Emperor of the French Napoleon I.

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Paris, or to any other point in France, there may be a
reserve fund for this expenditure.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 165

CCXXXI

TO MARSHAL BESSlfcRES, DUG D'lSTRIE, COMMANDING
THE ARMY OF THE NORTH.

PARIS, 20th November 1809.

I AM pained to observe that you do not proceed with the
necessary firmness. You have the chief command, and you
ought to overcome all difficulties. There are guns at Lillo,
at Antwerp, at Bergen-op-Zoom, at Breda, and at Batz. You
have fifteen or sixteen companies of gunners, but to get
these you must withdraw every one you have on the
defensive. These sixteen companies must make up goo
men. It is clear that if you want to line Antwerp, and all
the banks of the Scheldt, with men and war material, as
though the enemy were on the offensive, you will not come
to any result at all. Counting the Dutch, you have 30,000
men, apart from 30,000 National Guards, who can protect
your rear, and occupy Breda, Bergen-op-Zoom, and all the
Dutch fortresses. With your flotilla, you should be able to
land 30,000 men in one day. You hold command of all the
Dutch fortresses and troops, of my fleet, my arsenals, and my
troops. Everything you do will be well done, provided you
win, and that quickly. Act swiftly and vigorously, without
4 buts,' and 'ifs/ and 'fors.' Instead of writing to the Minister
of War, give orders, and let me soon hear that the Sloe
is rid of the enemy. The special affection I bear you has
induced me to give you a chance of winning this glory. Be
firm, show wisdom and decision. If there are any evil-
disposed persons in the Dutch army, have them arrested. If
the King hinders you, don't listen to him. Overcome all
obstacles. The only thing I should blame in you would be
pusillanimity or irresolution. I shall sanction everything that
is vigorous, spirited, and politic.

CCXXXII

TO GENERAL CLARKE, DUG DE FELTRE,
MINISTER OF WAR.

PARIS, gtk December 1809.

I HAVE your report touching that wretch Argenton. I
have nothing to say, except that the reporter must draw up
his ai tides of impeachment, without regard to anything but
justice.



166 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CCXXXIII

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

TRIANON, \^th December 1809.

I THINK it is necessary that you should send a courier
to-day to the Duke of Vicenza, to bring him the Moniteur. 1
You will point out that it must make the necessity for a
prompt and decisive answer on his part, clear enough. You
will answer him that it is not true that Prince Galitzin's
letter was shown to any one at all ; that when the word Poland
is used in any document, it is by a mistake on the part of
the employes, who do not mean any harm ; that I have in-
formed the Prince of Neufchatel of mydispleasureat his having
allowed this word to appear in the Military Convention ; that
these delicate shades can hardly fail sometimes to escape the
notice of the employes ; that I was glad to have it intimated,
in the speech delivered by the Minister of the Interior to the
Legislative Body, that the acquisitions in Galicia were not
a political, but an accidental matter; that the Emperor
Alexander has perceived how I have settled the question of
Moldavia and Wallachia, at the very moment in which I
received news of Prince Bagration's reverses ; that I have
helped on the peace with Sweden ; and that the sentence in
my speech, already mentioned, will procure him peace with
the Porte. What more could I do ?

You will tell him that Mons. Ledoulx' conduct is madness,
and that I am ordering him to return to Paris to account
for it. [You will in fact transmit this order to him. I shall
be glad to have information about the condition of the
country from the Consul. He will leave his Chancellor
behind him.] You will further inform the Duke of Vicenza
that if the presence of a French Consul at Bucharest is an
inconvenience, he shall be removed.

The Duke of Vicenza will not fail to tell Mons. de
Romanzoff that, all Frenchmen being born with the idea
that France must protect the Porte, there are certain things
which depend on the Protocol, and on circumstances, and
that I cannot publicly proclaim the fact that I am abandon-
ing Turkey ; and that my speech leaves no doubt as to the

1 Containing the Decree of Divorce between Napoleon and Josephine.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 167

union of Moldavia and Wallachia. The Duke of Vicenza,
who has the Protocols of the Altenburg Conference 5 must
point out to Mons. de Romanzoff, that, during these confer-
ences, we never showed any desire to have Galicia ; that we
have made a separate question of that, and that Austria, on
the contrary, would have given it to us altogether.



CCXXXIV

TO PRINCE CAMBACRES, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

TRIANON, 22nd December 1809.

OUR brother, the King of Holland, having requested us
to permit him to separate from his wife, Queen Hortense,
we have thought proper to seek the opinion of the Family
Council, both as to the request itself, and as to the measures
to be taken to arrange everything relative to the respective
interests of the parties. We therefore cause this letter to be
sent to you, so that you may convoke the Family Council,
which will be held in the Throne Room at the Tuileries.
The Council will be presided over by yourself. Our brother,
the King of Westphalia, is nominated to take part in it, and
the Duke of Conegliano will be called as Senior Marshal of
the Empire. The further composition of the Family Council
will follow the rule prescribed by the Thirty-fourth Article
of the Family Statute.



ccxxxv

TO M. FOUCHE, DUG D'OTRANTE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

TRIANON, 2^th December 1809.

SEND General du Chatelet, the two brothers Clauves-
Briant, and Major D'Assonville, of the Department of
Jemappes, orders to proceed to Paris. You will inform
them that my intention is that they shall not continue to
live in Belgium, and that they are to select a residence forty
leagues from Mons. You will suggest to me that their
children and cousins should be at once taken, and placed in
a Lyce'e or in a regiment.



i68 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

Write to Venice that Mme Cassini is to be arrested, and
let it be known that whoever has recourse to foreign in-
fluence will be treated in the same manner. I do not intend
that Mons. Cassini shall leave Fenestrelle on any pretence
whatsoever. The villain lost all right to my protection
when he appealed to foreign influence.



CCXXXVI

TO M. FOUCHfi, DUG D'OTRANTE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, 2Jth December 1809.

I SEND you a summary of your statistics about the
Belgian families. Send me the draft of a Decree the pro-
visions of which you will see in the notes I have added to
the effect that those persons who might do harm to the
Government by their fortune, or their connections, are to be
obliged to come and live in Paris, and that, in other cases,
the children are to be sent to St. Cyr, or to St. Germain.
Have the same thing drawn up for all the conquered
countries which have lately been added to France.

CCXXXVII

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, Tpth December 1809.

PUT the strongest pressure on the King of Naples, and
make him understand that if measures are not taken to pay
his debts, and if he does not fulfil all his engagements, I
shall exact payment by main force ; that his kingdom is
always costing me money, and that I am furious at not
being paid what I am owed.

CCXXXVIII

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, \*]th January 1810.

I SEND you back your report about Rome. It strikes me
as being weak, and contains some doubtful assertions. When



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 169

you say that the entry of the troops into the March of
Ancona was not an act of hostility, you put yourself in the
wrong, and bring forward questions which would startle
Europe. The style is not sufficiently business-like ; what
I want is hard reasoning, not picturesqueness. I will ask
you, therefore, to remodel this report, and return it to me.
Generally speaking, the report has no divisions or plan, and
leaves no impression on the mind after it has been read.



CCXXXIX

TO M. FOUCH, DUG D'OTRANTE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, 21 si January 1810.

ORDER Mons. d'Oultremont, of the Department of the
Ourthe, to come to Paris ; when he arrives, you will inform
him that he is to remain there, until you have made him
aware of my intentions.

You will also order Mons. Van-der-Leyen, of Krefeld, in
the Department of the Roer, to proceed to Paris. You will
tell him to reside there until further orders ; and that unless
his two sons, who are at Leipsic and Frankfort, have been
brought back to France, and placed, according to their ages,
in a Lycee or some other establishment, within six months,
I will have his property confiscated.

You will order Mons. Chasteler, of the Department of tfie
Dyle, to come to Paris. When he appears before you, you
will inform him that I intend he shall take up his residence
elsewhere than in Belgium as, for instance, in one of the
towns in Old Flanders, or in Champagne.

You will give the same order to Mons. Ribaucourt, of the
Dyle, to Messrs. Jacques and Philippe Despres, Vermoesand,
Van de Werke, Van-Praet, Glys, and to Mme d'Oultremont,
of the Department of the Deux-Nethes.

You will be careful not to have more than two of these
people sent for from their Departments, at a time, and to
leave an interval of a fortnight or three weeks between the
dates of their departure, so that this measure may not appear
forced and extraordinary, but merely a regular administrative
step.

A person who has been described to me as being rich does
not appear on your list Let me have a report about this.



1 70 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON 1

CCXL

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, Ztfh Jamiary 1810.

I HAVE asked you for a report on American affairs. It
is necessary, before all things, that you should write to
America, in cipher, to ask that another Minister may be sent
to Paris, and to bring formal complaint against this one, who
is perfectly useless. Meanwhile, until I can send a new
Minister to America, send a secondary agent, who can act
as Secretary of Legation. He will sail on an American
schooner and will carry your despatches ; he will also be
the bearer of the American Minister's letter about the
sequestration of St. Sebastian, and your reply, in which you
will once more develop my ideas on that subject All this
should be done without delay.

CCXLI

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, 2.7 tk January 1810.

SEND for the Dutch Minister this evening before mid-
night. You will inform him that my troops have entered
Breda and Bergen-op-Zoom, but that the authorities have
behaved badly, which has obliged me to take severe measures ;
that I hear the Dutch troops are moving towards Holland ;
that there seems to be an intention to take up a hostile
position ; that I have just given orders to bring up the
troops I have at Diisseldorf and Hamburg, by forced marches;
that the King's meaning has yet to be made clear, that he
will be responsible for the blood that will be spilt, and that
this misfortune will not be long delayed ; that after I had
received the Duke of Reggio's packet, I gave orders to my
Minister of War to communicate that Marshal's despatches
to the King ; that I have created an army in Brabant, and
have placed the Dutch troops under the Duke of Reggio's
orders ; that if the King desires to avoid misfortune and
bloodshed, he must instantly send orders to his troops to



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 171

quit the hostile position they have taken up ; that the first
soldier or civilian who opposes force with force, in the
countries between the Meuse and the Scheldt, will be put
to the sword, and that the King will be responsible for the
blood that will flow, and for the consequent misfortunes to
Holland.

CCXLII
TO M. DE REMUSAT, PREFECT OF THE POLICE.

PARIS, i$th February 1810.

As the opera, ' The Death of Abel,' is ready mounted, I
consent to its being played ; buMn future I intend no opera
shall be given without my order. If the last management
has left the new one my written permission, it will be in
order, not otherwise. The former management deferred to
me, not only as to receiving works, but as to selecting them.
Generally speaking, I disapprove of the production of any
work founded on Holy Scripture. These subjects should
be left to the Church. The Chamberlain who has charge of
the theatrical business will immediately make this known
to the authors, so that they may devote themselves to other
subjects. The Ballet of ' Autumnus and Pomona ' is a cold
and tasteless allegory. That of the * Rape of the Sabines '
is historic and more suitable. Only mythological and his-
torical ballets are to be given never anything allegorical.
I desire four ballets may be produced this year. If Gardel
is not in a position to do it, you are to find other persons
who will. Besides 'The Death of Abel/ I should desire
another historical ballet, more apposite to present circum-
stances than the ' Rape of the Sabines.'

CCXLIII

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, iSth February 1810.

INFORM my Ambassador at Madrid that I have given
orders that the four provinces, Catalonia, Arragon, Biscay,
and Navarre, are to form four governments ; that I have
given the fullest powers to the Generals commanding there,
and that I have desired the revenues of these four Govern-



172 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

ments shall be paid into the Army Chest. Ask the Prince
of Neufchatel to give you my Decree ; you will send it to
Mons. Laforest, and you will commission him to inform the
King's Ministers that this is my will, that Spain has quite
sufficient resources to bear this expense a fact I cannot
doubt, more especially when I consider his wild expenditure. 1
You will let my Minister know, by a cipher letter, that his
correspondence must become more active ; that I intend to
incorporate the left bank of the Ebro, and perhaps even the
whole country up to the Douro, 2 with France ; that he must
take care that no one touches the property belonging to the
sentenced families, and that no member of these families must
be permitted to return ; that if this question were put
forward in any treaty or capitulation, he must oppose it, and
protest against it ; that I will not consent to ratify any
pardon that may be thus extended, and that wherever my
troops lay hands on such persons, they will be put to the
sword. And further, that .he must take a more active part ;
must speak to the King's Ministers, and point out that
rewards have been bestowed on Frenchmen whose only
merit consists in having followed the King ; that the money
thus bestowed is a loss to the common stock ; that the
Spanish war is costing me several hundred millions of money,
and that instead of being repaid for the enormous expense I
have had, I have the pain of seeing him squandering Spanish
moneys on his favourites. You will send Mons. Laforest to-
morrow's Moniteur, so that he may see my principles as to
the French Princes, and that I have the right, when they
forget the ties which bind them to France, to recall them,
or to force them to act primarily in the interests of their
country. 3

CCXLIV
TO M. FOUCH, DUG D'OTRANTE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, \%th February 1810.

I CANNOT be otherwise than displeased with the tone of
the newspapers. Who gave the Gazette de France leave to

1 The word ' wild ' was struck out of the draft by the Emperor.

2 Here Napoleon has erased the following sentence in the draft: 'That
the constant talk which goes on about integrity displeases me ; that those who
do it cast down the glove and defy me ; that this is impolitic on their part.'

8 This last phrase was struck out of the draft.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 173

say that MM.Le"on de Beauvau,de Noailles, and de Mortemart,
are soon to travel to Germany on a mission ? What is the
meaning of this? I remark upon it because I have long
noticed that the newspapers are mixing themselves up with
what does not concern theni, and filling their columns with
nothing but doubtful news.



CCXLV

TO MME DE LA ROCHEFOUCAULD, LADY OF HONOUR TO
THE EMPRESS JOSEPHINE.

PARIS, 24//fc February 1810.

MADAME, I have been satisfied with the manner in
which you have performed your duty as Lady of Honour, in
my Palace. I regret, and yet I cannot but approve, the
feeling which causes you to desire not to fill the position of
Lady of Honour in the new Household. But I should be
sorry if that inspired you with the smallest doubt of my
feeling for you, for I should wish to give you proofs of my
satisfaction, and to be especially agreeable to you, on every
opportunity.



!



CCXLVI

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.



PARIS, z6tk February 1810.

I DESIRE you will submit to me, in the course of the day,
the carefully prepared draft of a circular to be addressed to
my Ministers and Consuls, in which you will give the true
motive of my alliance with Austria. This circular is not to
be printed, but my Ministers will base their language on it.

In it you will say, that one of the principal means used by
the English to rekindle the war on the Continent has been
the supposition of my intention to overthrow all dynasties.
Circumstances having placed me in a position to choose a
Consort, I have desired to deprive them of that dangerous
pretext for disturbing the nations and sowing discord which
has steeped Europe in blood. Nothing appeared to me more
likely to calm the general anxiety, than my request for the



174 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

hand of an Austrian Archduchess. The brilliant and lofty
qualities of the Archduchess Marie Louise, of which I had
been specially informed, have enabled me to act in conformity
with my policy. The request for her hand having been made,
and acceded to by the Emperor of Austria, I sent the Prince
of Neufchatel to make my formal proposal, and to be present
as witness at the marriage, which will take place at Vienna, on
the 6th of March, when an Archduke will act as my proxy.
I have been very glad to take advantage of this opportunity
'!ko unite two great nations, and prove my esteem for the
ijjAustrian nation, and the inhabitants of the town of Vienna.
You will add that I desire they will suit their language to
the bonds of kinship which unite me to the House of Austria,
without, however, saying anything to diminish my close
alliance with the Emperor of Russia. You will write
specially to my Ministers at Stuttgart, Munich, and Carls-
ruhe, to let them know the itinerary of the Empress's journey,
and give them detailed instructions as to the etiquette to be
followed when she passes through the various Courts. There
is no use in going by what was done in my case, for I only
passed through when I was travelling on business, and I
never concerned myself at all with etiquette. I had so
much to think of, that I set no store by anything of the kind.
But the Empress's case is different. The manner of the
Empress's reception must be clearly settled, and also the
question of whether she is to pay a visit to the Queens, while
she is at Munich and Stuttgart. My intention is that the
course followed with regard to her, shall be such as would
formerly have been taken respecting the Empress of Ger-
many.



CCXLVII

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADORE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, 2-nd March 1810.

SEND a note to the Minister of Baden to inform him that
I am grieved to see that Prince Louis has recovered his
influence at Carlsruhe ; that the Catholics are subjected to
vexatious treatment ; that officers who have not fought on



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 175

our side, or who have served against us, are promoted, to the
prejudice of those who have fought under my orders ; that I
desire this deliberate attempt to displease me may be put a
stop to ; that the Baden Cabinet's behaviour is unworthy of
an ally ; that I shall take the part of the troops who fought
through the Polish, Prussian, and Austrian campaigns with
me ; that I insist that Prince Louis shall retire from the
States of Baden ; that he is at the bottom of all the mischief;
that he is to leave the country instantly, and that if he does
not, I will have him arrested, and shut up in a French fortress,
where he shall expiate all his crimes.

Write to my Minister to say, and make it known far and
wide, that I insist that appointments shall be equally divided
between Protestants and Catholics, that promotion shall be
given to the soldiers who served with my troops, and not to
new-comers, and that I even request the new-comers may be
got rid of.



CCXLVIII

TO M. Foucufi, DUG D'OTRANTE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, I2//& March 1810.

I FREQUENTLY complain of the newspapers, but I do not
believe the orders given them are ever sufficiently positive.
This is what you should write to the editors:

The editors are never to publish any news as to what I
have done, drawn either from foreign newspapers or foreign
correspondents. There is no difficulty about this. If a
foreign newspaper says I have been to the Comedie Frangaise,
the French newspapers are not to repeat the fact ; if they
say I have made a treaty, published such or such an edict, it
is not to be repeated for a matter relating to the Government
should not come from abroad. Thus, if this rule were
followed, one-half of the complaints to which the newspapers
now give rise would disappear. It is ridiculous that it should
be from a German newspaper that people hear I have sent
Gobelins tapestry to the Emperor of Austria. The journalist
who draws such a piece of intelligence from a German news-
paper must clearly be a simpleton, and no justification can
be offered for him.
13



1 76 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I



CCXLIX

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, DUG DE CADCRE,
MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, yd April 1810.

I DESIRE that the present made to Mons. de Metternich
should be of the same value as that made to the Prince of
Neufchatel : he must therefore receive a similar medallion.
I approve of the present you suggest for the Prince of
Schvvartzenberg. I desire these gifts may be presented with
as little delay as possible. I think Prince TrauttmansdorfT,
who already has my portrait, would rather receive some
Gobelin tapestries or a fine toilet service (necessaire}. Prince
Schwartzenberg, who has a great house, might perhaps prefer
an ordinary portrait, worth about 16,000 francs, and a
porcelain ne'cessaire, to the value of 30,000 francs. Count
Metternich might perhaps also prefer a handsome porcelain
necessaire^ in which case you would give him a portrait of the
ordinary value. Have hints given on this subject



CCL

TO iPRINCE EUGENE NAPOLEON, VICEROY OF ITALY.

PARIS, yd April 1810.

I HEAR Cardinal Oppizoni was not present at my marriage.
He ought to have been there, in his triple quality of Cardinal,
Senator, and Bishop of one of my chief towns.

You will send for him, and you will inform him that
he is to send in his resignation .as Archbishop of Bologna,
before the evening.

You will make him aware of all the indignation I feel at
the shameful conduct of a man whom I have loaded with
benefits, whom I have made Cardinal, Archbishop, and
Senator, whom I have protected, and whose infamous de-
baucheries I concealed, by intervening with my authority,
and interrupting the course of criminal proceedings at
Bologna. You will be careful to send his resignation by
the evening express, and to see that the Chapter forthwith
appoints suitable Vicars.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 177

You will not fail to make him feel that there must be no
hesitation, and that he could not possibly desire to remain
Archbishop in spite of me, after the failure in duty of which
he has been guilty.



CCLI

TO M. FOUCHE, DUG D'OTRANTE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

CoMPifcGNE, i$th April 1810.

HEREWITH you will find the Jetter written me by Prince
Ferdinand Make me a report on the whole of this business,
in a sense which will fit it for publication in the Moniteur.
Is the arrest of the person in question so little known, that
he may be supposed to have been arrested at Valengay ?
I should like you to put in your report, that the person
arrested at Valengay is at Vincennes ; that he had been
charged with a mission from the English to the Princes ;
that he had attempted to carry it out, and that Prince



Online LibraryEmperor of the French Napoleon INew letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III → online text (page 15 of 34)