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agotert tuition



THE SEVEN
CARDINAL SINS



In Five Volumes
By

Eugene Sue

PRIDE Volume L
Illustrated




New York and Boston

H. M. Caldwell Company

Publishers



Copyright, 1899
BY FRANCIS A. NICCOLLS & Co.



Pride Vol. I.



CONTENTS.



ffAPTEB PAGE

I. THE OLD COMMANDER . . . . .13

II. THE BRAVE DUKE 24

III. THE DINNER IN THE ARBOUR ... 32

IV. THE DUCHESS 41

V. THE LION OF THE BALL .... 54

VI. THE DUEL 66

VII. THE PRETTY MUSICIAN . . . .73

Vm. THE UNHAPPY SECRET 79

IX. THE PRIVATE INTERVIEW .... 89

X. REVELATIONS 96

XI. THE PURSE OF MONEY 106

XII. A VAIN INTERVIEW 115

XIII. UNEXPECTED CONSOLATION .... 125

XIV. THE SOLEMN COMPACT 136

XV. A GLORIOUS DREAM 145

XVI. AN INCOMPREHENSIBLE REFUSAL . . . 154

XVII. PRESUMPTION AND INDIGNATION . . . 161

XVIII. A PURELY BUSINESS TRANSACTION . . 171

XIX. IN M. DE MORNAND'S STUDY . . . 177

XX. ATTENTIONS TO THE HEIRESS . . . 185

XXI. THE HUNCHBACK MEETS THE HEIRESS . 195

XXn. AN ORGY OF SINCERITY . 204



2082667



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE

XXIII. AN INVOLUNTARY AVERSION .... 213

XXIV. AN UNWELCOME VISITOR .... 224
XXV. MATRIMONIAL INTENTIONS DISCLOSED . . 232

XXVI. THE COMMANDER'S ADVICE .... 242

XXVII. THE ABODE OF THE DUCHESS . . . 251

XXVIII. A SACRED MISSION 261

XXIX. HUMILIATION AND CONSOLATION . . . 273

XXX. AN APOLOGY ACCEPTED 283

XXXI. THE PRIVATE STAIRWAY . . . .293

XXXII. UNBURDENING THE HEART .... 302

XXXm. THE THREE RIVALS 310

XXXIV. TORMENTED BY DOUBTS 321



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

" < HERE is A VERY IMPORTANT LETTER ' " . Frontispiece
" RAN HIS BLADE THROUGH HIS ANTAGONIST'S RIGHT

ARM" 69

"SHE HELD OUT THE BANK-NOTE" 130

" ' I WILL GO AND TRY TO FIND THAT YOUNG COX-
COMB ' " . 278



Pride, Vol. L



PRIDE.



CHAPTER I.

THE OLD COMMANDER.

Elle avait un vice, 1'orgueil, qui lui tenait lieu de toutes les
qualite's. 1

COMMANDER BERNARD, a resident of Paris, after hav-
ing served under the Empire in the Marine Corps, and
under the Restoration as a lieutenant in the navy, was
retired about the year 1830, with the brevet rank of
captain.

Honourably mentioned again and again for his daring
exploits in the maritime engagements of the East In-
dian war, and subsequently recognised as one of the
bravest soldiers in the Russian campaign, M. Bernard,
the most unassuming and upright of men, with the
kindest heart in the world, lived quietly and frugally
upon his modest pension, in a little apartment on one
of the least frequented streets of the Batignolles.

An elderly woman, named Madame Barbangon, had
kept house for him ten years or more, and, though really
very fond of him, led him a rather hard life at times,

1 She bad one fault, pride, which, in her, answered in place of all the
virtues.

13



PRIDE.

for the worthy female, who had an extremely high tem-
per and a very despotic disposition, was very fond of
reminding her employer that she had sacrificed an
enviable social position to serve him.

The real truth was, Madame Barbangon had long
acted as assistant in the establishment of a well-known
midwife, an experience which furnished her with mate-
rial for an inexhaustible stock of marvellous stories,
her great favourite being her adventure with a masked
lady who, with her assistance, had brought a lovely girl
baby into the world, a child Madame Barban^on had
taken care of for two years, but which had been claimed
by a stranger at the expiration of that time.

Four or five years after this memorable event, Madame
Barbanc,on decided to resign her practice and assume
the twofold functions of nurse and housekeeper.

About this time Commander Bernard, who was suffer-
ing greatly from the reopening of several old wounds,
needed a nurse, and was so well pleased with Madame
Barbanon's skill that he asked her to enter his
service.

"You will have a pretty easy time of it, Mother
Barban^on," the veteran said to her. " I am not hard
to live with, and we shall get along comfortably to-
gether."

Madame Barban9on promptly accepted the offer, ele-
vated herself forthwith to the position of Commander
Bernard's dame de confiance, and slowly but surely be-
came a veritable servant-mistress. Indeed, seeing the
angelic patience with which the commander endured
this domestic tyranny, one would have taken the old
naval officer for some meek-spirited rentier, instead of
one of the bravest soldiers of the Empire.

Commander Bernard was passionately fond of garden-
ing, and lavished any amount of care and attention
upon a little arbour, constructed by his own hands and
covered with clematis, hop-vines, and honeysuckle, where

14



THE OLD COMMANDER.

he loved to sit after his frugal dinner and smoke his
pipe and think of his campaigns and his former com-
panions in arms. This arbour marked the limits of the
commander's landed possessions, for though very small,
the garden was divided into two parts. The portion
claimed by Madame Barban9on aspired only to be useful ;
the other, of which the veteran took entire charge, was
intended to please the eye only.

The precise boundaries of these two plats of ground
had been, and were still, the cause of a quiet but deter-
mined struggle between the commander and his house-
keeper.

Never did two nations, anxious to extend their fron-
tiers, each at the expense of the other, resort to more
trickery or display greater cleverness and perseverance
in concealing and maintaining their mutual attempts at
invasion.

We must do the commander the justice to say that he
fought only for his rights, having no desire to extend,
but merely to preserve his territory intact, territory
upon which the bold and insatiable housekeeper was
ever trying to encroach by establishing her thyme, sa-
vory, parsley, and camomile beds among her employer's
roses, tulips, and peonies.

Another cause of heated controversy between the
commander and Madame Barban9on was the implacable
hatred the latter felt for Napoleon, whom she had never
forgiven for the death of a young soldier, the only
lover she had ever been able to boast of, probably. She
carried this rancour so far, in fact, as to style the Em-
peror that " Corsican ogre," and even to deny him the
possession of any military genius, an asseveration that
amused the veteran immensely.

Nevertheless, in spite of these diverse political senti-
ments, and the ever recurring and annoying question
of the boundaries of the two gardens, Madame Barban-
9on was, at heart, sincerely devoted to her employer,

15



PRIDE.

and attended assiduously to his every want, while the
veteran, for his part, would have sorely missed his
irascible housekeeper's care and attentions.

The spring of 1844 was fast drawing to a close.
The May verdure was shining in all its freshness ; three
o'clock in the afternoon had just sounded ; and though
the day was warm, and the sun's rays ardent, the pleas-
ant scent of freshly watered earth, combined with the
fragrant odour of several small clumps of lilacs and
syringas, testified to the faithful care the commander
bestowed upon his garden, for from a frequently and
laboriously filled wash-tub sunk in the earth, and dignified
with the name of reservoir, the veteran had just treated
his little domain to a refreshing shower ; nor had he, in
his generous impartiality, excluded his housekeeper's
vegetable beds and kitchen herbs from the benefits of
his ministrations.

The veteran, in his gardening costume of gray linen
jacket and big straw hat, was now resting from his
labours in the arbour, already nearly covered with a
vigorous growth of clematis and honeysuckle. His
sunburned features were characterised by an expression
of unusual frankness and kindness, though a heavy
moustache, as white as his bristling white hair, imparted
a decidedly martial air to his physiognomy.

After wiping the sweat from his forehead with a blue
checked handkerchief and returning it to his pocket,
the veteran picked up his pipe from a table in the
arbour, filled and lighted it, then, establishing himself
in an old cane-bottomed armchair, began to smoke and
enjoy the beauty of the day, the stillness of which was
broken only by the occasional twitter of a few birds and
the humming of Madame Barban^on, who was engaged
in gathering some lettuce and parsley for the supper
salad. If the veteran had not been blessed with nerves
of steel, his dolce far niente would have been sadly dis-
turbed by the monotonous refrain of the old-fashioned

16



-THE OLD COMMANDER.

love song entitled " Poor Jacques," which the worthy
woman was murdering in the most atrocious manner.

" Mais a present que je suis loin de toi,
Je mange de tout sur la terre," J

she sang in a voice as false as it was nasal, and the
lugubrious, heart-broken expression she gave to the words,
shaking her head sadly the while, made the whole thing
extremely ludicrous.

For ten years Commander Bernard had endured this
travesty without a murmur, and without taking the
slightest notice of the ridiculous meaning Madame
Barban9on gave to the last line of the chorus.

It is quite possible that to-day the meaning of the
words struck him more forcibly, and that a desire to
devour everything upon the surface of the earth did not
seem to him to be the natural consequence of separation
from one's beloved, for, after having lent an impartial
and attentive ear a second time to his housekeeper's dole-
ful ditty, he exclaimed, laying his pipe on the table :

" What the devil is that nonsense you are singing,
Madame Barbangon ? "

" It is a very pretty love song called l Poor Jacques,' "
snapped Madame Barbangon, straightening herself up.
" Every one to his taste, you know, monsieur, and you
have a perfect right to make fun of it, if you choose, of
course. This isn't the first time you have heard me
sing it, though."

" No, no, you're quite right about that ! " responded
the commander, satirically.

" I learned the song," resumed the housekeeper, sigh-
ing heavily, " in days in days but enough ! " she
exclaimed, burying her regrets in her capacious bosom.
"I sang it, I remember, to that masked lady who
came "

"I'd rather hear the song," hastily exclaimed the

1 Instead of " Je manque de tout sur la terre."
17



PRIDE.

veteran, seeing himself threatened with the same tire-
some story. " Yes, I much prefer the song to the story.
It isn't so long, but the deuce take me if I understand
you when you say :

" ' Mais a present que je suis loin de toi,
Je mange de tout sur la terre.' "

" What, monsieur, you don't understand ? "

No, I don't."

" It is very plain it seems to me, but soldiers are so
unfeeling."

" But think a moment, Mother Barban9on ; here is a
girl who, in her despair at poor Jacques's absence, sets
about eating everything on the face of the earth."

" Of course, monsieur, any child could understand
that."

" But I do not, I must confess."

" What ! you can't understand that this unfortunate
young girl is so heart-broken, after her lover's departure,
that she is ready to eat anything and everything even
poison, poor thing! Her life is of so little value to
her, she is so wretched that she doesn't even know
what she is doing, and so eats everything that happens
to be within reach and yet, her misery doesn't move
you in the least."

The veteran listened attentively to this explanation,
which did not seem to him so entirely devoid of reason,
now, after all.

"Yes, yes, I understand," he responded, nodding his
head ; " but it is like all love songs extremely far-
fetched."

" ' Poor Jacques ' far-fetched ? The idea ! " cried
Madame Barbangon, indignantly.

" ' Every one to his taste,' as you remarked a moment
ago," answered the veteran. " I like our old sea songs
very much better. A man knows what he is singing
about when he sings them."

18



THE OLD COMMANDER.

And in a voice as powerful as it was discordant, the
old captain began to sing :

" Pour aller a Lorient pgcher des sardines,
Pour aller a Lorient pecher des harengs "

" Monsieur ! " exclaimed Madame Barbangon, inter-
rupting her employer, with a highly incensed and pru-
dish air, for she knew the end of the ditty, " you forget
there are ladies present."

" Is that so ? " demanded the veteran, straining his
neck to see outside of the arbour.

" There is no need to make such an effort as that, it
seems to me," remarked the housekeeper, with great
dignity. " You can see me easy enough, I should think."

" That is true, Mother Barban^on. I always forget
that you belong to the other sex, but for all that I like
my song much better than I do yours. It was a great
favourite on the Armide, the frigate on which I shipped
when I was only fourteen, and afterwards we sang it
many a time on dry land when I was in the Marine
Corps. Oh, those were happy days ! I was young then."

"Yes, and then Bu-u-onaparte " it is absolutely
necessary to spell and accent the word in this way, to
give the reader any idea of the disdainful and sneering
manner in which Mother Barbangon uttered the name of
the great man who had been the cause of her brave
soldier boy's death " Bu-u-onaparte was your leader."

" Yes, the Emperor, that ' Corsican ogre,' the Emperor
you revile so, wasn't far off, I admit."

" Yes, monsieur, your Emperor was an ogre, and
worse than an ogre."

" What ! worse than an ogre ? "

"Yes, yes, laugh as much as you like, but he was.
Do you know, monsieur, that when that Corsican ogre
had the Pope in his power at Fontainebleau, do you know
how grossly he insulted our Holy Father, your beast of
a Bu-u-onaparte ? "

19



PRIDE.

" No, Mother Barban9on, I never heard of it, upon
my word of honour."

" It is of no use for you to deny it ; I heard it from a
young man in the guards "

" Who must be a pretty old customer by this time,
but let us hear the story."

"Ah, well, monsieur, your Bu-u-onaparte was mean
enough, in his longing to humiliate the Pope, to harness
him to the little King of Rome's carriage, then get into
it and make the poor Holy Father drag him across the
park at Fontainebleau, in order that he might go in this
fashion to announce his divorce to the Empress Jose-
phine that poor, dear, good woman ! "

" What, Mother Barbangon," exclaimed the old sailor,
almost choking with laughter, " that scoundrel of an
Emperor made the Pope drag him across the park in the
King of Rome's carriage to tell the Empress Josephine
of his divorce ? "

" Yes, monsieur, in order to torment her on account
of her religion, just as he forced her to eat a big ham
every Good Friday in the presence of Roustan, that
dreadful mameluke of his, who used to boast of being a
Mussulman and talk about his harem before the priests,
just to insult the clergy, until they blushed with shame.
There is nothing to laugh at in all this, monsieur. At
one time, everybody knew and talked about it, even '

But, unfortunately, the housekeeper was unable to con-
tinue her tirade. Her recriminations were just then
interrupted by a vigorous peal of the bell, and she
hurried off to open the door.

A few words of explanation are necessary before the
introduction of a new character, Olivier Raymond, Com-
mander Bernard's nephew.

The veteran's sister had married a copyist in the
Interior Department, and after several years of wedded
life the clerk died, leaving a widow and one son, then

20



THE OLD COMMANDER.

about eight years of age ; after which several friends of
the deceased interested themselves in the fatherless
boy's behalf, and secured him a scholarship in a fairly
good school.

The widow, left entirely without means, and having no
right to a pension, endeavoured to support herself by her
needle, but after a few years of pinched and laborious
existence she left her son an orphan. His uncle Ber-
nard, his sole relative, was then a lieutenant in com-
mand of a schooner attached to one of our naval stations
in the Southern Pacific. Upon his return to France, the
captain found that his nephew's last year in college was
nearing an end. Olivier, though his college course had
been marked by no particularly brilliant triumphs, had
at least thoroughly profited by his gratuitous education,
but unfortunately, this education being, as is often the
case, far from practical, his future on leaving college
was by no means assured.

After having reflected long and seriously upon his
nephew's precarious position, and being unable to give
him any pecuniary assistance by reason of the smallness
of his own pay, Commander Bernard said to Olivier :

" My poor boy, there is but one thing for you to
do. You are strong, brave, and intelligent. You have
-received an education which renders you superior to
most of the poor young men who enlist in the army.
The conscription is almost sure to catch you next year.
Get ahead of it. Enlist. In that case, you will at least
be able to select the branch of the service you will enter.
There is fighting in Africa, and in five or six years
you are likely to be made an officer. This will give you
some chance of a career. Still, if the idea of a military
life is distasteful to you, my dear boy, we will try to
think of something else. We can get along on my pay,
as a retired officer, until something else offers. Now
think the matter over."

Olivier was not long in making up his mind. Three

21



PRIDE.

months afterward he enlisted, on condition that he
should be assigned to the African Chasseurs. A year
later he was a quartermaster's sergeant ; one year after-
ward a quartermaster. Attacked with one of those
stubborn fevers, which a return to a European climate
alone can cure, Olivier, unfortunately, was obliged to
leave Africa just as he had every reason to expect an
officer's epaulettes. After his recovery he was assigned
to a regiment of hussars, and, after eighteen months'
service in that, he had recently come to spend a six
months' furlough in Paris, with his uncle.

The old sailor's flat consisted of a tiny kitchen, into
which Madame Barban^on's room opened, of a sort of
hall-way, which served as a dining-room, and another
considerably larger room, in which the commander and
his nephew slept. Olivier, knowing how little his uncle
had to live on, would not consent to remain idle. He
wrote a remarkably good hand, and this, together with
the knowledge of accounts acquired while acting as
quartermaster, enabled him to secure several sets of
books to keep among the petty merchants in the neigh-
bourhood ; so, instead of being a burden upon the veteran,
the young officer, with Madame Barbangon's connivance,
secretly added his mite to the forty-eight francs' pay the
commander received each month, besides treating his
uncle now and then to agreeable surprises, which both
delighted and annoyed the worthy man, knowing, as he
did, the assiduous labour Olivier imposed upon himself
to earn this money.

Accustomed from childhood to privations of every
kind, first by his experience as a charity pupil, and
subsequently by the vicissitudes of army life in Africa,
kind-hearted, genial, enthusiastic, and brave, Olivier had
but one fault, that is, if an excessive delicacy in all
money matters, great and small, can be called a fault.
As a common soldier, he even carried his scruples so
far that he would refuse the slightest invitation from

22



THE OLD COMMANDER.

his comrades, if he was not allowed to pay his own
score. This extreme sensitiveness having been at first
ridiculed and considered mere affectation, two duels, in
which Olivier quite covered himself with glory, caused
this peculiarity in the character of the young soldier to
be both accepted and respected.

Olivier, cheerful, obliging, quick-witted, and delighted
with everything, enlivened his uncle's modest home im-
mensely by his gay spirits. In his rare moments of
leisure the young man cultivated his taste by reading
the great poets, or else he spaded and watered and
gardened with his uncle, after which they smoked their
pipes, and talked of foreign lands and of war. At
other times, calling into play the culinary knowledge
acquired in African camps, Olivier initiated Madame
Barbangon into the mysteries of brochettes de mouton
arid other viands, the cooking lessons being enlivened
with jokes and all sorts of teasing remarks about Bu-u-o-
naparte, though the housekeeper scolded and snubbed
Olivier none the less because she loved him with her
whole heart. In short, the young man's presence had
cheered the monotonous existence of the veteran and
his housekeeper so much that their hearts quite failed
them when they recollected that two months of Olivier's
leave had already expired.



23



CHAPTER II.

THE BRAVE DUKE.

OLIVIER RAYMOND was not more than twenty-four
years of age, and possessed a singularly expressive and
attractive face. His short, white hussar jacket, trimmed
with red and decorated with yellow frogs, his well-cut,
light blue trousers, that fitted his well-formed supple
limbs perfectly, and his blue kepi, perched upon one side
of a head covered with hair of the same bright chestnut
hue as his moustache, imparted an extremely dashing
and martial air to his appearance, only, instead of a
sabre, Olivier carried that day under his left arm a big
roll of papers, and in his right hand a formidable bundle
of pens.

As the young man deposited these eminently peaceful
implements upon a table, he turned, and exclaimed
gaily, " How are you, Mamma Barbanc,on ? "

In fact, he even had the audacity to put his long arms
about the housekeeper's bony waist, and give her a
slight squeeze as he spoke.

" Will you never have done with your nonsense, you
rascal ? " snapped the delighted housekeeper.

" Oh, this is only the beginning. I've got to make a
complete conquest of you, Mamma Barban9on."

"Of me?"

" Unquestionably. It is absolutely necessary. I'm
compelled to do it."

"And why?"

" In order to induce you to grant me a favour."

We'll see about that. What is it ? "
24



THE BRAVE DUKE.

" Tell me first where my uncle is."

" Smoking his pipe out under the arbour."

" All right ! Wait for me here, Mamma Barban9on,
and prepare your mind for something startling."

" Something startling, M. Olivier ? "

" Yes, something monstrous unheard-of impos-
sible ! "

" Monstrous unheard-of " repeated Madame Bar-
bangon, wonderingly, as she watched the young soldier
dash off in pursuit of his uncle.

" How are you, my lad ? I didn't expect you so early,"
said the old captain, holding out his hand to his nephew
in pleased surprise. " Home so soon ! But so much the
better ! "

" So much the better ! " retorted Olivier, gaily. " On
the contrary, you little know what is in store for you.
Courage, uncle, courage ! "

" Stop your nonsense, you young scoundrel ! "

" Close your eyes, and now, ' forward march ! ' '

" Forward march ? Against whom ? "

" Against Mother Barban9on, my brave uncle."

" But why ? "

" To break the news that that that I have invited
some one to dinner."

" The devil ! " exclaimed the veteran, recoiling a step
or two in evident dismay.

" To dinner to-day," continued the young lieutenant.

"The devil!" reiterated the veteran, recoiling three
steps this time.

" Moreover, my guest is a duke," continued Olivier.

" A duke ! We are lost ! " faltered the veteran.

And this time he entirely vanished from sight in his
verdant refuge, where he seemed as resolved to maintain
his stand as if in some impregnable fortress. " May
the devil and all his imps seize me if I undertake to
announce any such fact as this to Mother Barbangon ! "

" What, uncle, an officer of marines afraid ? "



PRIDE.

" But you've no idea what a scrape you've got your-
self into, young man ! It's a desperate case, I tell you.
You don't know Madame Barbangon. But, good heavens,
here she comes now ! "

" Our retreat is cut off, uncle," laughed the young
man, as Madame Barbanc,on, whose curiosity had been
excited to such a degree that she could wait no longer,
appeared in the entrance to the arbour. " My guest
will be here in an hour at the very latest, and we needs
must conquer or perish of hunger, you and I and my
guest, whose name, I ought to tell you, is the Due de
Senneterre."

" It's no affair of mine, unhappy boy," responded the
commander. " Tell her yourself ; here she is."

But Olivier only laughed, and, turning to the dreaded
housekeeper, exclaimed :

" My uncle has something to tell you, Madame Bar-



"There's not a word of truth in what he says,"
protested the veteran, wiping the sweat from his brow
with his checked handkerchief. " It is Olivier who has


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