Eng. (Lancashire). Parish Bury.

The registers of the parish church of Bury in the County of Lancasrter. Christenings, burials, & weddings (Volume 2) online

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Online LibraryEng. (Lancashire). Parish BuryThe registers of the parish church of Bury in the County of Lancasrter. Christenings, burials, & weddings (Volume 2) → online text (page 33 of 52)
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the management of a president, vice-president, treasurer, committee,
honorary secretary, and librarian, elected annually by the general
body of the members. Each subscriber is at liberty to propose a
work, stating its recommendations, &c., but its reception or rejec-
tion is discretionary with the committee. The library is open daily.

The other Library is in the Old Cock Yard, and was established
in the year 1823, in pursuance of a resolution adopted at a meeting
holden in the vestry of Sion Chapel. The price of a ticket is £1. Is,
and the annual contribution 12s. ; at present the number of sub-
scribers amounts to about 130, and there are above 1300 volumes on
various subjects. Its affairs are managed by a president, vice-pre-
sidents, treasurer, committee of members, secretary, and librarian.
It is opened on the afternoons of Wednesday and Saturday. By
a resolution lately adopted, non-proprietors are admitted to the
library for an annual subscription of 16s.

A A 2



35() TOWNSHIP OF HALIFAX.



ROOMS.



There are two public subscription News Rooms open daily in
the town, one at the "Rooms" in Harrison Lane, the other in the
Old Cock Yard. The former is a handsome spacious apartment
appropriately furnished, and well and regularly supplied with the
London and provincial daily and weekly papers. It was established
in the year 1825, and is conducted on a most respectable manage-
ment by a committee chosen annually from among the members.
New Subscribers are admitted by ballot, seven members being re-
quired to be present at the nomination. The subscription is one
guinea and a half yearly, payable in advance on the 1st of June.
The latter room is also well supplied with the London and pro-
vincial papers and is very numerously and respectably attended, it is
under the management of a committee similarly chosen. New
members are admitted by nomination of another member, subject
however to general approval. The subscription is one guinea per
annum.

THE magistrates' OFFICE.

This building, at Ward's End, is used by the Magistrates for the
holding of their petty sessions and the transaction of business, until
a more suitable and commodious place shall be provided under the
provisions of the New Market Act. A clerk is in regular attendance
and a petty sessions is holden here every Saturday, for the ordinary
dispatch of business.

THE COURT OF REQUESTS.

This Court-House, in Union-street, is a building convenient for
its purposes, and a considerable sum has been expended in fitting
it up. The court room is well adapted for the holding of courts
generally, and the transaction of judicial business. The Sheriff's
Assessor, and his Deputy also hold their local courts here.

NEW MARKET PLACE.

I have before had occasion to recite the Act under which this
market place was erected. It is separated from Southgate by iron
palhsadoes. The West end adjoining this street is an open square,
in the centre whereof stands an ornamental iron pillar, serving the
useful purposes of a pump and lamp post. The market buildings
are of red brick. A building extends from the centre of the



TOWNSHIP OF HALIFAX. 357

East side of the square to the bottom of the market, forming
a double row of shops, and divides the market place into two com-
partments. The shops on both sides of the square, and on the North
side of the market, together with all the shops in the centre building,
are occupied as shambles. The shops on the South side have rooms
above them and are occupied as dwellings. All the shops are fronted
by a coUonade. The Southern compartment of the market is con-
siderably broader than the other, and in the centre thereof is a
covered shed for the erection of standings, wherein are sold
miscellaneous articles. In this compartment are the fish, fruit,
and vegetable markets. A bioad colonnade projecting from the
centre building is used by the country people, for the sale of
poultry, butter, eggs, &c. The vacant spaces on market days are
occupied by temporary stalls. At the bottom of the market place
are large and convenient slaughter houses, under proper regulations
as regards their cleanliness.

THE manufacturers' HALL.

There is a boldness of conception about this building which
produces an effect rather imposing than otherwise ; it was erected
in the year 1779. It is a large quadrangular stone structure, oc-
cupying a space of 10,000 yards, with a rustic basement story on
square cippi, and above, two other stories fronted by two entire
colonnades, within which are spacious walks leading to arched
rooms, intended as repositories for the goods of the several manu-
factories ; the number of small rooms amounting to 315. The dis-
tances of the columns is about eight feet and a half, equal to the
width of the rooms, each of which has one sash window and a door
to the galleries. Situated on a descent towards the East, that side is
three stories high ; the first story has an arcade, which is continued
as far as the centre of the North and South sides : The West side
consists only of two stories. The building is 110 yards in length,
and 91 in breadth. The centre is occupied by a grass plot. It is
proof against fire and thieves. With respect to the first adds
Dr. Whitaker, nothing about it can be consumed but the roof;
and as for the latter, had the portable goods of the Foresters of
Hardwic been so collected and so secured of old, the axe might have
rusted and the gibbet have rotted down, in the interval between
two executions.



358 TOWNSHIP OF HALIFAX.

It was erected at the expence of the merchants and manufactu-
rers of shalloons and other woollen goods within the Parish, for the
accommodation of themselves and the merchants and buyers fre-
quenting the market of Halifax. The hall was opened for business
on the 2nd January, 1779; and its total cost was upwards of
£12,000. Its internal management is vested in a committee of the
principal manufacturers who have an interest in the success of the
undertaking, and who have adopted a code of rules and regulations
for the observance of all who frequent it : they are posted at the
principal entrance. Public meetings are held in the Hall, with the
permission of the proprietors, the area being admirably adapted for
the purpose. It is also usual for the candidates for the representa-
tion of the West Riding to address their Halifax constituents in
this place. The hustings for the election of members for the
Borough are also erected here, on the East side.

THE BATHS,

Are situated at the lower part of the town in a retired
situation, adjoining the water side. The buildings and gardens
contain an extensive and commodious suite of cold, warm, swim-
ming, shower, and vapour baths, with appropriate dressing and
waiting rooms, and are amply supplied with fine spring water rising
near the premises. The buildings are of plain red brick, the gardens
are tastefully arranged, and a large lawn is attached for the exer-
cise of bowls.

THE MULCTURE HALL.

This may be assigned as the oldest mansion house in the
township. Its proper name is the Mote, or Moote Hall, and in all
probability the Lord of the Manor formerly held his court here : it
has evidently obtained its present name from the mulcture dish ap-
pertaining to the mill, being kept at the hall, for that a mill has
existed here beyond the time of legal memory there can be no doubt.
The present building is of the Elizabethean age, and has a handsome
appearance viewed from the bank above ; it must have been an
enviable situation when the Hebble flowed along the valley, a
pure and uninterrupted stream.



out,
ital
and
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//



TOWNSHIF OF HALIFAX. 359

THE BANK.

As a private residence the Bank in George street is a handsome
mansion ; it was erected in the year 1766, and contains a splendid
suite of apartments, ornamented with several rich and chaste devices ;
the back front opens into pleasure grounds tastefully arranged, and
secluded from observation by a high wall. The king of Denmark,
sojourned here one night on his northern tour, Avhen in this
country ; hence was the name of this street, at that time called
Loveledge lane, changed to the more regal appellation of George
street.

The present state of Halifax certainly exhibits, in every point of
view, a very different appearance from the description given of it
by former historians. The immediate approaches to the Town on
all sides are on the whole as good as the nature of the country will
permit them to be. The North Bridge is a handsome erection ;
but the road- way wiU admit of improvement. The smoke arising
from some furnaces near, and under it, is a source of much annoy-
ance to passengers over it. The houses erected within the town
during the present century are commodious, substantial, and well-
built ; and the masonry is of superior workmanship. The appear-
ance of the shops is also much improved ; and many of them
exhibit, in a greater or less degree, a portion of metropolitan taste.

The general tendency to a dispersed population at Halifax
called forth a remark from Dr. Whitaker, who observed, that it
had displayed itself in many excellent houses of stone, scattered
around from the distance of two miles to a quarter of a mile from
the capital, all examples of good taste and the rational application
of commercial wealth. Nor has this disposition to seek for retire-
ment in the vicinage of the town at all abated since the doctor's
time ; many of the principal gentry and merchants having lately
erected some handsome mansions and villas in the suburbs, sur-
rounded with luxuriant pleasure grounds and gardens.

It is much to be desired that every inducement should be held
out, and every encouragement given, to this mode of investing cap-
ital ; it not only concerns the comfort and respectability of the town
and exhibits a substantial indication of its thriving prosperity, but
is decidedly to be preferred to the rapid increase of small burga^-e



TOWNSHIP OF HALIFAX. 359

THE BANK.

As a private residence the Bank in George street is a handsome
mansion ; it was erected in the year 1766, and contains a splendid
suite of apartments, ornamented with several rich and chaste devices ;
the back front opens into pleasure grounds tastefully arranged, and
secluded from observation by a high wall. The king of Denmark,
sojourned here one night on his northern tour, when in this
country ; hence was the name of this street, at that time called
Loveledge lane, changed to the more regal appellation of George
street.

The present state of Halifax certainly exhibits, in every point of
view, a very different appearance from the description given of it
by former historians. The immediate approaches to the Town on
all sides are on the whole as good as the nature of the country will
permit them to be. The North Bridge is a handsome erection ;
but the road- way will admit of improvement. The smoke arising
from some furnaces near, and under it, is a source of much annoy-
ance to passengers over it. The houses erected within the town
during the present century are commodious, substantial, and well-
built ; and the masonry is of superior workmanship. The appear-
ance of the shops is also much improved ; and many of them
exhibit, in a greater or less degree, a portion of metropolitan taste.

The general tendency to a dispersed population at Halifax
called forth a remark from Dr. Whitaker, who observed, that it
had displayed itself in many excellent houses of stone, scattered
around from the distance of two miles to a quarter of a mile from
the capital, all examples of good taste and the rational application
of commercial wealth. Nor has this disposition to seek for retire-
ment in the vicinage of the town at all abated since the doctor's
time ; many of the principal gentry and merchants having lately
erected some handsome mansions and villas in the suburbs, sur-
rounded with luxuriant pleasure grounds and gardens.

It is much to be desired that every inducement should be held
out, and every encouragement given, to this mode of investing cap-
ital ; it not only concerns the comfort and respectability of the town
and exhibits a substantial indication of its thriving prosperity, but
is decidedly to be preferred to the rapid increase of small burgage



360 TOWNSHIP OF HALIFAX.

tenements that are extending over every portion of land that can be
made available for building ; and compelling the inhabitants of the
town to seek for air and sunshine on the moors and mountains.



In turning our attention to those parts of the Parish immediately
dependant on the Parish church, it is necessary to observe that
North and South Owram, Hipperholme, and Shelf, have a charac-
ter peculiar to themselves. On the North side of Ovenden brook,
the whole basis of the earth becomes argillaceous, and the face of
the country alters with it. The perpetual decomposition of argil-
laceous matter gives a rotundity and smoothness to the surface of
the hills, very different from the vast projections or long and sharp
ridges of quartz which characterise the vale of Calder and its de-
pendencies. In this quarter also of the Parish there is a meanness
in the appearance of the houses, produced by the same cause; as
argillaceous stone rises in much thinner lamince, and is far less
obedient to the chisel than quartz concretions.

I shall proceed with the out- townships, according to their
proximity to the capital.



THE TOWNSHIP OF NORTH OWRAM,



This township, which lies to the North-east of Halifax, is divi-
ded therefrom by the Hebble ; on the West it is separated from
Ovenden by a brook which falls into the Hebble at Lee Bridge.
On the North it is bounded by Shelf, and on the South by South
owram. Its area comprises about 3400 statute acres, in a ge-
neral state of cultivation.

It is said to derive its name from having a large Bank which
the Anglo-Saxons called Opep, the last syllable being derived from
para, a village ; the village on the north hank, being situated to the
North of another township called South Owram ; and if the ascent
from the brook by the present road and up the old Range Bank to
the village of North Owram, which gives denomination to the district,
was the only highway prior to the erection of the North-Bridge, Ave
may imagine it to have been rather an arduous undertaking for our
forefathers to journey from Halifax to North Owram at certain times.

The township is not mentioned in Domesday, but was originally
granted by the crown to the Earl of Warren, for the history of whose
title the reader is referred to the Manor of Halifax. John the 7th
Earl, obtained a charter of free warren here and at Shibden from the
crown, 37 Henry III. and was found to be lord thereof by Kirby's
inquest, 24 Edward I. By an inquisition taken at Wakefield, 17
Edward III. it appeared, that Thomas de Totchill enfeoffed William
his son, and gave him full seisin of all his lands and rents in North
Owram, to hold to said William, and the heirs of his body ; after
whose death, Margaret, daughter and heiress of the said William,
was in the wardship of Earl Warren, by reason of her minority.
I'he manor came to the crown in the person of Edward III. incon-
sequence of the grant from the last Earl, before referred to. By
an inquisition taken at Halifax, 1577, it was found to belong



362 TOWNSHIP OF NORTH OWRAM,

to Queen Elizabeth, as parcel of the manor of Wakefield, late
parcel of the duchy of York, and at that time annexed to the duchy
of Lancaster. By anotlier inquisition at Pontefract, 5 and 6 Philip
and Mary, it appeared that Sir Henry Savile, knt. died seised in his
demesne as of fee of the manor. At present it is the property of
the Duke of Leeds, and parcel of his manor of Wakefield.

"The oldest mention I have seen made of this township, (says
Watson) is in a fine, 4th of king John, between Alice, who was the
wife of Hen. de Yeland, plaint, and Robert de Sandall, Will, de
Orbur, and Roger de Thornton, who grant to Alice the third part of
the ser\'ice of two oxgangs of land here."

Northowram is altogether a fine country, rich in hill and dale,
under its surface there are several large beds of coal of excellent
quality, and the collieries afford an inexhaustable supply of that
valuable mineral. It contains also some quarries of capital stone for
building. Nor are there wanting some copious springs of good water
on the North bank, sufficient for the use of the surrounding popula-
tion, — some of these springs have only latterly been brought to
light. On the whole, it is a thriving township, and ranks next to
Halifax in point of commercial importance. It participates in all
the advantages to be derived from a proximity to the town,
without being subject to its imposts, or the restrictions of its local
act. It possesses also the benefit of a most extensive traffic and
thoroughfare through its very centre to the great manufacturing
marts, and these circumstances have caused the erection of many
large and extensive manufactories in various parts, particularly on the
North bank, in the vicinity of which and Haley-hill, a considerable
population has been drawn together, and which is rapidly pro-
gressing.

This township is exclusively the seat of nonconformity within
the Parish. The first chapel was erected here by the Pi.ev. Oliver
Heywood, in the year 1680, and with a few alterations it continues
to this day. It is a plain and humble edifice, with little to admire
as respects its outward appearance, but an interesting object so far
as it is to be regarded as a monument of the early non- conformists.
It is looked upon by the Independents with much veneration.
The Wesleyan Methodists, the New Connexion of Methodists, and
the Primitive Methodists have, severally, places of worship within



TOWNSHIP OF NORTH OWRAM. 363

the township, and the Baptists have a small meeting house at Ha-
ley-hill. A regard for historical truth however compels me reluc-
tantly to state, that amongst a laborious and active community of
upwards of 10,000 souls, the majority engaged in manufactures,
there is neither church nor chapel belonging to the establishment.
This fact is of too important a nature to be looked upon with apa-
thetic indifference, particularly in the present day.

The necessity of some ecclesiastical provision is too apparent to
admit of argument, it certainly ought to be brought under the notice
of the proper authorities. The wealth and respectability of the town-
ship, and the well known zeal and philanthropy of its gentry is a
guarantee that if a movement was once made, the evil would soon
be remedied. The central situation of Booth Town affords a most
eligible and commanding scite for the erection of either church or
chapel, with a convenient cemetery.

There are some places of antiquity in this township that require
to be shortly noticed. The first is

BOOTH TOWN.

Thoresby, in his Topography, says, "Booth's Town, near
Halifax, seems to have been so called from a sort of Tabernacles."
" Whether (remarks Watson) there was ever a fixed habitation of
this sort, or the lords of the country only placed their tents on this
ground whilst they took their diversion in the neighbourhood, is
uncertain. It gave name, however, to a family ; of whom frequent
mention is made about the time of Henry VHI. It is not im-
probable that this village may have an high original, and have
been a settlement even in the British times, for Bod, which our
Saxon ancestors pronounced Borh and we Booth, in the times
preceding Christianity signified an habitation. A handsome, respec-
table old family house has long existed here.

Horley Green is remarkable for a spring I have before men-
tioned.

SHIBDEN HALL,

A fine old mansion, buried beneath the shades of its venerable
oaks, takes its name from a rich and beautiful valley contiguous
to which it is situated. The valley in all probability was so deno-



364 TOWNSHIP OF NORTH OVVRAM.

minated from the great number of sheep depastured there. Schepe,
and dene a valley, has been written various ways, Sipeden, Shepiden,
Schipedene, Scheppedene, Schipden, Schepden, Shipden, and Shib-
den ; and formerly gave name to a family, who on some account or
other, changed it to Drake. Watson gives a splendid pedigree of
this family, drawn up by the author of the Eboracum, commencing
with William de Schepden, of Nether Schepden, who lived temp.,
Edward I, as by charter dated at Schippedene in 1306, and who
had John de Schipeden, alias Drake, and William. We also read
that A. i». 1307, one Matthew de Schepedene, or de Halifax, was in-
stituted into the living of Sandal Parva, on the presentation of the
Prior and Convent of Lewes, in Sussex. After the Drake's, Shib-
den Hall became the property of the Waterhouses : the next owners
were the Listers, from whom are descended its present possessors,
a very respectable and ancient family, whose pedigree Watson has
also given.

HIGH SUNDERLAND

Is a very ancient farm which the Anglo-Saxons called by the
name of Sunbep, or Sun&op-lonS ; or it might be separated, or set
apart for some particular purpose, or privilege, the knowledge of
which is now lost ; for in that case they would give it this name,
as being sundered or divided from the lands about it. It is called
High, from its elevated situation, and is supposed to give name to
a respectable and loyal family, whose descendants are still resident
in the Parish.

When the present fabric at High Sunderland was erected, does
not appear by any inscription upon the building ; but it is conjec-
tured was either the work of Richard Sunderland, who married
Susan Saltonstall, about 1597, or of his son Abraham, who married
Elizabeth Langdale ; but more probably the latter, because we meet
with the arms of Saltonstall and Langdale, impaled with those of
Sunderland, in the windows. This house seems once to have been
well ornamented ; there are still some statues and busts remaining,
of tolerable workmanship. In a chamber window under the arms
of Saltonstall, Langdale, and Thornhill, of Fixby,
Fselix quem virtus generosa exomat avorum,
£t qui virtute suis adjicit ipse decus. Ij. S.

The initials L. S. are supposed to signify Langdale Sunderland,



TOWNSHIP OF NOKTH OWRAM. 365

because in another place the arms of Saltonstall and Langdale, (as
above,) are impaled with those of Sunderland. This Langdale also
appears to have lived a good part of his time at Coley Hall, and to
have sold the estate so late as the interregnum. Over the north
door is written, Ne subeat glis serdus, a mistake for surdus ; and
over a door on the north side, Ne intret amicus hirudo. In the
hall over the fire-place,

Maxima Domus utilitas, etpernicies, ignis et lingua.
Over the south door.

Hie Locus odit, amat, punit, conservat, honorat,

Nequitem, pacem, crimina, jura, probos.
Which, says Watson is also on the town-house at Delft, in Holland,
and also on the town-house at Glasgow, in Scotland, with bonos in-
stead of probos. Below the above lines. Confide Deo. Diffide tibi.
On a pillar on the left hand of the south door, Patria Domus. On a
pillar on the right hand of the same. Optima Coelum, On the south
front,

Omnipotens faxet, Stirps Sunderlandia sedes
Incolet has placide, et tueatur jura parentum,
Lite vacans, donee fluctus foriTiica marinos
Ebibat et totum Testudo perambulet orbem !

How vain adds Mr. Watson, are our wishes, and how uncertain
the continuance of earthly things, may hence be seen, when either
the writer of these, or his son, alienated this very estate, which
the then owner so earnestly wished might continue in the family
for ever !

Over the principal gate, Nunquam hanc pulset portara qui vio-
lat sequum. On the same is a cherub sounding a trumpet ; and in
a scroll, Fama virtutum, Tuba perennis. A drawing of this gate-
way, is to be found in Mr. Horner's views of the principal buildings
in the town and parish of Halifax. Its present possessor is William
Priestley, Esquire, of Lightcliife.

SCOTE OR SCOUT HALL,

Is a square-built mansion, situated on a small eminence on the
south side of the upper part of the valley of Shibden. There is no
date on any part of the building, but an adjoining cottage bears date
1661, and has a dial plate inserted in it which is dated an'no 1617.



366 TOWNSHIP OF NORTH OWRAM.

It does not appear that this was ever the residence of any family of
note, and tradition has preserved a story of the builder having been
killed in hunting, while the hall was in course of erection ; but of
his name and family there are no traces.



Online LibraryEng. (Lancashire). Parish BuryThe registers of the parish church of Bury in the County of Lancasrter. Christenings, burials, & weddings (Volume 2) → online text (page 33 of 52)