Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Foster.

History of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions online

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for four years, his friends declaring that his administration of the affairs
of that important office was the most satisfactorv that had ever been ren-
dered there.

On January 7, 1890, at the Catliolic church of St. John the Baptist at
Hanover, in the neighboring county of Washington, Anthony C. Pecenka



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 86/

was united in marriage to Cliristina Pacha (Pejsa), who was born at Min-
clen, in Sanilac county, Michigan, April 17, 1865, daughter of Matej and
Marie Pejsa, Bohemians, who were married in their native land and later
came to America, presently settling in Michigan, where the former died,
his widow later coming to Kansas with her children and establishing her
home here. Matej, or Mathias, Pejsa was born in the village of Drhovice
No. 2, in the kingdom of Bohemia (Cechy), February 24, 1806, and his
wife, Marie Placha, was born in the neighboring village of Drazice No. 18,
February 19, 1824. They were married in the latter village on November
26, 1844, and five children were born to them in Europe. In the latter
part of September. 1853, they came to the United States and located in the
city of Cleveland, Ohio, in the latter part of December of that same year.
In the February following twins were born to them. In August, 1854,
Matej Pejsa and his family moved up into Canada and there remained until
in May, 1859, when they moved down into Michigan and settled in Sanilac
county, Matej Pejsa buying a tract of land in the immediate vicinity of
Minden, in that county. The land agent at Detroit, from whom he pur-
chased the land, had difficulty with the spelling of the foreign name and
with a careless disregard for the proper preservation of the family name
and the accuracy of the land record, recorded the purchase in the name of
"Matthis Pacha." which latter spelling of the name, in order to keep the
record straight, the family afterward observed and has since maintained,
all the members of this considerable family, with the exception of Albert
Pejsa, of Hanover, this state, continuing to spell the name Pacha. Matej
Pejsa died in Michigan in November, 1868, and his widow maintained her
residence there until 1875, when she came to Kansas with her family and
established her home on a farm, where her last days were spent, her death
occurring on June 5, 1895. Of the large family of children born to Matej
Pejsa and wife, Mrs. Pecenka is the youngest, the others of these children
who grew to maturity, several having died in infancy, being as follow.
Frank, of Pleasant Plain, Iowa; Jacob, of that same place; Matej, of Rich-
wood, Union county, Ohio ; Mrs. Mary Benda, of Lanham, Nebraska ;
Joseph, of Marysville, this county; Mrs. Katherina Triska, of Hanover;
Mrs. Anna Klecan, of Hanover; Mrs. Elizabeth Hladik, who died on Feb-
ruary I, 1893; John, of Black Duck, Minnesota, and Albert, of Hanover.

To Anthony C. and Christina (Pejsa) Pecenka have been born eight
children, namely: John Anthony, born on January 5, 1891 ; Katherina and
Christina (twins), February i, 1893; Mary, December 11, 1898, who died
on April 8, 1901 ; Mary, October 4, 1901 ; Zita, April 24, 1903; Francis



868 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

Anthony. May ii, 1906, who died on July 13. 1906, and Francis Alois,
August 6. 1908, all of whom are at home. Katherine Pecenka was gradu-
ated from the Marysville high school in the spring of 1917. Mr. and Mrs.
Pecenka are memhers of the Catholic church and their children have been
reared in the faith of that church. The family have a very pleasant home
and have ever taken a proper part in the general good works and social
activities of the community in which they live, helpful in promoting the
general welfare.



FRANK SEDIVY.



Frank Sedivy, one of the well-known and successful farmers and
stockmen of Blue Rapids City township, Marshall county, where he is the
owner of two hundred and ten acres of splendid land in section 2, was born
in Bohemia on December 13, i860, and is the son of Frank and Anna
(IMachacek) Sedivy.

Frank and Anna Sedivy were also natives of Bohemia and there they
received their education in the schools of that country, grew up and were
later married. They established their home in their native land and con-
tinued to live there until 1870, when they decided to come to America,
where they might better have an opportunity to make a home for them-
selves and those dependent upon them. On their arrival in the United
States they at once proceeded to Iowa, where they resided for a year, after
w'hich they came to Kansas, and here they settled in Marshall county, near
the Riley county line. A home was made on the homestead of eighty acres,
where the father engaged in general farming and stock raising until the
time of his death in 1885, at the age of fifty-five years. His wife, who was
born in 1835, died in 1908. During their residence in the county, where
they led worthy lives, they made many friends, who held them in much
regard and esteem. They were the parents of the following children : Frank,
Louis, Anna and William. Louis is a resident of Cottage Hill township,
Marshall county, where he is the owner of two farms and he is successfully
engaged in general farming and stock raising. Anna is the widow of L.
Swacha and is living in Grant county, Oklahoma. William is a well-known
farmer of Blue Rapids township.

Frank Sedivy resided in the land of his birth until he w^as ten years
of age, when he came to this country with his parents and with them settled
in Marshall countv. Here he received his education in the common schools



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 869

and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted his
father with the farm work and became impressed with the dignity and inde-
pendence of the hfe of a farmer. In 1891 he purchased a farm of eighty
acres four miles south of the town of Blue Rapids. The farm at that time
was for the most part undeveloped and unimproved. Mr. Sedivy at once
entered into the task of making development of the place, and in addition
to the building of a good house and barn, he made many other valuable
improvements that added much to the beauty and the value of the place.
In 1904 he traded the farm for his present place in Blue Rapids City town-
ship. Here he has erected several buildings and made many valuable im-
provements. Today he is known as one of the substantial and successful
men of the township and the county. He is a stockholder of the Farmers'
Elevator Company and of the Fair Association of Blue Rapids.

Politically, Mr. Sedivy is identified with the Republican party and has
always taken an active interest in local affairs, and for many years has been
a member of the local school board. He is a progressive citizen and takes
the keenest interest in the development of the schools of the township, and
has had much to do with the growth and prosperity of the county in general.

On March 31, 1891, Frank Sedivy was united in marriage to Antonia
Pishny, who was born in Moravia, on February 7, 1865, ^.nd is the daughter
of Ignatz and Antonia (Roman) Pishny. Her parents were also natives
of Moravia and there they received their education in the schools of that
country and grew to maturity and were married. They were the parents
of five boys and two daughters, and when the daughter Antonia was thir-
teen years of age, in 1878, the parents decided to come to America. Here
they located in Cottage Hill township, Marshall county, Kansas, where they
still reside. Mr. Pishny is eighty-five years old and has retired from farm
work. Each of his sons are living on their own farms in the same town-
ship.

To Frank and Antonia Sedivy have been born five children, as follow :
Richard, Bessie, Helen, George and Mila. Richard, a graduate of the ani-
mal husbandry course of the Kansas State Agricultural College, is employed
at Tremonton, Utah. Miss Bessie is a graduate of the short course of
Kansas State Agt-icultural College. Helen is a graduate of the Blue Rapids
high school and is now one of the successful teachers of Marshall county,
and Georgia is a student in the Blue Rapids high school and is completing
her senior year.

Mr. and Mrs. Sedivy endured many of the hardships of life, before
they succeeded. Now they have many friends in their community and are
held in the highest regard by all.



870 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

TOT IX RUEGER.

Among the many well-known residents and successful farmers and
stockmen of Guittard township, Marshall county, is John Rueger, who was
born in Sauk county, Wisconsin, on September 8, 1863, the son of Leonard
and Leona Rueger.

Leonard Ivueger was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1820, and there
received his education in the public schools and grew to manhood. When
but a young man he left his native land and came to the United States, and
after his arrival in this country he proceeded at once to Wisconsin, where
he engaged in general farming until 1874. He then came to Kansas and
located in Balderson township, Marshall county, where he first purchased
eighty acres of land, on which he built a log house, in which he and his
family lived for a number of years. After having settled on the land he
at once engaged in the breaking of the tract, and with his oxen he soon had
some of the farm under cultivation. He later purchased another one hun-
dred and sixty acres of land, which he sold to his sons, and at the time of
his death in 1888 he was the ow^ner of eighty acres of excellent land.

Leonard Rueger was first married to Leona Rueger and by her he was
the father of five children, of whom John was the youngest. After the
death of Leona Rueger, Leonard Rueger was later married to Roseine
Wendle, and to this union tw^o children were born. Mrs. Rueger is now
living in western Kansas at the age of eighty-one years. Mr. Rueger and
his family were active members of the Catholic church and were for many
years prominent in the social life of the community in which they lived, and
where they were held in the highest regard and esteem.

John Rueger received his education in the local schools, and was ten
years of age when he came to Kansas with his parents. As a lad he began
working for six dollars per month on the farm, and for thirty-one years he
\vorked for Xavier Guittard, who owned the section of land, where John
Rueger now owns one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. Rueger purchased the
tract from Mr. Guittard, having earned the money during his many years
of labor on the place. Tn addition to this one hundred and sixty acres of
excellent land, he is the owner of another eighty acres, that he has added
to his original place. He is engaged in general farming and stock-raising
with much success and keeps a fine lot of Durham cattle and many fine hogs.
He is also a shareholder in the Union elevator at Beattie, and is recognized
as one of the prominent and successful residents of the township.



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. S/I

In 1907 John Rueger was married to Mary Wiler, who was born in
Switzerland on February 26. 1878. and is the daughter of Christ and EHza-
beth (Street) Wiler. Mr. and Mrs. Wiler were also natives of that coun-
try and there they received their education in the public schools, grew to
maturity and were married. After their marriage they continued to live in
the land of their nativity until 1881. when they .decided that they would
come to the United States. On arriving in this country they located in
Balderson township, Marshall county, where they lived nine years, after
which they moved to Oklahoma, where they lived until the time of their
deaths some years ago. They were the parents of seven children, all of
whom are now living.

To John and Mary Rueger have been born two children, Arthur F.,
who was born on February 10, 1908, and Eugene J., born on January 7,
19 1 3. Mr. and Mrs. Rueger are devout members of the Catholic church
and have long been prominent in the social life of the district. They have
always taken a keen interest in the development of the educational and the
social life of the community, and are held in the highest regard for their
many excellent qualities.

Mr. Rueger has seen many changes in the country since as a lad he
herded cattle for Guittard. During those early days much of the country
was a wild tract of prairie land, and at times not less than four hundred
Indians were encamped not far from the present home of Mr. Rueger.



JOSEPH MANNING.

Joseph Manning, one of Franklin township's well-known and substan-
tial farmers, an honored veteran of the Civil War and the owner of a fine
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in section 18 of that township, is a
native of Ohio, but has been a resident of Marshall county since 1870, when
he came here from Iowa with his family and settled in Franklin township,
where he ever since has made his home, one of the best-known pioneers of
that part of the county. Joseph ^Manning was born on a farm in Franklin
township, Clermont county. Ohio, November 20. 1837, son of John and
Ursula B. (Morgan) Manning, both natives of that same state, the former
of whom also was born in Clermont county, son of John Manning, one of
the earliest settlers in that part of the state.

In 1850 the younger John Manning and his family left Ohio and moved



872 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

to Appanoose county. Iowa, where he estabHshed his home and where he
and his wife spent the remainder of their Hves, honored pioneer residents
of that county. They were the parents of eleven chldren, of whom the sub-
ject of this sketch was the fourth in order of birth. Joseph Alanning was
about thirteen years of age when his parents moved to Iowa and he at once
became a vahied assistant to his father in the labors of developing and im-
proving the new homestead. He was living there when the Civil War broke
out and in August, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company I, Thirty-
sixth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served with that command
for three years, or until the close of the war. Upon the completion of his
military service, Mr. Manning returned to his home in Iowa and on Decem-
ber 31, 1865, was united in marriage there to Maria I. Holshouser, who was
born in Putnam county, Indiana, August 30, 1849, fourth in order of birth
of the eight children born to her parents, Milus A. and Caroline (Atkinson)
Holshouser, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Indiana,
who moved from the Hoosier state to Iowa in 1850 and settled in Wapello
county, later moving to Appanoose county, where they spent their last days.
A few years after his marriage Joseph Manning and his wife came to
Kansas and pre-empted a homestead of a quarter of a section of land in
section 18 of Franklin township, this county, with the view to establishing
a home there, but five years later returned to their old home in Appanoose
county, Iowa, where they remained until 1883, when they returned to their
homestead farm in this county and here have resided ever since, long having
been regarded as among the most substantial and influential residents of
that part of the county. ]\Ir. Manning also owns a quarter of a section of
land in Jewell county. For years he has given considerable attention to the
raising of Shorthorn cattle and formerly was an exhibitor at county fairs
and stock shows, once having received a prize on his cattle at the county
fair. ]\Ir. ^Manning is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's
attention to local political affairs, having held several township offices at one
time and another. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church
and have ever given their thoughtful attention to the afTairs of the same. To
them six children have been born, namely: William A., who died in in-
fancv; Nevada A., who died at the old family home in Iowa on February
14, 1882, at the age of fourteen years; Edward A., now a bookkeeper in the
office of a cement factory at Kansas City, Missouri, who married Miss
Nellie Faulkner, of Marysville, and has two children, a son and a daughter;
Gertrude M.. who married Clarence Bevers, a farmer living near Beattie,
this countv, and has one child, a son; Hallie ]M., who married Dr. E. L.



MARSHALL COUNTY^ KANSAS. 8/3

Wilson. Jr., of Alarysville, and O. Clyde Manning, who is at home assist-
ing his father in the management of the home farm. The Mannings have
a very pleasant home and have ever taken a proper part in the social activi-
ties of their home neighborhood, helpful in advancing all good causes there-
about.



HERMAN J. ANDERSON.

Among the native sons of Sweden who have come to the United States
and settled in Cottage Hill township, ]\Iarshall county, and here success-
fully engaged in general farming and stock raising, is Herman J. Ander-
son, who was born in the west part of Sweden on March 20, 1862, being
the son of Jacob and Lottie (Swenson) Anderson.

The parents of Herman J. Anderson were also natives of Sweden and
there they received their education in the public schools and grew to matur-
ity and were married. They continued to live in the land of their nativity
until 1869, at which time they decided to come to America. On their arrival
in the United States they came direct to Kansas, where they established
their home in Riley county. Here the father homesteaded a tract of land
which he later developed and improved into a splendid farm, and there he
engaged in general farming and stock raising until the time of his death
in 1879, at the age of fifty-five years. His wife was born in 1826 and died
in 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were excellent people and were held in
the highest regard and esteem by all who knew them.

Herman J. Anderson received his education in the district schools of
Riley county and there grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad
and young man he assisted his father with the farm work. After the death
of the father, Mr. Anderson assumed the management of the home place,
where he remained until 1886, when he came to Marshall county and pur-
chased a part of his present large farm of some eight hundred acres. The
farm was much smaller at the start, but he has added to the original tract,
as he could and as he prospered. He has two sets of farm buildings, which
are most substantial and well kept.

It was in 1884 that Herman J. Anderson was united in marriage to
Mary Isaacson, a native of Sweden, and who came to the United States
with her parents at the time the parents of her future husband came to this
country. The family settled in Riley county and there her father home-
steaded a farm which he developed and improved, and there he engaged in



8/4 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS,

general farminj^ and stock raising until the time of his death in 1904, at the
age of seventy years. The widow of John Isaacson is now living at her
home in Riley county at the age of eighty years.

To Herman J. and Alary Anderson have been born the following chil-
dren: Edward, William, Elmer. Mabel and Alice. Edward, who is now
thirtv years of age, is farming a part of his father's farm; William, twenty-
eight years of age, is engaged in general farming on a part of his father's
farm ; Elmer, nineteen years of age, and Mabel, sixteen years old, are both
at home; Alice died at the age of five months. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson
were active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and long prominent
in the social life of the township, where they were held in high regard and
esteem. Mrs. Anderson, a most estimable woman and one who made many
friends, was born on September 22, 1864, and departed this life at her home
in Cottage Hill township on January 21, 1916.

Politically, Mr. Anderson has always taken a keen interest in the civic
life of his home township and county, although not an office seeker, has
held the position of justice of the peace for one term. He is a man of
pleasing qualities, and because of his progressive spirit and excellent judg-
ment his advice is often sought on matters of public importance. He is a
stockholder in the County Fair Association and in the State Bank at Water-
ville. and also in the Elevator Company, the Telephone Company and the
Eumber Company at Waterville. He has always used his best interest in
the development of his home district and is a strong advocate of the build-
ing of good roads and the support of the best schools, and in these matters
his influence has been fraught with much good.



JOHN ALFRED LINDQUIST.

Among the many native born Swedes, who came to the United States
and located in Marshall county, is John Alfred Lindquist, of Cottage Hill
township, who was born on March 11, 1861, being the son of John and Caro-
lina Larson, who were also natives of Sweden, where they spent their lives
and there died some years ago. They were among the highly respected
people of the district in which they lived and they were held in the highest
regard and esteem. Their lives were spent in humble, but honorable circum-
stances. They were of a religious turn of mind, and they reared their
family to be honest men and women. Their lives were spent amid adverse



MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS. 875

circumstances, yet they were ambitious to have their children enjoy more
of the pleasures of life than was given to them.

John Alfred Lindquist remained a resident of his native country until
he was twenty-six years of age, when he decided that he would come to
America, where the advantages were better for young men and where he
might obtain a home for himself. After landing in the United States, with-
out a cent in cash, he at once proceeded to Waterville, Marshall county,
where he engaged as a farm hand, at sixteen dollars per month. He con-
tinued in this work for a year, and then he rented a farm and engaged in
general farming for himself for six years. He saved all that he could
during that time, and then he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of
land, which is a part of his present farm of four hundred acres in Cottage
Hill township. He paid two thousand nine hundred dollars for the place
and there were but few improvements on the farm at that time. He later
erected a splendid house and other farm buildings, but retained the old stone
barn that was on the place at the time he made the purchase. By hard
work and close application he has prospered in his work as a general farmer
and stockman and has increased his farm to its present large proportions,
and he is recognized as one of the substantial and influential men of the
township and county.

On October 6, 1889, John Alfred Lindquist was united in marriage to
Matilda Larson, who. was born in Sweden on October 2, 1861, the daughter
of Lars and Christina Gustafson. Her parents were also natives of that
country. There the parents received their education in the public schools
and there the father died in 1884. Three years after the death of the hus-
band and father, Mrs. Gustafson and her daughter, Matilda, came to the
United States, where the other members of the family had located some
time before, and it was here that the mother died shortly after her arrival
in this country. The family located in Kansas and here Mr. and Mrs.
Lindquist met and were later married. To them have been born the follow-
ing children : Carl Herman, Endfred Theadore, Hilder Eugenia, Albin
Herbert, Helga Matilda, Ernest Robert, Gerda Elfreda and Lillie Melvena.
Carl Herman is one of the successful young farmers of Cottage Hill town-
ship and is meeting with much success in his chosen work; Endfred Thea-
dore is a farmer of the county; Hilder Eugenia is the wife of Victor Nel-
son, a farmer of Cottage Hill township ; Helga Matilda is attending high
school at Waterville, and the other children are at home. Mr. and Mrs.
Lindquist are active members of the Lutheran church and are prominent in
all church work as well as in the social life of the 'community in which they



876 MARSHALL COUNTY, KANSAS.

live and where they are held in the highest regard and esteem. Mr. Lind-
qiiist is a deacon of the church in Cottage Hill township, and has had much
to do with the success of the local organization.

Politically, Mr. Lindquist is a member of the Republican party and has
always taken an active interest in local affairs. While he is not an office
seeker, he believes that every man should take an interest in the selection
of the best men to administer the affairs of the township, the county and
the state. In the life of Mr. Lindquist is well illustrated the result of con-
sistent work and close application to business. Coming to this country a
poor young man, he has risen to a position of one of the influential and
substantial men of the county.





Online LibraryEmma Elizabeth Calderhead FosterHistory of Marshall County, Kansas : its people, industries, and institutions → online text (page 86 of 104)