Emma Florence Cunliffe.

Southern accent, Sept. 2008-Apr. 2009 (Volume v.64) online

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segregation is an issue that
not only affects schools, but
churches and, at times, the
workplace. It is referred to
as the separation of races by
choice.

Melissa Tortal, an Asian-
American senior non-profit
administration major, believes
the issueis definitely prevalent
on campus. She said, "Walk
into the cafe or KR's and you
can see it. Not everyone self-
segregates, but it is there."

Faculty and staff also agree
with Tortal. Kevin Kibble, as-
sociate chaplain, believes that
a large majority of students
self-segregate.

Kibble believes a reason for
self-segregation is "our human
tendency to find comfort, sol-
ace and friendship in people
that we perceive have a large
degree of similarity with our
own."

Ludine Pierre,
a Haitian-Ameri-
can junior psy-
chology major,
believes the
reason is be-
cause Southern
houses a lot of
different people
from all around
the world with
different back-
grounds and up-
bringings.

It seems it
.would be
easier for a Hispanic to be-
friend another Hispanic be-
cause they share the same cul-
ture. The same goes for other
races.

In 2005, the Miami Herald



featured an article dem-
onstrating the self-
segregation of teen-
agers entering
high school in JSS

South Florida.
A freshman .'■'■.'■'

high school ■H
student was
quoted, "Kids
nowadays
don'tcareabout
the color of skin
anymore." Yet, ex-
perts showed that
many high school
students largely be-
friended their own. S
"Many of our stu- B8
dents are far from
home and need some Mm
sense of solidar-
ity of who they are
and what they are
hoping to find out <ii*
while they are here.
In most cases, but not
all, these parameters fall along
racial lines by default," Kibble
said.

Another reason for segrega-
tion at Southern is academies.
Depending on the geographi-
cal location of an academy,
many of them aren't particu-
larly diverse. In the Southern
Union, many academies are
predominately of one racial
color, unlike those in some
parts of the North and out
West. The academy mentality
usually lingers into college,
without consciousness of the
segregation being caused.

Stuart King, a white senior
international business major
who attended Georgia-Cum-
berland Academy, agreed.
"For me, college was just on
a larger scale from academy.
I applied the same formula I
used in high school, when it
came to activities, and brought
it to college, especially my
friendships."




The reasons for self-
segregation are logical. But
is it a good or bad concept to
have on a Christian campus?

Are students in some 4
way or another neglecting
others because of color?

Pierre said, "It is not .
necessarily a bad thing,
however, I think that if i
we are not willing to
be open to other cul- ffi
tures we end up ste-
reotyping big time... we
mistreat people based
on assumptions."

Kibble believes it
is important to find a M
system of support and
solidarity. But it is
also "very important
that young people in
an academic institution
generate a healthy curios-
ity about other people and
their ways."

While cultural identity
is important, it sometimes
deters people from getting to



know individuals from the in-
side out, instead of the out-
side in. For many, cultural
identity becomes a security
blanket.

"Christ did not discrimi-
nate on the cross, why
should we separate our-
selves as his children?"
Pierre said. "We should
agree to disagree, because
everyone is not always go-
ing to be on the same page.
One thing we should agree
upon though is that we are
one in Christ."

Ten minutes have passed
and Miguel realizes he's been
standing by the condiment ta-
ble staring at people. Embar-
rassed, he quickly looks for a
table. He spots a small group
of White college kids laugh-
ing at a table by the window.
Walking in their direction,
he decides to do something a
little uncomfortable.... "Is this
seat taken?" He asks.



Graphics by Christina Weitzel



8 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4,;

Rachel Hopkins
Lifestyles Editor
[email protected]




What do Christian women really want?

V Villi I M" ^>" _ ^.__„ n „„;n»™ said. "Someone



Chris Mateo

(; n >mmiTf)B



What do women want? It's
an age-old question that makes
every man berserk trying to
find the answer. We scamper
through our young-adult lives
thinking diamonds, clothing,
shoes and other material pos-
sessions will suffice, but, yet,
it's not enough. Sometimes
it seems it would be easier to
he Mel Gibson and somehow
possess the power to know
what every woman desires,
but, unfortunately, this is the
real world. And the reality is—
we don't know.

Even scholars have a hard
time figuring it out. Alex Shal-
man, a psychologist and blog-
ger, says the answer to every
woman's wants is simply— a
man. Sounds obvious, but is it
that simple?

A September 2006 issue of
Glamour UK magazine, stated



that a woman wants a man
that allows her to be who she is
at all times-mood swings and
all. Monica O'Brien, a personal
and professional development
blogger, states she wants a
man that makes her feel spe-
cial and challenges her. Other
female bloggers mention they
want men who are reliable.

But as a Christian man look-
ing for a Christian woman, the
better question is... what do
Christian women want? Are
the wants of a Christian girl
different than that of a Glam-
our girl, or any other non-
Christian woman?

To find solutions to these
questions and more, I went to
the obvious source— women.

Laurel Dominesey, a single
senior non-profit administra-
tion and development major,
stated, "What I want is stabil-
ity and comfort. A man of God
who knows he's a man and
doesn't look to me for valida-




Vexation: Two things
actually. Breakouts (like
the ones on your face that
you thought you'd be able
to leave behind in high
school), and the chemical
laden products I use to treat
them. Double whammy.

Solution: Eco-friendly
YET effective skin prod-
ucts.

Implementation:
Look for skin products that
use natural ingredients like
tea tree oil, witch hazel or
willow bark. Avoid prod-
ucts thai je parabens.



eenon



Clarification: Most
ingredients will ultimately
end up in nature, so the
fewer synthetic ones we
use, the better. Plus, only
about 11 percent of the
10,500 ingredients used
in personal care products
are screened for safety, so
it's important to look for
natural, less questionable
ones when shopping. Burt's
Bees Herbal Blemish Stick
(which you can find at the
Campus Shop), Derma E
Very Clear Spot Blemish
Treatment and Desert Es-
sence Blemish Touch Stick
are a few good ones.



nnminesev said. "Someone

tionbutrathermspiration Domvne ey s

nur^m^,^ -^trytoaskanything

r^antls 3 ra/S ° f She realizes no one is per

Apriority. Someone who feet, and how tang .Chns

parncipateinthethingsl ^^ bout^a*"

Soundseasyandattainable; she said "I care about yoy,

rhen why do we have a prob- who you have become and how



lem getting the girl?

"Women want a man that
takes initiative and is able
to pursue us," said Angela
McPherson, a sophomore
mass communication major.
She continued to say, "We
want options... though it may
seem like you're not the ideal
candidate for a girl, go for it,
why not?"

Wow! It seems that Chris-
tian women are truly looking
for secure godly men. Ironic,
isn't it? But are their views
on sex different than that of a
non-Christian woman?

"I'm looking for a Chris-
tian man where I don't have to
state my boundaries because
he upholds the same mor-
als and principles that I do,"



God has changed you."

So when it comes down to
it, these responses boil down
to one word: confidence.
Christian women want con-
fident men, not just any type
of confidence, but confidence
that comes from Christ and
not our male egos. As young
Christian men, we need to be
confident of our own morals
and principles, especially, our
boundaries for sex, before we
go out into the jungle and pur-
sue that hot lady-friend.

Here it is guys— real Chris-
tian women with real answers.
Next time you're on the Prom-
enade and you see that attrac-
tive girl, introduce yourself.
We can't all be Mel Gibson,
but we can try.



This
Weekend



Not sure what to do this
weekend? Here are a few
ideas to get you headed in tk
right direction.

A Christmas Carol

Chattanooga Theater

Center

7 p.m., Thursday,

Dec. 4 (other dates and

times through the 14th)

Tickets start at $10

fheatercenter.com

Enchanted Garden of
Lights

Rock City Gardens
6-9 p.m., Sat. Dec. 6
(through Jan 3)
$15.95 for adults
seerockcity.com



Winter Days and Lights |
Holiday Starlight Parade
Downtown Chattanooga
6 p.m., Sat. Dec. 6
Free
Downtownchattanooga.oij I



Clueless gift givers can take hear



Rachel Hopkins

rnhniRirrnR



It can sometimes be dif-
ficult to think of original gifts
for people on your Christ-
mas shopping list. Here's a
few ideas that may not have
crossed your mind, but just
might be a hit.

1. A magazine subscrip-
tion - This may sound kind of
lame, but if someone on your
gift list has a specific interest
(or just buys the same maga-
zine at the check out counter
every month), this can be a
winner. Lots of people enjoy
reading magazines, but are too
cheap to buy them on a regu-



lar basis. Plus, it's the gift that
keeps on giving and everyone
likes to get mail that has noth-
ing to do with how much they
owe Southern.



choose what they wants. It*
be a huge hit with the humai»|

tarian in your life.



3. A Gifts.com gift carf-

Truly one of the most W
2. A Really Useful Gift sonal gifts possible, but«f
Catalog gift certificate - exciting to receive ref
Each year, ADRA publishes a A Gifts.com card can
Really Useful Gift Catalog that chased on their Web site
contains hundreds of specific is good for hundreds
donations, like providing one chants. The list include! ;i
month of hot lunches for a
Malagasy school child or giv-
ing a goat to a girl in Niger.
Gifts start at $1 and it's re-
ally fun to pick out different
ways to help. You can give a
gift in someone's name or just
give them a gift certificate to



ing stores, restaurants, I
aters and even Tickets
Sure, it may be a good*

say "I don't actually W«K
very well," but it's also a 8

way to say, "I'm not too P
to admit it, so enjoy w>
some gift card."



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008

spoils



THE SOUTHERN ACCENT 9

Zack Livingston

Sports Editor

[email protected]



llt's North Carolina's title to lose



Davis Wallace



2 basketball is back to
I Ml strength with new young
talent, exciting teams, and of
course everybody's favorite,
March Madness. There is one
big question this season: "Is
this North Carolina's year?"
I Last year it seemed like it was
I their year. They started off
I strong by winning their first
Ii8 games, then winning n
lof their last 13 games. They
Ionised their way to a second
[straight ACC title for the first
Itime since 1998. They even
I made the final four for the
■first time since 2005 when
Hiey won it all. However,
■even with the 2008 National
fclayer of The Year, in Tyler
■Bansbrough, North Carolina
Bras not able to come away
■nth the National Title. Now
with players like Kevin Love,



Mario Chalmers and Derrick
Rose all currently in the NBA,
North Carolina has no reason
to lose.



There is no time
like the present
time for Hans-
brough and the

boys to bring
the title back to

Chapel Hill. ?



This year has to be the year
for the North Carolina Tar-
heels. Tyler Hansbrough is re-
turning for his senior season,
All-American's Ty Lawson and
Wayne Ellington are return-
ing for their junior seasons
instead of going pro like they



almost did earlier in the sum-
mer. Also bringing in amazing
freshmen recruits like Tyler
Zeller, Ed Davis, Larry Drew II
and Justin Watts. This might
be the best team North Caro-
lina produced since the 1997-
1998 Antwan Jamison and
Vince Carter led team.

North Carolina has ad-
vanced a step closer to the
national title game since Tyler
Hansbrough has been at UNC.
So again, there is no time like
the present for Hansbrough
and the boys to bring the title
back to Chapel Hill. Right now
it is looking like injuries will
be the only thing that will stop
them from winning it all. If
not this year, there is no tell-
ing when North Carolina will
have another great opportu-
nity to win a title. It could be
in two years; it could be in five
years; that's why it's Carolina's
title to lose.



Toon Squad become 3-on-3 champions



Linski Cherisol

CoNIRlBljIQB



■ Sean Lemon showed ev-
eryone just how important
fflwas in the game, as he hit
Qe decisive game point shot
G3 sudden death overtime to
ISut down the Muffin Staffers,
llmon had eight points, four
Mounds, two blocks, and one
EyEa] in the 3-on-3 champion-
EjgP Mark Knutson, who was
Jkiably the biggest man in
H tournament, posted seven
Bj 1115 . five rebounds, two

Mocks and one assist.
Mffhe 3-on-3 tournament
Mkased 25 teams in which
■H° had to score 11 points
to advance to the next round
without loosing twice. The
m$j n Squad never lost a single
game.

"We should have played on
■H e outside courts because



this has been a street ball tour-
nament and I've loved every
second of it, baby," said Mike
Boyd, director of intramurals.

The Muffin Staffers came
out with a 3-0 lead at the start,
and then Toon Squad stormed
back with a 5-0 run. Knutson
used his size and strength to
get to the basket every time,
but the Toon Squad used pes-
ky defense to disrupt him as
much they could.

"Mark Knutson is a really
big guy and a great player,"
said Zack Livingston, a senior
mass communication major.
"There's nothing you can do
to really stop him, but you can
try to contain him, and that's
what we did."

Lemon made a reverse lay-
up to make the score 10-9.
Knutson answered right back
by making a lay-up of his own
to tie the game and force sud-



den death overtime. On the
first play of overtime, Lemon
took a contested mid-range
jump shot to end it all. "Sean
Lemon came through and I'm
just glad he's on my team,"
Livingston said.

"My team wanted me to
take the shot, so I took it and it
went in," said Lemon, a soph-
omore allied health major. "A
year ago I wasn't playing bas-
ketball at all, so playing now
feels great."

There was some controversy
throughout the tournament as
some players couldn't handle
the street ball style of play and
wanted referees to call fouls in
the games for them.

"We ought to have refs next
time on every court," Boyd
said. "The night went well re-
gardless, everyone had a good
time but we'll definitely fix that
problem next time."



Intramurals

Schedule


Men's A Division


116 6 pm


Business Time/Bietz Me Again


Field 1 '


11/6 7 pm


Showtime/Sellouts


Field 1


11/6 8 pm


Ninja Turtles/Smash Bros


Field 1


n/6 9 p m


Last Minute/The Plague


Field 1


11/9 5 pm


Shake N' Bake/Ninja Turtles


Field 1


11/9 6 pm


Squirrel Tails/Bietz Me Again


Field 1


11/9 7 pm


Regulators/Last Minute


Field 1


11/9 8 pm


yaMAHA Shuffle/Showtime


Field 1


11/10 6 pm


Bietz Me Again/Showtime


Field 1


11/10 7 pm


Shake N' Bake/Last Minute


Field 1


11/10 8:30 pm


Championship


Field 1


Men's B Division




11/6 6 pm


300/Bus Drivers


Field 3


ll/6 7 pm


McThunderstix/All The Way


Field 3


11/6 8 pm


The Horde/Aghhh


Field 3


11/6 9 pm


DP/Band of Brothers


Field 3


11/9 5 pm


Los Toros/300


Field 3


11/9 6 pm


The New Breed/DP


Field 3


11/9 7 pm


5th Down/The Horde


Field 3


11/9 8 pm


Old School/All The Way


Field 3


11/10 6pm


The New Breed/Old School


Field 3


11/10 7pm


Los Toros/The Horde


Field 3


11/10 8:30pm


Championship


Field 3


Women's A Division




11/6 6 pm


Lunachicks/Spartans


Field 2


11/6 8 pm


Raging Penguins/McDream Team Field 2


.11/9 Spm


Pageant Pistons/Spartans


Field 2


11/9 7 pm


October Rush/Raging Penguins


Field 2


11/10 7pm


Pageant Pistons/October Rush


Field 2


Wnrrpn's R Division —




11/6 7 pm


Blazn/Black Diamonds


Field 2


11/6 9 pm


Ultimatum/Pink Ladies


Field 2


11/9 6 pm


Kung Fu Pandas/Blazn


Field 2


11/9 8 pm


Oh Snaps/Ultimatum


Field 2


11/10 8pm


Kung Fu Pandas/Oh Snaps


Field 2



■■■■■■■i







10 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008

Deadline Monday at noon

[email protected]




Ijpo^mijng-^ventsjialje^



Last Day Events | Our next
Adventist Theological Society
meeting will be a symposium
on Last Day Events by Dr.
Norman Gulley and a panel of
theology professors. All are in-
vited to attend this symposium
in Lynn Wood Hall at 3 p.m. on
Sabbath, Dec. 6. The meeting
will adjourn in time for those
so desiring to attend the Festi-
val of Carols and Lessons.

Prayer Groups | 7:15a M-F
near the flag pole; i2:oop
MWF in the Student Center
seminar room; 5 p.m. M-F at
the fountain between Hack-
man and the library.

Starving for Lesotho |

Many are starving in Africa
and SIFE is hoping to make
a difference. During spring
break, six students are travel-
ing to Lesotho, Africa to build
three greenhouses to help
bring food to those who are
starving and affected by HTV/
AIDS. On Thursday, Dec. 4
from 9 a.m. until Friday, Dec.
5 at 9 p.m., SIFE students are
participating in a 36-hour fast
to raise money for their trip.
SIFE is looking for people to
sponsor their fast, fast along
with them, or give donations
to their cause. For more in-
formation contact Alex Mihai,
[email protected]



Friday, December 5

Payday

Withdrawals after today receive
«F»

9 a.m. -Noon - MSN Thesis/Proj-
ect Presentations (Herin 105)

5:29 p.m. - Sunset

7 p.m. - Upper Room - Marquis
Johns (Thatcher Chapel)

8 p.m. - Vespers - Chris and Shan-
non Sorensen (Church)

After Vespers - Adoration (Lynn
Wood)

Sabbath, December 6

99:30-10:15 a.m. - Continental
Breakfast (Church Fellowship Hall)

10:15 a.m. - Saltworks Sabbath
School (Seminar Room-upstairs)

9:75 Sabbath School (Church Fel-
lowship Hall)

SMC Sabbath School (Gospel Cha-
pel-upstairs)

Adoration - John Nixon (Church)

11:30 a.m. - Connect - Jackie
James (Collegedale Academy)

11:45 a.m. -* Renewal- John Nixon
(Church)

1:30-5 p.m. - Cave Open (Student



Park)

2:15 p.m. - FLAG Camp - RSVP to
[email protected] to reserve spot
(Wright Hall Steps)

3 p.m. - Adventist Theological So-
ciety Meeting - Norman Gulley (Lynn
Wood Chapel)

Sabbath Ministries: Sick & Shut-in
(Wright Hall Steps)

5 p.m. - Evensong - Festival of
Lessons & Carols (Church)

8 p.m. - Wind Symphony Christ-
mas Concert (lies P..E. Center) Convo-
cation Credit



Sunday, December 7

All Day - SAT Exams (Lynn Wood
Hall)

No Field Trips or Tours

9 a.m.-i p.m. - CK open for Break-
fast/Lvtnch (No lunch served at Caf-
eteria)

9:30 a.m. - Employee Christinas
Brunch (Dining Hall)

3 p.m. - Spirit of Christmas Parade
(Little Debbie Parkway)

6-8 p.m. - Thatcher Open House

8:30 p.m. - SA Christmas Party
(Dining Hall)



Monday, December 8

No Field Trips or Tours
Online Registration open for New/
Transfer Students

LSAT Exams (Lynn Wood Hall)
3:30 p.m. - University Senate



Tuesday, December 9

No Field Trips or Tours
Online Registration open for New/
Transfer Students

Wednesday, December 10

No Field Trips or Tours

Online Registration open for New/
Transfer Students

7:30 p.m. - Biology Expo (Hickman
Atrium)



Thursday, December 11

No Field Trips or Tours

Online Registration open for New/
Transfer Students

11 a.m. - Convocation, Clubs/De-
partments (Various Locations)



your chance to display your
Southern swpirit!

Malamulo Update | Don't
forget to watch for the Mala-
mulo Banner: The Committee
of 100 has promised $1 for ev-
ery student signature on the
banner we are going to send
to Malamulo as a show of sup-
port!



Add your photo | Your great
Southern pictures can STILL
be posted on the student
photo collage in the Student
Center. The photo collage will
be on display until the end of
the semester. Simply email
your digital photo files to [email protected]
southern.edu and the collage
will be updated with your pic-
tures within days. Don't miss



Charity Matandiko, Matthew
Blair, Ryan FitzGerald, Tara
Becker

December 7

Andrew Krohne, Arvin Tan-
ag, Eric Johnston, Eric Rose,
Hollis James, Natalie Stark, ■
Ryan Sanderford, Ryan Visser,
Victor Morua

December 8

Aaron Speegle, Allison Ge-
rard, Danny Atvidres, Ken
Caviness, Yolanda Jordan

December 9

Ashley FitzGerald, Eugenie Bernelle Taitague, Jeff-

Louis-Pierre, Jason Maxie, Landess, Jigna Vashi, Jona-
Kirsten Wolcott than Burishkin, Jonathan

Freese, Kevin Young, Matt
December 6 Hummel, Michelle Moore, Su-

Austin Cole, Betsy Mansilla, zanne Ocsai



December 10

Dan Boyd, Lise Ingabi-
re, Sherry Jensen, Vanessa
Korter



December 11

Edgar Alquinta, Gradyi
Todd, Jeff Sagala, Jessica Ha-
luska, Jonathon Castells, Ross
Knight, Stephen Milota



December 5




■M



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008



classifieds^



THE SOUTHERN ACCENT 11

To add or remove classifieds email
[email protected]



^expensive room avail-
ble next semester | Seeing
a female to live with 3 girls.
Located one mile from South-
em. P rivate room ' shared
bath, wireless Internet, cable,
jining room, kitchen, wash-
er/dryer, living r00In ' P orch
and big back yard. $200/
mo. plus water and utilities.
CallMelanie at 423-667-7564.

Roommate wanted | Inter-
viewing roommate for second
semester. Large house in high-
neighborhood, garage,
room comes furnished, great
roommates. jdickerson®
southern.edu

2 Roommates wanted |
Upstairs apartment within
walking distance from cam-
Two rooms available.
Large room $275, small room
$245 + utilities. Located right
across from health services.
[email protected] or call
423-653-8302.

Room for rent | Preferably
la female. Less than 10 min-
utes from Southern. Access
:o entire house and back-
ed, including a deck. Wash-
& dryer. $35o/mo. Call
I23-309-1674.

tooms for rent | 2 rooms

*>r rent for female students.
^Med 7 miles from Colleg-
!ed ale, 3 miles from Ooltewah.
^ress to kitchen, laundry,
pble and wireless Internet.
!« home in the country
»th large deck. Available im-
■ediately for $8 5 / wk . Call
Ma cell; 423-280.3243
ome: 423-238-1490.



^'Pool fridge I Black,
i'nn-sized fridge in good con-
for $90. Call Samara at
23 -3i3-08 3 2 or e-mail at
;< "[email protected]



^ for sale | 2004

e Pa ft a it

fil -4, I50cc Scooter



with only 375 miles! Like new,
hardly used, pearl white metal-
lic, rear storage compartment,
3 Vespa helmets included, re-
cently serviced, new battery.
Excellent gas mileage. Asking
$2,750. Serious inquiries only
please. Call 706-264-9441.

Media viewer for sale

MyVu pmv-i003i "solo edi-
tion" personal media viewer
(video glasses) - for 5th gen
iPod video only. Watch movies
on your iPod without strain-
ing to see the tiny screen, $55.
Call Jonathan 423-605-8437.

Web site/graphic design-
er wanted. Must be willing to
work for a reasonable rate on a
Web site project. Contact Na-
[email protected]

Guitar lessons | Be a rock
star! Affordable guitar les-
sons, both group and indi-
vidual. Beginners and in-
termediate, flexible times.
E-mail Rika for more info at
[email protected]

Ford Focus for sale | '04

Ford Focus SVT, Limited Ed.
Blue, all the extras, 71K, well
maintained. $8,500, Call Jus-
tin at 423-308-9610

2004 Envoy XL | Excellent
condition, fully loaded with
new tires. Grey with leather
interior. 82k miles. Asking
$12,000. Please contact Sam
at 423-503-5286.

'98 Taurus | for sale. Hunter
Green. 129,000 miles. Great
car! $2000. Contact Willis @
322.5249-

Paintball gun for sale |

2 paintball markers, Minimag
(all upgrades) and VM-68,
tons of extras. If you know
what it is, you know what its
worth. Steal it for $200. Call
Jonathan 423-605-8437.



Cavalier Tail lights | 2002
4-door tail lights excellent
condition $10. Call Jonathan
423-605-8437.

1988 Honda Prelude SI |

pw ac cc power sunroof, pio-
neer deck and speakers, new
tires, lots of receipts too much
to list. $2,850/obo jdicker-
[email protected]

For sale | GBS-prevention
seat wanner. $200/ obo. Great
Christmas present for every-
one on your list. Call Jason



Online LibraryEmma Florence CunliffeSouthern accent, Sept. 2008-Apr. 2009 (Volume v.64) → online text (page 28 of 63)