Emperor of the French Napoleon I.

New letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III online

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i6 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

It is impudence on M- Pinto's part to assert that three
Portuguese ships and two frigates did not blockade Alex-
andria. We spoke them.

All your letters convince me that you are very far from
realising all the strength, and all the obstinacy, even, that
must be put into a negotiation. You may be sure that
your treaty, when it is sent to England, will betray your
want of business habits to that Court, and to M. Pinto.
This is pardonable. But in such a case a man should seek
much counsel, and be less sure about his conclusions. You
will be convinced of the great importance I attach to the
proper drawing up of a treaty when I tell you, that even if
the three provinces had been granted, there are certain
articles that, for instance, by which we should have guar-
anteed the Portuguese possessions which would have
prevented me from ratifying this one.



XVIII

TO CITIZEN LUCIEN BONAPARTE, AMBASSADOR
AT MADRID.

PARIS, yd Messidor, Year IX.
(22 nd June 1801.)

I HAVE received your letter of 24th Prairial. Affairs of
such importance are no child's play.

Your last letters from the Minister for Foreign Affairs,
and mine, will have informed you that all the present plan
depends on our taking possession of two or three Portuguese
provinces.

Can it be possible that with your good sense, and know-
ledge of the human heart, you can have let yourself be
deceived by Court flatteries, and that you should not have
been able to make Spain aware of her real interests ?

In a word, here lies the whole question. If the three
provinces are occupied, we shall have an honourable peace
with England before the month of Vendemiaire ; and if we
should be obliged to abide by the Peace of Badajoz, the
war would go on for several years. It is because everything,
in the political system, hangs so closely together, that a
Minister should always move with great caution, and never
make any hurried decision.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 17

How can you possibly have imagined that, after the Treaty
of Luneville, I would send 15,000 men into Portugal, to
make peace on the same, or perhaps on less advantageous,
terms, than those obtained by the Directory six months
before the Treaty of Campo-Formio, and at a time when we
were still at war with Austria?

I have already caused the English to be informed that I
will never depart, as regards Portugal, from the ultimatum
addressed to M. d'Araujo, and that the status quo ante bellum
for Portugal must amount, for Spain, to the restitution of
Trinity Island ; for France, to the restitution of Martinique
and Tobago ; and for Batavia, to that of Curagoa and some
other small American isles.

In the conversation which followed the presentation of
this Note, the English Minister gave it to be understood that
this appeared to him reasonable.

Influence the Court to which you are sent. Do not allow
yourself to be influenced by it.

Make your declaration to M. Pinto. Make it likewise to
the Court of Spain. Let the armies do the rest. When so
small an effort is all that is needed to insure the world's
peace, it is worth the while of the Spanish Court, and the
French Agents, to make it.

As for you personally, you must remain in Spain.

Felix Desportes spends his time at Madrid gossiping with
all the Ambassadors, who write a heap of nonsense, which
comes back to me, to their various Courts. He also writes
a great deal too much to Bayonne journalists.



XIX

TO CITIZEN TALLEYRAND, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, I4//& Messidor, Year ix.
(yd July 1 80 1.)

I REQUEST you will inform M. Azara that I should wish the
Count of Leghorn to be beyond Chambery by the I4th of
July. For it will not be fitting that he should witness the
festivities held on that day, in all the great towns of the
Republic.



i8 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

XX

TO CITIZEN FORFAIT, MINISTER FOR NAVAL AFFAIRS.

PARIS, 2yd Thermidor, Year IX.
(nth August 1801.)

I BEG you will inform Rear- Admiral Ganteaume that bis
not being included in the list of State Councillors is no proof
of any dissatisfaction on my part, since Citizen Chaptal,
Minister of the Interior, who enjoys the greatest confidence,
is also omitted from the list ; but that it is the result of my
intention to employ him on duty which may necessitate his
absence for a long time.

In a separate letter, you will express my regret that he
did not succeed in carrying out his mission to bring help to
the Colony. You have, no doubt, already complimented
him on his capture of the Swiftshire (sic).



XXI

TO CITIZEN TALLEYRAND, MINISTER FOR
FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

PARIS, i6th Ventdse, Yearx.
(Jth March 1802.)

I DESIRE you will instantly send for the Spanish Am-
bassador, and communicate the following Note to him :

' Admiral Bruix has just informed the Government, that
he is blockaded in the Port of Brest by twenty-one English
ships only ; that he has seventeen French ships in the best
order, and thoroughly equipped ; that M. Gravina has fifteen
Spanish ships, ready to weigh anchor; that the First Consul
considers it shameful and humiliating to both nations, that
their fleets should be blockaded by such an inferior force ;
that he is sending orders by telegraph to Admiral Bruix, to
leave port at once, and give chase to the twenty-one English
vessels ; that His Catholic Majesty's intention, in sending
fifteen ships to Brest, was not to render them useless to the
service and glory of the two Powers ; that the First Consul
requests orders to support the French Fleet in this sortie,
may be sent by telegraph to General Gravina.

You will make him understand that in the present position,



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 19

political and military, of Europe, the sortie of the two fleets,
even with no object beyond that of chasing the English
Squadron for twenty-four hours, would be extremely advan-
tageous in its results, for both nations.



XXTI

NOTE ANNEXED TO A LETTER TO THE POPE,
DATED 4TH PRAIRIAL, YEAR X.

IT will be expedient, for the dignity of the Government of
France, and beneficial, for the dignity of the Church, to grant
a warrant of secularisation to Citizen Talleyrand.

This Minister has rendered service both to the Church and
to the State. He has publicly and irrevocably renounced
all his clerical functions and dignities. He desires that this
renunciation should be confirmed by the formal recognition
of the Head of the Church; he deserves this special favour.

On political grounds it is inexpedient, now that France
again becomes a Catholic nation, that a Minister who holds
the chief confidence of the Government should-be the subject
of doubt and controversy as to his former status.

As regards his efforts to reunite the Church and the
Government, he must be in a position to reap the free
expression of the gratitude of all who care for it, the
reward of the zeal he has shown for the re-establishment of
religion.

Such weighty considerations will at once appeal to the
benevolence and the justice of the Holy Father.

There shall be no mention of the form such an instru-
ment should take. His Holiness will select that which
appears most fitting and most complete. As for precedents,
the Holy Father will find many in history.

In the seventeenth century, under Innocent X., Camillo
Panfili, a Cardinal, and the Sovereign Pontiff's nephew, was
secularised, and died a layman.

In the fifteenth century, Caesar Borgia, Archbishop of
Valencia, became Due de Valentinois, married a Princess
of the House of Albret, and died a layman.

Ferdinand di Gonzaga, who was first an ecclesiastic and
then Duke of Mantua ; Maurice of Savoy, who married in
1642, after having taken orders; the two Cardinals Bourbon.



20 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

uncle and nephew, both of them Archbishops of Lyons all
of whom laid down their ecclesiastical dignities with the
consent of the Holy See died laymen.

Two Kings Casimir of Poland one, who succeeded in the
eleventh century, another, who was elected in the seventeenth,
were freed, not only from the bonds of the clerical order,
but from monastic vows ; the first was a Benedictine, the
second a Jesuit, and this last, besides being declared a lay-
man, received permission to marry his sister-in-law.

Henry of Portugal, Archbishop of Lisbon, and successor,
in 1588, to the crown of Sebastian, died a King and a
layman.

Frangois de Lorraine, who surrendered his right to the
Dominions of his brother Charles IV. in 1634, and afterwards
became the father of Leopold, passed from the priesthood
into the laity, and remained faithful to the Church.

All these instances are taken from the period during
which the Holy See was in the fulness of its authority.
The use then made of it by the predecessors of Pius VII.
was dictated by motives of expediency, for the Church's
good. These motives still exist, and it is doubtful whether,
at any of the epochs referred to, the same request was based
on such weighty reasons.



XXIII
TO POPE PIUS VII.

ST. CLOUD, 26th Vendtmiaire, Year XI.
(iXtA October 1802.)

MOST HOLY FATHER, Since the Concordat, we have
observed, in the person of M. de Belloz, Archbishop of Paris,
all the virtues, qualities, and talents necessary to the highest
dignities and most important functions in the Church. He
could not fail to perform the duties, and support the dignity,
of a Cardinal, in the most eminent manner, both as to wisdom
and holiness. For this dignity we nominate and present the
said Archbishop of Paris to Your Holiness, for the next
creations to be made, according to custom, for the Christian
States.

We pray God will preserve you many years, Most Holy
Father, to rule the Church.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 21

XXIV
TO M. DE BARRAL, BISHOP OF MEAUX.

ST. CLOUD, iQth Floreal, Year XI.



I HAVE given orders to the Treasurer to send you the sum
you ask for, and to add 60,000 francs to be distributed in
works of charity. I shall always be very glad to give you
proof of the esteem I feel for you.



XXV -

TO CITIZEN BARB-MARBOIS, MINISTER OF
THE PUBLIC EXCHEQUER.

26th Prat rial, Year xi.
(\$thjune 1803.)

I BEG you will have a valuation made of the finest pearls
in the Treasury, and also of an assortment of coloured
stones, which my wife desires to purchase. She would
require them before her departure for Belgium.



XXVI

TO CITIZEN FABRE DE L'AUDE, PRESIDENT OF THE
FINANCE SECTION OF THE TRIBUNATE.

ST. CLOUD, i$th Vendemiaire, Year mil.
(%th October 1803.)

I HAVE received your various letters as to the settlement
of your family. You do not doubt the interest I feel in
everything which affects you. I have ordered the Treasurer,
Esteve, to remit you 10,000 francs to help towards the for-
tune of one of your daughters ; I have also given orders
that from 1st Vendemiaire, Year XII., the expenses of one
of your daughters shall be defrayed, at any educational
establishment you may select. I desire you will take these
arrangements as a proof of my satisfaction with the services
you have rendered.



22 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

XXVII

TO GENERAL SOULT, COMMANDING THE CAMP
AT ST. OMER.

LA MALMAISON, z^rd Plnvidse, Year xil.

(\^th February 1804.)
(This letter was published in the Correspondence, No. 7541. The lines

there described as illegible run as follows.}

HAVE the crew and gear of the fishing-boat which com-
municated with the English seized at once. I reproach
myself with having neglected to have this done sooner.
Make the skipper speak, and I even give you authority to
promise him his pardon if he gives information ; and if he
should seem to hesitate, you can go so far as to follow the
custom as to men suspected of being spies, and squeeze his
thumbs in the hammer of a musket.

XXVIII

TO CITIZEN MELZI, VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE
ITALIAN REPUBLIC.

PARIS, y)th Plumdse, Year xn.
(2Oth February 1804.)

I HAVE instructed M. Mareschalchi to keep you informed
of everything that happens here. 1

You must have absolute confidence in the report made to
me by the Chief Judge. There is nothing more to be known.
The business would hardly be worthy of the name, save for
the part taken in it by General Moreau, who has been the
accomplice of those wretches, a fact which, for three days,
I could not believe ; but the proof became so overwhelming
that I was unable to interfere with the course of justice.
Paris and France are one family, with but one feeling and
one opinion. Communicate this fact to the State Council.
Place no faith in any false report which may be circulated.
I have run no real risk, for the police had its eye on all these
machinations, and I have the consolation of not finding
reason to complain of a single man, among all those I have
placed in this huge administration. Moreau stands alone ;
but he had long since drawn away from the Government.

1 The trial of Moreau, Georges, Pichegru, etc.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I ^ 23

XXIX
TO MADAME



CASTLE OF STUPINIGI, 2nd Floreal, Year xiu.
(22nd April 1805.)

MONS. JEROME BUONAPARTE has arrived at Lisbon, with
the woman with whom he lives. I have ordered this prodigal
son to proceed to Milan, passing through Perpignan, Toulouse,
Grenoble, and Turin. I have informed him that if he
diverged from that road he would be arrested. Miss Patter-
son, who lives with him, has taken the precaution of bringing
her brother with her. I have given orders that she is to be
sent back to America. If she were to evade the orders I
have given, and to come to Bordeaux or Paris, she would be
brought back to Amsterdam, and put on board the first
American vessel. I shall treat this young man severely, if
he shows himself unworthy of the name he bears, during the
only interview I shall grant him, and if he persists in carry-
ing on his liaison. If he shows no inclination to wash away
the dishonour with which he has stained my name, by for-
saking his country's flag on land and sea, for the sake of a
wretched woman, I will cast him off for ever. I may make
him an example which will teach young soldiers the sacred-
ness of their duty, and the enormity of the crime they
commit when they forsake their flag for a woman.

Write to him, on the supposition that he will go to
Milan. Tell him I have been a father to him, that his
duty to me is sacred, and that the only chance of salvation
remaining to him, is to obey my instructions. Speak to his
sisters, so that they may write to him too. For, once I have
pronounced sentence upon him, I shall be inflexible, and his
life will be blasted for ever.

XXX
TO M. FOUCH, MINISTER OF POLICE. 1

MILAN, loth Prairial, Year xiu.
(30^ May 1805.)

I HAVE told you what you are to think of the reports the
English are endeavouring to spread, so as to give colour to

1 The rough draft of this letter is very ill-written, and almost illegible.



24 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

the step taken by the Emperor of Russia. Yet the news-
papers must not be permitted to take a line favourable to
Russia, to that corrupt . . . weak, and silly Cabinet. At
this moment, indeed, it is showing some spirit, but more
from a feeling that it can do nothing, than from any other.

A contrast must be drawn with the shameful position of
the English. They must be compared to a besieged fortress.
From the top of the towers on which we see them, they
fancy they will save the country (?). The Englishman, strong
in the position of his army of observation, and in the space
which separates him from his enemy, does not glance behind
him. If he sees dust rise in the distance, he does not inquire
whether it is raised by a convoy of provisions or an enemy.
It is certain that in war, as in love, nothing is done without
. . . [several illegible words}. In opposition to this, set the
bravado and the cringing (?) of the Russians. Say they are
a barbarous nation, whose strength is in its cunning, a nation
without funds, which could not send 30,000 men to campaign
outside its own borders, without sacrificing them all.

What became of this bond(?) the moment war was
declared ? Russian intervention was refused. And in this
connection their inconsistency and rashness must be demon-
strated. Official documents were actually garbled so as to
persuade the people that Russia did not offer her mediation
to prevent the war from breaking out.

Have caricatures made : An Englishman, purse in hand,
entreating the various Powers to take his money, etc. This
is the real direction to give the whole business ; and the
huge care the English are taking to gain time, by spreading
false news, all the symptoms together, prove its extreme
importance.

Have it put about in Holland that news comes from
Madeira (?) that Villeneuve has fallen in with and captured
an English convoy of one hundred sail, on its way to
India.

Do not allow M. Musset to remain in the Bavarian States.
Write and have him arrested* wherever he may be. A
perusal of Drake's documents suffices to show what that
ruffian is. It is by this name that my agents, in whatever
country they may be, will describe him.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 25

XXXI
TO JEROME BUONAPARTE.

MILAN, 20th Prairial, Year XIII.
(gthjzme 1805.)

I HAVE received your letter of the loth Prairial. I shall
shortly proceed to Genoa. Nothing you can say to me can
affect my determination. Lucien prefers a disgraced woman,
who bore him a child before he had married her, and who
was his mistress while her husband was at St. Domingo, to
the honour of his own name and family. I can only mourn
over such an amount of mental alienation, in a man on whom
Nature has bestowed much talent, and who has been snatched
from a brilliant destiny by his unexampled selfishness, which
has carried him far from the path of honour and duty.

Miss Patterson has been in London, and caused great
excitement amongst the English. This has only increased
her guilt.

XXXII
TO M. FOUCH, MINISTER OF POLICE.

GENOA, 12th Messidor, Year xiil.
(is t July 1805.)

I CANNOT help seeing with surprise, that the intrigues and
bad advice of that Mdme Hulot tend to prevent her son-in-
law from going to America, and will force me to do what I
would rather have avoided. I do not intend her to remain
in Paris. Send her forty leagues away. She is not to go
and see the Empress at Plombieres : that would give her
an opportunity to commit some impertinence, which would
oblige me to punish her severely.

XXXIII
TO M. FOUCHfi, MINISTER OF POLICE.

FONTAINEBLEAU, 2$th Messidor, Year xm.
(lyhjuly 1805.)

THE Gazette de France seems to me to be doing very
badly. I do not know why it reports that foolish story of
the marriage of the Prince Eugene with the Queen of
Etruria. It has many other improper items. Advise the
Editor to be more sensible.



26 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

XXXIV
TO PRINCE EUGENE.

ST. CLOUD, 8M Thennidor, Year xni.
(2jthfufy 1805.)

I AM informed that you are in correspondence with a

person named D . 1 do not know if you are aware that

this person is nothing but a woman of the town, an intriguer
of whom the police have frequently made use. A woman 01
this kind ought not to receive any letter from you. She
is the filth of Paris. I think it my duty to warn you of this,
that you may rule yourself accordingly in future.

XXXV.
TO M. FOUCHE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BOULOGNE, i%th Thermidor, Year xm.
(6th August 1805.)

THE conscription in the Department of the Eure is a
complete failure. All the conscripts have deserted. It is
also a blank in the Eastern Pyrenees. My intention as
regards the Eure, which is at the very gates of Paris, is that
you should come to an understanding with the new Prefect,
and take measures to have all the conscripts arrested and
marched off. I send you a proclamation with reference to
the same object. Of all abuses, that which touches the
conscription is the most worth consideration, for it is the one
which entails the most serious consequences.

XXXVI

TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR.

BOULOGNE, igth Thermidor, Year XIII.
(Tth August 1805.)

I DESIRE you will express my displeasure to the Prefects
of the Gironde, the Herault, the Loire, the Upper Loire,
the Cantal, the Lot, and the Deux-Nethes. Inform them
that they are the seven Prefects who have given least atten-
tion to the conscription, who permit the greatest amount of
desertions, and who are altogether most behind-hand. Order
them to take efficacious measures to remove this blot from
their Departments and government. Tell them that the
smallest neglect of so important a matter is an injury to the
State.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 27

XXXVII
TO M. FOUCHfi, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BOULOGNE CAMP, tfh Frttctidor, Year xni.
(22nd August 1805.)

I HEAR that General Lecourbe has returned to his country
house a few leagues from Paris. I had sent him orders to
go to the Franche-Comte. If he is still at his country house,
have him arrested, and brought back to the Franche-Comte
by the police. The general officer in question has conducted
himself so ill, that he cannot be allowed in the neighbourhood
of Paris. Inform him that the first time he ventures within
forty leagues of Paris, I will have him arrested and deported.
Advise him to sell his property near Paris, and make him
understand that he had better behave himself; that I am
aware of his share in the Georges conspiracy, and of his
conduct in general. I must take this opportunity of express-
ing my displeasure at your having allowed him to come so
near. He is a cunning fellow, a bad and dangerous man,
hand and glove with all my enemies.

I must also tell you that the conduct of the police lacks
consistency. The Lenormant affair proves this. If Lahorie
and three or four other individuals belonging to Moreau's
party, whom I had banished to different departments, were
not seen openly in Paris, the many foolish and ridiculous
plans, which will only result in their own destruction, would
never come into their heads. Fix all your attention on this
point, and clear Paris of everything which should not be
there.

XXXVIII
TO M. FOUCHfi, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BOULOGNE CAMP, nth Frtictidor, Year xm.
(29/A August 1805.)

ALLOW me to tell you that your conduct is utterly unin-
telligible to me. Either you are profoundly ignorant of
mankind, or you are trying to make me look into matters
which should not concern me. Lecourbe is in Paris. He
has no business there. A falser and more thorough rogue
does not live. Let him be out of Paris in twelve hours,
and never permit him to return. Anybody with the most



28 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

elementary ideas of government must feel that Lecourbe
must never be allowed within a hundred leagues of Paris.
You should never have advised him to come there.

Another matter is that of Mdme de Stael. She claims
that I gave her leave to come to Paris, and wants to stay
there. She must betake herself to Coppet. You must
feel I am not such a fool as to prefer her presence in Paris
to her being twenty leagues off. At Geneva, which is every

one's country, French affairs are her sole occupation 1

Inform her friends that she will stop at a distance of forty
leagues. All elements of discord must be removed from
Paris. It is impossible for me to leave bad citizens free to
disturb my capital, whilst I myself am two thousand leagues
away, at the far end of Europe.

XXXIX

LETTER TO BE SENT BY PRINCESS AUGUSTA TO THE
STATES-GENERAL OF BAVARIA.

THE PALACE AT MUNICH, i$th January 1806.

GENTLEMEN OF THE STATES-GENERAL OF BAVARIA, I
have to thank you for the kind things you say of me in the
address you have presented to His Majesty the Emperor, my
august father-in-law. I accept with pleasure the gift the
States-General desire to offer me. But permit me to dispose
of it, with the consent of the Prince, my husband, by giving
dowries to fifty girls of my own age, chosen amongst the
most virtuous in the various towns and cantons in Bavaria,
and to two soldiers, either wounded or distinguished by
bravery during the last war out of each Bavarian regiment
in the brave army of my much honoured father. I wish
these marriages to take place on the 1 4th of next February,
but would leave all other executive details entirely to you.
On that 1 4th of February I shall, wheresoever I may be, take
part in thought in the festivities in my own land, and I shall
feel my happiness increased by the happiness of fifty good
and virtuous couples.

Be assured, gentlemen, of my esteem, and of my desire to
give you proof of it, in every circumstance.

1 Here follow several illegible words. This rough draft is very badly
written.



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