Emperor of the French Napoleon I.

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the man Florent, of Breda, arrested. You suggest my
appointing a Commission. I think I have already appointed
a Committee of the Council of State for this business.

Give orders that the man Desruisseaux, accused of having
been at Bayeux, in 1801, in connection with an English
correspondence, shall be arrested, and sent to a fortified castle.
I cannot but blame your culpable indulgence of such scamps.
What hope can you have of successfully watching wretches
of that kind ? Have them seized, and shut up in the fort of
Joux.

Send me a general report on all the smugglers. Could we
not get eight or ten millions out of them ? What means can
we take of bringing them to justice?

1 Stephen Vieusseux was one of the partners in an Antwerp house, which had
branches at Hamburg and in Paris, and which practised smuggling on a large
scale. When he was arrested, he replied, ' I have sold the merchandise I had
stored in Holland, without troubling myself as to where it came from, or whither
it was to be sent. I afterwards bought this merchandise in France, without
inquiring whether it had been brought in illegally. No law has forbidden me
these speculations, nor does any law forbid them at this moment.' National
Archives, AF. iv. 1502, Police Report, 2Oth May 1808.



^90 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

cxv

TO M. FOUCHfi, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BAYONNE, z6th May 1808.

WE intend, having reason to be displeased with Madame de
Chevreuse, Dame du Palais, that she shall remain in banish-
ment, in her property of Luynes, near Tours, and that she
shall be punished for her disobedience, if she trangresses the
said order. You will be good enough to see to the execution
of the present order.

cxvi

TO PRINCESS PAULINE BORGHESE.

BAYONNE, 26th May 1808.

I HAVE your letter of the i8th May. I approve of your
going to take the waters in the valley of Aosta. I am sorry
to learn your health is bad. I suppose you are wise, and that
it is by no fault of yours ? I observe with pleasure that you
are pleased with your lady-in-waiting, and with your Pied-
montese ladies. Make yourself loved ; be affable with every-
body ; try to be even-tempered, and to make the Prince
happy.

cxvn

TO M. FOUCHfi, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BAYONNE, nth June 1808.

I SEE, in the Journal de France, an article on King Charles,
dated from Fontainebleau, which seems to me conceived in
a bad spirit. Generally speaking, it is time to cease mentioning
this. family. Let the journalists know this, and see to it.

I do not know why I no longer have a Police report every
day. Take measures that I may receive one daily.

The arrest of Prejean and his four comrades is a matter of
great importance. I trust he will not escape, and that you
will profit by all the information he may be able to give you.
If the English agents, and those of the Comte de Lille, who
certainly are in Paris, and in the Morbihan, could be arrested,
it would be a great thing. I beg you will give me exact
information as to all Prejean's depositions.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 91

CXVIII
TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

BAYONNE, \6thjune 1808.

You must have a statement drawn up of all our grievances
against AH Pasha, and send it to my Charge d'Affaires at
Constantinople, and to the Ambassador of the Porte in
Paris, requesting satisfaction against the Pasha, or that he
should be declared a rebel.

Write in cipher to my Commissary-General at Corfu, that
he must stir up the neighbouring small Pashas, who are dis-
satisfied with Ali Pasha, against him, and weaken him in
every way, by giving assistance in arms and money (secretly,
of course) to all his enemies.



CXIX

TO MARSHAL BERTHIER, PRINCE DE NEUFCHATEL,
MAJOR-GENERAL OF THE GRANDE ARM&E.

BAYONNE, 22nd June 1808.

THE King of Westphalia's Minister has published a
circular, dated 3rd June, which is a most humiliating thing
for the French Army. Write to the King, that he is to
revoke it on the spot, and that it is my intention that French
Commanding Officers shall enjoy all the dignities of their
rank in his dominions. It is ridiculous that French Com-
manding Officers should have to refer to Westphalian
Commanding Officers to men, in other words, who were
formerly our enemies and bore arms against us in matters
necessary to the wellbeing of our. soldiers. Tell the King,
that Colonel Morio, in whom I have not the slightest con-
fidence, could not possibly be Chief of the Staff of the
French Army ; that that gentleman has no head and no
sense. What is the meaning of this subordination of French
soldiers to Westphalian soldiers ? Twenty years hence, at
the nearest, such a thing might be tolerated. I await the
King's reply, to know what course I must take, to maintain
the dignity due to my troops, and my officers.



92 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

cxx

TO M. DE LAVALLETTE, DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE
POSTAL SERVICE.

BAYONNE, 26th June 1808.

THE Spanish Princes have received a number of letters
addressed to them at Valengay, from Bayonne, Perpignan,
and various other points on the Spanish frontier ; yet I have
strictly desired you to take measures to prevent their receiving
any.

CXXI

TO M. FOUCHE, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BAYONNE, 2%thjune 1808.

MADAME DE STAEL keeps up a steady correspondence with
the man Gentz, and has allowed herself to be drawn into the
clique of London intriguers. I wish her to be watched at
Coppet, and desire you will give orders to that effect, to the
Prefect of Geneva, and the Commandant of the Gendarmerie.
Her intercourse with this individual cannot be otherwise
than harmful to France. You will let it be known that up
till now she has been looked on as a mad woman, but
that, from this day forward, she enters a circle detrimental
to the public peace. I have also given orders to the Minister
for Foreign Affairs, to have this made known to all my
agents at foreign Courts, and to have her watched wherever
she goes.

CXXII
TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

BAYONNE, 2&thjune 1808.

As Madame de Stae'l is in regular correspondence with
Gentz, the author, and as this intercourse cannot be anything
but reprehensible, it is my intention that you shall inform my
Ministers and agents, in Germany, and especially at Weimar,
that if that lady should enter the countries where they reside,
they are to abstain from seeing her, and they are to have her
watched.



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 93

CXXIII
TO M. FOUCH, MINISTER OF POLICE.

BAYONNE, vqthjune 1808.

I HAVE your letter of the 26th. The changes made in the
Police Council are irregular. You should not have made
them without my order.

I have carefully read all the examinations sent me by the
Prefect of Police. They seem to me important. But it is a
calumny to say he attacks the Senate. In what he has sent
me, there is not one word that can compromise a single
Senator. Your duty is to support the Prefect of Police,
and not to disown him, and give currency to false rumours
against that magistrate.



CXXIV

TO PRINCE CAMBACRS, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

BAYONNE, ztyhjune 1808.

I HAVE received your letter of 26th. The report of the
Prefect of Police, and the examination and confrontation of
General Guillaume and Gariot, seem to me very important.

Nothing can exceed my displeasure with this Minister of
Police, who displays his hatred of the Prefect of Police,
instead of supporting, encouraging, and directing him. The
Minister tries to cast blame on the Prefect of Police, by
saying he makes reflections on the Senate. There is not one
word against the Senate in everything the Prefect of Police
has sent me. Speak to Pelet and Real in my name. I desire
you will support M. Dubois in every particular, and give him
public proof of your esteem. Warn his enemies and detractors,
that the more they endeavour to depreciate his zeal, the
more striking will be the proofs of esteem I myself shall
bestow upon him. I am guided by my own reason and
judgment, and not by other people's opinion.

It is a certain thing, that since the Year VIII. the anarchist
party has never ceased hatching underhand plots in France.
I have forgiven this, over and over again. We must now



94 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

make an example, which will cut all these machinations
short.

Why have not you, who are a lawyer, pointed out to the
Minister of Police, that he had no right to create a new
system ? He should have consulted the assembled State
Councillors and the Secretary-Geneial, who holds the pen.
But he should not have taken a decision as to creating a
Police Council. The State Councillors, who know the
established rules, should have refused to perform such
functions, for this new system could not be called into
existence, without my authority.



cxxv

TO PRINCE CAMBACRS, GRAND CHANCELLOR OF
THE EMPIRE.

BAYONNE, \yhjuly 1808.

SEND for M. Pouche*. Ask him what he means by his
letter of the loth, which I send you. Why does he think
I should sweep away the Senate ? Does he not know the
Constitution ? Does he not know that I have no reason to
complain of any member of that body, which has never
failed to prove its attachment to my person ? Is the Minister
mad? or is he joking? Ask him for his proofs that the
Prefect (of Police) used such language. Have this function-
ary brought face to face with M. Fouche, and clear the
business up. Why has the Minister kept this matter from
the knowledge of the Police Council ? Send me the report,
and the Council's proceedings. I found fault with his having
taken the pen away from the legally appointed secretary of
the Council ; but I gave no orders to reverse that action, and
you did not tell him to do so. Explain to me, in short, what
Fouche" is about, with all this. Is he mad ? At whom does
he aim ? Nobody is attacking him. Nobody is attacking
the Senate. What does it all mean? I am beginning to be
thoroughly puzzled by the Minister's conduct. What do
Real and Pelet de la Lozere say ? What do you think of it
all ? Can his jealousy of the Prefect of Police possibly have
carried him to such lengths ?



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 95

CXXVI

TO GENERAL DUROC, GRAND MARSHAL OF
THE PALACE.



BAYONNE, ityhjtdy 1808.

HERE are two letters which you will send to Remusat,
that he may present them to the King and Queen (of Spain). 1
The King wishes to go to Nice. He can start as soon as
he chooses. He can travel incognito, or as I do. He will
be free to proceed as he chooses.

If he does not desire to travel incognito, all the honours
due to his rank must be paid him. He will be given what-
ever escorts he desires. Of course, he will travel at his own
expense, and will establish himself at Nice, at his own cost.
One of his officers can go to Nice, with a letter from the
Minister of the Interior, to prepare his house. I conclude
he will take one of the houses in the suburb. There are
some good-sized ones, I think. If he should desire to go
to Mentone, I do not know if the Prince of Monaco's house
is fit to receive him. At all events, he can drive there, and
see if he could settle there. I wish the Queen of Etruria
to follow the King ; unless she should prefer going to
Colorno in the State of Parma. I would, in that case, give
her the use of that castle. I do not wish her to go to Paris,
not on her own account, but on her son's. But my will is not
to appear in the matter at all. M. Remusat, to whom you
will write about all these arrangements, will proceed entirely
by means of hints. On the whole, I think Colorno would
be the best. It seems to me, that the best and most con-
venient method for the King's journey would be for him to
take boat on the Seine, and go to Avignon by the Saone.
These arrangements will be welcome to me, because I shall
thus get Compiegne into my own possession again. So,
instead of delaying the departure, Remusat must rather
press it forward.

As for the Prince of Peace, he, being a person of very
little importance, may live at Paris, and wherever he pleases.
Remusat will say he is commissioned to give all orders.

1 Charles iv. and his consort, who were then at Compiegne.
8



96 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CXXVII

TO JEROME NAPOLEON, KING OF WESTPHALIA.

BAYONNE, \6thjuly 1808.

You owe two millions to the Sinking Fund. You have
allowed your bills to be dishonoured. That is not like a
man of honour. I never allow any one to forget what is
due to me. Sell your plate and diamonds. Cease indulging
in foolish extravagance, which makes you the laughing-stock
of Europe, and will end by rousing the indignation of your
subjects. Sell your furniture, your horses, and your jewels,
and pay your debts. Honour comes first of all. It ill
becomes you not to pay your debts, when people see the
presents you give, and the unexampled luxury you live in,
which disgusts your subjects. You are young and incon-
siderate, and you never pay any attention to money matters,
especially at this moment, when your subjects are suffering
from the effects of a war.



CXXVIII

TO JEROME NAPOLEON, KING OF WESTPHALIA.

BAYONNE, \bthjuly 1808.

I HAVE your letter, brought by your aide-de-camp
Girard. I exhort you to three things : respect, gratitude, and
attachment to myself, and the French nation, to whom you
owe everything ; the severest economy, so that the wretched-
ness of the circumstances weighing on your people should
not be contrasted with unlimited luxury and expenditure on
your part ; an economy, which is always necessary at the
beginning of a reign, when public opinion is taking shape,
an economy so great that you will not only have no debts,
but that, on your civil list of six millions, you will spend
three on your household expenses, keep 1,500,000 francs for
unforeseen expenses such as marriages, festivities, and the
construction of palaces, and 1,500,000 francs, which shall in
ten years have formed a reserve fund of 1 5,000,000, and which
you will meanwhile lend to accelerate the formation of your
army ; and further, employ your time in learning what you
do not know cavalry, artillery, and infantry tactics, the



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 97

administration of justice, and the management of finance :
when you have fulfilled all these conditions, you will deserve
my esteem, that of France, and of your own people. To
fulfil them all, you will require a great deal of reflection,
you must reform many things, and change many of your
ways.

CXXIX

TO JEROME NAPOLEON, KING OF WESTPHALIA.

BAYONNE, i6tkjuly 1808.

COURIERS are passing between H 's country house, and

Cassel. I have already informed you that H is a wretch,

stained with* every sort of embezzlement, and guilty of
things which I cannot put on paper ; I am horrified that
after this, you should still continue to correspond with him.
I am even told he is in Italy ; in that case you may expect
to see him shut up in a strong castle. I will have him
arrested, even in the very palace he dares to profane ! I give

you notice, that the first time you write to H you will

disobey the head of your family, and you will bring down
misfortune on all those people.



cxxx

TO PRINCE CAMBACRS, GRAND CHANCELLOR
OF THE EMPIRE.

BAYONNE, 17 th July 1808.

I SEND you the Police Report. 1 I beg you will read it
carefully, and compare it with the documents. I have long
thought it was Mons. Fouche's jealousy of the Prefect of
Police which caused his behaviour. I am beginning to
fear that Fouche, who has lost his head, favours busy-
bodies, of whom he hopes to make use, and does not desire
to discourage those who count on circumstances connected
with death, or on extraordinary incidents, because he himself
thinks so much of the future, as his steps about a certain divorce
prove. Under these circumstances, I request you to call the
Police Council together, and verify the following assertions

1 The Police Report for the 1 3th of July is, in fact, missing from the official
collection of Police Reports.



98 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

(ist), That there has been only one interview between the
accused persons whereas it is clear, from the cross-examina-
tions, that there were a great many ; (2nd), That it was the
result of chance whereas it is proved that they were
arranged beforehand ; (3rd), That no proposal was made by
the Senators, or in their name whereas Servan and Jacque-
mont declared themselves commissioned to make proposals,
without the Senators knowing anything of them, as is
usual with leaders of conspiracies ; (4th), That they had
come to no decision of any kind whereas they never
thought of anything else : the day for the rising was already
fixed, and the one thing which stopped them short, was the
idea of the presence of the Imperial Guard in Paris ; (5th),
That they never arranged any meetings whereas they saw
each other every day.

These conclusions are too absurd. I do not see that
Malet, Florent-Guyot, nor even Jacquemont, are compro-
mised ; the only person who has plotted, is the Prefect of
Police. Mons. Fouche takes me to be too great a fool !

After this item in the Report, comes a still more impor-
tant note, in the Minister's own hand. I desire you will send
for Mons. Regnaud, and ask him if he made the assertion.
If he denies it, you will ask the Minister why he invented it.
You will likewise send for the Prefect of Police, and clear up
all this jumble. Mons. Fouche's cackling has turned a trifling
affair, which only reveals the necessity for punishing and
putting down a few evil-disposed persons, into a matter of
immense importance. The whole business is marked by a
spirit and behaviour which I do not understand. Why does
Mons. Fouche send me this analysis, instead of sending me
the whole of the Police Council Report ? What would
happen if evil-doers were never put down till there was an
army of them, and if every attempt to alarm or mar the
public peace, in a well-ordered State, were not stopped short?



CXXXI
TO M. DE CHAMPAGNY, MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

TOULOUSE, zyhjuly 1808.

I SEND you back your portfolio. I cannot understand all
this mess of Mons. Bourgoing's. He does things which



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 99

compromise the dignity of France and are contrary to my
intentions. Long ago I gave two orders : the first, to
d'minish the number of officers, governors of fortresses, war
commissaries, and storekeepers, employed on the military
roads in Saxony, by two-thirds ; second, that the remaining
third should be paid at my expense, and should not cost
the King of Saxony, who, at the very most, is only bound
to furnish quarters, anything at all. Instead of this, Bour-
going thanks the King for the orders he has given, a mean
and ridiculous step ; for either the King is bound, as a
member of the Rhenish Confederation, to feed whatever
troops of mine pass through his dominions in which
case I owe him no thanks ; or he is not bound to do
anything of the sort and then it is ridiculous for me to
thank a small Prince of the Rhenish Confederation for
giving me thirty or forty thousand francs. It would have
been quite easy not to accept them from him. Write to the
Saxon Minister, that I have found fault with Bourgoing's
conduct ; that my intention is to have as few employes as
possible in Saxony, and that they are not to cost the country
anything. You will inform Mons. Bourgoing that he is
only to use his good offices in important matters ; that the
employes in Saxony receive salaries, and are not to ask for
anything.



CXXXII

TO THE PRINCE DE NEUFCHATEL, MAJOR-GENERAL OF
THE GRANDE ARMF.E.

TOULOUSE, zbthjtily 1808.

GIVE orders to have the Gazette de Bayreuth suppressed,
and let the correspondence of the gazetteer be sealed up
the seals to be affixed by French officers. An examination
will be made of all the papers, and all documents relative
to correspondence with the English will be sent to Paris.
The journalist will be kept in prison, and examined as to his
acquaintances, and as to the intrigue he has been carrying on
with the English, these several years past.



ioo NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

CXXXIII

TO JOACHIM NAPOLEON, KING OF NAPLES.

AGEN, yolk July 1808.

I HAVE your letter. I observe with pleasure that your
health is improving.

The news from the Duchy of Berg is not satisfactory.
Your agents are packing everything up, and sending it over
to the left bank. Your stud is slipping away towards the
Tyrol. All this makes a very bad impression in the country,
and in Germany. Is it worth while to betray such greedi-
ness about trifles ? In any case, if you care very much about
your horses, are you not sure of having them within fifteen
or twenty days? Your behaviour is thoughtless, and has
a bad effect on opinion. Write and give orders that nothing
is to be taken away, and that no avidity is to be shown.

The heat is so great that I fear, if you start too soon, you
will not be able to bear it. Take care of your health, first of
all, that is the chief matter.



CXXXIV
TO JOSEPH NAPOLEON, KING OF SPAIN.

BORDEAUX, $isfjuly 1808, n P.M.

I HAVE your letters of the 24th, 25th, and 26th. The
tenor of your letter of the 24th does not please me at all.
There is no question of dying, but of fighting, and being
victorious ; and that you are, and will be.

I may find the Columns of Hercules in Spain, but not the
limits of my power. Ever since I have been in the service, I
have met nothing so cowardly as these Spanish mobs and
troops. Besides, troops, and help of every kind, are moving
towards you. You have a third more strength than you
really need, if you use it with the proper precision. Except for
Moncey, and his disgraceful retreat from San-Clemente, on
Ocana, and dastardly council of war, I am very much pleased
with my troops. Savary is a clever and brave-hearted man,
who has failed in his general arrangements, because he has
not, as yet, the habit of commanding in chief, but who,



NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I 101

nevertheless, is much stronger than those you have around
you. Caulaincourt has done very well at Cuenca. The
town has been sacked ; that is the fate of war : it was carried
by main force.

Russia has recognised you. The letter to that effect has
been sent to Mons. de Strogonofif. When I reach Paris I
shall hear Austria has done the same.

Your position may be a trying one, as a king, but as a
general, it is brilliant. There is only one thing to fear:
Beware of losing touch with the army, and of sacrificing it to
the Spaniards. No mercy must be shown to ruffians who
murder my wounded men, and commit every sort of horror.
It is very natural that they should be treated as they are ; I
have told you this already, and now repeat it. Since the
splendid victory of Medina de Rio-Seco, which so swiftly
settled the Spanish business, Marshal Bessieres is absolute
master in the north.

I was glad to see you have not sent Morlot's Division
to Marshal Bessieres, as was suggested. Dupont must be
supported. Have no anxiety as to the issue of all this. I
know your position thoroughly. Nothing of what has hap-
pened has surprised me. Otherwise, should I have sent
1 50,000 men into Spain, raised two conscriptions, and spent
80,000,000 of money? I would rather have lost a battle
than have read Moncey's official report.



cxxxv

TO MARSHAL SOULT, SECOND IN COMMAND OF THE

GRANDE ARME AT STETTIN.

ST. CLOUD, 2yd August 1808.

DUPONT has utterly disgraced himself, and dishonoured
my arms. Folly, cowardice, and infatuation presided over
his operations during the end of July, and have quite upset
my affairs in Spain. The harm he has done me is a trifling
thing, compared with the disgrace. The details of the whole
matter, which I am glad to keep as secret as possible, excite
the most lively indignation. Yet it will all have to be
cleared up some day, and the honour of our arms must be
avenged.



102 NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I

I think the evacuation of Prussia will be signed to-morrow
or next day, and it will take place towards the end of
October. I think it would be well for you to blow up
Spandau, but it should be done secretly and promptly, so
as not to give rise to any protest. You must have miners
with you. The whole thing should be over within five days,
without its being suspected at Berlin. You might even have
it said, that the damage has been caused by the blowing up
of a powder magazine, or of the vaults in which the powder
was kept. I hold the fortresses of Glogau, Stettin, and Custrin,
until the indemnities are paid, and all business matters
settled. The first and sixth Corps, and three divisions of
dragoons from the Grande Armee, come to Mayence, to finish



Online LibraryEmperor of the French Napoleon INew letters of Napoleon I, omitted from the edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III → online text (page 9 of 34)