Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Foster.

History of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions online

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They have been progressive, hard-working and economical people, who by
their own efforts have made good in their work. Mr. Vanamburg is a mem-



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 829

ber of the Modern Woodmen of America and is one of the hustlers of the
local lodge.

In 19 1 2 Mr. Vanamburg engaged in the poultry business to a large
extent and has met with much success, shipping his chickens to many of the
states of the Union. He is also a successful general farmer and breeder and
raiser of fine horses, cattle and hogs.



HENRY W. MOELLER.



Henry W. Moeller, a successful farmer and one of the well-known resi-
dents of Marysville township, Marshall county, was born in this county,
on January 25, 1878, and is the son of Fred W. and Mary (Holle) Moeller.

Fred W. Moeller was born in Buckeburg, Germany, April 7, 1843, ^^^
there received his education in the public schools and grew to manhood.
He continued to reside in Germany until 1855, when he decided to come to
America, where he might have a better opportunity to obtain a home. After
his arrival in the United States he proceeded to Illinois and after some years
he rented a farm and engaged in farming for five years. He was married
on June 2y, 1867, to Mary Holle. He came to Kansas in 1869, where he
bought one hundred and sixty acres of land near Marysville. This farm
he developed and improved and became one of the successful farmers of the
township. Here he made his home for many years when he retired from
the farm, and moved to Marysville, where he operated a hotel and saloon
for some time, and there he died on January 23, 1890. For a number of
. years he devoted a part of his time to the work of an auctioneer, and was
recognized as one of the best in the district. He was able to speak both
English and German in his work, and was thus in a position to make his
profession niost effective. Mr. Moeller was county commissioner for one
term of three years — 1876-79.

Mary (Holle) Moeller was born in Hessen, Germany, on December 3,
1845, ^^^^ there received her education in the common schools and there spent
her girlhood days. As a young woman she came to the United States in 1867
and located in Illinois, where she was united in marriage to Mr. Moeller the
same year. They were residents of that state for some time after their
marriage, and came to Kansas in 1869. She and Mr. Moeller were members
of the German Lutheran church and were- prominent in the social life of the
conmiunity. To them were born ten children, two of whom died in infancy.



830 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

and Charles H. died in California in 191 6 at the age of forty-five years. Mary
Schroeder resides in Omaha, Nebraska, where her husband is a cigar-maker;
Christina Luedders resides in Marysville, where Mr. Luedders is a clothing
merchant ; Fred H. lives at Emporia, Kansas, and is the agent of a wholesale
grocery company; Philip is at Omaha and is engaged as a cigar manufac-
turer; Henry W. is the subject of this sketch; Emma Moser is a resident
of Thomas, Oklahoma, where her husband is a farmer, and Alma Huber
resides at Blair, Oklahoma, where Mr. Huber is a banker. After the death
of her husband, in 1890 Mrs. Moeller remarried in 1893 to John I)uever
and lived on the farm till the death of Mr. Duever on February 23, 1904.
]\Irs. Duever, two years later, became the wife of Peter Rahde in 1906 and
now resides at Marysville.

Henry W. Moeller received his education in the common schools of
Marshall county, and at the age of fifteen years, began life for himself.
For three years he worked as a farm hand, after which he worked in a
bakery at Lincoln, Nebraska, for five years. He then gave up his work as
a baker and returned to farm life. He rented a farm of one hundred and
sixty acres, near Marysville, where he remained for one year, when he
purchased his present farm of one hundred and forty-seven acres in Marys-
ville township. He is successfully engaged in general farming and stock
raising, and gives much attention to the breeding and the raising of Short-
horn cattle and Duroc- Jersey hogs, and has some of the finest of these ani-
mals to be found in this section of the county. He feeds all the grain that
he raises, selling the finished hogs and cattle rather than the grain.

On June 4, 1899, Henry Moeller was united in marriage to Rosa Klug,
the daughter of Jonathan and Henrietta (Wiscow) Klug. Mr. Klug was
born on May 14, 1849, in Wisconsin. Mrs. Klug was born on April 5,
1855, in Abbot Sherman. Wisconsin. Mr. Klug came to Nebraska in 1875
and there purchased a tract of land, where he has since been successfully
engaged in farming. He and his wife are active members of the German
Lutheran church, of which Mr. Klug has served as trustee for many years.
They are the parents of seven children, five of whom are now living, as
follow: Rosa, Matilda, Frank, Lizzie and Jessie. Matilda Goeble is a
resident of Lincoln, Nebraska, where Mr. Goeble is employed in the parks;
Frank is a farmer and is now on the home place ; Lizzie Knuistadt is a widow
and is at home with her parents, and Jessie is at home.

Rosa (Klug) Moeller was born in Seward county, Nebraska, on March
18, 1879, and was reared on the home farm and educated in the common
schools of her community. Before her marriage she did some work away



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 83 1

from home. She and her husband are active members of the German
Lutheran church and are prominent in the social hfe of the township, and
are active members of the Knights and Ladies of Security. Mr. Moeller is
also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Bankers Life
Insurance Company of Nebraska. They are the parents of the following
children: Uneeda, born on September 23, 1900; Elsie, August 28, 1902;
Arthur, May 22, 1905; x\lma, April 19, 1907; Marietta, October 28, 1912,
and Henry Ford, December 4, 191 5. Alma died at the age of five years
in 1912.

Henry W. Moeller has by his own efforts risen from the position of a
poor boy, making his own way in the world, since the age of fifteen years,
to that of one of the substantial and influential men of the township, honored
and respected by all who know him. His life has been one of activity
and he has accomplished much that is worthy of note, and has always taken
a keen interest in local affairs. As a farmer and stockman he is recognized
as one of the most progressive and successful in the county.



JAMES L. POTEET.



James L. Poteet, deceased, was for many years a well-known farmer
and stockman in Richland township, Marshall county. He was born on
July 8, 1859, and died on February 19, 1915, after a useful and successful
life. As a lad he located in Nebraska with his parents and there he was
married on February 23, 1898, to Celest White, a native of Illinois and the
daughter of Joseph and Lillie White, and after their marriage they estab-
lished their home on a farm in Kansas, where they always lived.

Soon after their marriage, James L. Poteet and wife rented land one
mile south of Summerfield. They had no money, yet they purchased one
hundred and sixty acres of land, in the fall of that year. To this they
later added more land and became the owners of four hundred and eighty
acres. It was by close management and application to business that they
met with success. Mr. Poteet was a good manager and a man possessed
of much business acumen. He thoroughly developed his excellent farm
and erected a magnificent modern house of ten rooms in 1912. He installed
every modern convenience such as water, lights, bath and a furnace.

Mr. and Mrs. Poteet were for many years active members of the United
Presbyterian church and took much interest in all church work and were



8;^2 MARSHALL COUNTY. KANSAS.

prominent in the social life of the community, where they were held in the
highest regard. Mr. Poteet was identified with the Repnljlican party and
always took much interest in local affairs, and was a man in whom all had
the utmost confidence. He was a home man and after his marriage he never
spent a night away from home. He and Mrs. Poteet were the parents of
one child, I.uther. who is now thirteen years of age and attending the public
schools.

Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Poteet. has with much ability and
success, managed the home farm and rents one hundred and sixty acres
of the tract. With some hired help she has met with great success in
her general farming and stock raising.



ED. W. RINGEN.



Ed. \V. Ringen, one of the w^ell-known and successful farmers and
stockmen of Richland township, Marshall county, was born in Dearborn
county, Indiana, on ]\Iarch 5, 1865, the son of John and Louisa (Rholfing)
Ringen.

John and Louisa Ringen were natives of Pennsylvania and Germany,
respectively. The father came of German ancestors and was educated in
the schools of Pennsylvania and there grew to manhood. He later moved to
Dearborn county, Indiana, where he engaged in general farming and stock
raising for many years. He and his wife were among the highly respected
people of the community. Their later years were spent in the Hoosier state
and there they died some years ago.

Ed. W. Ringen received his education in the common schools of his
home district and grew to manhood in Dearborn county, Indiana, and there
he lived until he was twenty-two years of age. At that time he decided to
seek a new location, and in 1887 he came to Kansas, locating in Richland
township, Marshall county, and here he worked by the month for some years.
After having spent some eight years of his life working for fifteen dollars
per month, he rented land until 1907, when he purchased his present farm.
Here he has made all the improvements and today has one of the best
developed and nicely improved places in the township.

On March 19, 1891, Ed. W. Ringen was united in marriage to Anna
Heiserman. who was born at Lincoln, Illinois, on November 30, 1868, the
daughter of Fred and Mary (Hund) Heiserman. The father of Mrs.



MARSHALL COUNTY. KANSAS. 833

Ringen was a native of Germany, having been born in that country on Janu-
ary 25, 1834. It was there that he received his education in the public
schools and there he continued to live until he was twenty-one years of age,
when he left the land of his nativity and came to the United States. In 1855
he came to this country and at once established himself as a farm hand in the
state of Illinois. There he married Mary Hund, who was born in 1847.
Some years after their marriage they came to Kansas, with horses and wagon
and established themselves on a homestead of eighty acres of land in Rich-
land township, Kansas. This farm was later developed and improved and
here Mr. Heiserman engaged in general farming and stock raising for many
years, with much success. He soon became the owner of two hundred and
forty acres of land and was one of the prominent men of the township. On
that farm his wife died in 1908. They were the parents of the following
children: Henry, of Liberty, Kansas; WilHam, now a farmer of Oklahoma;
Jacob, of Norton county, Kansas; George, a successful farmer of Marshall
county; John, of Oklahoma; Fred, of Smith county, Charles, a farmer of
Richland township; Albert, on the home farm; Walter, a farmer of Mar-
shall county; Anna; Rosa, the wife of William Ringen; Lillie, the wife of
John Wagner, of Richland township, and Edward, of Oketo township. Mr.
and Mrs. Heiserman were ever prominent in the social life of the community,
and were active in the moral and educational development of the township,
and were among the highly respected people of the district.

To Ed. W. and Anna Ringen have been born the following children :
Herbert Duncan, now deceased; Walter, born on October 24, 1892, and Cora
born on January 4, 1895. Walter is a graduate of the State Agricultural
School and thoroughly versed in the art of scientific farming. Mr. and Mrs.
Ringen are active members of the German Lutheran church and are prom-
inent in the social and the religious life of the county. Politically, Mr.
Ringen is identified with the Republican party and has ever taken a keen
interest in all local affairs, and is regarded as one of the progressive and
substantial men of the township. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen
of America and of the American Hereford Cattle Breeders Association.

During their early lives, both Mr. and Mrs. Ringen experienced many
of the hardships common to the children of the pioneer families. Mrs.
Ringen, being the eldest girl in the family, had much of the household duties
to perform, and her task was no easy proposition. Their educational advan-
tages were limited, and even when in school they scarcely ever attended more
than two or three days a week. As boy and girl, in their respective homes,

(53)



8:^4 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

thev learned well how to do the work both in the house and on the farm.
After their marriage they applied themselves to the task of getting a home
and making it one of the best in the district. They have always taken much
interest in the educational development, and their children arc having the
advantages of the best training the schools afford. Many labor-saving
devices are installed in their home, and the washing, churning and the pump-
ing of the water is all done 1)y machinery. The house is a splendid one and
has every mtjdern convenience and is nicely located. The barns are com-
plete and modern in every particular, and are arranged in the most systematic
wav possible.

Mr. Ringen's cattle are aniong the best in this section of the state.
"Rocky Boy", the head of the herd, lie obtained from Vermillion, and is a
beautiful animal. Mr. Ringen exhil^ited him at the Royal Stock Show at
Kansas City when he was five years old, in 1913. He is the sire of "Rocky
Bob Xo. 560081", an animal in which the owner has the greatest confidence
for future greatness. "Plumber" is another noted sire on the place, and was
obtained in Nebraska. In addition to the sires, Mr. Ringen has some sixty
cows on the farm.



JOSEPH A. SEDLACEK.

Joseph A. Sedlacek, one of the w-ell-known and successful business men
of Bremen, ^Marshall county, w'here he conducts an extensive business in hard-
ware, furniture, automobiles and musical instruments, was born in Bohemia
on June 21, 1853, the son of John and Katherine (Pecenka) Sedlacek.

John and Katherine Sedlacek were also natives of Bohemia, the former
having been born in 1802 and the latter in 182 1. They were reared on the
farm and received the educational advantages of excellent schools. After
completing his education, John Sedlacek engaged in farming until 1874, when
he retired from active life, but lived on the home place. In 1878 he came to
the United States to visit his son, Joseph A. Sedlacek, and remained in this
country two years, when he returned to his native land and died on the home
farm in January, 1889; his wife died in 1878. Mr. Sedlacek, before his mar-
riage to Katherine Pecenka, had been married to Anna Jenik, w^ho was born
in 1794 and died at the birth of her son, John, who lived to be forty years of
age. She was a highly educated woman.

John Sedlacek later married Katherine Pecenka, and to that union nine
children were born, of whom three are now living as follow: Frank and



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 835

Wesley, of Bohemia, and Joseph. Mr. and Airs. Sedlacek were devout mem-
bers of the Catholic church and were held in high regard. John Sedlacek was
a man of much prominence and for five years was royal game warden of his
district, a position of much moment. He was also a veterinary surgeon and
had an extensive practice, throughout the territory. He was a strong advo-
cate of the best schools and the highest class of public improvements.

Joseph A. Sedlacek had the advantages of good schools and supple-
mented his primary education with three years in a school of practical educa-
tion at Moravia. After completing his education he engaged in business for
himself and in 1876 came to the United States. He spent nine months in this
country and then returned to his native land, but the next year he returned to
America, and located in Marshall county, Kansas, where he purchased one
hundred and sixty acres of land in section 31, Logan township. This he
developed and improved and engaged in general farming and stock raising
for ten years, when he rented the farm and moved to Bremen. When he
located on his farm it was all wild prairie and the only improvements were a
dugout and a well. He was in a position to make many needed improve-
ments, as he landed in the county with over seventeen hundred dollars, which
he brought from Bohemia. A frame house, good barn and corn crib were
erected and in time many other valuable additions were made on the place,
which, with the cost of land bought of Mr. Brennen, amounted to one thousand
and twenty-five dollars.

When locating in Bremen, Mr. Sedlacek purchased two lots, on which he
erected a two-story business block and residence at a cost of thirty-five hun-
dred dollars. The upper floor of the business block he devoted to a public
hall, and in the lower part he installed an up-to-date hardware business which
he conducted with success until 1908, when the premises was destroyed by
fire, his loss being several thousand dollars. The fire that destroyed his prop-
erty also burned the greater part of the business section of the town. The
year he had the fire he rebuilt, this time building a structure of brick, thirty-
two by sixty-eight feet, and two stories, the upper story being devoted to a
hall and four bed-rooms. The new building was in time completed at a cost
of eight thousand five hundred dollars, and Mr. Sedlacek soon established his
stock, valued at nine hundred dollars, which now stands at seven thousand
five hundred dollars. In addition to his mercantile business, Mr. Sedlacek
was for two terms justice of the peace and postmaster of the town from
April 13, 1908, to January i, 191 5, when his son, who is associated with him
in business, assumed the office.

Joseph A. Sedlacek was united in marriage on August 27, 1878, to Anna



836 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

Pecenka. the dauohter of John and Anna (FHdr) Pecenka. John and Anna
Pecenka were natives of Bohemia, where the former was born in 1825 and
the latter in 1830. They received their education in good schools in their
native land. After completing his education, John Pecenka engaged in grist-
milling in his native land and continued in that business until 1861, when he
came to the United States. On his arrival in this country he and his family
proceeded to Iowa, where the father rented a farm and engaged in general
farming for eight years. He then came to Marshall county, w^here he home-
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land and at the same time pre-empted
one hundred and sixty acres. With much hard work and strict economy he
developed the farm and soon had it under a high state of cultivation, and here
he engaged in general farming and stock raising until his death in 1902. For
many years he was recognized as one of the substantial and progressive men
of the township, where he and his family were among the prominent and
respected residents. Before his marriage to Anna Pecenka, John Pecenka
had been united in marriage to Kate Kasper, who died at the birth of her
daughter and when her only son was two years of age.

Anna (Pecenka) Sedlacek was born in Bohemia on January 15, 1857,
and when four years of age came with her parents to the United States. She
received her education in the public schools of Marshall county. Mr. and
Mrs. Sedlacek are devout members of the Catholic church and have always
taken a deep interest in the social and civic life of the community. To them
have been born the following children : Anna and Emilie, who died in infancy.
Anna was a graduate of the Marysville Modern Normal College and. later
clerked in one of the stores of her home town. Her death occurred when
she was tw^enty-eight years of age. John J., who was born on May 7, 1890,
in Marshall county, was reared in Bremen, Kansas, and graduated from the
common schools and from St. Benedict's College at Atchison, Kansas, where
he completed a four-year course of instruction in two years, receiving the
degree of Master of Accounts, and was graduated in June, 1907. After
completing his education he clerked for a time in one of the stores at Marys-
ville, after which he came to Bremen, where he is now associated with his
father in business, and is postmaster of that place.

On August 27, 19 1 3, John J. Sedlacek was united in marriage to Kathe-
rine Jedlicka, the daughter of Frank and Ludmila (Hora) Jedlicka, who were
natives of Bohemia and later settled in Washington county, Kansas, where
they are now the owners of two hundred and forty acres of fine land and
are among the prominent people of that section. Katherine (Jedlicka)
Sedlacek was born in 1891 and received her education in the common schools.



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 837

She and Air. Sedlacek are the parents of two children, John ]., born on
December 13, 1914, and Katherine M., born on February 16, 1916. The
family are devout members of the Catholic church and active in the social
life of the community.



JOSEPH B. WUESTER.

Joseph B. Wuester was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, in the year 1858.
In i860 his parents came to Marshall county, Kansas, and located on a farm
three miles north of Beattie, where he grew to manhood. In the year 1880
he was united in marriage to Aliss Rosa R. Schwarz and remained on the
farm until 1884. when they engaged in the general mercantile and grain
business in Home City. Kansas, which they conducted for about twenty
years. In 1904 he organized the State Bank of Home City where he has
always enjoyed the confidence of the people and prospered in business.

To this union were born three children, William, who died at the age
of five years; Joseph W. and Charlotte R. Harry, both of whom reside in
Home City. Charlotte R. was born on August 24, 1885, and was married
to S. C. Harry, January 3, 1909. To them was born one child, Audrey
La-Xelle. March 2T,, 1914- Joseph W. was born on November 26, 1887;
he was married to Ruby Haw, September 18. 191 1. To them were born
two children. Charlotte La-Verne. January 25, 1913, and Blanche, June
18, 1916.



JOHN W. DENLINGER.

The late John ^^^ Denlinger, a well-known and substantial farmer of
Marshall county, who died at his home in Rock township in 191 5, was a
native of the great Keystone state, but had lived in the West since the days
"of his childhood. He was born at Blair, Pennsylvania, April 9, 1854, a
son of John and ^Margaret (Wort) Denlinger, natives of that same state,
who moved to Iowa about i860, where the subject of this memorial sketch
grew to manhood and where he lived until 1893, when he came to Kansas
and bought a farm in Center township, this county, where he made his home
until March of 1901, when he moved to a farm that he had bought
in Rock township the year before and on which he spent the remainder
of his life, his death occurring there on December 10, 1915. At



838 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

the time of his death Mr. DenHnf,^er was the owner of four hundred and
forty acres of land and was regarded as one of the best circumstanced men
in that part of the county. He was a Democrat and had served the pul)lic
for two terms as treasurer of Center township and for three terms as a
member of the school board. He was a member of the Baptist church, as
is his widow, and ever took a proper part in local good works. Mrs. Denlinger
is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres surrounding her
pleasant home in Rock township and she and her family are very comfortably
situated.

John W. Denlinger was twice married. It was while living in Iowa
that he was united in marriage to Ella Ford, who died on October 25, 1893.
To that union five children were born, namely: John, deceased; George,
deceased ; Burt, who is a well-known farmer in Rock township, this county ;
]\Irs. Jessie Waite, of Axtun, Colorado, who died May 7, 191 /, and Orval,
who died on July 3, 1897. George Denlinger was frozen to death on
January 13, 1888, during a fearful blizzard in Iowa. He and his brother,
John, w^ere on their way home from school w^ien overtaken by the blizzard
which cost George his life, while John was badly frozen, but was not past
resuscitation when found by a search party. John Denlinger, who came to
IMarshall county with his father upon the latter's removal from Iowa, was
killed by an accidental shot during a "wolf drive" in this county on Janu-
ary 21, 191 3. He left a widow and two small children, the youngest of



Online LibraryEmma Elizabeth Calderhead FosterHistory of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions → online text (page 82 of 104)