Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Foster.

History of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions online

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the boys and the girls of the state might be trained for a life of usefulness
and good citizenship, was to him a matter of the utmost importance. Today,
this institution has given to the state many men and women who have brought
honor and success to the great state of Kansas. Being a man of progressive
ideas, and, perhaps, in advance of the times and community, he advocated
reforms that had much to do with the growth of his home town. He always
had great faith in the future of Blue Rapids and his constant effort was ever
in the interests of a better and a greater city. He was for many years a
member of the school board and had much to do with formulating the present
excellent system of schools.

Politically, Doctor Hunter was identified with the Republican party, and
always took the greatest interest in local affairs, both in the city and the
county. He was not a partisan, but he used his best efforts in the selection
of good men to administer the aft'airs of the county, rather than to the selec-
tion of any man because of party affiliation. He was a member of the
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and of the Order of the Eastern Star,
and he and his wife were prominent and active members of the Presbyterian
church. As a young man he united with the church, and always took much
interest in religious work. Both he and his wife were long active in the
social life of the community, where they were held in the highest regard.

On November 13, 1884, at Axtell, Kansas, William Hunter was united
in marriage to Carrie L. Axtell, a native of Red Oak, Iowa, and the daughter
of Jesse and Emeline (Shangle) Axtell, natives of the state of Ohio, where



6/0 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

they \vere\born, near Alt. Gilead, Morrow county. Jesse Axtell left his home
in Ohio in the year 1859 and located at Red Oaks, Iowa, where he was a
merchant for a number of years. At the outbreak of the Civil War he
enlisted in an Iowa company and saw much active service. After receiving
his lionorable discharge he returned to Iowa, where he lived until 1879, when
he came to Kansas and established a store and lumber yard at Axtell, where
he successfully engaged in that business until the fall of 1885, when he came
to Blue Rapids. Here he and Doctor Hunter opened a lumber yard, which
was operated by them until 19 12. He was also interested in the plaster
business and was one of the organizers of the Electric Power Company. Mr.
and Mrs. Axtell were both born in the year 1840 and since the death of his
wife, on August 10, 19 10, he has made his home at Long Beach, California.
They were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are now living:
Carrie I>., Ida, Chloe, Carson, Gertrude, Willis and Clinton. Carrie L., the
widow of Doctor Hunter, is a resident of Blue Rapids; Ida, the wife of Mr.
Mattern, is living at Adrian, Michigan; Chloe, the wife of Mr. Molby, is a
resident of Barnes, Kansas; Carson lives near Bedford, Massachusetts; Ger-
trude, the wife of Mr. Loomis, resides at Long Beach, California; Willis is
engaged in the lumber busness in Blue Rapids, and Clinton is an electrician
and is with the General Electric Company at Schenectady, New York.

To the union of William and Carrie L. Hunter, there were four children
born : Edith, Oliver W., Charles Axtell and one that died in infancy. Edith
died at the age of four and a half years ; Oliver W., after completing his work
in the high school of Blue Rapids, entered the Agricultural College at Man-
hattan, where he completed the work and where for the past six years he
has been assistant professor of bacteriology. He has his master's degree
from the L'niversity of Wisconsin and is a student of much ability. Charles
Axtell is also a graduate of the Agricultural College at Manhattan and took
his master's degree in 191 6 from the University of Wisconsin, and is now
professor of l^acteriology in the University of Florida, at Gainesville. Both
the sons are establishing an enviable reputation in their chosen work and are
now recognized as authorities on many matters of professional importance.
Thev have ever been hard students and earnest workers, and their great
desire was to succeed in their work.

Doctor Hunter was a man of unusual ability and possessed of much
business acumen. Honest in his every business transaction, he won the con-
fidence and the respect of the business men of the county. As a physician
and surgeon, he was recognized as one of the most proficient in the district



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 671

where he practiced. He attended strictly to business and was most careful
in his duties to his patients. He had an extensive practice throughout a large
district, and his death was a distinct loss to the professional and business life
of the community in which he lived and where he was held in such high
regard.

Mrs. Hunter is now living in Blue Rapids, where she has a beautiful
home, and where she is actively engaged in the social and the religious life
of the city. She is a woman of pleasing qualities and possessed of con-
siderable ability. She is prominent in the Order of the Eastern Star and is
one of the active members of the Afternoon Club, in which she takes much
pleasure.



ALBERT WITTMUS.



Among the many well-known and successful men of Kansas who were
born in foreign countries and who have later come to the United States, is
Albert Wittmuss, of Balderson township, Marshall county, who was born in
Germany on July i8. 1868, the son of William and Augusta Wittmuss.

William and Augusta Wittmuss were natives of Germany, where they
were educated, grew up and were later married. For a number of years
after their marriage they continued to live in Germany, where Mr. Wittmuss
engaged in farming. In 1882, when the son, Albert, was fourteen years of
age, the parents decided to come to America. On their arrival in this country
they located at Omaha, Nebraska, where the father worked as a laborer until
1886, when he moved to a farm west of that city and engaged in farming for
some vears, after which he moved to South Dakota, where he now lives.

Albert Wittmuss received his early educational training in the schools
of Germany, and came with his parents to the United States. When the
family located in Omaha, Albert Wittmuss continued to live at home and
remained with his parents on the farm in Nebraska, until he was twenty-two
years of age. In 1890 he came to Kansas, and as he had no money he worked
as a farm hand for some time and then he rented a farm and engaged in farm
work for himself and later purchased his present farm of one hundred and
sixty acres in Balderson township, which he has developed and improved,
and today has one of the ideal farms of the township. He has made all the
improvements and has a splendid eight-room modern house, a large bank
barn, forty-two by forty-four feet, with tool shed, thirty by fifty feet, and a
cattle barn, forty-four by fifty feet. He has his fariji in an excellent state



6/2 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

of cultivation and liis l)uil(lings are kept in the l)est repair. As a farmer and
stockman he is recognized as one of the most successful in the district, his
cattle and hogs being among the finest in the county.

In i<*^93 Albert Wittmuss was united in marriage to Louisa Walker,
who was born in Germany in 1870 and is the daughter of Jacob and Mary
(Lutz) \A'alker. Her parents were also natives of that country and there
resided until 1875. when they came to the United States. On their arrival
in this country, Mr. and Mrs. Walker located in Illinois, where they remained
for a few years and then moved to Nebraska, and later were among the early
settlers in this part of Kansas. They are now living at Summerfield.

Albert Wittmuss and wife are the parents of the following children :
Ludwig, Anna, Hilda and Arnold. The family are active members of the
Evangelical Lutheran church and take much interest in all church work and
are prominent residents of the township in which they live. Mr. Wittmuss
is an independent voter and looks to the men who are to administer the affairs
of county and state rather than to any party. He has always taken a keen
interest in local affairs and has had much to do with the growth and develop-
ment of the district. He is one of the stockholders of the Farmer's Elevator
Company at Summerfield.

At the time Albert Wittmuss came to Kansas and when he had pur-
chased his farm, he and his parents lived in a shanty, twelve by eighteen feet,
until a better house could be built, some ten years later. Those early years
were full of hardships and privations, but, with the sterling c[ualities of his
race, Mr. Wittmuss has made for himself a place among the substantial and
successful men of the county and is one of the most patriotic Americans in
the state of Kansas.



A. B. GARRISON.



A. B. Garrison, a well-known and successful farmer and stockman of
Summerfield, Marshall county, was born in Rush county, Indiana, on July
21, 1859, the son of \\'illiam and Louisa (Cruse) Garrison, who were natives
of Indiana, the former having been born on July i, 1836, and the latter on
March 9, 1839. The father died on January 16, 1910, and the mother on
September 12, 191 1. They received their education in the schools of Indiana
and there grew up and we were married. The father of William Garrison was
l3orn in the state of Kentucky and was one of the early pioneers of Rush
'count^', Indiana.



f^fH?" NEV7 YO?^K (



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 6/3

After their marriage, W^illiam and Louisa Garrison continued to live in
Indiana until 1867, when they decided to come to Kansas. On their arrival
they established their home on a homestead in the northeast part of section
I, Balderson township, Marshall county. This farm was at that time wild
prairie and unimproved. The pioneer home was soon established in a small
house tliat had been erected, and here Mr. Garrison engaged in the task of
clearing and developing his farm, and here he engaged in general farming
and stock raising, until five years before his death, when he and his wife
retired from the more active duties of life and moved to Summ'erfield, where
they continued to live until their deaths. They were married on March 2,
1858, and were the parents of four sons as follow: Charles S., of Chicago;
Henry L., a farmer of Richland township; E. M., of Richland township,
and A. B.

A. B. Garrison received his education in the public schools of Marshall
countv and grew to manhood on the home farm, where he assisted with the
farm work. The first school that he attended in Kansas was in a log school
house, w ith cottonwood slabs for seats and no desks. School was in session
but three or four months during the winter months, and it was amid those
primitive conditions that the children of the district received their education.
A. B. Garrison remained on the liome farm until he was twenty-two years
of age, when he engaged in work for himself. For two years he worked
as a farm hand, when he purchased eighty acres of land in section 8, Rich-
land township, and a part of the present farm. He purchased the tract at
ten dollars per acre and that on time. The place was undeveloped and unim-
proved, but at the present time is one of the well-developed and improved
places of the township. In 1893 he purchased another eighty acres of land
at thirty-five dollars per acre, and is now the owner of one hundred and sixty
acres in the home place, in addition to another three hundred and twenty
acres in the township. As a general farmer and stock raiser, Mr. Garrison
met with much success and was soon recognized as one of the prominent and
substantial farmers of the district.

In 1907 ^Ir. Garrison left the farm and moved to Summerfield, where
he lived until 1912, when he again returned to the farm and took up the
duties of farm life. Here he remained until February, 191 5, when he again
moved to Summerfield, where he now lives. He and Mrs. Garrison were
married on November 29, 1882, at Beattie, Kansas. Mrs. Garrison, who
was Jessie B. Winter, was born in Rush county, Indiana, on May 20, 1859, the
daughter of Gideon and Priscilla (Knisely) Winter, the former born in 1815

(43)



674 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

and died on January 18, 1879, and the latter Ijorn in 1819 and died on May
3. 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Winter were natives of Kentucky and there received
their education and grew to manhood and womanhood. They later moved
to Indiana, where they remained until 1869, when they located on a farm
in Richland township, Marshall county. They were from the same section
in Indiana, as were the parents of A. B. Garrison, and it is known that both
Mr. and Mrs. Garrison, when babies, v\^ere rocked in the same cradle together.
Mr. and Airs. Winter were the parents of the following children : Jane
Thruman, now a resident of Marysville ; Elizabeth and Mary are now
deceased ; William is a resident of Shelby county, Indiana ; Joseph resides
in Colorado ; Frances Small resides at Summerfield, her husband being a
well-known retired farmer ; Mary Turner lives in Oregon and Adeline Mar-
tin is a resident of Council Grove.

A. B, and Jessie B. Garrison are the parents of the following children :
Floyd, Etta, Clarence, Walter, Austin, Benjamin, Raleigh, Etta May and
Bessie. Floyd is a successful farmer in Lincoln township. He is married
to Manda Duckworth and they are the parents of three children, Lola, Velma
and Elsie ; Etta is the wife of Ervin Click, of Richland township, and is the
mother of three children as follow: Cecil, Ethel and Ruth; Clarence died
at the age of four months ; Walter married Lottie Finnerty and is engaged
in farming on the home place. He and his wife are the parents of one child,
Weston ; Austin is at home and Benjamin Harrison is on a farm adjoining
the home place. He married Marie Sharp and they are the parents of one
child, Glenna; Raleigh, a successful farmer, is married to Cora Easter and
they are the parents of one child, Imogene ; Etta May and Bessie are at home.
Mr. and "Mrs. Garrison are identified with the Republican party and take
much interest in local affairs. Mr. Garrison has served as township assessor
and treasurer, and as treasurer of the school district. Since becoming a resi-
dent of Summerfield, he has served as city school clerk. In all his official
life he has given the same care and attention to the business of the township
and city, that he gives to his own business afi^airs. His record as a public
ofificial spread beyond the confines of his home district, and he was appointed
to fill a vacancy on the board of county commissioners ; in 1904 he was elected
to the same position, and because of his excellent services he was retained in
the important office until 191 1.

Mr. and Mrs. Garrison are regular attendants of the Methodist Epis-
copal church and give liberally of their means to its support. They have
long been prominent in the social life of the community and are held in the
highest regard by all who know them. Fraternally, Mr. Garrison is a mem-



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 675

ber of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the Ancient Order of
United Workmen. In addition to his many other duties, he is a director of
the Summerfield State Bank since 1904, and has had much to do with its
growth and success.

During his active hfe, Mr. Garrison has always taken much interest in
the breeding and raising of purebred Poland China hogs, and since 1898
has exhibited many of his animals at the county and state fairs. At the state
fair in Nebraska in 1904. he won many first prizes on hogs of his own breed-
ing. Today he is recognized as one of the most successful breeders in this
part of the state, and on his farm may be seen some of the finest animals,
many being supplied for breeding purposes in Kansas, Missouri, Colorado
and Nebraska. In addition to the breeding of hogs, he is an extensive
breeder of Shorthorn cattle and sheep. He has served as president of the
Standard Record Association with headquarters at Maryville, Missouri.



HENRY GREIVELDINGER.

Henry Greiveldinger, a well-known and successful farmer of Logan
township, Marshall county, was born in Luxemburg on June 15, 1845, the son
of Christopher and Lena (Cinnon) Greiveldinger.

Christopher and Lena Greiveldinger were also natives of that country,
the father having been born in 1800 and the mother in 1806. They received
their education in the schools of their native land and there grew to maturity.
Mr. Greiveldinger received instruction in both German and French and was
a man of much ability. After completing his school work he engaged in
farming in his native land until 1855, when he and his family came to the
United States. Fle established his home in Wisconsin, where he engaged
in general farming and stock raising until his death in 1863. After the death
of her husband, Mrs. Greiveldinger moved to Kansas, where she died in Mar-
shall county in 1888. They were the parents of fourteen children, seven hav-
inp- come to the United States in 1855 and all are now deceased with the
exception of Henry, who was the thirteenth child of the family.

Henry Greiveldinger received his earliest educational training in Ger-
many and completed his education in the schools of the United States. Fle
p-rew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted his father
with the work. In 1863, on the death of his father, he went to Michigan,



6/6 " MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

where lie worked in the woods and in the saw-mills of that state until 1870,
when he came to Marshall county. Here he took a homestead of one hun-
dred and sixty acres of land in L()<;an townshij). which he has since made his
home. The tract al that time was undeveloped and unimproved, but with
much hard work and close application to business, the place is now one of
the attractive country homes in the county. He has erected a large and sub-
stantial house, good barn and other outbuildings, and has made many other
valuable improvements. As a general farmer and stockman, he is recognized
as among the successful ones of the township. He keeps a large herd of
splendid Shorthorn cattle and many Duroc-Jersey hogs. Some years ago he
specialized in the raising of hogs and shipped many carloads, but at present
the numbers are more limited.

Henry Greiveldinger was united in marriage in 1872 to Elizabeth Pir-
rott, the daughter of Peter and Catherine (Allair) Pirrott, natives of France
and Germany, respectively. The parents received their education in the
schools of their home communities and there grew to maturity. After their
marriage Air. and Mrs. Pirrott continued to live in Germany until 1871, when
thev came to the United States. Mr. Pirrott was a farmer in Germany and
on coming to this country, he located on a farm in Waterville township, where
he homesteaded eighty acres of land. He did much in the way of develop-
ment and engaged in general farming for eight years, when he sold the place
to his son and made his home with his children until his death in 1895. Mr.
and Mrs. Pirrott were prominent members of the Catholic church and were
highly respected people. They were the parents of fourteen children, three
of whom are still living as follow : Antona, a retired farmer of Seneca,
Kansas; Catherine Cordell, a widow who lives at Tipton, Kansas, and Eliza-
beth, the wife of Henry Greiveldinger. Elizabeth Pirrott was born on Octo-
ber 20, 185 1, in Germany, where she received her education in the public
schools and resided there until she was twenty years of age, when she came
with her parents to \\'aterville township, where she lived until her marriage.

Henrv and Elizabeth Greiveldinger are the parents of eight children as
follow : Peter, v/ho is a farmer of Ford county, Kansas ; Henry, a barber,
of Hanover ; Catherine Brychta, who resides in Logan township, where her
husband is a farmer ; Antone, who is a farmer of Herkimer township ; John,
a farmer of Washington county ; Elizabeth Heboid, whose husband is a farmer
of Logan township; Maggie Page, the wife of a farmer of Waterville town-
ship and Joe, who is also a farmer. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Greiveldinger are earnest
members of the Catholic church and have long been active in the social life



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. djj

of the township, where they have lived for so many years. Mr. and Mrs.
Greiveldinger have rented their place to their son, Antone, and moved to a
beautiful home which thev own in Hanover, Kansas.



VENCEL MALICKY.



Among the well-known farmers and stockmen of Oketo township, Mar-
shall county, who were born in foreign countries and came to the United
States when but lads, is Vencel Malicky, the owner of three hundred and
eighty-three acres of splendid land, and who was born in Bohemia on April
15, 1850, the son of Vencel and Wilhelmina (Benbednor) Malicky.

\^encel Malicky and his wife were natives of Bohemia and were educated
in the schools of that country, grew to maturity and were later married.
After their marriage they continued to live in Bohemia until 1865, when they
decided tO' seek a home in the United States. On their arrival in this country
they at once proceeded to Iowa, where they established their home on a farm,
on wliich they lived and prospered until the time of their deaths some years
ago. They were held in the highest regard and esteem in the community in
which they lived. Their lives were active ones and they accomplished much
in the new land, among strangers and amid new conditions. They were the
parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second
born.

Vencel [Malicky received his education in the schools of Bohemia and in
the state of Iowa. He grew to manhood on the home farm in \\^ashington
county, Iowa, and assisted liis father with the work on the home place. In
1875 he started farming for himself, his father having given him forty acres
of land in Washington county, Iowa. He farmed this tract until 1880, when
he moved to Nebraska, where he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land
in Gage county. There he made many improvements and did much in the
way o^. developing the farm, and made that place his home until 1885. He
then sold out and invested in one hundred and sixty acres of government
land in Oketo township, Marshall county. This was excellent land, but
undeveloped and unimproved, being a part of the Indian Reservation of that
section of the country. Here he built a fine frame house and has made many
valuable improvements on the place, which he has since made his home. He
is engaged in general farming and stock raising with much success. He



6/8 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

keeps a fine lot of Shorthorn cattle and some splendid hogs, and is recognized
as one of the successful and substantial men of the county.

In 1875 j\Ir. Malicky was united in marriage to Antonia Vesely who
was born in Bohemia on June 2, 1855. She spent a part of her childhood in
that country and at the age of nine years she came with her parents to the
United States and settled with them in the state of Iowa, where she received
her education and there grew to womanhood. To Mr. and Mrs. Malicky
have been born the following children : Vencel, Anthony, John, Emma,
Milton, Joseph, Charles, Frank, Rose, Stella, Tillie and Anna. Vencel is
farming the home place; Anthony is a resident of Barston, Nebraska; Emma
Chadima is living in Nebraska ; Joseph and Stella are now deceased ; Charles,
Rose and Anna are at home; Frank is a farmer in Nebraska, and Tillie is a
graduate of the Oketo high school and is now- taking a course in deaconess
work at the National Training School of Kansas City, Missouri. Mr. and
Mrs. Malicky with their family are active members of the Methodist Epis-
copal church and have long been active in the social and the religious life
of the district.

Politically, Mr. Malicky is identified with the Democratic party and has
served in his present position as a member of the school board for the past
thirty years. He has always taken keen interest in local affairs and has had
much to do with the civic life of the township, of which he is one of the pro-
gressive men. He is a stockholder of the co-operative store and the mills
at Oketo.



A. B. SAATHOFF.



It is a well-established principle, that w'herever the native German has
settled, he has for the most part made a success of his work, and this is
especialh- true of those who have engaged in farming and stock raising.
Among the numljer who have met with success in Marshall county, is A. B.
Saathofi^, who was born in Germany in 1844, and in that country was edu-
cated and grew to manhood.



Online LibraryEmma Elizabeth Calderhead FosterHistory of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions → online text (page 65 of 104)