Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Foster.

History of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions online

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at Home City, Kansas.

John H. and Freda Ida Krug are the parents of one child, Leman Paul,
who was born on April 3. 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Krug are members of the
Lutheran church and are prominent in the social and religious life of the
town, where Mr. Krug is recognized as one of the substantial and most pro-
gressive business men, and where he has taken an active part in promoting
its best interests.



FRED MOSER.



Fred Moser, a well-known resident of Marysville township, Marshall
county, is a native of Germany, where he was born on March 11, i860, the
son of Jacob and Marie Moser.

Jacob and Marie Moser were also natives of Germany, where they were
educated, grew up and were married. Jacob Moser was born in 1825 and
was reared in a village, where he and his wife lived until the time of her
death in 1864, when the son, Fred, was four years of age. For four years
after the death of his wife, Mr. Moser continued to live in Germany, when
in 1868 he decided to come to America. After the death of Marie Moser,
Mr. Moser was united in marriage to Rosa Onger, a native of Germany.
By Marie Moser, Jacob Moser was the father of three children as follow:
George, who is now deceased; Fred the subject of this sketch and J. C., a
butcher of Marysville. To Rosa Moser has been born three children as fol-
low : William, Mary and Charles, all of whom are now deceased.

On his arrival in the United States in 1868, Jacob Moser at once came
to Kansas and purchased three hundred and sixty acres of land in Marys-
ville township, Marshall county. This he developed and improved and
engaged in general farming and stock raising with much success until the
time of his death in 1896. He and his family were members of the German
Lutheran church and were prominent in the early social and religious life
of the township, where they were held in the highest regard. Mr. Moser was



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 66l

identified with tlie Democratic party and took a good deal of interest in local
affairs, and had much to do with the civic life of the township and the county.
He was a progressive man and his farm and stock were among the best in
the district. Being a man of excellent judgment, his advice was often sought
in matters that pertained to the welfare and improvement of the locality.

Fred Moser received his earliest educational training in the public schools
of his native land and at the age of eight years came to the United States
with his father and the other members of the family. He completed his edu-
cation in the schools of Marshall county, and grew to manhood -on the home
farm, where he assisted his father with the farm work. At the age of twenty-
one years he engaged as a farm hand by the month and later worked in a
stone quarry. After some years of this work he was employed in the office
of the division superintendent, of the Northern Pacific railroad. In 1897
he returned to the farm, he and his brother renting two hundred and twenty
acres of land, which was a part of the old home place. Here he engaged
in general farming for two years, when he rented one hundred and sixty
acres near Oketo, where he lived for ten years, at the end of which time he
came to his present farm where he is successfully engaged in the operation
of three hundred and eighty acres of splendid land. In addition to his gen-
eral farming, he pays much attention to the raising of cattle and hogs, and
has some of the best animals in this section of the township. He has always
taken an interest in local affairs and has served his township as a member of
the school board.

In 1888 Fred Moser was united in marriage to Anna Georgina May,
the daughter of David and Mina (King) May. David May was born in
Germany in 1836 and was there educated in the public schools and there grew
to manhood. He later came to the United States and located in Illinois,
where he was married to Mina King. Some years later they located in Cass
county, Nebraska, where they died. They were the parents of two children,
Frank and Georgina. Anna Georgina (King) Moser was born in the state
of Illinois and was educated in the common schools and lived at home until
the time of her marriage. Her death occurred on February 24, 1902. She
was a woman of many excellent qualities and during her short life had made
many friends. She and Mr. Moser were the parents of the following chil-
dren : Perry W., born on February 20. 1889; Mina May, February 4, 1890;
Royal G.. June 13, 1894; Minnetta, March 28, 1896; William ]., January 12,
1898, and Horace A., born on December 9, 1900. The children are all at
home with the exception of Royal G., who is working on a ranch in Nebraska.



662 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

PETER S. BURNETT.

Of the well-known and prominent retired farmers and stockmen of
Blue Rapids, ]\larshall county, is Peter S. Burnett, a native son of the South-
land, born in North Carolina on October 20, 1835, the son of Jesse and
jMary (Stoner) Burnett, also natives of North Carolina, and there they
received their education in the public schools and were later married.

Jesse Burnett was the son of Thomas Burnett, a life-long resident of
North Carolina, where he was drowned many years ago. When Peter S.
was three years of age, his parents left the South and came to Indiana, where
they established their home on a farm in Putnam county and there the father
died in 1884, at an advanced age. He was a hard-working and industrious
man and was held in the highest esteem. His wife, Mary Burnett, was born
in 1816 and died in April, 1913. She was the daughter of a Revolutionary
soldier, Peter Stoner, who married Eva Cottner, both being natives of the
state of Pennsylvania. The father was a soldier of the Revolutionary War,
and a strong supporter of the government. They also came to Putnam
county, Indiana, w^here they died.

Peter S. Burnett lived for many years in a log cabin and received his
education in the early schools of Indiana and was on the farm in Madison
township, Putnam county. He remained on the home farm until 1856, when
he engaged as a farm hand at twelve dollars per month. There was at that
time little to regulate the hours that a man should work each day, other than
the sun or the weather. It was from daylight to dark, and many times it
was from before daylight until after dark. While yet a lad and going to
school, he split rails and cut many a cord of wood.

On the attempted dissolution of the Union, Mr. Burnett demonstrated
his patriotism and his determination to assist in the defence of the flag, bv
enlisting in Company G, Thirtieth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He
fought his first battle at Bellemont, Missouri, on November 7, 1861, and
on February 12, 1862, he was at Ft. Henry, Tennessee. He w^as later at
Ft. Donalson and saw the surrender of the Southern forces to General
Grant, under whom Mr. Burnett was then serving. It was an impressive
sight to the new soldier to see, amid the waving of the Stars and Stripes,
the fluttering of the white flags of truce. He also saw active, service and
hard fighting at Pittsburg Landing and was with the forces at the hard fought
battle of Brittenslane, Tennessee. He took part in several important skirm-
ishes and was made first sergeant of his company. On May 2, 1863, he
was in the battle at Port Gibson, Mississippi, and on May 12 at Raymond;



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 663

May 14, the battle of Jackson was fought; on the i6th, Champion's Hill; on
May 17, Big Black ri\er and on Alay 22, the forces settled down for the
siege of Vicksburg, and for forty-seven days, this memorable engagement
continued, when on Jul}' 3. 1863, the white flag was seen to wave from the
camp of the Confederate forces, and the long and trying ordeal was over.
From April until September of the next year he was at the siege of Atlanta,
during which time he was in several small fights. He was with Sherman on
the march to the sea, and was present at the surrender of General Johnson.
During his campaign to tlie sea, he fought battles in the couatry where he
was born, though in the opposing forces of most of the residents of that sec-
tion at that time. He was in the march from Raleigh, North Carolina, to
Washington, where he took part in the Grand Review. He was then sent to
Louisville, Kentucky, where he was mustered out of the service on August
ly, 1865, and was discharged at Springfield, Illinois, some time later. For
four long- vears. he had given his best services to the cause of the Union and
was once more a free man to engage in the work of life.

In December, 1865, Mr. Burnett came to Kansas and located on a farm
in section 12. W'aterville township, Marshall county. The township has since
been changed to Blue Rapids City township. Here he purchased one hun-
dred and sixty acres of partly improved land at ten dollars per acre. There
\\ere many people in the community at that time who thought him foolish to
pay so much for farm land at that time, where there were so many acres to
homestead at a much lower price. But the tract suited him and he made the
purchase. He made many extensive improvements and developed the farm
into one of the finest in that section. He engaged in general farming until
1891, when he retired and moved to Blue Rapids, where he now has a splen-
did residence. He enlarged his original farm until he became the owner of
two hundred and fifty acres, all of which he placed under high cultivation.
He was an extensive breeder of Shorthorn cattle and kept many hogs. He
soon became recognized as one of the most successful and progressive farm-
ers and stockmen in the county, where he has ever been held in the highest
regard.

On May 9, 1867, Mr. Burnett was married to Margaret J. Stout, a
native of Buchanan county, Missouri, where she was born on October 29,
1848, and her death occurred on August 4, 1890. She was the daughter of
Albert and Xancy (Williamson) Stout, who were natives of Virginia. They
settled in ^Missouri, where they remained until 1859, when they came to Mar-
shah county, and settled on a farm near Blue Rapids, where Mr. and Mrs.
Burnett were later married.



664 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

To Peter S. and ^Margaret J. Burnett was born one child, Belle, who is
now the wife of Elmer F. Haven of Jacksonville, Florida, where Mr. Haven
is an inspector for the Armour Packing Company, of which he is the chief
of the bureau of animal industry. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Burnett were long identified
with the active life of their home community, and were ever interested in all
that tended toward the moral, social and educational betterment of the town-
ship and the county. Mrs. Burnett was an exceptional woman, who by her
pleasing qualities won for herself many friends, who hold her in kindly remem-
brance. Both she and Mr. Burnett were attendants of the Baptist church,
taking much interest in all church services and were substantial supporters
of the society.

Politically, Mr. Burnett is a member of the Republican party, and has
always taken a keen interest in the civic life of the township. Though he
has never been a seeker after office, he has serv^ed as a member of the local
school board for twelve years. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of
America and of the Grand Army of the Republic Post at Blue Rapids and is
the quarter-master of the local organization. His life has been an active one
and he takes much pride in the fact that during his life in the defense of his
country, he was under fire for three hundred days. Today he is one of the
honored and highly respected men of the state.



FRED CROME.



Fred Crome, the well-known manager of the elevator at Bremen, Kan-
sas, was born on the home farm in Logan township, on January 28, 1878,
the son of Conrad and Alary ( Sluter) Crome, natives of Germany, where the
father was born in 1828 and the mother in 1838.

Conrad and Alary Crome were educated in the schools of Germany and
there grew up and were married. Air. Crome spent five years of his young
life in Australia, where he worked in a gold mine. The rest of his life,
until 1 87 1, he lived in his native land where he was engaged in farming.
In 1 87 1 he decided to come to the irnited States, where he might better
make a home for those dependent upon him. On his arrival in this country
he located for a time in Indiana, where he worked in a smelter, making rail-
road rails. The following year he came to Kansas and purchased one hun-
dred and sixty acres of land in Logan township, Marshall county. This land
he developed and improved and engaged in general farming and stock rais-



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MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 665

ing until the time of his death in 1904. He and his wife always look an
active part in the services of the German Lutheran church, of which they
u'ere members and of which Mr. Crome was a trustee for many years. He
was identified with the Republican party and was prominent in the civic and
political life of tlie townshi]x l^'"or a number of years he served as road boss
and was a member of the local school board.

Conrad and Mary Crome were the parents of thirteen children, of whom
eight are living, as follow: , Conrad F., Herman, Fred, Hermine. William,
Anna, John and Emma. Conrad is a farmer in Alarshall county ; Herman
is engaged in general farming in Washington county ; Hermine Pralle is the
wife of a well-known farmer of Logan township: William is farming the
home place: Anna Duever resides on a farm in Washington county, where
her husband is a successful farmer: John is a rural mail carrier out of
Bremen and Emma Lauderbach is living in Logan township, where AL".
Lauderbach is a successful farmer and stockman. Mr. and Mrs. Crome were
ever prominent in their home community, took much interest in the social
and moral development oi the district and were held in the highest esteem
and regard by all who knew them.

Fred Crome received his education in the local schools and was reared
en tlie home farm, where as a lad he assisted his father with the farm work.
At the age of sixteen years he was employed as a farm hand and worked bv
the month for nine years. He then rented a farm of one hundred and sixty
acres in section 31, Logan township, and after three years he purchased the
place. He made many extensive improvements and placed the farm under
a high state of cultivation. After nine years he traded it for the elevator
at Bremen and a residence property in that place. In connection with his
farm work, Mr. Crome operated a threshing machine from 1901 to 1906.

The elevator which Mr. Crome now owns, was established about 1894
by W. H. Koeneke, who enlarged and improved the property in 1901. Since
assuming possession of the elevator,' Mr. Crome has made many \-aluabie
improvements and is now doing about thirty thousand dollars in business
each year. He is most progressive and believes in keeping his elevator up to
a high standard of excellence. He has the confidence of the public and his
business shows an increase from year to year.

In 1908 Fred Crome was united in marriage to Kate \A'assermann.
who was born in Herkimer township, Marshall county, in 1887, the daughter
of Chris and Katie (Germerroth) Wassermann, natives of Germany and now
prominent residents of Herkimer township. Mrs. Crome died at the birth
of her child, Katie, who was born on October 2'/, 1909. In 191 2 Mr. Crome



666 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

was united in marriage to Lizzie Wassermann, a sister of his first wife, who
was born in Marshall county in 1889 and received her education in the schools
of her home township. To this union three children have been l)()rn as f(jl-
low : Fred, whose birth occurred on January 29, 1913 ; Munford, on Novem-
ber 19, 1914. died cm January 22, 191 7, and Edgar, on April 9. 1916. Mr.
and Mrs. Cronie are members of the German Lutheran church and are prom-
inent in the social life of the town.



OSCAR T. RUSSELL.



Among the well-known and successful farmers of Marysville township,
Marshall county, may be mentioned Oscar T. Russell, who was born in the
state of Illinois on May 22, 1864, the son of John H. and Maria Jane (Wat-
kins) Russell, who were natives of Ohio and Kentucky, respectively, the
former having been born in 183 1 and the latter in 1835.

John H. Russell was reared on the farm and received his education in
the public schools. \A'hen he was but a lad he came with his parents to Illi-
nois, where thev established their home on a farm, and there the son, John,
learried the principles of agriculture during his younger days and became
impressed with the independent life of the farmer. In 185 1 he was united in
marriage to Maria Jane Watkins, who received a splendid education in the
public schools and w-as a successful teacher for several years. Mr. and Mrs.
Russell w-ere married in the state of Illinois, where they lived for some years
after their marriage, when they decided to locate in Iowa. Mr. Russell pur-
chased four hundred acres of land in northwestern part of that state, which
he developed and improved and engaged in general farming and stock raising
for five years, when he sold the place and in 1884 moved to Kansas. Here
he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of splendid land near Marysville,
the farm being the one on which the son, Oscar T., now lives. John H.
Russell engaged successfully in farming and stock raising until the time of his
death in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Russell always took an active interest in the
services of the Methodist Episcopal church, of wdiich they were members.
Political] V, Mr. Russell was identified with the Republican party, and while
taking much interest in local afi^airs, was not an office seeker. He and Mrs.
Russell were the parents of the following children : Sophia, James, Oscar
T., Effie A., W. G. and five that are now^ deceased. Sophia Mulnix lives at
Potwin. Kansas, where her husband is a druggist; James H. is a retired



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 667

farmer at Siimmerfield, Kansas; Effie A. resides at Marysville, Kansas, and
W. G. is a merchant at Jefferson City, Missouri.

Oscar T. Russell was reared on the farm and received his education in
the common schools. He remained at home, assisting his father with the
work on the farm, until he was twenty-one years of age, when he started in
work for himself. He rented a farm near Marysville, where he lived for
two years. He and his brother, W. G. then purchased one hundred and sixty
acres of land, which they farmed in partnership for two years, when Oscar
purchased the entire farm, which he operated until 1906. In the latter year
he sold the place and purchased the old home place of one hundred and sixty
acres, which he has increased and is now the owner of five hundred and forty
acres of the best land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation and
well improved. During a portion of his time as a farmer he has given atten-
tion to the feeding of cattle : but for the past few years, he has devoted the
greater part of his energies to the cultivation of corn and wheat, in which
lie has been most successful.

In 1897 Oscar T. Russell was united in marriage to Adelaide Riley, the
widow of Albert H. Riley, and the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Neely)
Robinson. Mr. 'and Mrs. Robinson were natives of England and Canada,
respectively, the father having been born in 18 16 and the mother in 1829.
John Robinson received his education in the schools of England and as a
young man farmed in that country before he went to Canada. On his arrival
in Canada he purchased a farm and there he engaged in general farming and
stock raising until his death in 1872. He had purchased three hundred and
sixty acres of land in Center township, Marshall county, but had never li^•ed
on it. His widow lived on it with her family of nine children. Mrs. Robin-
son was educated in the schools of Canada and there she lived for some time,
dying on the home farm in Marshall county, in 1897. They were very active
members of the Methodist Episcopal church and took much interest in all
departments of church work. They were prominent in the social life of the
community, and did much for the moral and social uplift of the district, in
wdiich they were held in the highest regard. They were the parents of the
following children: Henry N., George W., Isabelle. Albert R., Sarah Jane,
Victoria E., Adelaide, Morley P. and Lillie. George W. lives at Lincoln,
Nebraska, where he is a street-car conductor; Isabelle Smith resides at
Sabetha. Kansas, and her husband is a traveling salesman : Albert R. lives
near Alarvville, Missouri, engaged in farming; Sarah Jane Healy resides at
Los Angeles, California, where her husband is an adjuster for one of the
railroads; Victoria E. Rilev resides near Home City, Kansas, where her hus-



668 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS,

band is a farmer and stockman; Morley P. lives near Blue Rapids, Kansas,
and is a farniei'. and Lillie is now deceased.

Adelaide (Robinson) Russell was horn near Petersbui\^-, Canada, on
July 26, 1867; was reared on the farm and received her education in the local
schools. She and Mr. Russell are llie i)arents of four children as follow:
Blanche, born on Ai)ril 11, 1898, graduated from the Marysville high school
in the class of 1916; Lawrence Oscar. August g, 1901, a student in the high
school; Robert, April 3, 1908, and Esther, February 20, 191 2. Mrs. Russell
is an active member of the Christian Science church and Mr. Russell also
attends tliat organization. Politically, Mr. Russell is identified with the
Democratic party and has served his district as a member of the school board
for four terms.



WILLIAM HUNTER, M. D.

William Hunter, M. D., now deceased, and for many years one of the
well-known and successful practitioners of Blue Rapids, Marshall county, was
born at West Newton, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, on July 29, 1850,
and died at his home in Blue Rapids, Kansas, on November 28, 1914. His
parents were natives of the state of Pennsylvania, where they received their
education in the public schools, grew to maturity and were married. After
their marriage they established their home in that state where they continued
to li\e until 1866, when they came to Missouri and located on a farm, whei'e
they became prosperous and influential people.

William Hunter received his early educational training in the schools
of West Newton, where he resided until he was sixteen years of age, at which
time he came to Missouri with his parents. Here he entered the Savannah
Normal school, from which he was later graduated. For seven years he was
one of the successful teachers of the state, and later pursued a business course
in Kansas City, ^Missouri. He later entered the Ensworth Medical College
at St. Joe and was graduated in 1879. After completing his education, he
established himself at Axtell, Kansas, wdiere he practiced his profession until
1886, when he came to Blue Rapids, Kansas. For several years he engaged
in the practice of medicine, when he became interested in the cement and
plaster manufacturing business in his home town. He and Jesse Axtell first
built the Great Western Plaster Mills, which they operated for a number of
years, when they sold the business. Doctor Hunter then became interested
in the Marshall County Power and Light Company. This business was first



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 6D9

known as the Electric Plaster Company, but after the selHng of the mill, the
new company was organized. For many years Doctor Hunter was the secre-
tary of this successful company, that had so much to do with the general
deyelopment and growth of this section of the state.

During seventeen years of his active life, Doctor Hunter was the local
surgeon of the Missouri Pacific and the Union Pacific railroads, in which
capacity he gave satisfactory evidence of his medical and surgical skill. He
was for many years the regent of the State Agricultural College at Man-
hattan, an institution in which he always took the greatest interest. He was
always most influential in educational matters, and one of his greatest desires
was to see the educational institutions of the county placed on the highest
plane possible, and to him is largely due the excellent school system now in
force. He was greatly opposed to any inferior enterprise ; he regarded a
poor system of schools as a great hindrance to the progress of the district.
He believed in a practical education and one that would fit the boy and the
girl for the more important duties of life. The agricultural school, where



Online LibraryEmma Elizabeth Calderhead FosterHistory of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions → online text (page 64 of 104)