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Ernst Anton Max Haas British Museum. Dept. of Oriental Printed Books an.

Catalogue of Sanskrit and Pali books in the British Museum online

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CATALOGUE



OP



SAMKEIT, PALI, AND PEAKEIT BOOKS



IN THE



BRITISH MUSEUM,

ACQUIRED DURING THE YEARS 1876-92.



BT



CECIL BENDALL, M.A.



ASSISTANT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSB.; PROFESSOR OF SANSKRIT IN UNIYERSITT COLLEGE, LONDON;

SOMETIME FELLOW OF OONVILLE AMD CA1US COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM.



SOLD AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM, / :^

AND BT

Messrs. LONGMANS & CO., 39, Paternoster Row ; B. QUARITCH, 15, Piccadilly, W.; A. ASHER A CO^

13, Bedford Street, Covbnt Garden ; KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., Paternoster House,

Charing Cross Road ; and Mr. HENRY FROWDE, Oxford University Press, Amen Cobner.

1893. o.



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• ••2i«.2



- Z¥V^o-




LOKDON :

PBINTID VT OILBIRT AHD BITIiraTOK, LIMITED,

ST. JOHV'S H0U8B, OLBBKBKWBLL, B.C.



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This Catalogue of the Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit vbooks in the British Museum has
been compiled by Professor Bendall, Senior Assistant in the Department of Oriental
Printed Books and MSS. It is supplementary to that made by the late Dr. E. Haas,
and is arranged on the principles laid down by that scholar in his introductory
remarks to the earlier work, with some modifications which are fully explained in
the Preface to the present volume.

ROBERT K. DOUGLAS,



British Museum,
May 29, 1893.



KEEPER OP THE DEPARTMENT OP ORIENTAL
PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS.



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PREFACE.



(Haa8,p.iv.)



As the present work forms a supplement to the " Catalogue of Sanskrit and Pali Books
in the British Museum," by the late Dr. E. Haas, it will be useful to make some
observations as to new features introduced, including points of' departure from the
principles laid down in the preface of that work.

First, as to the scope of the work. The term ** Prakrit " has been added to the Scope
title of the present volume, because the publications in Prakrit have very considerably
increased since the date of Dr. Haas's Catalogue. This has been (as may be seen from
our Select Subject Index) mainly owing to the literary activity of the Svetambara Jain
sect. I may here note that Jain works are catalogued under the Sanskrit titles
authorized by tradition, though the corresponding Prakrit forms are also given in the
Index of Titles.

The Subject-Index just referred to forms a second new feature of the present work,
and is similar to those which have been found useful in the catalogues of several Indian
vernaculars. In view of the comparatively greater number of handbooks available for
students of Sanskrit, no attempt has been made to render this Index exhaustive ; but
it is hoped that it will prove useful to students, as well as to the compilers of chresto-
mathies and other educational works. Referring to Dr. Haas's remarks on the scope
of his Catalogue (p. iv.), it may be here stated that an endeavour has now been made
to supply references to texts published in the Journals of learned societies, which were
there omitted. A complete list of the translations of the Bible into Sanskrit and Pali
has also been added.

In order to explain the mode of transcription, as well as to afford a ready means Tran*.
of reference for the very numerous alphabets used in printing Sanskrit works, a table (HftaB,p.T.)
of transliteration has been added.

No serious discrepancies will be found between this and the system adopted by
Dr. Haas ; but the experience gained by the publication of catalogues of other Indian
literatures has shown that some few fresh signs* were desirable.



* Especially in the distinction of the various nasals, and the substitution of the mark usually employed to
express prosodial length for the sign identified with accentuation {e.g. d, not d, for ^t).



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vi PREFACE.

The general principle laid down by Dr. Haas (p. v.), that *• the historical ground is
the only safe one on which to build a system of uniform transcription,** has been loyally
carried out ;* indeed, the exception npted by him — the case of the unpronounced final a —
has been in the present work treated according to the general law, and written accord-
ingly without parentheses.t
Nomen- The same general principles of nomenclature have likewise been followed, with

(HaR8,p.Ti.) two exceptions : (1) The Bengali (and North Indian) addition of the word " Sarman"
(Brahman) after the personal name has been disregarded, as conveying no useful new
information, the vast majority of Sanskrit writers still being of the highest caste.
(2) In the South Indian names Dr. Haas's plan of cataloguing such names under
initials has been departed from. The author instanced by him (T. Kristnasawmy Iyer)
now appears as Krishnasvami Aiyar, T., the name designated by the initial being regarded
as, in some sort, an epithet. The advantages of this more practical system are : (1) that
it accords in general with the practice of duly qualified Europeans in South India, e.g. the
compilers of the Madras University Calendar ; (2) that, taken in connexion with native
nomenclature in the other Presidencies, it reduces the cataloguing of Indian names to
a principle at once more simple and, as I venture to think, more scientific than that
of taking them '' as they stand," viz., that all Indians should be catalogued
under their native personal names. | Such names are readily distinguishable
from epithets and the like by the Sanskrit scholar, owing to the fact that throughout
all India in the literary classes the name given at birth is usually a compound of regular
construction, and almost invariably of religious import, e.g. Devadatta (r/. ZtjpoSotos).

It may be well to add here that personal names are transliterated on precisely
the same principles as other Oriental words. A recent very able writer has tried to
justify the opposite plan by assuming " the principle that everyone has a right to spell

* Besides the exception noted below, a slight change has been made in transcription of those names of
modem Hindus the base of which ends in •[ n. In conformity with modern usage, the n is now dropped, though
it is retained in the case of the old writers, such as Dan^in, Sridharasvamin.

t In certain vernaculars, however, and in personal names not directly referable to Sanskrit origioals, the
final a has been dropped. Compare the preface to the Catalogue of Hindi Books.

J That the personal name is really the chief name, even in the south of India, may be seen from the following
circumstances : (1) That native converts, when they retain their old names at all, retain their personal names in
lieu of surnames, prefixing to them the names which they receive at baptism, such as John or Samuel. The old
prefixed (so-called) " family "-name (or rather place-name) disappears or is (apparently) cancelled. Accordingly,
by the plan now adopted, works written before and after conversion would appear under the same general
heading. ( 2) Native scholars of South India, when writing of themselves in the body of a Sanskrit work,
entirely suppress their prefixed local family-name (amongst other reasons, it is usually of non-Aryan origin, and
versu dieere non est), and use the personal name alone. Compare the Sanskrit dedicatory verses of E. Siva^ankara
Papaya's works. Attention has been already diawn by Dr. Haas (p. vii.) to the exceptional conditions of Sin-
halese names.



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PREFACE. vii

his own name as he likes/'* But this principle, if principle it be, must apply only
to the native alphabet of the writer.! When European Orientalists are so hopelessly
at variance, how can we expect natives to write any words — even their own names — on
a consistent plan ?

Some pains have also been taken to give the names of European writers
with a full correctness befitting a Catalogue that forms part of the system of a
large library. Orientalists who may be surprised at finding somewhat long epithets
added to their names in the present work may be reminded that their literary name-
sakes are probably to be found in the General Catalogue of the Museum Library, the
rules of which have in the main been observed here, with some slight modifications. J
A case in point is the omission of publishers' names in imprints, which here are only
added to distinguish two editions of the same year or where the book derives a special
character from its mode of publication. §

A certain discretion has been reserved in mentioning or giving cross-references to
the names of persons laying claim to be considered as editors. In a few cases where
the " editor " was partly a press-corrector and partly a prolific issuer of reprints, a
mere list of the headings of the works published has been given under his name.

In revising the latter half of this work much assistance || has been derived from
Dr. S. Th. Aufrecht's useful Catalogus Catalogomm.

I have profited on many occasions by the advice of my colleague, Mr. A. G. Ellis,
on points relating to arrangement and style ; and still more often by the wide knowledge
of the North Indian vernaculars possessed by my friend Mr. J. F. Blumhardt, whose
work for this Department in connexion with these languages is so greatly appreciated.

CECIL BENDALL.
British Museum,

May, 1893.

• G. A. Grierson, Notes on the Vernacular Literature of Hindustan, p. ix,

f In this a settled usage is generally observed. Thus, the form Chattopadhyaya is adopted because the
Brahmans bearing that name always write '^nfWP^mr, as Dr. Haas has shown (p. v.). Occasionally modem
Pandits appear to use a Sanskritized literary name (compare Caius for Kaye). See the heading Vi'fHOBA Anna
KabhIpakab (col. 481).

I In the present work, as a supplementary catalogue, it has been thought best, on practical grounds, to
follow Dr. Haas's arrangement, by which in the case of grammatical works, where commentaries are piled on
commentaries many deep, the leading commentator is treated as an independent author.

§ J^.y. an official character. See the numerous publications of the Departments of Public Instruction in India.

II Many works, however, have been printed, especially in South India and Ceylon, of which no MS. is
registered in the catalogues on which Dr. Aufrecht's work is founded. Of the Sanskrit literature extant in
Ceylon very little seems to be known in Europe. The works there published deal chiefly with medicine and
with astrology.



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COERIGENDA AND MINOR ADDENDA.



23,


„ 10.


32,


„ 28.


40


» 23.


43,


» 14.


54,


>} 9.


62,


„ 10.


62.




103.




129,


5th entry


173,


line 1.


194.





Col. 4, line 22 (note). For Nayyadhamma, read Neyyadhamma,
„ 15, Heading AnandatIrtha, add note: A Canarese commentary on this author's

Mahabharatatatparya was published at Bombay, 189], and will be
found in the Canarese Catalogue.
For See Yogavasishtaramayana read See Gurujnanavasishta.
After the words Brahma-sutras add reference : I. i. — ii. 1.
For pp. 193 read S. 1936.

After the word Kiratarjuniya add reference : [Sargas, I. — IV.]
Delete passage in parentheses and note, /or vol. I. — III. read 5 vol., and

correct date to 1848-72.
For Buddhagosa read Buddhaghosa.
(Entry DhammapadaJthakatha) add note. In progress.
Delete the entries under Ganapati-atharvasirsha, and see now Upanishads

(col. 430).
Similar works appear under the headings Samaganav sandhyaprayoga and
Vedas. — Samaveda. — Appendix, For the press-mark read 14010. b. 4 (1).
For Naganatha Bhavadvandya read Uddhava.

The heading Krishna Suri should be transposed intoits correct alphabetical
order before Krishnasvami.
224, „ 22. The reference within square brackets should more suitably read thus :

Majjhimanikaya, II. v. 8.
250. Heading NARA8i]|fHA, Atmuri'Lakshmi, See now Addenda, cols. 527 and 523.

261, „ 14. For Mahadesika read Vedantacharya.

264, last 1. but 3. Delete Mukhopadhyaya.

265, line 1. For NIlamadhava read Nilamani.
270. First entry under Padmaraja. Make this a cross-reference to Upendra-

charya, and accordingly delete " compiled.''
296. Heading Pulle, second entry. Delete In progress, and add in previous

line : 2 pt.
354 ad fin. To the last heading add a note : See also the headings Harischandra

Tarkalamkara and Vedas — Samaveda. — Appendix ; adding a similar

note to the last cited entry (col. 459).
376, 1st entry. Add : Pt. 1.
376, ad fin. Add a cross-reference to the editor, Sathagopacharya, of the work catalogued

under Mahabharata Harivamsa, in col. 525.
482. Transpose the second and third entries.



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TABLE OF TEANSLITEKATION.



NAGARI, BENGALI, TELUGD, OANARESE, MALAYALAM, SINHALESE,

AND BURMESE ALPHABETS.*





K&6.


BiNa.


Tit.


Can.


MAt.


Sin.


Bub.


a


W


"f


»


t9


(»*


qP


99


a


wn


^


t3


«5


(SfQ)


«f3


38")


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<a


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i


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tt3





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e,d


c


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^


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i; (eo6)


ao (a 6)


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6J«9


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c@S


ka


M


»


r


•5*


<£>


es)


OD


kha


«


^


V


&)


6U


O





ga


n


t


X


rl


GO





O


gha


^


^


to


?^


<LU


S5


ID


na


V


<S


zt


as


6«3


©


C


eha


^


F


x5


sS


iU


O


o


chha


^


^


^


^


ora


c^


30



• No type is available for the representation of the Grantha alphabet. In some few South-Indian religious works a
curious attempt has been made to express Sanskrit texts by the use of the Tamil alphabet : but even these rarely bear title-
pages printed in that inadequate character.

b



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TABLE


OP TRANSLITERATION.-<(7on«»nttad.)






Na».


BiNO.


Til.


Cam.


Mal.


Sin.


BCR.


ja


H


W


U


W


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j^


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«r


#


e*


W


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e


ta


z


»


fc>


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s


9


?


tha


z


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(^


6





£)


§


da


¥


V


^$


ni


CU)





Q


dha


V


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4


C09


cS


5


na


m


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ra


«nr>


^


oo


ta


ir


^


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S


(9)


•eo


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tha


^


«


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$


LD


a


00


da


?


w


es


d


a


<;


3


dha


M


^


<$


?


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na


^


^


^


<c5


no


er>


^


pa


^


^


ti


si


aJ








pba


n


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0.0





is>


ba


w


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eo


eoj


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bha


H


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t5>


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ma


n


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to


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ya


1?


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CO)





00


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n


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tf


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6


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la


^


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e;


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9a


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sha


^


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sa


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Anusvara, Visarga and Anunasika are represented by m, h and n respectively.



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SUPPLEMENTAEY CATALOGUE



OF



SANSKRIT BOOKS.



ABAJI YISHXnr EATHAVATE. See Somesvara-
DEVA Kirtikaumudi , . edited by A. V. K. 1883. 8^

14058. b. 19.



ABALAKAHTA 8EHA. trtJ^nnyfOT^^t^ ^rt^JWtP^,
fffSTirtenrt^ ^ Mrtj^rtlSt [Dhatusara-kridantasan-
graba. A collection of nominal derivatives from
verbal roots,. arranged in order of verbal roots,
of suffixes and of the derived words.] pp. 116.
^ft^lvil lASA [Gdcutta, 1886.] 8^ 14093. b. 17.

ABHATACHABANA OUPTA. See Naratana Ka-
viRAJA ¥^^<W^«1 [Edited by A^G.] [1880.] 8^

14043. oc. 4.

ABEATADEVA. See Aupapatika. ^ TWWrf etc.
[With a commentary by A.] [1879.] obi. 4^

14100. f. 1.



See Bhagavati-sutra. Jain Sutrd San-

grdhd . . . Bhagvati Sutrd . . . with a commenteury
in Sanskrit by A. etc. 1877, etc. 8°.

14100 0. 6.

See Bhagavati sutra. ^8R HH^flft ?nr. [With



Abhayadeva's commentary.] [1882.] obi. 4**.

14100. f. 9.



See JSatadharmakatha. QIAIM^^^I^^.



[With a Sanskrit commentary by A.] [1876.]
obi. 12°. 14100. c. 3.

See Prasnavyakarana. UVI^K^U^ill [sic.']



[With a Sanskrit commentary by A.] [1876.]
obi 8°. 14100. 0. 4.



ABHATADEVA. See Samavayahga. ^Ifinrnrtn [With
vfitU or commentary by A.] [1880.] obi. 4^.

14100. f. 8.

WRTW etc. [With A.'s
[1880.] obi. 4^

14100. f. 3.



See Sthananga.

Sanskrit commentary.]



See Upasakadasa. T^nmn^f^ [Together

with the Upasakadafavivarana of A.] [1876.]
oU. 12^ 14100. c. 2,



sao . . with the . . com-
1885. 8^

14002. a. (vol. 105.)

[With the



The

mentary of A., etc,



See ViPAKAsuTRA. frrniRnr

Sanskrit commentary of A.] [1876.] oU. 8®.

14100. c. 5.

ABHTDHAMlTAPITAgA. [For the more impor-
tant writings of this division of the Tripi^aka of
the Southern Buddhists, See Abhidhammattha-
sangaha, Dhammasakgani, Puggala-pannatti.]

14098. b.

ABHIDHAHABATNAHAIiA. '^^^?:>^ohJ^
erdoc3n>txT^oS6iSboXo eepl?°r\56$^^5a^e) etc.
[The Abhidhanaratnamala, also called Shadrasa-
nighantu, a dictionary of Materia medlca, with
a Telugu interpretation.] .pp. 9, 62. Madras,
oo-o-o [1881.] 8°. 14043. c. 32.

ABHIirAVAGOTTA. See Utpala. fiQRinirf^srTflft-
ifi&'ft [Pratyabhijnavimarfini, with the shorter
commentary of A., called Laghuvritti.] 1866, etc.
fol. 14096. f, 4



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ACADEMIES iCALcuTTA-aBEUAinr],



ACADEMIES lauBMAnnr-LONDoir].



4



ACADEMIES.



CALCUTTA.



Asiatic Society of Bengal.

New Series. 1848, etc.



Bibliotheca Indica etc.
14002. a., b.



[Continuation of note.]



>>


79.'
80.


[Perstan.]


Vol. 106.


Pwranas, — Kurma-
puraqa.


II


81.'


Kdtantra,


91


107.


Pwranas. — Bjrihan-


rt


82.


Aranyakas. — Aitare-






ndradtyapurdna.






yaraiijaka.


it


108.


Jwyadatta 8ur%.


9*


83.


Bddardya^a,


tt


109.


Purdnas. — Yaraha-


>l


84.


Sdndilya.






paraiia.


II


85.


Purdnas, — VaynpD-


tt


110.


Prajnd'pdramitd.






raqa.


tt


111.


Par d far a.


,,


86.


Somadeva Bhatta.


tt


112.


IPersian.]


II


87.


lArabic.]


tt


113.


Ootama,


11


88.


Chandx.


tt


114.


Yifvefvara, son of


II


89.


Ydska.






Pe4<Jibhatta,


n


90.


Lalitavistara.


St


115.


[Tibetan.]


II


91.


Vishnu.


tt


116.


Bddarayana.


II


92.


Apastamha,


tt


117.


Id.


ft


93.


Pataiijali.


tt


118.


Saddna/nda Tati.


11


94.


Pardfara.


tt


119.


[Persian.]


it


95.


Suffuta.


tt


120.


Purdnas, — Biihad-


}i


96.


Hemachandra,






dharmapnraija.


tt


97.


[Perstan. 1


tt


121.


[Hindi.]


II


98.


Gangefa Upddhydya,


tt


122.


Kapila.


SI


99.


[Persian.']
^dnkhdyana.


tt


123.


UdoAfona,


II


100.


tt


124.


Kshemendra.


tt


101.


Sdyanachdrya,


♦1


125.


Purdnas. — Markan-


tt
tt


102.
103.


Ndrada,
Chandefvara.




126.


^eya puTai}a [Bn-

glish.]
[Persian,]
Saunaka.


tt


104.


Jolly (J.E.)


* II


127.


tt


106.


UpdsaJiadasd,





128.


NydyaHndu.



Rajendbalala Mitra. a descriptive Catalogue
of Sanskrit MSS. in the library of the Asiatic
Society of Bengal [followed by an Appendix
containing an alphabetical list of Sanskrit
grammars known to exist.] Pt. I. pp. vii. i.
171. Ivii. Calcutta, 1877, etc. 8^ 14096. i L

The Sanskrit Buddhist Literature of Nepal



[Catalogue, raisonn^ of the collection of MSS.
presented by B. H. Hodgson to the Society.]
pp. xlvii. 340. Calcutta, 1882. 8° 14096. cc.

OAKBBIDaE.

TTniYersity of Cambridge. Library.
Bbndall (Cecil). Catalogue of the Buddhist
Sanskrit Manuscripts in the University Library,
Cambridge. With introductory notices and illus-
trations of the palaeography and chronology of
Nopal and Bengal, pp. xii. Ivi. 225. Cambridge,

1880. 8^ 14096. d. 16.

GEBMANT.

DeutBohe Horgenl^dische Oesellschaft.
Abhandlungen fiir die Kunde des Morgenlandes,
herausgegeben von der deutschen Morgenlan-
dischen Gesellschaft (Bando I.-IV.) unter der
verantwortlichen Redaktion des Prof. Dr. H.
Brockhaus (Band V des Prof. Dr. Ludwig



Krehl ; Band VI. ... des Prof. Dr. Otto Loth ;

Band VII.-IX. ... des Prof. E. Windisch.) Leipzig,

1859, etc. 8^. In progress. 763. 1 9-14.

The Sanskrit and Prakrit works contoMied in the above a/re de»
scribed under the following headings .—



Dhanefvara 8uri. Bd. 1.
Somadeva Bhaffa. Bd.2 ^ i.
Afvaldyana. Bd. 8^4.
^dntanava. Bd. 4.
Hdla. Bd. 5^7.
Pdraskara. Bd. 6.



Bhadrabdhu. Bd. 7.
Vetdla^aHchavimfati. Bd. 8.
Ba/udhdyana: ibid.
Stenzltr (A. F.) and Ofihya*
sutras. Bd. 9.



• LEIPZIG.

DentBche Horgenlandische Gesellschaft. See above :
— Germany.

LOin>ON.
Pali Text Society.

Journal of the Pali Text Society edited by
T. W. R. Davids. London, 1882, etc. 8°.

In progress. 14098. b.

Tesots published in this Journal appear under these headings :



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