Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Foster.

History of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions online

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his widow, who was born in 1857, is still living, making her home at
Atchison, where she has lived since her early childhood. She was born,
Anna Ostertag, in Buffalo, New York, and was little more than an infant
when her parents came West and located at Atchison. Grandfather Oster-
tag was a smith and wheelwright and early drove a thriving business in
fitting wheels to the heavy wagons of the freighters on the plains, Atchison
being one of the busiest points of departure for these great wagon trains in
an early day. He helped to lay the rails over the ice in the Missouri river,
for the transportation of the first locomotive engine taken into Atchison,
and was one of the active factors in the upbuilding of that town in pioneer
days. To Charles E. Bradley and wife three children were born, Father
Bradley having two brothers, Harold, who is operating the shoe store his
father established in Atchison in i88t. and Aloysius, who is a clerk in the
First National Bank of Atchison.

Father Bradley received excellent scholastic training for his holy office.
Upon completing the course in the local schools he entered St. Benedict's
College, at Atchison, and upon completing the course there entered Kenrick
Seminary, St. Louis, where for five years he was grounded in philosophy and
theology, completing his studies in 1906. On April 17 of that same year, at
Kansas City, he was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Lillis and was
appointed assistant to the pastor of St. Mary's parish, in that city, serving in



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 485

that capacity for one year, at the end of which time he was sent to Paola,
this state, where for five months he substituted for the pastor of that parish.
He then, on August 23, 1907, was appointed pastor of the church of the Holy
Family at Summerfield. this county, the first resident pastor of that parish.
During his pastorate of nearly two years at Summei^field, Father Bradley
erected the parish house there and in many other ways strengthened the
parish, remaining there until June 27, 1909, when he was transferred to the
parish at Emmett, where lie remained for two years, or until his transfer
to the parish of the Annunciation at Frankfort. June 27, 191 1, a charge
which he still holds and in which he is doing much to advance the cause of
the parish, both in a spiritual and a material way, excellent progress having
been reported in all departments of the work of the church during his pastorate.
Father Bradley is well read and widely informed, not only on matters per-
taining to his holy calling, but on the current topics of the day, and has been
an influence for much good since taking up his work in Frankfort. His
popularity in the city and surrounding country is not confined to the members
of his parish and he is held in the very highest esteem by all, regardless of
religious faith or affiliation.



MRS. MELISSA HASLETT.

Mrs. Melissa Haslett is one of the real pioneers of Marshall county and
there are few who have more vivid or distinct recollections of the days of
the unbroken prairie and of the open range, of the days before the railroad
had penetrated into this part of Kansas and when the lumbering ox carts
or the mule trains over the old Overland trail afforded the onlv means of
transportation. She came into Kansas when a young woman with her parents
in territorial days, the family settling on a pioneer farm four miles northeast
of where h^rankfort later sprang up. and she ever since has been a resident of
this county ; therefore thoroughly familiar with the history of the same from
the days of the very beginning of a social order hereabout and has ever done
well her part in the development of the social and cultural life of the com-
munity of which she has been a member since the days of her girlhood, even
before Kansas had taken her place in the proud sisterhood of states.

Melissa Mitchell w^as born in Calhoun county, Michigan, August 3,
1838, a daughter of George and Maria (Brainard) Mitchell, natives of the
state of New York and pioneers of Michigan, who were the parents of six
children, three of whom grew to maturity, Mrs. Haslett having a brother,



486 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

Edwin Mitchell, and a sister, Mrs. Myla Herrick, both of Clay Center, this
state. George Mitclicll died in r^Iichigan in 1H47 and in T(S5<S his widow
and her children came to Kansas, settling four miles northeast of the present
city of Frankfort, wlierc tliey established their home, thus having been among
the very earliest settlers in this part of Kansas. Mrs. Mitchell was married
four times. She had five children l)y her first husband. He died in Mich-
igan ; then she married a ATr. Caldwell, by whom she liad one child. He also
died in Michigan. Then she married George Marshall, with whom she
came to Kansas; no children were br)rn. He died and was buried in Kan-
sas. Her last husband was a Mr. Striker; there were no children. Years
later Mrs. Striker moved to Clay Center, where she spent her last days, her
death occurring in 1908. She was born in 1818 and had thus reached the
great age of ninety years at the time of her death.

On July 3, 1858, the year in which she came to Kansas, Melissa Mitchell
was united in marriage to HarAcy Randall, a cabinet-maker who had come
out here to try his fortunes on the plains ; both came together ; they were mar-
ried in Michigan. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Randall pre-empted
a tract of one hundred and twenty acres of land four and one-half miles
northeast of where Frankfort later sprang up and there built a log house
which cost them six dollars. This house had neither windows nor a floor
and had but a "shake" roof, about as humble a dwelling as any young couple
ever started housekeeping in, but their hearts were strong and their hands
willing and they started in to develop a real home there on the wind-swept
plain and were doing very well when the Civil War broke out. Mr. Randall
at on(;*e enlisted his services in defense of the Union and in 1861 went to the
front as a member of Company D, Eighth Regiment, Kansas Volunteer
Infantry, with which command he served until his death in 1862, dying in
the service of his country. When her husband went to \var Mrs. Randall
left her humljle farm home and with lier two children rejoined her mother
in the latter's home farther to the south, where she made her home until
her marriage in 1865 to Charles Haslett. a native of Vermont, who had come
to Kansas in i860 and was a veteran of the Ci\'il War, he also having gone
to the front with the Eighth Kansas, with which command he served until
his honorable discharge on account of disabilities incurred in Andersonville
prison. ]Mr. Haslett served for fifteen months in Rebel prisons, having been
moved from one to another until finally, the fourth move, he found himself
in dreaded Andersonville. Upon his final exchange and removal from that
horrid prison pen, he was in such a reduced physical condition that he was
honorablv discharged from service and returned to his home in Kansas.



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 487

After her second marriage, Mrs. Haslett returned to her farm northeast
of Frankfort and found that (hiring her absence the log house which she had
left there had been torn down and carried away by some unscrupulous but
enterprising settler who no doul:>t wanted the logs for use on his own claim,
and it became necessary for her and >.Ir. Haslett at once to erect a new house.
Thev built a neat frame house, thirty-four by fourteen feet, and there, for
a second time, this pioneer woman started in housekeeping. Their affairs
prospered and though they suft'ered, in common with all the early settlers
of this county, during the days of the grasshoppers and the scourging hot
winds, they gradually built up a good piece of property, adding to their
holdings until they became the owners of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty
acres. There they made their home until 1895, when they left the farm and
moved to Frankfort, where Air. Haslett died in 1902, he then being seventy
years of age, and where Mrs. Haslett is still living, one of the honored pio-
neer residents of Marshall county. Mrs. Haslett still owns her farm, deriv-
ing a comfortable income from its rental.

By her first marriage Mrs. Haslett had two children, Clara, who died in
1863, and Harvey Randall, who is now engaged in the loan business at Okla-
homa City. To her second union four children were born, namely : Myla
Mayme, who married Z. M. Robison and died in 191 1, leaving seven chil-
dren, Elmer, Ollie. Melissa, Charles, Gertrude, Iva and Guy; Edwin Elliot,
who died in youth ; Ira, who also died in youth, and Henry, of Morris county,
this state, who has been twice married and is now a widower with one child,
a son, Walter. Mrs. Haslett has ten great-grandchildren, Elmer Robison,
who lives in North Dakota, having two children: Mrs. Ollie (Robison)
Pendleton, of Oklahoma, having two children; Mrs. Melissa (Robison)
Line, of Illinois, having four children, and Mrs. Gertrude (Robison) Peter-
son, of Texas, having two children. Charles Robison lives in Salt Lake
City and Iva and Guy Robison are living in New York with their father.

Mr. Haslett was an active member of the local post of the Grand Army
of the Republic and Mrs. Haslett has been a member of the Woman's Relief
Corps since the organization of the same at Frankfort, ever taking a warm
interest in the beneficent objects of that patriotic body. Mrs. Haslett retains
very vivid recollections of pioneer days here on the plains and is a veritable
mine of information concerning matters relating to pioneer days. She recalls
that the first year she and Mr. Randall occupied their pre-emption claim their
taxes amounted to two dollars and fifty cents. On the nights preceding
January i, 1861, they attended a "watch meeting" at the home of a neighbor,
two miles distant, driving across the prairie with their ox-teams through snow



_j.88 • MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

four feet deep. Mrs. Haslett said tlu- fnnny diing about this was, there was
ueither a watch nor a clock in the house. They only had an ahnanac and
watched 1)v tliat, knowing- that the moon would rise by i i P. M.
On Julv 4 of that same year they attended a ])icnic at the Barrett
settlement, to which all the settlers for miles about drove in, there
being about sixty persons present thus to celebrate the national holiday out
here on the plains. When Mrs. Haslett came to Kansas the nearest market
was at Atchison and they drove over each fall, "if they had the money";
otherwise they did without and got along as well as they could with the pro-
ducts of their own hands. That, of course, was before the days of the rail-
roads or of established highways and the settlers drove their ox-teams by the
shortest route, right out over the open range, definite trails thus gradually
becoming established, the same serving as highways until a proper system
of roads gradually was evolved as the country became settled and the range
became fenced.



ANDREW J. TRAVELUTE.

Andrew J. Travelute, one of the early settlers of Marshall county, W'ho
became prominent in the agricultural development of the section, and now
living a retired life, was born on June 30, 1841, in the state of Pennsylvania,
being the son of Charles H. and Margurete (Spealmann) Travelute.

Charles H. Travelute was the son of Andrew and Christena Travelute
and was born in France in 1818, where he spent seven years of his life on
the farm. In 1825 his parents came to the United States and located in
Pennsylvania, where they engaged in general farming, and where they lived
and died. Charles H. Travelute received his education in the common
schools of Pennsylvania and there grew to manhood. He later located in
Marysville towmship, Marshall county. The trip to Kansas from the home
in Illinois was made in a covered wagon, which was used the first summer
as a residence. On his arrival in Marshall county, Mr. Travelute home-
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land on which he built a frame house
and was soon actively engaged in the development and improvement of his
farm. In time he became the owner of three excellent farms, in addition to
ether valuable property. He was a man who took interest in local affairs and
served his county as assessor and as commissioner. After reaching an advanced
age he sold his farms and lived a retired life at Marysville, where he died in
1900.




MR. AND MRS. ANDREW J. TRAVELUTE.



THE P?KW Y- ■



'X



L



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 489

Alargurete (Spealmann) Travelute was born in Wiirtemburg, Germany,
on November 6, 1818, and was tbe daughter of John and Mary Speahnann.
The parents came to Pennsylvania when the daughter, Margurete, was
but a child, and later went to Illinois, where they died. Margurete Spealmann
grew to womanhood in Pennsylvania and there completed her education in
the common schools and was later married to Charles H. Travelute. Some
years later she and her hu.sband located in Illinois and then in Marshall
county, Kansas, where she died on May 20, 1902.

Andrew J. Travelute received his education in the public schools of
Ogle county, Illinois, and there grew to manhood on the home farm. His
ochool days were not spent in well-equipped buildings as those of today, but
in the log cabin with a slab for a seat. On completing his education he re-
mained on the liome farm assisting in the work, until the outbreak of the
Civil war, when he enlisted in Company A, Sixty-seventh Regiment, Illinois
Volunteer Infantry, his enlistment being for one hundred days. He saw
service at Chicago, Illinois, guarding prisoners and was later sent South,
where he did guard duty. He later returned to Chicago, where he contracted
typhoid fever and was discharged. He returned to his home in Ogle county
and in 1863 he and Dendridge Dean drove horses and mules across the
mountains and plains to California. There he worked for a time in the
quartz mines and drove a stage coach. On July 3, 1865, he left San Francisco
for New York, by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He returned to Ogle
county, Illinois, where he remained until the spring of 1866, when he came
to Alarshall county, Kansas, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty
acres of land in Marysville township. The tract at that time was all wild
prairie, on which he built a small log cabin, wdiich was used as a residence
for four years, when he built a frame structure, fourteen by sixteen, with
upstairs apartments. The house was dedicated with a dance in the upper
part, a ladder being used on the outside of the building to gain access to the
dance room. It is needless to say that the dance w^as the social event of the
year, in that pioneer settlement.

In time, the wild land was developed, and where once grew the tall
prairie grass in unrestrained freedom, were seen broad fields of golden grain.
The farm was enlarged until there was three hundred and twenty acres in
the tract, all of which was under high cultivation and well improved. Mr.
Travelute continued to reside on the farm until February, 1901, and was
actively engaged in general farming and stock raising, being particularly
interested in the breeding and raising of Poland China hogs. On bis



490 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

retirement from the farm lie moNed to Marysville. where he has a handsome
residence. Mr. Tra\'eltite is a man of rare lousiness judgment and, in addi-
tion to his extensi\e land interests, he is a stockholder in the Elevator Com-
pany and the Citizens State IJank, heing a director of the latter institution.

On October c), 1866, at St. Bridget, Marshall county, Andrew J. Trave-
lute was united in marriage to Eli/^ri])eth Josephine Mohrbacher, who was
born near Milwaukee, AVisconsin, o'l June ig, 1846. She is the daughter
of Jacob and h^lizaljeth (I.atterncr) Mohrbacher both of wdiom were natives
of Bavaria, Germany, w-here they received their education in tlie public
schools and were later married. The father was born on August 24, 1810,
and died on April 6, 1872. In his native land he was a cooper by trade,
l)ut did much farming. In [8.15 Mr. and Mrs. Mohrbacher decided to leave
the land of their l)irth and seek a home in the United States. On their ar-
rival in this country they proceeded to Wisconsin, where they established a
home, and there resided for many years. They later moved to St. Joe,
Missouri, making the tri]j with oxen and wagons, having seven prairie
schooners and fourteen voke of oxen, bv which thev brought their l)uilding
material. In i860 they came to Alarysville, arriving here on May i, of that
year. Mr. and Mrs. Mohrbacher and tlieir eleven children suffered many
of the hardships of primitive travel and the life on the plains. The daughter,
Elizabeth Josephine, received her education in the schools of Wisconsin and
after the family located in Kansas she taught the first school in Marshall
county, at district No. i. The papers of the county some years ago, pub-
lished a most interesting article hx her on the earlv school life of the district.
The first school house built in this county, was built at Barrett, the first
steps to Ijuild such a house having been taken by Mr. A. G. Barrett, de-
ceased, but who has se^■eral relatives residing in our city. The first teacher
who w^ielded the rod of correction in this humble school house was Miss
Mohrbacher, now Mrs. Travelute, of Marvsville: she is the mother of Mrs.
Brumbaugh, of this city. The first wdiite boy born in the county, Mr. P. F.
Radcliffe, attended this school term.

To Andrew J, and Elizabeth Josephine Travelute have been born the
following children: Robert ^^'illard, Henry M., John A., Josephine, Charles
L. and Emma. Robert Willard, now deceased, married Carrie Moore and
to that union two children were liorn. Some years after the death of her
husband, Mrs. Travelute married Mr. Brock and now lives at Kansas Citv,
Missouri; Henry AI., who married Elizabeth Koppes, lives at Lincolnville,
Marion county, Kansas, and they are the parents of nine children : John A.
is deceased; Josephine Brumbaugh lives at Home City, Kansas, and is the



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 49 1

mother of four sons ; Charles L. li\'es in Smith county Kansas ; he has been
twice married, his first wife at her death left two sons. His second wife was
Edna Forke. of Raymond. Nebraska. Emma is at home with her parents.

Mr. and Mrs. Travelute are devout members of the Catholic church and
reared their children in that faith. Mr. Travelute is identified with the
Democratic ])arty and has always taken an active interest in local affairs and
has served as justice of the peace, road overseer and a member of the council.
He is a meml^er of the Knights of Columbus and the Sons of St. Gregory,
also a member of the Grand x-\rmy of the Republic, of which he was com-
mander for one vear.



JAMES ARTHUR HAMLER.

Among the prominent 1)usiness men and well-known residents of Sum-
merfield, Marshall county, is James Arthur Hamler, the efficient assistant
cashier of the State Bank of that citv, who was born on a farm near Hiawatha,
Brown county, Kansas, on October 22,. 1882, the son of Howard and Eliza
( Dieffenderf er ) Hamler.

Howard Hamler was born in the state of Pennsylvania in 1853 ^"^ is
of German ancestry. EFe is the son of Daniel Hamler and wife, who were



■ ADDENDUM.

Andrew J. Travelute died at his home in Marysville on Tuesday morn-
ing, June 12, IQ17. at 3:30 o'clock. Funeral services were held on Thursday
morning, June ]-|, at St. Gregory's Catholic church, wdiere solemn requiem
mass was celebrated by Rev. August Redeker, of Marysville, as celebrant,
Reverend Bradley, of Frankfort, as deacon, and Reverend Hillary, of Seneca,
as sub-deacon.

The presence at the funeral of hundreds of people from far and near
attested to the high esteem in which Andrew^ Travelute was held by all who
had known him. The Grand Army of the Republic, the Woman's Relief
Corps and the Knights of Columbus, of which the deceased was a member,
attended in separate bodies.



490 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

retirement from the farm lie nioxed to Marysxillc, where he has a handsome
residence. Mr. TraNelnte is a man of rare hnsiness jndgment and, in addi-
tion to liis extensi^■e land interests, he is a stockholder in the Elevator Com-
])any and the Citizens State ])ank. being a director of the latter institution.
On October 9, 1866, at St. Bridget, Marshall countv, .Andrew J. Trave-
Inte was united in marriage to Elizabeth Josephine Mohrbacher, who was
born near Milwankee. Wisconsin, on Tnne 19, 1846. She is the daughter
of Jacob and Elizabeth (T.atterner) Mohrbacher both of whom were natives
of Bavaria, Germany, where they received their education in the public
schools and \\ere later married. The father was born on August 24, 1810,
and died on April 6, 1872. In his native land he was a cooper by trade,
but did much farming. Tn [8^15 Mr. and Mrs. A^ohrbacher decided to leave
the land of their l)irth and seek a home in the United States. On their ar-
rival in this country they proceeded to Wisconsin, where they established a
home, and there resided for many years. They later moved to St. Joe,
Missouri, making the tri]) with oxen and wagons, liaving seven prairie
schooners and fourteen ^•oke of oxen, bv which thev brought their building
material. Tn i860 th.ey came to Marysville, arriving here on May i, of that
year. Mr. and Mrs. Mohrbacher and their eleven children suffered many
of the hardships of primitive travel and the life on the plains. The daughter,
Elizabeth Josephine, recei\'ed her education in the schools of W^isconsin and



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 49 1

mother of four sons; Charles L. hves in Smith county Kansas; he has been
twice married, his first wife at her death left two sons. His second wife was
Edna Forke, of Raymond, Nebraska. Emma is at home with her parents.

Air. and Mrs. Tra\-elute are de\'out members of the Catholic church and
reared their children in that faith. Mr. Travelute is identified with the
Democratic party and has always taken an active interest in local affairs and
has served as justice of the peace, road overseer and a member of the council.
He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Sons of St. Gregory,
also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, of which he was com-
mander for one vear.



JAMES ARTHUR HAMLER.

Among the prominent business men and well-known residents of Sum-
merfield, Marshall county, is James Arthur Hamler, the efficient assistant
cashier of the State Bank of that citv, who was born on a farm near Hiawatha,
Brown countv, Kansas, on October 2^, 1882, the son of Howard and Eliza
( Dieffenderf er ) Hamler.

Howard Hamler Wci,s born in the state of Pennsyhania in 1853 and is
of German ancestry. He is the son of Daniel Hamler and wiie, who were
natives of Pennsylvania, and there received their education in the public
schools and were later married. They continued to reside in that state until
1875, when they came to Kansas and established their home in Brown count}/,
where they became prominent in agricultural enterprises. The son, Howard,
also engaged in farm work in this section of the state, and came here from
his former home in Pennsylvania, after his marriage in 1875, to Eliza Dieffen-
derfer, who was born in Pennsyhania in 1857. Daniel Hamler and his
sons purchased land in Brov, n county, Kansas, when they came to the state.
They later developed the farms and made them among the best in the county.
Howard Hamler engaged in general farming and stock raising in the county,
until some years later and then moved to Seneca, where he retired. He later
moved to Manhattan in 1900, so that he might give his children a better oppor-
tunity to obtain an education. He is still the owner of one hundred and
sixty acres of good land and a splendid home in Manhattan.

Howard and Eliza Hamler are the parents of the following children :
Nora E., James Arthur and Harr}- T. Nora E. received her education in
the public schools and later studied in the University of Campbell, at Holton.
Kansas. For a number of vears she was a successful teacher, before her



492 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

marriag'e to ?xlr. .Anderson, of Oneida: Ilrirry T. received liis primary edu-
cation in the i)uldic schools and later completed the course of study at the
Manhattan Agricnliural College and is new a successful farmer and stockman
near. Belpre, Edwards county, Kansas.

James Arthur Hamler received liis educalinn in the common schools
of Xemaha county, and later graduated t'rmn the Kansas Wesleyan Business
College at Salina in 1901. After ct)ni])]eting his education, he was connected



Online LibraryEmma Elizabeth Calderhead FosterHistory of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions → online text (page 45 of 104)