Emperor of the French Napoleon I.

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Jena, Friedland, Eckmiihl, Essling, Wagram, and Madrid.
This banner must be about the same size as that affixed
to the eagles. Most of the eagles have lost theirs ; they can
be renewed every two or three years, without any great
expense. Have the sketch for this banner made, and draw
up the detail of what is to be put for each regiment.

A definite order must be issued, about the pike to be
carried by the two ensigns, whose duty it is to escort and
defend the eagle. The pike must be a strong one, with
which the standard may be defended, independently of the
brace of pistols each of these officers wears on his breast.

Finally, I desire each battalion shall have a guidon
without any emblem or inscription. It will be a pole, carry-
ing a piece of stuff, of one colour for the first battalion, of
another for the second, another for the third, and another
for the fourth, so that the number of the battalion may
be easily recognised merely by the colour of the flag.

There will be one eagle to each cavalry regiment. I
request you will turn your attention to all this. The custom
has been very much neglected in various corps. It must
be re-established.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 257

CCCLXXXVIII

TO M. MARET, DUG DE BASSANO, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

ST. CLOUD, i8M November 1811.

MAKE a complaint to the Mecklenburg Charge d'Affaires,
of the way in which things are going on in that country, and
the bad feeling of the press. Write to Mons. Desaugiers
that I blame his weakness, and that at the very first fresh
offence, he is to write to the Prince d'Eckmiihl, who will
have the journalist arrested, and severely punished. He
must have an explanation in this sense, with the Prince of
Mecklenburg.

Write to Bavaria to point out the absurdity of not arrest-
ing Dr. Schneider, and of allowing him to hang about the
frontiers of Switzerland, and the importance of taking ad-
vantage of the folly committed by the man, when he returned
to his country, to seize his person, and keep him in prison.

Arrange with the Minister for the Navy as to the answer
to be sent to Naples, about the ships. The idea of selling
ships cannot be entertained ; but Neapolitan crews might
be received on board three French ships, which might be
replaced by Neapolitan vessels. These, though belonging
to France, would fly the Neapolitan flag.

CCCLXXXIX

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

ST. CLOUD, 21 st November 1811.

SEE the Minister of Public Worship, and desire him to
inform the three Bishops of Ghent, Tournay, and Troyes,
that they no longer possess my confidence. The Minister
of Public Worship will send some one to them, to demand
their resignation of their Bishoprics. As soon as these
resignations have been sent, by letter, to the Minister of
Public Worship, my intention is that you shall oblige the
Prelates to start secretly, and at night, for points sixty
leagues from Paris, and from their dioceses. You will inform
me as to the places of residence you may choose for them,
so that I may approve them.



258 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CCCXC

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

ST. CLOUD, 24^ November 1811.

HEREWITH you will find a Decree, which declares a
certain number of Curiali beyond the pale of the civil law.
Have them deported to Corsica, and take care that all their
goods, furniture, and houses, are confiscated and sequestered.
These people must be out of Rome twenty-four hours after
the receipt of this Decree, and the thing must be done swiftly
and quietly.

CCCXGI

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

ST. CLOUD, ysth November 1811.

IT is my intention to set the Bishop of Troyes at liberty,
and keep him under surveillance, in a commune in one of
the safest parts of France in Alsace or Normandy. Con-
sult the Bishop, as to the town to which he would like to
retire; my intention being to place him in a small commune.
You will report to me, so that I may give you further orders.

CCCXCII

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

ST. CLOUD, 30^ November 1811.

WHAT is the meaning of this courier whom Princess
Pauline has sent to Soissons ? Find out about it.

CCCXCIII

TO QUEEN JULIE OF SPAIN.

PARIS, ^th December 1811.

I AM informed that the King of Spain is continuing, with
a lavishness very ill suited to his position, to give salaries



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 259

to persons in Paris, who do nothing for him, and this because
I continue to pay him his income of a million a year, as a
French Prince. So long as you remain in Paris, I intend
the Minister of Finance shall pay that million over to you,
but I desire that all salaries to persons in Paris, who render
you no actual service, may be suppressed. I am assured
that 50,000 crowns are thus unnecessarily expended, and
they would be very much better employed, if they were sent
to Madrid, to the King, seeing that he is asking for money
on every possible occasion.



cccxeiv

TO COMTE MONTALIVET, MINISTER OF THE
INTERIOR.

PARIS, gtk December 1811.

INFORM the Prefect of the Deux-Nethes 1 of my dis-
pleasure with his ridiculous behaviour at the ceremony on the
2nd. Instead of proceeding to the house of the General in
command, and accompanying him, he went straight to the
Church, unknown to anybody, so that there was a regular
scene. . . . Make the Prefect understand that obedience to
the laws can never disgrace him ; that, further, he owed
some consideration to a General holding so important a
command as that of Antwerp, who had been maimed, and
lost an arm, on the field of battle ; that the only result of
such behaviour must be to disturb the harmony between
civilians and the military which has not earned the right
of being being despised and ill treated in any country, and
least of all in France.

cccxcv-

TO JEROME NAPOLEON, KING OF WESTPHALIA.

PARIS, loth December 1811.

I HAVE your letter of 5th December. I only notice two
facts in it : (ist) That the Hanoverian and Magdeburg
proprietors are leaving their houses, to avoid paying the
heavy additional charges you have laid on .them. (2nd) That

1 Mons. de Voyer d'Argenson.



260 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

you do not think you can be sure of your army, and warn me
not to reckon on it.

As to the first point, it does not concern me. I have
constantly advised you, as a matter of principle, to keep
down the enemies of France, not to allow them to become
over confident, and, by showing a greater amount of con-
fidence in the Generals commanding at Magdeburg, to insure
the safety of that important fortress ; and, in short, to
manage the whole finance system of Westphalia, which is
the worst governed State in the Confederation, consistently
and economically.

As regards the second point, it is what I have never
ceased telling you since the day you ascended the throne.
A small number of troops, and these well chosen, and a more
economical administration, would have served yourself, and
the common cause, far better.

When you have facts to lay before me, I shall always be
glad to be informed of them, but when, on the contrary, you
desire to draw me fancy pictures, I will ask you to spare me
them. You tell me nothing new, when you tell me your
administrative system is a bad one.

CCCXCVI

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, io//z December 1811.

HAVE the Bishop of Troyes removed at night, and taken,
with post-horses, to Falaise, without passing through Paris.
You will let the officer in command of the Gendarmerie know
that he has to keep an eye on his behaviour. You will ask
him to give his word of honour not to go two leagues beyond
Falaise, without your authority. Have the Bishop of Tournay
removed in the same manner, and send him to one of the
small communes in the diocese of Orleans. It must not be
the chief commune.

In the same way, you will take the Bishop of Ghent, and
send him to a small commune in the diocese of Dijon.
Make them all give their word that they will stay quietly in
these communes, without having any correspondence with
their dioceses, or mixing themselves up with ecclesiastical
affairs.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 261

CCCXCVII

TO COMTE DE LAVALLETTE, DIRECTOR OF THE
POSTAL SERVICE.

PARIS, 2$tk December 1811.

I AM sorry you should have allowed Princess Pauline's
letter to the Comte de St. Leu 1 to pass, for you know all
such letters are read abroad, and Europe is thus admitted
into the family secrets.

I desire you will stop all the family letters to the Comte
de St. Leu, and all the letters Trom the Comte de St. Leu
to his family. The advantage of this will be, that they will
correspond by every private opportunity, and that their
letters will not be read.



CCCXCVIII

TO M. MARET, DUG DE BASSANO, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, 2.6th January 1812.

I HAVE dismissed Mons. Tassoni, my Italian Charge
d'Affaires at Naples. I am summoning him to Paris, to
give an account of his conduct. Find out about this Charge
d'Affaires; he has behaved so ill, that I have dismissed
him. It was not his place to remain neutral, in a business
which affected the dignity of my Crown. If, apart from this,
he should be found to have been in communication with
Maghella, or any other person, I intend to make a severe
example of him.

As regards this Neapolitan business, I conclude it to be
clearly understood, that Dolgorouki will not be received at
Court, nor recognised as Minister ; that you have warned
Baron Durand of my intentions, and that he would leave
Naples, if any other course were followed. My Ministers must
be pre-eminent at Naples, as in all the other States of the
Confederation, because I am their Suzerain.

1 Louis Napoleon, ex-King of Holland.



262 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CCCXCIX

TO M. MARET, DUG DE BASSANO, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, qth February 1812.

I BFG you will make my Minister at Cassel acquainted
with the Decree which provides that every insult to my
soldiers, in the territory held by the Grande Armee, shall be
laid before a military court, for sentence. I conclude you
have received this Decree ; let it also be communicated to
Mons. de St. Marsan.

My Minister at Cassel must let it be known, that I am
exceedingly displeased with the town of Brunswick, and that
the very next time the town is guilty of an offence, I shall
put it beyond the pale of my protection, and have so severe
an example made of it, that the posterity of the inhabitants
will remember it, a hundred years hence.

CCCC

TO M. MARET, DUG DE BASSANO, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, ztyh February 1812.

WRITE to my Minister at Naples, that I have recalled
Maghella, who performed the duties of Minister of Police at
Naples, and that he must let it be known that he must
leave Naples, to return to France, within forty-eight hours,

on pain of arrest You will not conceal from Baron Durand,

that Maghella is accused of intriguing against the safety of
the Empire, and that he had an understanding with the
English, to stir up a rising of so-called patriots, in Italy. He
will not mention this to him, but he must speak very
decidedly, and Maghella must instantly depart from Naples.

CCCCI
TO JEROME NAPOLEON, KING OF WESTPHALIA.

WILNA, 41 h Jiily 1812.

I HAVE received your packet sent from Grodno, at four
o'clock yesterday afternoon. I was exceedingly glad of its
arrival, as I hoped you would have sent the Major-General



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 263

news of Bagration's Corps, of the direction in which Prince
Poniatowski had pursued it, and of the movements of
troops in Volhynia. What was my astonishment at learning
that all the Major- General had received, was a complaint
of a General !

I can only express my dissatisfaction at the small amount
of information I have from you. I neither know the number
of Bagration's Divisions, nor their names, nor where he was,
nor what information you obtained at Grodno, nor what you
are doing. I have five or six columns in motion, to intercept
Bagration's march. I cannot think you have so neglected
your duty, as not to have pursued him, the very next
morning. I hope, at all events, that Prince Poniatowski
has followed him, with the whole of the 5th Corps.
My operations are stopped, for want of information from
Grodno. I have had none since the 3Oth. The Chief of
your Staff does not write ; Prince Poniatowski does not
write. It is impossible to make war in this fashion ! You
never think nor speak of anything but trifles, and I am
distressed to see how thoroughly small-minded you are. If
General Vandamme has committed acts of brigandage, you
did well to send him to the rear, but in present circumstances
the question is such a secondary one, that I regret you have
not sent me information which might have been of service to
me, nor explained your position, by your courier.

I do not know why Prince Poniatowski does not correspond
with the Major- General, twice a day. I certainly ordered
him to do so.

Postscript. You are jeopardising the whole success of the
campaign, on the right ; it is not possible to carry on the war
in this way.

CCCCII

TO MONS. MARET, DUG DE BASSANO, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

Moscow, $th October 1812.

I RETURN these despatches. It seems to me extraordinary
that the person in question should have ventured to take
this upon him. I cannot help acknowledging that the thing
is well and cleverly written, but I do not know the man
well enough to be able to rely on what he says, for indeed, a



264 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

person of that kind might have invented the whole thing, to
give himself credit. I think I recollect his being employed,
some ten or twelve years ago, at the English Admiralty
Courts, and that he obtained the release of a dozen ships at
Hamburg, which he had given back, and on which he received
several hundred thousand francs. That being so, it would not
be according to my usual custom, to give him powers to act
as a Commissary for Exchange, but I do not object to your
employing him as a secret agent, and sending him back to
London, to negotiate any kind of business. The simplest
way of discharging my obligation to him, is to pay him.
I therefore think you should send for him to Wilna, and
have a long conversation with him, after which you should
send him back to England, by Sweden, Denmark, or any
other route.

As to the root of the question, I may decide to send a
French Commissary to London for I will have no English
Commissary in France. The agent might, therefore, be
commissioned to say, that if they choose to give him pass-
ports to admit a French Commissary, he will pass them
through. Only it must be clearly understood that I will not
abandon the principle of simultaneous exchange.



CCCCIII

TO MONS. MARET, DUG DE BASSANO, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

DOUBROWNA, i8/yfc November 1812.

FOR the last five days I have had no express. I hear
the enemy entered Minsk on the i6th. Where then was
Prince Schwartzenberg? I know not ! The Duke of Belluna
had not done anything by the i6th.

Since the last letter I wrote you, our position has been
damaged. Frost, and bitter cold, of sixteen degrees, have
killed almost all our horses 30,000 of them. We have
been forced to burn more than 300 pieces of artillery, and an
immense number of ammunition-chests. In consequence of
the cold, the number of men left behind has greatly increased.
The Cossacks have taken advantage of our absolute lack of
cavalry and artillery, to harass us, and cut our communica-
tions, so that I am somewhat uneasy about Marshal Ney,



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 265

who remained behind, with 3000 men, to blow up Smolensk.
Apart from that, a few days' rest and good food, and above
all, horses and artillery stores, will set us on our feet The
enemy has the advantage over us, in its habit of, and experience
in, moving on ice, and this gives it an immense superiority in
winter. Where we cannot get an ammunition-waggon, or a
gun, up the smallest ravine, without losing twelve to fifteen
horses, and wasting twelve to fifteen hours, they, with their
skates, and other specially made contrivances, move it more
quickly than if there was no ice.

Send news of us to Paris. See what artillery we can get
at Kowno and Wilna, and write to Dantzig, that all the
ammunition-waggons and campaigning vehicles there are to
be got ready to send to us. Find out, too, what is to be had
at Modlin, and the other fortresses in the Grand Duchy.

CCCCIV
TO JEROME NAPOLEON, KING OF WESTPHALIA.

PARIS, 2yd December 1812.

I HAVE your letter. I believe it is more necessary for you
to be in your kingdom, at this moment, than in Paris. No
troops of the Westphalian army remain with the Grande
Armee, and everything seems to point to a struggle next
spring. Let me know what you have sent, to fill up your
ranks, what you can do to complete your artillery and
cavalry, and, to conclude, what you are in a position to do,
towards provisioning, and thoroughly arming, Magdeburg,
against any event. A perusal of the reports, and news you
may have received, direct from the Grande Armee, may have
informed you that it has had to take up its winter quarters
on the Vistula, after having undergone considerable losses.

CCCCV

TO PRINCESS STEPHANIE, GRAND DUCHESS OF BADEN.

PARIS, 2tyk December 1812.

MY daughter, I have your letter of 2Oth December.
You cannot doubt the share I have taken in the loss which
has befallen you. But you have courage and good sense,
and I trust the year now about to begin, will bring you some
reason for consolation.



266 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I



CCCCVI

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVTGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, Stti January 1813.

I DESIRE you will send for M. Thurot, and ask him by
what right, and what authority, he sends me drafts of
decrees, and memoirs of every kind. Chance has thrown
his last into my hands. I had not seen the preceding
ones, for my Secretaries, and very properly, throw them
into the fire. The liberty taken by this individual, who
enters into correspondence with me, without permission,
strikes me as being very impertinent. Let him know that
he is to put a stop to it. He is an ill-conditioned fellow,
with whom I will have nothing whatever to do.



CCCCVII

TO COMTE DEFERMON, COMPTROLLER-GENERAL OF THE
STATE PROPERTY EXTRAORDINARY.

FONTAINEBLEAU, 2 ^th January 1813.

IT is my intention that the son of the King of Naples
shall not be invested with the principality of Ponte-Corvo,
until he has taken the oath of fidelity to me in person. Keep
back my Decree and retain possession of the Principality.
Speak to the Grand Chancellor so that the Titles Office
may not grant investiture.

CCCCVIII

TO COMTE BIGOT DE PRfiAMENEU, MINISTER OF
PUBLIC WORSHIP.

FONTAINEBLEAU, 24^ January 1813.

I HAVE ordered General Henry to move with his flying
columns, in pursuit of the robbers who have taken refuge in
the woods and are committing excesses. Write to the
Bishops in the Mayenne, and the Sarthe, that, without print-
ing anything, they are to write to their Cures, to back up
the military, by giving information, and causing it to be
given. The Bishops must see General Henry, so as to give



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 267

him all possible information. Send me a list of the most
active and influential priests in those localities.



CCCCIX

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

FONTAINEBLEAU, ^th January 1813.

I SEE that one of the Imperial Crowns in the Third Military
Division has been damaged. The culprits have pleaded,
indeed, that they were drunk, but this is no sufficient excuse.
Have two of them arrested instantly, brought before a court-
martial, and shot within twenty-four hours. You will then
assure the Police Commissaries and Prefects that large
numbers of troops are proceeding to the Elbe, and that
a body of 30,000 men will always be kept in the 32nd
Division, to insure the public peace. You must take hostages
for the worst Cantons.

CCCCX

TO GENERAL CLARKE, DUG DE FELTRE,
MINISTER OF WAR.

FONTAINEBLEAU, 2^hjanua-y 1813.

WRITE to General St. Cyr, that I am dissatisfied with the
small amount of activity and vigour he is at present dis-
playing. All persons who have committed excesses, and
stirred up rebellion, either by setting up any rallying signal
for the crowd, or by exciting it against the French, or the
Government, must be brought before a military tribunal,
and instantly shot Two or three examples are indispens-
able, and must be made.

Write to General Lauriston, that while he is with the
32nd Military Division, he must keep the populace down,
and try to make some examples. Some attempts at sedition
have already taken place. Any insult offered the French,
any attempt to resist authority, any setting up of a rallying
point, must be punished with the death penalty, and by
martial law. One of the Imperial Crowns in the 32nd
Division has been broken. The culprits assert they were
drunk. Drunk or not, two men must be shot. Write the



268 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

same thing to General St. Cyr. Let the two men who have
committed this offence be instantly arrested and shot. It is
indispensable that some examples should be made in the
country. Let them be made forthwith.



CCCCXI

TO ELISA NAPOLEON, GRAND DUCHESS OF TUSCANY.

FONTATNEBLEAU, 2$tk January 1813.

I HAVE just concluded a Concordat with the Pope. I
send you a copy of it. You will be good enough to keep it
to yourself, and not let any one whatever know of it. When
the news begins to spread at Florence, you can announce it
in the newspapers, in an article which you will write your-
self, and which, nevertheless, will have no appearance of
coming from an official source. You will mention the news
as a rumour. The Pope intends to settle at Avignon.



CCCCXII

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

FONTAINEBLEAU, 26tk Jamiary 1813.

YOU will receive a Decree, by which I order the forma-
tion of a flying column at Le Mans. General Henry, who
commands it, should be there to-morrow, and as the troops
are already at Blois, Vendome, and Cherbourg, he will be
able to begin operations at once. I am desiring the Minister
of War to remit him funds, both for secret expenses and for
gratuities.

Send a few intelligent and practical police agents down into
that country. Let them look about among the former
Chouans. Police Commissaries, Mayors, Sub Prefects and
Prefects, must march, whenever necessary, with the National
Guard, to scour the woods, and make an end of these
wretches.

See General Henry before his departure, and tell him to
keep constantly moving, and direct his columns carefully. I
conclude he will be at Le Mans to-morrow.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 269

CCCCXIII

TO PRINCESS PAULINE BORGHESE.

FONTAINEBLEAU, 2^th January 1813.

I HAVE your letter of 2Oth January. I am distressed to
notice how bad your health is. You would have done better
to come to Paris, than to have allowed yourself to be sent
from place to place, by doctors who hope to do you good.
You would have done better to go to Nice, than to Hyeres.
I see no objection to your going to that town.

CCCCXIV

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

PARIS, 2&th January 1813.

I BEG you will address all the idle tales from Vienna you
are sending me, to the Duke of Bassano. I have no time to
read them, and all they do is to charge my memory with
useless matter. The Duke of Bassano, who has nothing
else to think of, may assess the value of this information, by
comparing it with what other he may have.

The man who writes to you from Vienna is a blackguard,
who picks it all up in the streets ; nevertheless, it may be
worth sending to the Duke of Bassano.

CCCCXV

TO GENERAL CLARKE, DUG DE FELTRE,
MINISTER OF WAR.

PARIS, 28^ January 1813.

SEND orders, by express, to General Brenier, commanding
the 25th Military Division, to send 1200 infantry, and fifty
cavalry, under the command of a Brigadier-General, to Rons-
dorf, in the district of Elberfeld, in the Grand Duchy of Berg,
to disarm the district, and scatter the mob collected there ; to
arrest the chief culprits, have them instantly tried by court-
martial, and six of them shot ; to take hostages, and, if the
ringleaders should have taken flight, to have their nouses
burned.



270 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

General Brenier is to write to Diisseldorf, to the Minister
of the Grand Duchy, who will send 300 or 400 men to join
his Brigade. If the troops first despatched should not be



Online LibraryEmperor of the French Napoleon INew letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III → online text (page 22 of 34)