Eng. (Lancashire). Parish Bury.

The registers of the parish church of Bury in the County of Lancasrter. Christenings, burials, & weddings (Volume 2) online

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Online LibraryEng. (Lancashire). Parish BuryThe registers of the parish church of Bury in the County of Lancasrter. Christenings, burials, & weddings (Volume 2) → online text (page 15 of 52)
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1825. — This year was prolific in various schemes for the invest-
ment of capital, of which there was a considerable surplus in the
country. It might have been expected that the history of the
South Sea scheme would have been a good lesson on the subject of
adventures for several generations ; and that the various projects of
extracting silver from lead, making butter from beech trees, deal
boards from saw-dust, and air-pumps for the brain, which at that
time gulled the public, would have rendered the most credulous dupe
cautious of engaging in air-built speculations. To such an extent
did the epidemic rage in the month of January in this year, that it
presented schemes for twenty rail-road companies, twenty-two bank-
ing, loan, investment and assurance companies, eleven gas companies,
eight British and Irish and seventeen foreign mine companies, nine
shipping and dock and twenty-seven miscellaneous companies. The
rise in the public funds and on the original stock in various public
companies was beyond all precedent ; the original shares of £100
in the Navigation Company connected with this Parish rose to £650,
and several purchases were made at that price. It is not disputed
that some of the foregoing schemes proved advantageous, but the
majority of them were decided failures, and involved not only the
projectors but the dupes of their confidence in one common ruin,
producing in conjunction with secondary causes what has been not
unaptly termed, a "general panic." From the best information I
have been able to obtain on the subject, this district was not involved



THE MODERN ^RA. 153

in the speculations of the day to the extent that prevailed in many
parts of the kingdom ; and the commercial distress that did prevail
here, during this, and the subsequent year, was rather a conse-
quence, than a first cause, aggravated in no ordinary degree, by
the failure of some considerable Banking Establishments in the
county, w^ho had long possessed the public confidence. The estab-
lishments connected w^ith the town of Halifax remained unshaken,
either as regarded their credit, or the confidence which has been
invariably and deservedly placed in them.

1 830. — Among the local events of this year, the "Halifax Musical
Festival forms too important a feature to be passed over in silence.
I am indebted to " An historical Record" of that interesting and
joyous occasion, for the following facts.

The funds of the Halifax Dispensary (to which I shall hereafter
have occasion to advert) having been found inadequate to meet its
increased expenditure, (the consequence of its extended usefulness,)
a meeting of the inhabitants was held on the 12th June, to discuss
the expediency of organizing a Musical Festival, for the benefit of
that excellent institution ; this meeting was attended by upwards of
fifty gentlemen of the highest respectability and opulence in the
parish ; our worthy and patriotic townsman, Christopher Rawson,
Esq. taking the lead : resolutions were unanimously adopted, that
in the ensuing autumn, a musical festival should take place — a
guarantee fund formed — the co-operation and assistance of the gen-
try resident in the parish requested — and the Archbishop of the
Province, the Lord Lieutenant of the Riding, and other Noblemen
and Gentlemen connected with the Riding, solicited to become the
Patrons ; a committee of management was nominated to carry the
intentions of the Meeting into effect ; and upwards of £500 was sub-
scribed instanter, towards the guarantee fund. The spirit and zeal
which characterized this meeting, was responded to in the out-
townships ; sub- committees were formed, and a spirit of emulation
excited, well befitting the benevolent object it had in view. Wed-
nesday, Thursday, and Friday, the 29th and 30th September, and
the 1st of October, were the days fixed upon for holding the festival,
which it was resolved, should be celebrated by three morning per-
formances in the parish church, two Evening Concerts in the As-
sembly Rooms, and a Grand Fancy Ball at the same place, on the



]51 THE MODERN ^KA.

evening of the third clay. The principal vocal performers whom the
good taste of the committee had catered for the gratification and
amusement of an audience fully capable of appreciating their merits,
were Madame Stockhausen, Mrs. Wm. Knyvett, and our talented
young towns-lady. Miss Farrar, Mr. Braham, Mr. Wm. Knyvett,
Mr. Bennett, and Mr. Phillips. Mr. White was engaged to lead the
instrumental performers. Dr. Camidge to preside at the organ, M.
Stockhausen at the harp, the veteran Lindley at his violoncello, and
Mr. Nicholson on the flute. The instruments consisted of 15 violins,
6 violas, 7 violoncellos, 3 contra basses, 4 flutes, 4 oboes, 2 clarinetts,
4 bassoons, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 4 trombones, 2 bass horns, a serpent
and drums. The vocal performers comprised 19 soprano, 12 alto, 16
tenore, and 20 basso. The judicious arrangements made by the com-
mittee, to accommodate all parties, and to give effect to the perform-
ances, were of the first order ; the fine old organ in the church was
altered so as to make it chord with the instruments when at concert
pitch ; an extensive and commodious orchestra was constructed at the
west end of the church, and temporary seats at the east end, ex-
tending across the chancel from the screen to the railing of the
altar ; outside the church, a large awning, of ample width and ac-
commodation, was erected, extending across the church yard, from
the vicar's gate, to the chancel door. The proprietors of the New
Assembly Rooms, with a laudable spirit, caused an elegant new or-
chestra to be erected expressly for the occasion, enlarged the orchestra
appropriated to the musicians for the dance ; and made other arrange-
ments for giving eclat to the fancy ball. The publicity given to the
proceedings of the committee of management served but to increase
the spirit of enthusiasm which animated all who were interested in
the event. It is true that after the preliminaries of the festival had
been completed, the time fixed for its commencement, and the per-
formers engaged, a pamphlet, entitled " Strictures on Musical Fes-
tivals" was fulminated from the press, the object of which was to
characterize these festivals as " combining an unhallowed mixture
of things sacred and profane," and induce a belief that they were
calculated to become " inadvertently, contributors to that baneful
dissipation inseparably connected with these fascinating entertain-
ments." It is difficult to imagine what could be the motives of the
author in this gratuitous publication of his opinions, haj)pily,



THE MODERN ^llA. 155

the pamphlet not only served to stimulate the zeal of the committeetees should take especial care that none of the wood or trees
growing upon any part of his said lands should be cut, sold or
destroyed, but that the same might by all means be preserved till it
should be strong timber, and then be carefully made use of for
repairing and amending all his said houses, lands and tenements,
devised to his said trustees, and by them to be built for the pious
uses aforesaid : And he gave to the master and governors of the
workhouse £200 to be bestowed on lands and tenements for the
benefit of the workhouse and poor therein set on work, to be paid
by his executors, when the master and governors should have pro-
cured lands and tenements to be purchased therewith ; and if his
personal estate should extend to discharge the several legacies in his
will mentioned, and any thing remain, he gave the clear residue to
the said trustees, to be bestowed on lands merely for the benefit of
the poor of the ten townships in the parish of Halifax ; and he en-
treated the justices of assize for the county of York for the time
being, to compose and determine by their order, whatsoever differ-
ences doubts and questions might arise at any time, touching that
his will and meaning, or any thing therein contained.

"By a decree of commissioners of charitable uses, made in the
fifth year of King George the First, reciting an inquisition, whereby
it was found that such letters patent had been granted, and such
will made as aforesaid, and that the sum of £200 bequeathed by the
testator to the master and governors of the workhouse, had been
laid out in the purchase of lands and tenements in NorthoAArram,
called South Howcans, Rolling Hay, and Tenter Croft, and a small
parcel of land used for a lane, all then of the yearly value of £10,
or thereabouts, and that the workhouse had been misemployed, and
the rents and profits of the said tenements and premises misconverted
and divers other abuses committed in the trust, the commissioners
decreed that the surviving governors of the workhouse, and the
legal representatives of the deceased governors, should pay divers
sums of money, amounting in the whole to £641. 5s. lOd. to the
Rev. Thomas Burton, clerk, and others therein named, and did
adjudge the places and offices of the then surviving governors of the
workhouse to be void, and that the said Burton and others should
be trustees of the workhouse, and receive the rents and profits of



PUBLIC CHARITIES. 163

the said Hatter's close and tenements in Northowram, and apply the
same to the use of the workhouse, and the employment of the poor
of the town and parish placed therein, and that they should apply
for new lettfers patent of incorporation, to be granted to them, with
such powers as to the crown should seem meet, and apply so much
of the money thereby to them decreed, towards defraying the ex-
pense of obtaining such letters patent, or soliciting for the same,
as should be requisite, and that the workhouse should be conveyed
to the said Burton and others.

"On the hearing of exceptions taken to the decree in the
Court of Chancery, an order was made by the court, bearing date
the 18th February 1722, that the sum of £641. 5s. Id. should be
reduced to £604 8s. 5d. and with some other variations the decree
was confirmed.

"By another decree of commissioners of pious uses, dated the 4th
October 1749, after reciting the previous decree and order of the
Court of Chancery, and stating conveyances of the workhouse and
trust estate to the trustees appointed in pursuance of the order, and
that the trustees had received the said sum of £604. 8s. 5d. and
entered upon the trust premises, and had received the rents and
profits thereof, and had applied the same, and also the sum of £604.
8s. 5d. except £149. 7s. Sd. which then remained in the hands of
the surviving trustees, to the repairs of the workhouse, and main-
tenance of the poor of the town of Halifax kept and employed therein,
and that the said trust premises were then of the yearly value of
171. 5s. or thereabouts, exclusive of the workhouse, and that the
trustees had not been able to procure any letters patent or charter
of incorporation, and that for want thereof the trustees could not
compel any of the poor of the parish not resident in the town of
Halifax to come into the workhouse, so that the poor of that town-
ship only had been maintained therein, the commissioners named
ordered and decreed, that from thenceforth the workhouse should
be employed as a workhouse for the poor of the towns of Ovenden,
Northowram, Southowram, Hipperholme, Shelfe, Skircoat, Warley,
Midgley and Sowerby, as well as of the town of Halifax, and that
the rents and profits of the Hatter's Close, and of the tenements in
Northowram, should be employed for the maintenance of the poor
of the said several townships kept in the workhouse according to



M 2



164 PUBLIC CHARITIES.

the intent of the letters patent, and of the will of Nathaniel
Waterhouse.

By an Act of Parliament for better regulating the charities of
Nathaniel Waterhouse, passed in the year 1777, after feciting the
matters aforesaid, and other matters, and setting forth, that the
trust estates had in general been sufficient to answer the trusts
reposed in the trustees, but had not yielded any surplus profits for
the benefit of the trusts reposed in the governors of the workhouse,
and that the feoffees or trustees had no surj^lus in hand ; but on the
contrary, their trust estates were then indebted the sum of £100 and
upwards, for monies borrowed, and disbursed in the repair and
improvement thereof; and that at the time of obtaining the letters
patent, establishing the workhouse, the poor of the parish in general,
were maintained at the common charge of the whole parish ; but
some years afterwards the several townships, which constituted the
parish of Halifax, were separated by an Act of Parliament, passed
in the 13th and 14th years of king Charles 2d, with respect to their
poor, and afterwards each township distinctly supported its own
poor, by monthly payments, or in workhouses established by each
township respectively, by means of which separation and alteration,
the exercise of the powers in the letters patent was rendered
difficult, and could not be conveniently carried into execution ; yet,
in case the several trusts, vested in the governors and feoffees, or
trustees respectively, were united and vested in the same persons,
with proper powers, it was conceived that the purpose of both the
trusts would be more completely answered, the execution of those
trusts facilitated, and the several objects of the bounty of the donor
be greatly benefitted thereby. It was enacted, that all the messuages,
lands, and premises, comprized in the letters patent, and given and
devised by the will of Nathaniel Waterhouse, and also the lands and
tenements in Northowram, should be vested in William Walker and
four others in the Act named, upon trust, to convey the same to
the use of the vicar of Halifax, and his successor, vicars of Halifax
for the time being, and of the said William Walker and eight others,
therein named, their heirs and assigns, upon trust that the said
governors and trustees of the said premises, together with the six ■
governors and trustees to be elected as thereinafter mentioned,
should, out of the rents and profits of the trust estates, and the



PUBLIC CHARITIES. 165

monies in the hands of the governors, and such other trust monies
as should come to their hands in pursuance of that Act, pay the
expenses attending that Act, the debt of £100 and upwards, and
all other debts due from the charity estates ; and that the governors
and trustees should from time to time pay and apply the residue of
the rents and profits of such of the trust premises as were devised by
the will of Nathaniel Waterhouse to the feoffees or trustees therein
named, and also the residue (if any) of the monies in the hands of
the governors, according to the directions expressed in the will re-
garding the same, except in such instances where a different appli-
cation was by that Act directed ; and it was enacted, that when the
clear rents and profits of the trust premises should be sufficient to
answer the several annual payments directed by the will, and to
yield a sufficient surplus, there shall be paid annually out of the
surplus, the several further sums thereinafter mentioned, in aug-
mentation of such annual payments respectively ; that is to say, the
further sum of £6 yearly, to the said twelve aged or impotent poor
persons : the further sum of 20s. yearly, for the maintenance of
the house and twelve dwellings in the will mentioned : the further
sum of £20 yearly, to the overseer and master of the twenty child-
ren in the will mentioned: the further sum of 40s. yearly, to the
governors of the school; and the further sum of £20 yearly, to the
several preachers in the will mentioned, in augmentation of their
several stipends, thereby provided, and to be divided amongst them,
in proportion thereto respectively : And after reciting, that since the
separation of the ten townships, with respect to their poor, each of
such townships had established, or was desirous to establish within
itself, a workhouse, for the better ordering, setting tv^ work and
providing for its own poor separately, it was further enacted, that
the residue and surplus of the rents and profits of all the other trust
premises, vested and to be vested in the governors and trustees, in
pursuance of that Act, should be by the said governors and trustees
respectively paid on the first Wednesday in March, annually, to the
overseers of the poor of the said ten several townships, who should
pay and apply the same for the better ordering, setting to work, and
providing for the poor in the said workhouse of such ten tovmships
respectively, in the following proportions ; (that is to say), out of
every £48 there should be paid to the overseers of the poor of Hali-



166 PUBLIC CHARITIES.

fax, 121. Is. 6d. : to the overseers of the poor of Sowerby, 61. Os. 9d.
to the overseers of the poor of Midgley, 21. 18s. ; to the overseers
of the poor of Warley, 51. 13s.: to the overseers of the poor of
Ovenden, 4l. 17s. 9d. ; to the overseers of the poor of Skircoat,
21. 2s. lOd. ; to the overseers of thepoorof Northowram, 51. 17s. 9d. ;
to the overseers of the poor of Southowram, 31. 13s. 6d. ; to the
overseers of the poor of Hipperholme, 31. 13s. 6d. ; and to the
overseers of the poor of Shelfe, 11. Is. 5d. ; and so in proportion
for any greater or lesser sum than 481., which might from time to
time be in the hands of the governors and trustees ; and it was further
enacted, that the vicar of Halifax for the time being, should be one
of the governors and trustees of the said united charity ; and that he
and the said William Walker, and eight others, in whom the said trust
estates were thereby directed to be vested, should, within one month
next after the conveyance to their use, elect six other persons to be
governors and trustees, along with them, of the said united charity :
and that one of the new governors and trustees should be elected
from or out of the inhabitants of the township of Midgley, another
from the inhabitants of the township of Warley, another from the
inhabitants of the township of Ovenden, another from the inhabitants
of the township of Skircoat, another from the inhabitants of the
township of Northowram, and another from the inhabitants of the
township of Southowram ; and that there should be at all times
thereafter (besides the vicar of Halifax for the time being) five of
the governors and trustees resident in Halifax, two in Sowerby, and
one resident in each of the other eight townships of Midgley,
Warley, Ovenden, Skircoat, Northowram, Southowram, Hipper-
holme and Shelfe respectively ; and that on the death, resignation,
or removal out of such townships respectively, of any of the governors
and trustees, the remaining governors and trustees should elect
another inhabitant of the township where such death, resignation
or removal, should happen ; and if the remaining governors and
trustees should for three calendar months after any such vacancy,
neglect or omit to elect a proper person to be governor and trustee,
it should be lawful for such of the inhabitants of the township from
whence the vacancy or vacancies was or were to be filled, as should
be assessed to the church and poor, for £10 a year or upwards, to
elect such governor and trustee, governors and trustees, to fill up



PUBLIC CHARITIES. 167

the vacancy or vacancies so neglected to be suiDplied, such previous
notice being given of the time and place of such election as therein
mentioned, and the then right of election should be in the majority
of such inhabitants assessed as aforesaid, who should attend such
meeting ; and it was further enacted, that it should be lawful for
the governors and trustees, by indentures executed by all the
governors and trustees, or twelve of them at the least, in the pre-
sence of, and attested by two or more credible witnesses, to make
any grants, demises or leases, of any parts of the trust premises,
(except the workhouse in Halifax, during the time the inhabitants
in Halifax should choose to use or enjoy the same in manner there-
inafter mentioned), to such person and persons as should at any
public auction, within the town of Halifax, of which one month's
notice at the least, should be previously given, as therein mentioned,
be the highest bidder, or offer to give the greatest yearly rent for
the same, so as every such grant, demise or lease be executed by
all the governors and trustees, or twelve of them at the least, and
be not made to continue for a longer time than twenty one years,
to take effect in possession and not in reversion, or by way of future
interest, and be made without taking any fine, premium or foregift ;
and after reciting, that several parts of the trust estates were very
conveniently situated for building upon, for the use of the inhabitants
of the parish of Halifax, and on some parts of such trust estates,
very old houses and other buildings were standing, which were sub-
ject to frequent repairs, It was enacted, that it should be lawful for
the governors and trustees, by indenture under their hands and seals,
duly executed by all the governors and trustees for the time being,
or twelve of them at the least, in the presence of and attested by
two or more credible witnesses, to demise any such parts of the trust
estates not built upon, as might appear to the governors and trustees,
or twelve of them at the least, to be fit and proper to grant and
lease out for the purpose of new building, and also such parts of
the houses and other buildings then or thereafter to be erected on
the trust estates, as might appear to the governors and trustees, or
twelve of them at the least, to be fit and proper to lease out, for
the purpose of effectually repairing, re-building, or new-building
the same, (the said workhouse in Halifax excepted during the time
before in that behalf mentioned,) yet nevertheless so as the lands or



168 PUBLIC CHARITIES.

buildings to be leased should be let by public auction, after one
month's notice thereof as aforesaid, and the highest bidder or bid-
ders should be the lessee or lessees thereof, and so as every such
lease be executed by all the trustees or twelve of them at the least,
and be made for such number of years, not exceeding ninety-nine,
for the purpose of re-building, or erecting new buildings, and not
exceeding forty-one years, for the purpose of effectually repairing
any part of the trust estates, as to the governors and trustees should
be thought reasonable, with full power for them, from time to time
in like manner to renew the same, or any subsisting lease or leases,
so as all such leases be made to take eiFect in possession or imme-
diately after the determination of the then subsisting leases, and so
as every such lease be made without taking any fine, premium or
foregift in respect thereof, and so as in every such lease there be
contained such conditions as therein mentioned ; and that it should
be lawful for the governors and trustees to sell and convey such part
of the trust premises within the township of Halifax, as they should
think proper, for the scite of a new church, and for a convenient
churchyard to be enjoyed therewith, in the township or parish of
Halifax, for such prices as the trustees should think fit, and to sell
and convey such parts of the trust estates, for the making any pub-
lic roads within the township or parish, as the governors and
trustees for the time being, should think proper ; and also to sell
and convey any such small parts of the trust estates unto and in
order to accommodate any private person or persons, who were or
might be owners of estates adjoining to the trust estates and premi-
ses, or any part thereof, and for such prices as the governors and
trustees should think fit ; provided, that no one such sale to any
one owner of adjoining or contiguous estates, contain more than
one hundred square yards of ground, to be annexed to any such
adjoining or contiguous estate ; and that all the governors and
trustees, or twelve of them at the least, should agree to such sales
and execute such conveyances, and that all sums of money received
by the governors and trustees, as the price of such parts of the
trust estates, should be by them either applied and disposed of in
such manner as is thereby directed, concerning the rents and profits
of the trust estates and premises, or otherwise, at the election of
the trustees, be laid out in the purchase of other lands or heredita-



PUBLIC CHARITIES. 169

ments, within the parish of Halifax, and be conveyed and settled to
the same uses as the trust estates ; and it was enacted, that the



Online LibraryEng. (Lancashire). Parish BuryThe registers of the parish church of Bury in the County of Lancasrter. Christenings, burials, & weddings (Volume 2) → online text (page 15 of 52)