charles Larkin was reared on a
farm and engaged as a farmer in his native country until 1850, when he
decided to come to America. After a residence of some years in Illinois, he
came to Kansas in 1868, and here he remained for twelve years and was
engaged in general farming. He later located in Nebraska, where he con-
tinued his work as an agriculturist. In 1880 he came to Richland town-
ship, Marshall county, and established his home on the farm that the son,
Frank, now owns. It was here that he engaged in general farming for some
years before his death. His wife died on January 10, 1898. When Charles
and Mary Larkin first came to Kansas they located in Greenwood county,
where they experienced many of the hardships of the early pioneer. There
were no bridges over the streams, and during high water, when they could



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. IO3I

not get to the mill, it was necessary for them to grind their corn in the coffee-
mill. This was but an illustration of the many devices that they had to use
in order to live in the new country in that early day. They secured five hun-
dred acres of good land. They later sold one hundred and sixty acres of
the land for two hundred dollars and traded a Canadian horse for one hun-
dred and sixty acres. They then located in Nebraska, where they home-
steaded land and remained for some time. After coming to Marshall county,
they purchased land in Richland township for five and eleven dollars per
acre.

Charles and Alary Larkin were the parents of the following children :
Mary, William, Charles (i), Alvin, Frank, Louise, Emma, Charles (2),
Albert and Edward. Mary, now deceased, was the wife of Ed. Goodsale, a
successful farmer, and ihey were tlie parents of ten children, all of whom'
are now living ; William H. is a resident of Seattle, Washington, and is
married and he and his wife are the parents of seven children ; the first-born
Charles died in infancy ; Alvin is a resident of Dickerson county, Kansas, and
is a laborer; Louise, now deceased, was the wife of J. Voile and was the
mother of two boys; Emma is deceased; Charles (2) is married and lives at
Beattie and is the father of four children, three of whom are living; Albert
and Edward are deceased.

Frank Larkin was but eight years of age when his people located in
Nebraska and there he attended district school and grew to manhood. At
the age of seventeen years he began freighting between Table Rock and
Pawnee City, Nebraska, and engaged in this work for two years when
engaged in the dray business and transfer at Pawnee City, where he remained
until 1884. He then came to Marshall county, and established his home on
the old home farm of his father, which he purchased, and is now the owner
of two hundred and forty acres of splendid land, all of which is nicely
improved. Here he has done much in the way of general improvement; the
house has been rebuilt and other substantial improvements have been made.
Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, and has a fine bunch
of Shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs and Percheron horses, all of which
are graded stock. As a farmer and stockman he is recognized as one of the
successful and progressive ones of the township.

On November 3, 1883, Frank Larkin was united in marriage to Lizzie
B. Goodridge, who was born in Pawnee City, Nebraska, on July 9, 1866,
being the daughter of Frank J. and Estelle (Carey) Goodridge, who were
natives of Maine and the state of New York, respectively. Frank J. Good-



1032 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

ridge came to Nebraska when he was but sixteen years of age and later
engaged in freighting from Denver to St. Joe, Missouri, making the trip
tlirough the old trail that passed through the farm now owned by Frank
Larkin. These trips were made with oxen, and many hardships were
encountered in the long and slow journey. Mr. Goodridge died in 191 1 at
the age of sixtv-six years ; his widow is now living at Pawnee City at the
age of seventy-t^vo years. They were the parents of ten children, two sons
and three daughters now living.

To Frank and Lizzie B. Larkin have been born the following children:
Walter, Roy E., Stella, Murray, and twin girls that died in infancy. Walter
is now deceased ; Roy E. is engaged in general farming near Mina, Marshall
county ; Stella is the wife of H. Sturrat, and they live near Mina and are the
parents of three children, and Murray is at home. Mr. and Mrs. Larkin are
members of the Christian church and are prominent in the social and the
religious life of the community.

Politicallv. Mr. Larkin is identified with the Democratic party and has
always taken much interest in local affairs and has served as a member of
the school board and as road boss of his township. He is a member of the
Modern Woodmen of America and Mrs. Larkin is a member of the Knights
and Ladies of Security and the Eastern Star. They have a beautiful home
and are devoted to their family and are interested in all that tends to the bet-
terment of their home community.



LOUIS [. WAGNER.



Louis T- Wagner, a well-known and successful farmer and stockman of
Summerfield, Marshall county, was born in Franklin county, Lidiana, on
February 8, 1871. being the son of Jacob and EHza (Crusa) Wagner.

Jacob Wagner was born in Germany in 1840 and there received his edu-
cation in the public schools and grew to manhood. As a young man he came
to the United States and located in Indiana, where he was married. He and
his wife established their home in Franklin county, Indiana, where they con-
tinued to reside until 1880, when they came to Kansas. Here Mr. Wagner
purchased two hundred and forty acres of land, which is now owned by the
son, Louis J. The tract at that time was wild prairie and unimproved. A
.frame house was built and the task of development was at once begun. After
four years of active life on his new farm, Mr. Wagner died in- 1884. Eliza



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. IO33

\\'agner, who was bom in Indiana in 1840, is now living a retired life in
Sumnierfield. Kansas. She and Mr. Wagner were the parents of the fol-
lowing children: Harry, Louis J., Charles P., John, William and Edw^ard.
Harry is now deceased ; Charles P. is engaged in general farming and stock
raising on his excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Richland
township ; John also owns a farm in Richland township, of one hundred and
sixty acres and is a well-known farmer and stockman ; William is engaged
in the jewelery business at Sapulpa. Oklahoma, and Edw^ard .lives at Sum-
merfield.

Jacob Wagner was twice married, and to his union before he married
Eliza Crusa, were born three children as follow^: Todd, Katherine and
Addie. Todd resides in Des Aloines, Iowa ; Katherine Mertes. resides in
California and Addie Poffenberger lives near Fairbury, Nebraska.

Louis J. Wagner was five years of age when his parents left their home
in Iridiana and came to Kansas. Here he received his education in the dis-
trict school and grew to manhood on the home farm, where he remained until
19 10. He then moved to Summerfield, Kansas, where he engaged in the
buying and selling of stock, and is now one of the largest buyers and sellers
of stock in the county. Some years ago he purchased the old home farm of
two hundred and forty acres which he now owns, and w-here he has made
manv substantial improvements. He now has his farm rented and devotes
his attention to the buying of stock. He is also the owner of a one-half
interest in the pool hall at Summerfield, as well as other property of value.

On September 20, 1898, Louis J. Wagner was united in marriage to
Dora Hungate, the daughter of Dallas and Hattie (Nance) Hungate. Mr.
and Mrs. Hungate were born in Illinois, w^here they received their education,
grew to maturity and were married. They then left their home in that state
and located in Missouri, and later took up their residence in Nebraska, where
they lived for a time before coming to Marshall county. Here they estab-
lished their home in Summerfield in 1909, and are still residents of that place.

Louis J. and Dora Wagner are the parents of tw^o children. Famie, born
on Februarv 8. 1901, and Cecil, born on June 8, 1904. Mr. and Mrs. Wag-
ner are active members of the L'nited Presbyterian church and have long been
prominent in the social life of the community, where they are held in the
highest regard and esteem by all who know them. Mr. Wagner is a member
of the Modern ^^■oodmen of America, and has ever taken an active interest
in the civic life of the township and city. He is identified with the Repub-
lican party and is now representing his ward in the city council. Few men



1034 MARSHALL COUNTY^ KANSAS.

are better known throughout the county than Mr. Wagner. His business
of buying stock takes him to all parts of this section, and by his business-
like methods he has won the confidence and respect of the business men and
farmers of the district. His life has been an active one and he has accom-
plished much that is wortliy of notice. By hard work and hustling qualities
he has risen to a position which places him as one of the substantial and suc-
cessful men of the countv.



CHARLES A. SPRATT.



Among the busy men and successful residents of Blue Rapids township,
Marshall county, is Charles A. Spratt, the owner of one hundred and sixty
acres of land, and one of the finest gravel pits in the state of Kansas. He
was born in Buchanan county, Iowa, on December 7, 1865, and is the son of
Otis and Esther (Hardick) Spratt.

Otis and Esther Spratt were born in England, and there they received
their education in the public schools, grew to maturity and were married.
They continued to reside in the land of their nativity until 1855, when they
decided to come to America. After their arrival in the United States they
at once proceeded to the state of Iowa, where they established themselves on
a farm and there they continued to live until 1879, when they came to Mar-
shall county, Kansas. They settled on a farm five miles w^est of Oketo, on
the old Indian Reservation, which they developed and improved, and where
they lived for many years. They were a most estimable people and were
held in the highest regard by all wdio knew them.

Charles A. Spratt received his education in the schools of Iowa and in
Oketo towaiship, and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he
assisted his father with the farm work. He remained at home until 1890,
when he came to Blue Rapids township, w^here he purchased his present farm,
which he has developed and improved and where he is engaged in general
farming and stock raising with much success. He is a great fancier of fine
horses, high-grade Jersey cattle and good hogs, and his place is at all times
well stocked with these animals. He has among the animals on the farm
some of the finest in the county, and is recognized as one of the best stockmen
of the district.

In 1886 Charles A. Spratt was united in marriage to Ida Bickell, daugh-
ter of John Bickell and wife, prominent residents of the county. To this



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. IO35

union three children were born : Mrs. John March, Ralph and Benjamin.
The two former are residents of Blue Rapids township and the latter is living
in Idaho. Ida Bickell, who was a woman of unusual attainments and greatly
admired by all, died in 1893. On November i, 1900, Mr. Spratt was united
in marriage to Roseman Summers, and to this union two children have been
born, Cecile, who was born on April 22, 1904, and Iris, whose birth occurred
on July 4, 1905. Mrs. Spratt was born at Chanute, Kansas, on April i,
1 88 1. She was left an orphan at a young age, and was reared by Mr. and
Airs. J. W. Roush, of Chanute, who came to Blue Rapids township in 1897.
She received her education in the schools of Chanute and at Blue Rapids, and
has spent her mature life in the community where she now resides and where
she and her husband are among the worthy and prominent people. They are
active in the social life of their home district and are earnest members of
llie United Brethren church, to which they are liberal supporters and in which
they are acti\e workers. Few people of the township take greater interest
in the educational and moral development of the district.

Politically, Mr. Spratt is a member of the Republican party, and while
he has never aspired to office, he has always taken the greatest interest in
the civic life of his home township and county. He is most progressive and
is an advocate of substantial public improvements and is a supporter of the
best schools. He has long been a member of the Marshall County Fair Asso-
ciation, and has given his best efforts to its success.

On his farm Mr. Spratt has a splendid gravel pit of some forty acres
in extent. The pit is one of the most valuable deposits of clean, pure gravel
in the state. He ships to all parts of the state in carload lots, and employs
a number of men in the pit at all times. The product is most valuable for
concrete work, building material and high-grade road work.



TAMES E. KEEFOVER.



Among the well-known and successful farmers of Walnut township,
Marshall county, who have met with much success in his chosen profession
is James E. Keefover, who was born in Monongalia county, West Virginia,
on May 30, i86g, and is the son of George and Ann (Freeland) Keefover.

George Keefover was born on March 27, 1820, and was a native of the
state of Pennsylvania, where he received much of his education in the public
schools. He later attended school in Alorgantown, Virginia, and taught



1036 ilARSriALL COtJNTY; KANSAS.

school in that state, and was there married. Mrs. Keefover was born in
Virginia in 1S46 and died in 1890. In 1869, Mr. and Mrs. Keefover left
their home in Virginia and came to Kansas and here with their five children,
they established their home in Brown county. They remained in their new
home but a short time when they came to Marshall county, and homesteaded
one hundred and sixty acres in section 31, \\^alnut township. A slab house
was built and in this the family lived for a time. The first winter was a
hard one and the little family suffered many hardships and privations. The
winter was a hard one and the house was but rudely constructed and was a
poor shelter from the strong winds that blew across the wild waste of prairie.
Such a life demanded the determination of the strongest men and women,
and Mr. and Mrs. Keefover had come to Kansas in order to obtain for them-
selves a home, and they exerted every effort to that end. In the spring of
1870 Mr. Keefover engaged in the breaking of his land preparatory to the
planting of his crops. He had no horses and oxen were used to do his work
and for ten years he used' these animals. He later traded a part of his oxen
and seventy dollars in money for the one hundred and sixty acres of land



Online LibraryEmma Elizabeth Calderhead FosterHistory of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions → online text (page 103 of 104)