Emma Florence Cunliffe.

Southern accent, Sept. 2008-Apr. 2009 (Volume v.64) online

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Ben McArthur, chair of
Southern's history depart-
ment, enjoyed Peck's portrayal
of Lincoln.

"He really looked terrific,"
McArthur said. "He had Lin-
coln's craggy face and just re-
ally had the visual aspect down
really well."

Peck's lecture also includ-
ed some of Lincoln's famous
quotes and portions of his Get-
tysburg and second inaugural
addresses. McArthur also ap-




Photo by Hollie Macomber
Abe Lincoln, played by William
Truman Peck, portrays Lincoln 's
life.



predated this aspect of Peck's
presentation.

"Lincoln was such a great
speechwriter," McArthur said.
"I thought his [Peck's] incor-
poration of Lincoln's speeches
was really the highlight of the
program."



Handbells

Continued from Pg. 1

"We are so grateful that
friends of the Southern Ring-
tones wanted to make this in-
vestment into these students
and their desire to work to-
gether in creating music both
for their enjoyment and as a
gift to the community," said
Laurie Cooper, the handbell
choir director and research
assistant in the department of
social work and family stud-
ies.

Each octave has 12 bells,
and when they get their four
new octaves, the Southern
Ringtones will have a total of
61 bells to be used between
their 13 bell ringers.

Michael Johns, a junior
computer systems administra-
tion major, is excited to get the



new bells and said they will be
a lot nicer than the ones they
have been borrowing from
Spalding, which are a little
beat-up.

The group practices twice a
week. Currently they are pre-
paring for the Pops Concert on
Feb. 14, as well as a vespers
program at a church in Green-
eville, Tenn. on Feb. ai, which
will be their first performance
with the new bells. They are
also hoping to play for Son-
Rise as well as have a spring or
convocation concert.

Khan is happy to see the
club's success so far.

She said, "It's great. We
have support from the school
and music department, and
now that we'll have our own
bells, it seems like Southern
Ringtones will be a permanent
part of this campus."



theology major said. "[And]
they even gave us some
money for food," he added.

JP Mathis, dean of South-
ern Village, thought the stu-
dents handled the conditions
well.

"I was very impressed at
how the guys have been so
Christ-like in this whole situ-
ation," Mathis said.



Marty Hamilton, vice
president of financial admin-
istration, was quick in dealing
with the situation by findim,
the affected students tempo-
rary housing and hiring a
construction crew. Hamilton
said his goal was to have th e
students back in their apart-
ments in less than four weeks :



SOUTHERN 6




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Check the website...

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HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2009




THE SOUTHERN ACCENT S



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6 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT



religion



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 200q|
Chris Clou J
Rel 'g'on Editorl

[email protected]



Jesus is dead

Shane Akerman Jesus-stoiy. "

rn-.i.(i,n. According to Paul, Jesus

was not raised with a natu-

The following submission ra j body but a "spiritual" one.

is simply an expression of my He contrasts Adam who was

personal views. The intention ma( Je from dirt to Christ who,

is not to offend but to provoke wne n raised, was a life-giving

thought and discussion. My sp irit. Paul is explicit that the

hope is that this campus can resurrection of Jesus was not

be a safe place for tough ques- f »fl es h and blood," because

tions and the sharing of ideas. fl es h and blood cannot inherit

the Kingdom. Paul believed

1 remember the first time Jesus was alive because he had

I said and believed: Jesus is a visionary experience with

dead. No trio of words could Christ's "life-giving spirit."

have felt more foreign on my He never mentions an empty

tongue. tomb or a resuscitated corpse

My friend and I were dis- (t Corinthians 15:35-50).
cussing our growing skepti- Second is Mark, who is the
cism. We realized that the fj rs t to introduce the empty
tales of a talking snake, a vir- tomb story. Yet even within
gin birth and a man living Mark's gospel Jesus is never
three days inside a fish were actually seen after his death
beyond our capacity to believe. (Mark 16:1-8). Many Bibles
But doubt didn't come upon us
like a cloud; it was more like a
sunrise.

I had already given up the
notion that the Bible was in-
fallible. To claim one book as
the inerrant revelation of God
is, to me, definitively gullible.
So I started to study the Bible
with the same tools of critical
examination that I would use
in any other area.

When we study a figure of
history we don't blindly as-
sume that everything written
about him or her is true. If so
you'd have to believe in the
virgin birth of Alexander the
Great and Augustus Caesar as
well. One important step in
finding the truth about a his-
torical figure is to date your
sources and trust the earlier
ones more than the later ones.
Paul is our earliest source,
then Mark, then Matthew,
then Luke/Acts, then John.
I When you read these sources
independently, assuming you
didn't know what was in later
ones, you see a steady growth
in the fantastic nature of the



add an appearance section to
Mark's gospel but the footnotes
will probably tell you that this
is almost certainly not part of
the original work.

I've often

said that if

Thomas, who

knew Jesus

personally,

is allowed
to withhold

judgment
until he sees

Jesus for
himself then
surely I can
do the same.




In Matthew's version Jesus
is finally seen face to face. Je-



sus' resurrection is obviously
considered to be physical but
the emphasis is on sightings
rather than interactions with
the resurrected Christ (Mat-
thew 28:1-9).

In Luke, Jesus is said to
have broken bread and eaten
with the disciples. He even
directly denies being a spir-
it, something that Paul had
claimed decades earlier. But
Luke is now confronted with
a problem. When Jesus was
considered to have existed in a
non-physical, form then there
was no issue with Him appear-
ing and disappearing at will.
Luke, who is the first to stress
the bodily nature of the resur-
rection, is also the first to men-
tion an ascension. If Jesus is a
physical person He could only
get to heaven by flight (Luke
24:1-51).

John, the last to write about
Jesus, gives us the most in-
triguing story because Thomas
says he will not believe until he
physically touches Christ, so
Jesus shows up to prove him-
self (John 20:1-29). I've often
said that if Thomas, who knew
Jesus personally, is allowed
to withhold judgment until



he sees Jesus for himself then
surely I can do the same.

We can see a clear trajec-
tory stretching over decades
of time from Paul to John. The
meaning of the phrase "Jesus
is alive," changed dramatically
over that period. Each time
the story was retold the resur-
rection became more tangible
and physical which leads me
to believe that the actual event
the disciples experienced was
incredibly intangible and non-
physical, perhaps even halluci-
natory.

For many of you, the notion
that Jesus' body decayed like
everyone else's would make Je-
sus insignificant and His mes-
sage useless. That's as foolish
as saying the civil rights move-
ment ended when Martin Lu-
ther King, Jr. died or America
became worthless once George
Washington was dead.

My complaint against many
professed Christians isthatyou
have so deified your leader that
you often ignore what He actu-
ally taught. You act as though
worshipping Him, praying to,
Him and telling people about
Him is the sum of your duty
as Flis follower. He never



asked for any of those t
He asked you not to judge,*
asked you to give all you h
for the poor, He asked yoilj
love your enemies. I c
Christianity doing the ok
site, of all of these.

When I accepted for mysel
the fact that Jesus is (
became even more motiral^
to serve Him. His ma
became even more
ing because He gave
to the promotion of peao
inclusivity and I hope 1
the same. To insist that ^
is alive in heaven 1
culture of passivity where!
wait for Him to come M
this world, but to followa'j
Jesus means to be an »
agent for change and «°»
better the world as *«-]
have done.

The assertion that 1
thebodyofChristissorrJ
I take very seriously- «1
if Jesus is watching I<j|
imagine that He would J
follow His teaching? »«J
His resurrection thanj
in His resurrection*
His teachings.



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2009



opinion



THE SOUTHERN ACCENT 7

Sarah Hayhoe

Opinion Editor

[email protected]



Hey friend, I'd like a bicycle and laptop

NlCKLlVANOS trvinp tn r-roato „ „»„„..«.... £_ - _j_ „ , .



Nick Livanos

CoNKuaur™

If you asked your friend
for a million dollars and they
didn't give it to you, would
they be a bad friend?

Over Thanksgiving I was in
Africa with a non-profit called
Children Inspiring Hope. They
connect school kids in the U.S.
with school kids in Ghana
through a lot of art projects,
letters, peace flags, photos,
etc. It's like pen pals, but bet-
ter; pen pals on steroids.

What's really great about
this non-profit is that it's all
about relationships. That's
all. I know that there are lots
of places around the planet
with basic needs that are go-
ing unmet, and I'm not one
to ignore that fact. But there's
something really pure about
going around the world say-
ing, "Let's be friends.' They're



trying to create a generation
of globally-minded kids who
look at the world map and see
only allies. Not threats. Just
humans.



Dear God,
I really
need
money...



Kind of cool, right?

So Billy , Bobby, Timmy and
Sally U.S. all write letters to
the little boys and girls of Af-
rica. "I like snow cones! I have
a dog named Stinky! I like to
play- four-square and listen to
Hannah Montana while eat-
ing snow cones with my dog
Stinky!" Little kid stuff. Stuff
about themselves. Because
that's how people become



friends. By learning about
each other and caring enough
to do so.

But something happened
when some of the African kids
started writing back. We start-
ed seeing letters that said, "I
want a bike. Send me a bike."
"Buy me a laptop." "Give me...
Send me... I want..."

We had come all the way
across the Atlantic Ocean just
to be friends. Just to start a re-
lationship. And now they want
stuff from us?

In the Volta Region of Gha-
na, the word for white person
literally translated means,
"One who has plenty," or "One
who comes bearing gifts."
That's the image they have of
us. And it breaks my heart.
Because when I think of these
African kids, I think of how we
treat God.

"Dear God, I really need
money..."



"Dear God, please
work things out so I
can go snowboarding C>

for spring break..." ^

"Dear God, send Q

me a sign." "Give
me... Send me... I
want..."

If you asked your
friend for a million
dollars and they
didn't give it to you,
would they be a bad
friend?

Our friends are
not meant to be
banks. American
children are not
meant to be Santa
Claus to African chil-
dren. And God was
never meant to be a genie.

We had a big talk with that
class of Ghanaian kids, and
without embarrassing any-
one, we had the kids who had
asked for things re-write their




Graphic by K

letters.

Jesus came all the way
across the Atlantic Ocean just
to be friends with us. Just to
start a relationship. If anybody
needs me, I'll be busy re-writ-
ing my letter to Him.



The greatest need in the world: Where are all the leaders?



DonRima

rnWTBIHIITffp



There was a bit of prose I
I read years ago and recently
I found a copy of. Feel free to
I substitute your preferred gen-
I der speak for the term "men"
I as it's an older piece of writ-
| in g-

Here it is:

The greatest want in the
| world is the want of men.

Men who will not be bought
| or sold.

Men who in their inmost
| souls are true and honest.

Men who do not fear to call
|sm by its right name.

Men who's conscience is as
Itrue to duty as the needle to
■the pole.

Men who will stand for the
I nght though the heavens fall.
I We used to call these people

leaders" and we looked up to

lh,,,

Unfortunately, our society



and the world has declined to a
point where we're much more
concerned with valuing what's
most "politically correct," what
offends the least amount of
voters, fighting against what
the other political party wants
because they're not our party,
erego, their ideas are wrong by
definition.

Ever really wonder why
things aren't getting done?
Why government isn't work-
ing? Why we're in the finan-
cial and political mess we're in
right now?

Leaders simply aren't lead-
ing. They're too busy redeem-
ing campaign promises to spe-
cial interest groups _and have
totally lost sight of the big
picture of leading this nation
that our founding fathers held
so dear.

If we're looking at examples,
we have no further to look
back at our own history than
the recent debates in Congress



over the $700 billion bailout.
Clearly, this was congressional
and partisan bickering at its
worst. And for many of those
who claim to be our leaders,
it's business as usual at it's
worse.

It's time to stop business as
usual. It's time to end the par-
tisan bickering process that
has and continues to cloud
problem solving for our great
nation. It's time to return to
true leadership.

The time has come to end
management with bubble gum
and bailing wire, and to re-
place it with clear thought and
sound policy.

The time has come to end
the partisanship that divides
us not only politically but as
a nation, and replace it with
unity and strength of purpose
and direction.

The time has conic to re-
place giveaways with sound
business plans and policies.



That time of change is now, has to be in the form of action,

what remains to be seen is not a political buzzword. Are

if the new crop of would-be they up to it, oris it just going

leaders are indeed leaders, or to be business as usual all over

just more of the same. Change again?



Letters to the Editor policy

Letters to the editor are welcomed, but are printed on a
space-available basis and may be edited for style requirements.
Mailed letters must be signed and include an address and the
writer's phone number. Anonymous letters will not be pub-
lished. Letters should be typewritten or emailed. Letters en-
dorsing political candidates, third-party letters and letters that
have appeared in other newspapers will not be published. The
deadline for letters to the editor is 5 p.m. Sunday.

E-mail letters to: [email protected]



Guest Column policy



Guest columns are welcomed, but are printed on a space-
available basis and may be edited for style requirements. Col-
umns must be signed and include an address and the writer's
phone number. Anonymous columns will not be published.
Columns should be between 400-800 words, typewritten or
emailed and received by 5 P-m. Friday to he considered I- ir the
following edition.

E-mail guest columns to: saraluV uthern.edu



c







THE SOUTHERN ACCENT




THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2009

Rachel Hopkins

Lifestyles Editor

[email protected]



Album Review: Scott Kabel, See Seott Run



AlMEE BURCHARD

Scott Kabel is just that: him-
self. An honest guy who spins
lyrics like the images stored
in his brain. Some of those
images have gotten lucky, be-
coming songs with applicabil-
ity written all-over their lyrical
faces.

"On Parade" and "Thicker
Skin" leave impressions of
harmony, striking the chord
that many feel: the hope of be-
coming better. The paramount
of his current musical menu
includes "Slender Finger,"




Scott Kabel's album cover



which has emotional prow-
ess to leave many-a-woman
swooning, yet perhaps not
just any woman since Kabel's
music is his ministry. He calls



attention to Christ often, not
just in name, but in the values
he instills within his lyrics.

With a Folk Rock/Jazz ap-
proach he fills his lungs to free
a voice mixing its own colors
to song. An easy, enjoyable
voice for the ear, his music is
tinged with the risk of sound-
ing similar, yet at this stage
in writing still grasps a sound
foothold on the unique.

With songs like "Hippo"
one could simply put the re-
cord on for an enjoyable lis-
ten, or choose to wrap their
mind around the song's deep-
er meaning, of which is the



"wow" factor in Kabel's music.
His ability to transform daily
conflicts and observations into
melody relates listeners on a
personal level.

Currently his album is on
hold, however once out, Ka-
bel's music is well-worth dust-
ing off for a classic rainy day
listen to unwind, yet also pro-
vides a contemplative meal for
the mind with an ear for the
genuine.

Be sure to listen to a sam-
ple of Scott Kabel's music at
www.myspace.com/scott-
kabel.



New green eatery offers large food selection



Chris Lau
rnNT PIH " TFB



Need a new eatery? Foodie



Chris Lau gives us the DL on

what's delicious.

301 Manufacturers Road
Phone: 423-702-7300



Get your Green On

17



■tirtlMMiihitamti



Vexation: Taxes! April
15 gives me chest pains,
and it's quickly approach-
ing. Ouch.

Solution: Ease the pain
with some deductions! You
feel good about helping
someone or something else,
and you won't have to write
such a big check to The
Man. It's a win-win!

Implementation:
There are probably about a
million charities out there
to donate to, but since this
is a green tip, let's focus
on some environmental
ones. At the World Wildlife
Fund's website, wwf.org,
you can make one time do-
nation 1 - ' ' jlp endangered
species, or symbolically



adopt an animal and give
monthly. There are more
than 90 species to choose
from, but I'd probably pick
the penguin, or maybe the
meerkat! Awww. If you like
trees better than animals,
take a look at the Sierra
Club (sierraclub.org). They
have local chapters so you
can actually give to an en-
vironmental cause that's
close to home.

Clarification: Like I
said, there's about a million
ways to make charitable
donations, so try googling
"environmental charity"
to find more green causes,
or google "charitable do-
nation" to find out more
about donating in general.
Take that Uncle Sam!



Atmosphere -

Well-lit, industrial ware-
house.

Fare-

Options galore! Gigantic
hot food selection, bounti-
ful salad bar, many soup and
sandwhich choices, pizza, ge-
lato and coffee. Everything
is buffet or short-order style,
and the menus revolve daily.

Get your green on -

Local produce and organic
foods are sold and used in
their cooking.

When to go -

Pre-Coolidge Park with tons



of friends. Buy a delicious, in-
stant picnic and walk over to
Coolidge and enjoy. Everyone
will find something tasty. Also
a great first-date place.
Verdict: ****
Plethora of delectable items
make this place a big winner.
Price -$$

Editor's Note: Greenlife is
a restaurant and grocer, so
be sure to pick up your favor-
ite health foods and organic
products when you stop by
for lunch.



EARN $40 TODAY.
$80 THIS WEEK.



CASH IN YOUR POCKET.

DONATE PLASMA.

IT PAYS TO SAVE A LIFE.



This
Weekend

Not sure what to do this
weekend? Here are a few
ideas to get you headed in the
right direction.

"The Artist Within:
A Guide to Becoming
Creatively Fit"

Whitney Ferre's Creativity

Workout at Rock Point Books,

Chattanooga

Thursday, Feb. 12, 6 p.m.

Free

rockpointbooks.com

"Whoooo is your
Valentine?"

Chattanooga Nature Center
Saturday, Feb. 14, 1 p.m.
Reservation and prepayment
$9 for adults required
(includes materials for making
Valentine's cards)
chattanooganaturecenter.org

"Big Band Fever"

Chattanooga Symphony

and Opera

Tivoli Theater, Chattanooga

Saturday, Feb. 14, 8 p.m.

$10 for students

chattanoogasymphony.org

"We the People..."

A Group Discussion of
the Constitution
Rock Point Books,
Chattanooga
Sunday, Feb. 15, 3 pm.
Free
rockpointbooks.com



15.01 Riverside Drive, Suite 110

Chattanooga, TN 37406
423.624.5555 « zlbplasma.com



3815 Rossville Boulevard
Chattanooga, TN 37407
423.867.5195 ♦ zlbpla«ma.com





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY'lii'MOg 1 ' ■ ™

[sports___

iouthern hosts 2009 basketball season finale



THE SOUTHERN ACCENT 9

Zackary Livingston

Sports Editor

[email protected]



JJSKI Cherisol

CoNHiLnuTOR

I Squirrel Tails claimed the
|tle of the top basketball team
r the men's A league as they
^at the Redeem Team 50-
) behind Mark Knutson's 15
[bints.

"We worked hard and it
lels great," said Jordan The,
ffreshman allied health ma-
jor. "The losses we had were a
Ruple of tough ones but those
Hsses got us here."
^Jeana Mullins lead Simply
Bashing with 12 points to win
e women's A league champi-
khip over Holla 44-26.
fit was great to play with
ne friends from high



school," said Mullins, a sopho-
more sports studies major. "It
was good to get back together
and play because it's so much
fun."

Still Kickin' was the only
undefeated team and brought
a fundamental whooping on
the Obammers with a 36-22
win for the men's B league
championship.

"I think it was Dr. King's
blue shorts," said Gennevieve
Brown-Kibble, a proud wife
of champion Kevin Kibble.
"Those shorts were certainly
one of the factors for this year.
Yes, they may have sore knees,
yes, they may not be as fast,
but they have wisdom."



Hockey



ntramurals

Schedule



m's A Division




Mighty Pucks/Band of Brothers Court 1

Norge Ringerike/27,000 Sheiks Court 1

Sharks/Norge Ringerike Court 1

Sharks/Band of Brothers Court 1

Wheeze Kids/Band of Brothers Court 2

Sharks/27,000 Sheiks Court 1



LtsADivision



The Macrophages/ri-chickerz Court 2
: Hot Sticks/BLAZN ' Court 2

The Macrophages/Simply SmashingCourt 2
fri-ehickerz/Slap Shots Court 3

Ultimatum/Mangosteen . Court 3

Hockey Babes/The Macrophages Court 3



2/18



BLAZN/Hockey Babes
Shot Clinic/Mangosteen
fri-chickerz/BLAZN
Slap Shots/Hockey Babes
Simply Smashing/Hot Sticks
Shot Clinic/Kung Fu Pandas



Court 3
Court 3
Court 3
Court 3
Court 3
Court 3



Gianna Spence and her 11
points lifted Triple "S" over
CB's in a nail-biter to win the
title of the women's B league
championship. Triple "S" won
28-25.

"It was amazing," said Gi-
anna Spence, a freshman
psychology major. "We had a
great time, we enjoyed playing
with everybody, and everyone
had a good spirit."

In the men's C league, Your
Future Bosses beat Mountain
Dudes in a close one. Moun-
tain Dudes scored five unan-
swered points to tie the game
at 30 with under 30 seconds
to play. Your Future Bosses
tightened up the defense and
scored three points to win it
33-30.

A successful year in intra-
mural basketball has come to
an end. Although we will miss
it, at least we have intramural
hockey to look forward to. Un-
til next year, keep practicing,
but more importantly remem-
ber to have fun.




Photo by Rich I lr. I

Ladies A league team wins first place in championship game. From left Lisa
Calloway, Elizabeth Underwood, Jeana Mullins, .lacque Liles, Katie Ham-
mond, Lacey Dortch and Liz Erskine.



Southern Basketball

Intramural Champions

for 2009



Mens A: Squirrel Tails Ladies A: Simply Smashing j

Mens B: Still Kickin' Ladies B: Triple "S"

Mens C: Your Future Bosses



Slam Dunk Champio

Jamie Geiger



3-Pt. Champion:

Adam Rogers



NBA All-Stars play HORSE



Zack Livingston

Sports Fritob



Every year the NBA All-Star
weekend brings something
new for fans to look forward
too. Whether it's a brand
new skills event or a race up
and down the court between
Charles Barkley and Dick Be-
vetta, the All-Star weekend
always has something up it's
sleeves.

This year the NBA decided
to highlight not only the indi-
vidual skill and athleticism of
the All-Stars, but also empha-
size their ability to have fun.
The old school basketball game
'HORSE' will be a part of the
pre-game activities this week-
end. The contest will happen



at the NBA's All-Star Block
Party on Saturday in Phoenix
before the actual game takes
place.

Rookie of the Year, Kevin
Durant, and a favorite for this
season's rookie award, O.J.
Mayo, will take on the outdoor
court to see who can make
the impossible shots. Joining



Online LibraryEmma Florence CunliffeSouthern accent, Sept. 2008-Apr. 2009 (Volume v.64) → online text (page 43 of 63)