Emperor of the French Napoleon I.

New letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III online

. (page 26 of 34)
Online LibraryEmperor of the French Napoleon INew letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III → online text (page 26 of 34)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


308 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

printed about the Prince ; but yet it is necessary he should
know this is my opinion, and should not be able to deceive
himself upon the subject



CCCCLXX
TO FREDERICK, KING OF WURTEMBERG.

DRESDEN, 22nd Jtdy 1813.

SIRE AND MY BROTHER. I have received your Majesty's
letter of i6th July. I share the grief this second freak of
your son's must cause your Majesty. It is sad, that after
having done so much for your family, your Majesty should
be so poorly rewarded. Your Majesty must find some
source of consolation, at least, in the thought of your son's
youth, and his lively passions.



CCCCLXXI
TO ELISA NAPOLEON, GRAND DUCHESS OF TUSCANY.

MAYENCE, 22nd July 1813.

I AM surprised to notice that opposition is being offered
to a parish priest, appointed by the Bishop, in Florence.
Take the most vigorous measures to put down this religious
resistance, at the very outset. Send all persons guilty of it
to the island of Elba.



CCCCLXXII

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

MAYENCE, 2tyhjuly 1813.

LET the minor newspapers publish all that is known about
Mons. Anstett, the Russian Plenipotentiary at Prague. He
belongs to Strasburg, and the details, which will show he is
a Frenchman, and of very low extraction, will prove how
little the Russians, who make such an extraordinary selection,
really desire peace.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 309

CCCCLXXTII

TO GENERAL CLARKE, DUG DE FELTRE,
MINISTER OF WAR.

MAYENCE, y.stjuly 1813.

GIVE orders that all wives of generals, officers, and
Government employes, and all women of bad character,
including those dressed up as men, who have come from
Spain, and are now at Bayonne, and in the Departments of
the Landes, and the Basses Pyrenees, are instantly to be
sent back across the Garonne, and that, forty-eight hours after
the issue of the order you will cause the officer commanding
the Division to publish on this subject, all those who have
not obeyed, are to be arrested by the civil and military
authorities, and taken to their homes. The loose women will
be confined in the Salpetriere. You will take care that the

wives of the three Generals, G , F , and V , are

not only sent back across the Garonne, but straight to their
own homes.

CCCCLXXIV

TO THE PRINCE DE NEUFCHATEL, MAJOR-GENERAL
OF THE GRANDE ARM&E.

MAYENCE, y.stjuly 1813.

WRITE to the Marshals and Generals commanding Corps,
to the Governors of Dresden and Magdeburg, the Com-
mandant at Wiirtzburg, etc., that under present circumstances,
the Emperor's fete will be kept on the loth of August. For
this purpose I order a gratuity of twenty sous, for every non-
commissioned officer and private. The Marshals will take
measures to have the gratuity paid over on the 9th. This
sum will provide extra fare. Double rations of bread, rice,
brandy, and meat, will be issued to the troops.

I desire the Marshals will issue orders, that each General of
Division is to invite all the officers of his Division, together, to
his table. Each Marshal will himself preside at the table of
the Division with which he is present. For this purpose I
grant six francs a head, in addition to the double rations.
The total sum will be given to each Marshal, who will have
it placed at the disposal of the various Generals of Division.



3io NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

I also desire a Te Deum may be sung in every camp, that
there may be great illuminations at night, that the artillery
may let off fireworks, and that, in fact, each Marshal may do
everything suitable to the celebration of a day so dear to
Frenchmen, to cheer the soldiers, and impress the allied
nations. The allied troops will receive the same gratuity
as the rest.

The officers' repast should take place in the open air, and
at the same hour as the soldiers'. The toasts will be honoured
with salutes of 100 guns. In the allied countries, the local
authorities and principal inhabitants will be invited, and
even in hostile countries, the authorities, and such of the
chief inhabitants as have given satisfaction, may be invited.
Wherever that is possible, the General will give a ball.

At Dresden, the Imperial Guard will give a great ball to
the whole town. In the evening there will be manoeuvres,
and instead of cartridges, fireworks will be used ; this will
have a better effect.

The military operations, and the close of the armistice,
which may take place on the loth, are my reasons for
advancing the celebration from the I5th, to the loth.

At Frankfort, Hanau, Fulda, Cassel, and in the 32nd
Military Division (except at Hamburg), the fete will not be
kept till 1 5th August, when it will be celebrated at Wesel,
Mayence, and in the rest of France ; these towns are there-
fore not included in this day s Order.



CCCCLXXV

TO GENERAL .CLARKE, DUG DE FELTRE,
MINISTER OF WAR.

MAYENCE, ist August 1813.

IT would be well to give the public an account of the
Spanish business. Nothing must be said, either of the
Vittoria business, or of the King. The first notice you
will insert in the Moniteur, will run as follows : 'His
Majesty has appointed the Duke of Dalmatia his Lieu-
tenant-General, in command of his armies in Spain. The
Marshal took command on the I2th, and instantly made
arrangements to march against the English, who were be-



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 311

sieging Pampeluna and St. Sebastian.' After that you will
have General Key's first letter, about the assault of St.
Sebastian, inserted, and then the letters about such events as
took place on the 25th, 26th, and 2;th. It will be well for
you to make some addition to the number of prisoners and
guns taken, not on account of France, but on that of Europe.
As I am having General Rey's letter published in the
Journal de Francfort, and as I have made alterations of this
kind in it, I send you back the original, with my alterations,
so that it may appear in the Moniteur, in the same form.



CCCCLXXVI

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, 6th A^^gnst 1813.

THE Minister of Public Worship has sent me his report
on the Seminarists at Ghent. These are my intentions ; see
they are exactly adhered to.

You will have the Director of the Seminary, who professes
such bad principles, arrested, and confined in a State prison,
without anybody being aware of his whereabouts.

You will have all the Seminarists, over eighteen years of
age, seized, and taken to Wesel, whence they will be sent to
Magdeburg. They will be given military clothing ; General
Lemarois will enrol them in the regiments at Magdeburg,
and make them do military duty. They cannot become
priests now.

All the Seminarists below eighteen years of age, you will
have arrested, and taken to the best -Seminaries in old France,
dividing them up, so that there shall only be one in each
Seminary, and desiring the Directors to instil good principles
into them.

Give orders, too, that these Ghent Seminarists are to be
replaced by an equal number, drawn from good French
Seminaries, and already fairly well instructed in the principles
of the Gallican Church. And see the Seminary has a good
Director.

I have no time to write about this to the Minister of Public



312 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

Worship ; let him know the contents of my letter, and take
measures in concert with him.

I do not know whether it is at Tournay, or elsewhere, that
the Beguines are misbehaving themselves. Have them
turned out of the town.



CCCCLXXVII

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, *jth August 1813.

I HAVE your letter of 2nd August. I am really dis-
tressed by what you write me about poor Junot. He forfeited
my esteem during the last campaign ; but that did not
prevent my still feeling a regard for him. He has regained
my esteem now, for I see his cowardice, then, was already
caused by his illness. I approve all the proposals you
submit to me. See the Grand Chancellor, to whom I am
writing. There will be no difficulty about placing the two
young girls at Ecouen. You do not tell me the two children's
ages.

Speak to the Grand Chancellor, too, about the Duchess of
Istria, and find out what will have to be done to settle her
affairs. I intend to help her also.



CCCCLXXVIII

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, >jth August 1813.

I APPROVE of your making an arrangement with the
Duchess d'Abrantes, as to some country-house, whither she
shall retire, and live in future. You will inform her that as,
being the wife of the Governor of Paris, she has chosen to mis-
behave herself, and so to embroil her family affairs, that she
has ruined herself, and brought her children to starvation, it
is time for me to put an end to this state of things, and for
her to drop out of public notice.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 313



CCCCLXXIX

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, *ith August 1813.

I SEE an article about Mons. Anstett, in the Journal de
V Empire^ the terms of which are rather too emphatic. All
that was necessary, was to state who his parents were, what
he himself has done, and to say he has always been looked
on as an agent of the English, fro.m whom he has received a
salary.



CCCCLXXX

TO GENERAL CLARKE, DUG DE FELTRE,
MINISTER OF WAR.

DRESDEN, ^th August 1813.

LET Marshal Jourdan be allowed to retire, and let me
hear no more of him. Let all his aides-de-camp be em-
ployed elsewhere, and sent to join the army for duty. Do
the same thing with all the officers about the King, whom
he has not kept with him. I think I have already written
to ask you what rank they can be given, on going back to
duty.



CCCCLXXXI

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, nth August 1813.

THE Duke of Otranto, who has just travelled through all
the Austrian States, tells me the surest way to strike at that
Power, in the event of a war, will be to affect its paper
currency, on which all its armaments depend.



314 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CCCCLXXXII

TO COMTE DE REMUSAT, FIRST CHAMBERLAIN,
SUPERINTENDENT OF THEATRES.

DRESDEN, i2tk Attgust 1813.

I SEND you a statement of the gratuities I will allow the
actors of the Come"die Frangaise who travelled to Dresden.
This statement reaches a total of 111,500 francs; you will
have the gratuities paid out of the Treasury of Theatres.

Mons. Fleury 10,000 francs.

Talma 8,000

MM. Desprez, St. Prix, St. Phal, Baptiote ) ,

Cadet, Armand, and Vigny < ' oc



Michot, Thenard, Michelot
Mons. Barbier,
Mile Mars ....



Georges ....

Miles Emilie Contat and Buurgoin

Thenard and Mezeray
Mons. Maignien ....
MM. Frechot, Colson, Combes, Bouiilon, and

Mongellas J 5



4,000
3,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000

2,000



CCCCLXXXIII

TO PRINCE CAMBACERES, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

DRESDEN, iqtk Atigtist 1813.

You will find, enclosed, a confidential letter, with reference
to the verdict of the Brussels Court of Assize, which I am
sending to the Chief Judge. You will send for the Minister,
and hand him the letter yourself. You will also send for the
Minister of Police, so that before my intention is made
public, the accused persons may have been re-arrested, and
the jurymen who are implicated, seized. My letter will not
be inserted in the Moniteur, and the Decree submitted to the
Senate, until three or four days afterwards. I authorise you
to appoint the members of the Secret Council, and take the
initiative in the whole of this business. The Minister of
Police will be one of the members of the Secret Council.
Extraordinary circumstances necessitate extraordinary mea-
sures, and they are provided for in our Constitution.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 315

CCCCLXXXIV

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, itfh August 1813.

GIVE orders for the arrest of all the Canons and members
of the Tournay Chapter. See the Minister of the Exchequer,
and have their salaries instantly stopped. Give orders that
the Tournay Seminarists, under eighteen years of age, are to
be scattered through the seminaries in old France, and that
those over eighteen, are to be forthwith taken to Wesel,
whence they will be sent to Magdeburg. Give orders that
the Rectors and Professors of the Tournay Seminary are to
be obliged to take the oath insisted on in France, before the
Revolution, to teach the four points of doctrine of the Galli-
can Church. Let all this be done without a hitch, without
scandal, and let the delinquents be sent to a State prison.
Especially, and before anything else is done, let Goes, the
head of the Chapter, and Constant, both of whom signed
the resolution of the Chapter (an absolute act of rebellion),
be arrested. Arrange so as to have the Canons all arrested
at once ; you can send the three most guilty to a State
prison. As for the rest, whom I conclude to be aged men,
and simpletons, they can be lodged in Seminaries, but in
the very heart of old France.

Inform me as to the behaviour of the town of Tournay in
this matter. If the town has behaved ill, the seat of the
Bishopric must be removed to some other French town, or
the diocese must be suppressed. If it is necessary, send 250
gendarmes, mounted and on foot, into the Department of
Jemappes.

CCCCLXXXV

TO GENERAL SAVARY, DUG DE ROVIGO,
MINISTER OF POLICE.

DRESDEN, itfh August 1813.

GENERAL MOREAU has certainly reached Berlin. It would
be well for you to make sure of the whereabouts of Adjutant-
General Hulot, and even to take possession of his person.
He applied for his pension about a month ago, probably in
order to go and join General Moreau.



316 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CCCCLXXXVI

TO THE COMTESSE DE MONTESQUIOU, GOVERNESS
TO THE KING OF ROME. 1

DRESDEN, i^th August 1813.

I HAVE your letter, and the King's, of the Qth. I think
the King makes very good rhymes, and, more especially, that
his rhymes express very true feelings. I will leave it to the
Empress to provide the King with toys.

CCCCLXXXVII

TO THE PRINCE DE NEUFCHATEL, MAJOR-GENERAL
OF THE GRANDE ARMfiE.

DRESDEN, zgth August 1813.

I DO not approve of your sending Adjutant-General
Galbois to the King of Naples. I do not see why you should
inform the King of Naples as to my communications with
the Austrians. Your letter is an improper one, and serves
no good purpose. Send Adjutant-General Galbois to the
Duke of Ragusa.

In your letter to the Adjutant-General, I find the follow-
ing words : ' That he will recognise my liberal arrangements.'
This is an improper phrase. Do I owe him any explanation
of my intentions ? The people who draw up your letters do
it very ill.

CCCCLXXXVIII

TO MARSHAL GOUVION ST. CYR, COMMANDING THE
4TH CORPS OF THE GRANDE ARM&E.

DRESDEN, ist September 1813.

THE Duke of Tarento has allowed himself to be driven
back on Gorlitz. I may possibly be obliged to march on
Bautzen to-morrow, or the day after. You will therefore
promptly occupy all the defensive positions, so that the
Duke of Ragusa, and my Guard, may be free to march with
me, in that direction.

That unhappy Vandamme, who seems to have killed him-
self, had not a sentinel on the mountains, nor a reserve

1 The King of Rome was then two and half years old.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 317

anywhere. He plunged into a deep valley, without attempt-
ing to send out a single scout. If he had only kept four
battalions, and four guns, in reserve, on the heights, this
misfortune would not have occurred. I had given him posi-
tive orders to entrench himself on the heights, to encamp his
troops on them, and only to send isolated parties of men into
Bohemia, to worry the enemy, and collect news. Apart from
the men belonging to his corps, who have reached you,
many have arrived, and are still arriving, at Dresden.



CCCCLXXXIX

TO GENERAL COMTE FRIANT, COLONEL COMMANDING THE
INFANTRY GRENADIERS OF THE IMPERIAL GUARD.

DRESDEN, yd September 1813.

IF you move along the Bautzen road, you will find a
great number of stragglers and marauders from the 3rd,
5th, and nth Corps, who have thrown their weapons away.
My intention is that you should drive them all back to
Bautzen, whither muskets are being taken for them. Send
out patrols on the right and left of the high-road, and drive
me back all this rabble, with the butt-ends of your guns.

CCCCXC

TO THE PRINCE DE NEUFCHATEL, MAJOR-GENERAL
OF THE GRANDE ARMEE.

DRESDEN, ^th October 1813.

HEREWITH you will find the reports of General Chastel and
General Reiset. Inform General Chastel of my displeasure
at his behaviour, and order him to return forthwith to the
bank of the river. I had a right to expect more zeal for my
service, from any General of Division. Why did he not
instantly send an officer to the Headquarter Staff, and
another to General Souham, to warn them the enemy had
crossed ? How could he carry caution to such lengths as to
think his safety compromised, when the enemy had not yet
begun their bridge? I do not really know what terms to
apply to such cowardly and careless conduct. Write to the
Duke of Ragusa, that if the enemy has really thrown a bridge



3 i8 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

across the river at Miihlberg, he must instantly march and
destroy it. Give General Reiset orders to return to his post.
Write to General Souham, that if the enemy has thrown
a bridge across at Miihlberg, he must move upon it with
Ricard's and Delmar's Divisions, and his reserve Artillery,
drive the enemy back upon the right bank, and destroy the
bridge. Make him understand this operation is of urgent
importance. You will also order General Chastel to return
to his post.

CCCCXCI

TO PRINCE CAMBACERES, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF

THE EMPIRE.

ERFURT, z^rd October 1813.

I CANNOT understand this restriction on the publication
of the speeches made in the Senate, under pretence that
they must first be seen here. The pretext is absurd. The
Regent has quite sufficient judgment to decide whether they
contain anything objectionable. It is too late now to publish
them. This fashion of doing business, in such times as
these, does no good, and even does harm.



CCCCXCII

TO THE COMTESSE DE MONTESQUTOU, GOVERNESS
TO THE KING OF ROME.

MAYENCE, yd November 1813.

I HAVE your letter of 29th October. I am glad to see
that the little King's fall has done him no harm. I hear so
much praise of him, that my longing to see him, and my
obligation to you, are both increased.

CCCCXCIII

TO PRINCE CAMBACERES, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

MAYENCE, $th November 1813.

I SEND you a letter from King Louis, which appears to me
that of a madman. I conclude the Prince has not gone to



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 319

Paris. If he should come there as a French Prince, it is my
intention to forget all his follies, everything he has caused
to be printed, and to receive him. If he should come as
King of Holland, and still persist in pursuing that chimera,
he cannot be received. If he should have committed the
folly of coming, no visits are to be paid him, and he must
remain in retirement with Madame, at Pont. Above all, the
Empress must not see him.

CCCCXCIV

TO PRINCE CAMBACfiRfeS, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

MAYENCE, 6th November 1813.

I SEND you an unsealed letter to Madame ; you will read
it, and seal it, and you will confer with Madame about it.

If Louis comes as a French Prince, he will write me to that
effect, and as soon as you have his letter, he can be presented
to the Empress, and can enjoy the income of his appanage.

But if Madame can do nothing with him, and he is only
coming to disturb my peace, and put forward the wild plan
suggested to him by Austria, and by the enemies of France,
I expect Madame, who, up till now, has never done me any
service with her sons, will induce him to depart, and let
me hear no more of him. If, forty-eight hours after this
present attempt, Louis is still in Paris, and has not affirmed
that he comes as a French Prince, you will proceed to his
residence, with the Vice- Grand Elector, the President of the
Senate, the Chief Judge, and the Secretary of the Impenal
family, and you will call upon him to acknowledge the laws
of the Empire, to remain in France as a French Prince,
and to recognise the Decree which joins Holland to France.
If he refuses, a formal report will be drawn up, and imme-
diately afterwards, he will be arrested, and taken, incognito,
to the Castle of Compiegne.

Hold a small council, with the Prince of Benevento, the
President of the Senate, the Chief Judge, and Count Reg-
naud. Show them the King's letter to me, mine to Madame,
and this present letter. It is horrible that he should choose
this moment to come and insult me, and tear my heart, by
forcing me to act severely. But it is my fate to see myself

22



320 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

perpetually betrayed by the frightful ingratitude of the men
on whom I have showered most benefits, and more especially
by this one, for whose education I denied myself everything,
even absolute necessaries, when I was only twenty. You
know that the libels he published against me were printed
and underlined by Austria, after the declaration of war, as
though to blacken my character, and increase the enmity
which broke out in all quarters.

It is my most positive intention, as soon as Louis shall
have declared that he does not acknowledge the Decree, and
has thus placed himself in rebellion against the laws of the
State, to declare he has forfeited all his rights to the throne.
You understand that I do not even insist on this declaration
of the gratitude of Holland, if he will make your official
inquiry unnecessary, and will assert, in a letter written to
me, that he comes as a French Prince, to rally round the
throne, and offer his right arm to defend his country.



CCCCXCV

TO MADAME

MAYENCE, 6th. November 1813.

MADAME, AND VERY DEAR MOTHER, I learn by telegraph
that Louis has arrived at your house. I send you a copy of
the letter he has written me.

If Louis is coming as a French Prince, to rally round the
throne, he will find a welcome from me, and oblivion of the
past. I brought him up in childhood, and loaded him with
kindness. My reward has been the libels with which he has
chosen to fill every Court in Europe. Yet, once again, I
will forgive him ; you know I never harbour spite. But if
Louis, as his letter leads me to fear, comes to claim Holland,
he will place me under the painful necessity (ist) of dealing
severely with him ; (2nd) of doing so permanently, for I
should be obliged to send him a formal summons through
the Grand Chancellor, and in presence of the Prince Vice-
Grand Elector, the President of the Senate, the Chief Judge,
and the Family Secretary, and if he does not acknowledge
the laws of the Empire, he will forthwith be declared a
rebel.






NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 321

He shows very little generosity in thus causing me fresh
trouble, and obliging me to proceed with severity, at a
moment when I have so much on my hands, and when my
heart needs consolation, and not fresh anguish.

Holland is a French country, and will be so for ever. The
law of the State has thus appointed it, and no human effort
can take it away. I appeal to you, then, if Louis is coming
primed with the same wild fancies as before, to save me the
pain of having him arrested as a rebel subject, to induce
him to leave Paris, and to live quietly, and unknown, in
some corner of Italy. He was in Switzerland ; why did
he leave it ?

In spite of all the proofs of hatred he has given me, I
cannot believe him to be so wicked, and such an enemy to
his children, as to desire, in present circumstances, when the
whole of Europe is rising up against me, and when my heart
is wrung by so much trouble, to cause me the additional
distress of obliging me to proceed against him.

I close with a repetition of my assurance, that if, on the
contrary, he comes simply as a French Prince, to rally round
the throne, which is in danger, and to defend the interests
of his country, his family, and his children, I will forgive all
the past, I will never mention it to him, and I will welcome
him, not as remembering his conduct during the past ten
years, but as recollecting the affection I had for him in his
childhood.



CCCCXCVI

TO PRINCE CAMBACfiRtS, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

MAYENCE, 6tk November 1813.

THE King of Westphalia has had the property of Stains
bought for him. I believe this step is contrary to the Family
Statutes, and beg you to make sure. I fancy they contain
an article providing that no property can be acquired in



Online LibraryEmperor of the French Napoleon INew letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III → online text (page 26 of 34)