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F. C. G.'s Froissart's modern chronicles, 1902 online

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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




King Edward VIL in his Coronation Robes,



MS. Illumination.



F. C. G.'s *



r roissart's
Modern

v/hronicles
1902

Cold and Pictured



BY



F. Carruthers Gould



LONDON: T. FISHER UNWIN. 1903






FROISSART'S MODERN CHRONICLES.

1902.

An Edition on Japan Paper has been prepared
by the Publisher. It is limited to 50 copies, each
of which is numbered and signed by the Author.
Price i is. net.



FROISSART'S MODERN CHRONICLES.

1901.

With special cover design, decorated title, and
44 illustrations. Fcap. 4to, 35. 6d.



LONDON : T. FISHER UNWIN.



(All rights reserved.)

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INTRODUCTION



4 r*HE kindly reception accorded to my ' ' Froissarfs
Modern Chronicles" published last year, has
encouraged me to essay another volume chronicling the
principal political events of the year 1902. In this,
as in my first book, I have attempted to reproduce the
"atmosphere'" of Sir John Froissart, and should
conscientious critics, ^vho reverence accuracy, find faults
in my records, I would plead in exciise that had the
great mediaeval gossip himself written the political history
of last year, he might have misinterpreted the story as
it would have been told to him, and have failed to
discriminate between figures of speech and facts. For
it is possible that if Sir John Froissart had survived
to come to England for the Coronation in 1902 he
might have gathered gossip even from that strange
modern monster, compounded of a few facts and many
fancies, the Man in the Street.

F. CARRUTHERS GOULD.
v



CONTENTS



PAGF:

PROLOGUE . . . . . . i

Here speaketh the author of the purpose of these chronicles i

CHAP.

I. OF THE TROUBLES OF THE BUFFS 3,

Of tJie further discomforts of the Buffs ; how the Earl of
Durdans and Sir Cawniell de Bannerman met together,
but could not agree ; hoiv Sir Cawniell ivould not clean
his slate, and hoiv the Earl would not dwell within the
Tabernacle ...... 3.

How a certain man-of-law, Augustine de Birrell, discoursed

on the way of Metaphors and other harmful iveapons . i s



II. OF MATTERS IN PARLIAMENT . . . .17-

Of the opening of the Parliament of England by King
Edward the Seventh of the matters debated therein, and
hoiv Sir Arthur de B a If our did cause a change to be
made in the manner of procedure to the end that he and
others might play at golf . . . .17-

How the English, being desirous of buying horses for the
army in Africa, sent certain knights and squires
abroad for that business, and of the animals that they

bought . . , , . . .' .22;

vii



viii Contents

CHAP. PAGE

III. OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM . . . .26

Of the orgulous words spoken by a lord of Almaine ; how
Sir Joseph de Birmingham answered in like manner, of
the repute he gained thereby, and hmv he went into the
City of London and was there received with great favour 26

IV. OF THE WAR IN AFRICA AND OTHER MATTERS . 31

Of the war in Africa, how the lord de Kitchener caused
many castles to be builded, and how a certain flying
Dutchman could not be caught . . , .31

Of the evil fortune that befell the lord Paul de Methuen,
how he was sore hurt and taken prisoner, and how the
Dutch shewed him marvellous courtesy . . -35

Of the death of Sir Cecil de Kimberley of Africa, and of

the Earl of Kimberley of Norfolk in England . -37

V. OF THE ENDING OF THE WAR IN AFRICA . . 40

Hoiv the war in Africa was made an end of to the great
joy of the English and the Dutch . . .40

VI. OF THE CORONATION OF KING EDWARD AND OF QUEEN

ALEXANDRA . . . . . .48

How King Edward, after that he had appointed a day
for his coronation, fell grievously sick^ and of his
marvellous recovery from his malady . . .48

Jfozv the King and Queen were afterwards crowned in

the great church of the Abbey of Westminster . -5

VII. OF THE STRANGE ADVENTURES OF SIR DICKON SEDDON 58

Of the journey that Sir Dickon Seddon made from
Maoriland to Africa, hoiv he conversed with the lord de
Kitchener, and how he hastily departed from Africa and
sailed to England . . . . 58

Of the further marvellous adventures of Sir Dickon
Seddon, how he counselled Sir Joseph de Birmingham
and others in England, and the end thereof . . 64



Contents ix

CHAP. PAGE

VIII. OF CHANGES IN THE GOVERNANCE . . 68

Hmv my lord of Salisbury withdrew himself from the
governance with Sir Michael le Noir, and Sir Arthur
de Balfour became the captain of the Blues, and how
Austen de Birmingham was raised up and Jesse de
Callings was put aside . . . . 68



IX. OF THE KING'S GUESTS . . . 72

Hoiv the English and the Almains were contrarious one
to the other, and how the Emperor of Almaine came to
England to visit his uncle King Edward . 7 2

Of the welcome that King Edward gave to the Emperor
of Almaine, and how they took their pleasures together at
Sandringham . . . . . -74

How the King Dom Carlos of Portugal did also visit the
King of England at Sandringham . . 7&

X. OF THE VISIT OF DE LA REY, BOTHA, AND DE WET

TO ENGLAND, AND OF THE GREAT DRORGAN THAT
AFFRAYED THE ENGLISH . . . .80

How the Dutch leaders came to England and were
presented to the King and Sir Joseph de Birmingham,
and how they and Oom Paul ivrote books about the war
in Africa . . . . . .80

How a great monster called the Spearpoint Drorgan came
across the sea and sore affrayed the English . , 86

XI. OF THE VOYAGE OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM TO

AFRICA . . . . . . .90

Jfow Sir Joseph de Birmingham departed out of England,

and went to Africa, and the reason of his going . . 90

Hoiv Sir Joseph de Birmingham tarried by the way in
Egypt and saiv the Pyramids and the Sphinx. How he
aftenvards crossed the Equator, and the gifts he received
from Neptune . . . . . 93,



:x List of Illustrations

CHAP. _ PAGE

Hoiv Sir Joseph de Birmingham came to Uganda, and of

the divers wild beasts that abound therein . -97



XII. OF THE CHURCH AND ITS SCHOOLS . . 100

How the Bishops brought petitions to the governance,
praying that the Church might be relieved from the burden
of paying for its schools . . .100

Hoiv Sir Arthur de Balfour caused a Bill to be drafted,

and how the governance carried it through Parliament . 103

How the Archbishop of Canterbury passed out of this
mortal life . . . . . . in



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



'FRONTISPIECE. KING EDWARD VII. IN HIS CORONATION ROBES
(.1/S. Illlumination.)

SIR TOBY DE LUCE ...... 4

SIR CAWMELL DE BANNERMAN CALLETH AT A WAYSIDE INN . 7
THE EARL OF DURDANS REFUSETH TO DWELL WITHIN THE

TABERNACLE ....... 9

SIR JOHN FROISSART CONVERSETH ON THE WAY WITH

AUGUSTINE DE BIRRELL . . . . .12

THE EARL OF DURDANS PLAYETH AT THE GAME OF METAPHORS 14

:SIR CAWMELL DE BANNERMAN ALSO PLAYETH AT METAPHORS . 15
-SIR ARTHUR DE BALFOUR HATH BUSINESS TO ATTEND TO IN

THE COUNTRY 2O



List of Illustrations xi



PAGE

ENGLISH NOBLEMAN PLAYING AT THE GAME OF GOLF . .21

ENGLISH SQUIRE BUYING HORSES FOR THE ARMY IN AFRICA . 23

(Remount Records)

SIR BLUNDELL DE MAPLE PROTESTETH THAT TOWEL-HORSES
WOULD HAVE BETTER SERVED THE ARMY THAN THE
HORSES THAT HAD BEEN BOUGHT IN HUNGARY . . 24

(Remount Records)

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM DEFIETH THE LORD VON BULOW

OF ALMAINE . . . . . . 2 7

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM GOETH TO GUILDHALL . . 29

DE WET . .' . . . . -33

DE WET ESCAPETH THROUGH THE FENCE . . -34

THE LORD PAUL DE METHUEN . . . . 36

DE LA REY ........ 38

THE KING DESIRETH THAT AN END MAY BE MADE OF THE

WAR IN AFRICA . . . . . -41

DE LA REY, BOTHA, AND DE WET JOURNEY TO VEREENIGING . 42
THE LORD DE MILNER IS DEEMED TO BE ORGULOUS . . 44

THE LORD DE KITCHENER COMFORTETH DE WET . . 45

PLAYING AT THE ORGAN IN THE ABBEY CHURCH OF WESTMINSTER 52

(Coronation Records)

THE LORD DE HALSBURY AND THE DUKE OF NORFOLK . . 53

(From a Stiiined-glass Window)

THE EARL OF DURDANS AND THE EARL DE SPENCER . . 54

(From a Stained-glass Window)
THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY AND THE DEAN OF WESTMINSTER 55

(Coronation Records)

THE DUKE DE MALBROUK AND THE LORD DE LONDONDERRY . 56

(From a Stained-glass Window)

SIR DICKON SEDDON ON HIS VIAGE TO AFRICA AND ENGLAND . 59
SIR DICKON SEDDON PERFORMETH A WAR-DANCE AFTER THE

MANNER OF THE MEN OF MAORILAND . . 6 1

SIR DICKON SEDDON DEMANDETH TO KNOW IF THE LORD DE

KITCHENER HATH NEED OF MORE MUTTON FOR THE

ENGLISH ARMY IN AFRICA . . . . .62

THE LORD DE KITCHENER ANSWERETH SIR DICKON SEDDON,

WHO DEPARTETH IN HASTE . . . . 63



xii List of Illustrations



I'AGE

SIR DICKON SEDDON IN LONDON . . . 65

SIR DICKON SEDDON CONVERSETH WITH SIR JOSEPH DE

BIRMINGHAM . . . . . . .66

MY LORD OF SALISBURY AND SIR MICHAEL LE NOIR DEPART

FROM THE GOVERNANCE OF THE BLUES . . .69

JESSE DE COLLINGS RETURNETH BACK TO HIS THREE ACRES

AND HIS COW . . . . . -7

THE KING OF ENGLAND AND THE EMPEROR WILHELM OF

ALMAINE SHOOT TOGETHER AT SANDRINGHAM . -75

THE KING OF ENGLAND, THE EMPEROR WILHELM OF ALMAINE,

AND THE PRINCE OF WALES, WITH DIVERS OTHERS, GO

A-HUNTING . . . . . . -77

THE KING DOM CARLOS OF PORTUGAL AND THE PRINCE OF

WALES GO A-SHOOTING . . . . -78

DE WET WRITETH OF THE WAR . . . . -83

COM PAUL WRITETH HIS CHRONICLES . . . .84

SIR JOHN DE BRODRICK READETH THE CHRONICLES OF DE WET 85
THE GREAT SPEARPOINT DRORGAN . . . -87

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM DEPARTETH ON HIS VIAGE . . 92

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM IN EGYPT . . . -94

THE SPHINX . . . . . . -95

COIN OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM . . . .96

(Westminster Records)

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM BEHOLDETH A LION AND A UNICORN 98
THE BISHOPS BRING PETITIONS TO THE GOVERNANCE . IO2

SIR JONAH GORST IS CAST OVERBOARD . . . .104

MONK DRAFTING A BILL ...... Io6

(Education Records)

SIR JAMES DE BRYCE SPEAKETH AGAINST THE BILL . . 107

HUGH OF HATFIELD DESIGNETH A SCHOOL . . . Io8

DR. JOHN CLIFFORD PREACHING TO THE PEOPLE . . IIO

FRAGMENT OF A BAS-RELIEF DISCOVERED AT WESTMINSTER . lit

ARCHBISHOP TEMPLE 112



Froissart's Modern Chronicles

PROLOGUE

Here speaketh the author of the purpose of these chronicles,

IT may be that the first book of these chronicles
was not examined nor corrected so justly as such
a case requireth. Therefore to acquit me in that
behalf, and in following the truth as near as I can, I
have enterprised to set down the true report of the
acts, gests and deeds done in our parts, and in Africa,
in the year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and
two, and how and with what labours, dangers, and
perils they were gested and done.

Truth it is that I, who have enterprised this book
to ordain for pleasure and pastance, deem it a laudable
and meritorious deed so to do. For history, com-
pacted together by the histographier, extolleth, enhan-
ceth, and lifteth up such as ben noble and virtuous ;
depresseth, poistereth, and thrusteth clown such as
ben wicked, evil, pushful, and reprovable. What



2 Prologue

pleasure shall it be to the noble gentlemen of E no-land

1 O O

to see, behold and read the high enterprises, famous
acts and glorious deeds done and achieved in this
time ?

Forsooth and this hath moved me to write these
chronicles, and though I cannot of a surety vouch that
things were as I have set them down in this book,
yet I trust I have not swerved from the true import
of the matters, requiring all readers and hearers to
take this my rude work in gre.



CHAPTER I

Of the further discomforts of the Buffs ; how the Earl of Durdans and
Sir Cawmell de Bannerman met together but could not agree ; hoiv
Sir Cawmell would not clean his slate, and how the Earl would not
dwell iv i thin the Tabernacle.

YOU have already seen in the chronicles which I
have before written how that the party of the
Buffs in England was sore troubled, being buffeted
by cross currents when they were at sea, and having
no more comfort on land. When the Earl of Durdans
came up out of the furrow which he had set himself
to plough, and betook himself to Chesterfield to counsel
the people what they should do, the Buffs for the
most part hoped that their fortunes would now mend,
and that they might be in better countenance to with-
stand and prevail against the Blues, who had so long
held them in subjection, which they could not in any
wise do while they were divided among themselves.

Indeed for a time it seemed as if matters would
go more smoothly, and that the leaders and the
different parties of the Buffs might draw together and
become less contrarious one to the other, howbeit some



4 Froissart's Modern Chronicles

there were who were sorely vexed, as I have before
shewed you, by reason of the saying of the Earl of
Durdans that it behoved them to clean their slates,
holding this to be evil counsel.




SIR TOBY DE LUCE.



Now much depended on what Sir Cawmell de
Bannerman, who was the leader of the Commoners of
the Buffs, should be minded to do, and men mused,
saying to each other, "What will Sir Cawmell do?



The Discomforts of the Buffs 5

Will he wait upon the Earl of Durdans and swear
fealty to him, or will the Earl join himself to the
banner of Sir Cawmell ? "

I greatly desired to know the truth of this matter
that I might set it down in my chronicles, and, being
in England soon after, it happily chanced that I fell
in acquaintance with a certain knight, Sir Toby de
Luce, who had great knowledge of affairs of state
and was himself a maker of histories.

He was right courteous and told me many things
which I was covetise of learning. I demanded of him
if the Earl of Durdans and Sir Cawmell de Banner-
man had come together.

He answered me, "Yes."

Then I demanded of htm the manner of their
meeting, and in what wise they had conversed.

''That shall I shew you," quoth he, "to the
intent that you may put it in perpetual memory when
you return into your own country, and have leisure
thereto."

I was rejoiced of his words, and thanked him ;
then he began thus, and said, "On the Sunday before
Christmas Day in the year of our Lord a thousand
nine hundred and one, it fell about that Sir Cawmell
de Bannerman chanced to find himself near a wayside
inn, where he knew the Earl of Durdans was wont
to lodge when he was not elsewhere. So he drew to



6 Froissart's Modern Chronicles

the door and made inquiry whether the Earl was
within his lodgings, but when he was answered that
the Earl had gone to Matins and was not yet returned,
Sir Cawmell de Bannerman departed back upon his way.

" Now when the Earl of Durdans was told of the
visit that Sir Cawmell had made he sent a message
to him entreating him courteously to eat with him on
the next day.

" Truth it is that Sir Cawmell de Bannerman, on
the Monday following next to the Sunday before
Christmas Day went again to the wayside inn and sat
down with the Earl of Durdans, and they made good
cheer together.

" Also they talked merrily of divers matters, such
as the weather, and affairs in Scotland. And when
they had made an end of talking, Sir Cawmell de
Bannerman gave thanks to the Earl of Durdans for
his courtesy and entertainment and so rode home
again."

Then I, Sir John Froissart, said, "Sir Toby, I
believe you well," howbeit I had great marvel that these
two, the Earl of Durdans and Sir Cawmell de Ban-
nerman, had conversed of such light matters, and had
not, when they met together, taken counsel what
might be done to remedy the grievous plight of the
Buffs.

And of a surety I have been told by others that



8 Froissart's Modern Chronicles

these two did converse in such manner, but that they
could in no wise agree in the matter of the giving of
Home Rule to the Irish, the Earl of Durdans being
stoutly set against such enterprise on the part of the
Buffs.

Now I cannot say what is the truth of this matter,
but that they could not agree altogether, or indeed at
all, is manifest by reason of what the Earl of Durdans
and Sir Cawmell de Bannerman thereafter said to
their friends.

Quoth Sir Cawmell, " Are not two parties in the
state enough? Where then is the need for a third?
Moreover I know not what counsel the Earl of
Durdans would give us, for he does not shew us his
ideas clearly, but in parables and metaphors which
cannot be understood. Now he talks of spades, and
anon of phylacteries and slates."

And the Earl of Durdans went about saying, "The
evils that afflict the Buffs can only be cured by spades
and clean slates, and in no wise by methods of
barbarism."

This continued as I have shewed you for a two
or three weeks, and how it came to an end I will now
relate to you.

On the nineteenth day of February in the year
of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and two, a
five days after the Feast of St. Valentine, Sir Cawmell



The Discomforts of the Buffs 9

de Bannerman went on a pilgrimage to Leicester to
speak to an assembly of the Buffs who had gathered
together there to take counsel about the affairs of the
party. And he spoke to them in this wise : " The
Earl of Durdans doth injustice to us in that we know




THE EARL OF DURDANS REFUSETH TO DWELL WITHIN THE
TABERNACLE.

not to this day whether he is inside or outside our
Tabernacle."

Moreover Sir Cawmell declared that he would by
no means clean his slate as the Earl of Durdans had
counselled.



io Froissart's Modern Chronicles

Now when it was shewed to the Earl of Durdans
what Sir Cawmell de Bannerman had said, he was
sorely vexed.

Quoth he, " I will give Sir Cawmell de Banner-
man a right speedy answer. Let him know that I
am not minded to dwell within the Tabernacle wherein
he is pope, but shall remain outside with my clean
slate, and thereto I will ever stand."

These disputations and differences caused great
discomfort to the Buffs, who were now in more
pitiful case than they had been even herebefore, for
some of the Buffs, with whom, as rumour runneth,
were Sir Henry Asquith, Sir Edward de Grey, and
Sir Henry de Fowler, cried "A Chesterfield." Others
there were who agreed the rather with Sir Cawmell

o

de Bannerman, and these cried " A Leicester," the
chief of whom were Sir Harcourt de Malwood and
Sir John de Morlaix.

But many of the Buffs were vexed greatly, saying
that they were better without leaders than to have
such as disputed so hotly between themselves to the
grievous discomfort and undoing of the party, and to
the great joy of their enemies, the Blues.



Of Metaphors and Harmful Weapons 1 1

Hoiv a certain man of law, Augustine de Birrell, discoursed on the
way of Metaphors and otJier harmful weapons,

You may well understand, as I have before told
you, that I was greatly covetise of knowing the true
original and foundation of all these matters which I
have shewed you, and to that end I sought the
company of a certain Augustine de Birrell, a man of
law, and one of the counsellors of the King. Discreet
he was, and full rich of excellence and of reverence.
He had great knowledge of the affairs of the Buffs,
by whom he was had in honour and esteem. More-
over he excelled in wit as well as wisdom, and was
of a merry countenance and conversation. I had
wondrous pleasure and entertainment of his company,
and when it fell about one day that I encountered
him as we were the both of us riding on the road to
Westminster, I demanded of him to know what were
the true causes of the disputations and contrariousness
between the Earl of Durdans and Sir Cawmell
de Bannerman and the divers parties of the Buffs.

First I asked of him what was the meaning of

o

the slate, the cleaning whereof the Earl of Durdans
had counselled to the vexation of Sir Cawmell de
Bannerman and certain of his followers.

Quoth the man of law, "You must know that
slate is a substance which, if it be rudely handled,



Of Metaphors and Harmful Weapons 13

splitteth into thin sections and cannot in any wise be
made whole again."

T4=ten I demanded of him where this slate might
be found, and what was the nature of the writing
thereon which the Earl of Durdans would have to
be cleaned.

"Of a truth," the man of law answered me, "I
know not if there be any such slate, or ever was."

I had great marvel of this and inquired how a
slate might be cleaned if there were indeed no such
thing. Whereupon the man of law made merry at
my bewilderment, saying that he believed of a surety
the slate and the tabernacle were metaphors, and
could neither be written upon, nor cleaned, nor
dwelt in.

Then he shewed me what manner of thing a
metaphor is.

" It is," quoth he, " a figure of speech
of contrarious and perilous creation, for it ariseth
out of a word that hath been taken away out
of the place to which it pertaineth of right, and is
put where it is not clearly understood and cannot
easily be explained."

Upon this I demanded to know why the leaders
of the Buffs were so sore vexed with one another
about matters which existed not but were only figures
of speech. He answered me, " Of a truth I cannot



14 Froissart's Modern Chronicles

tell you, but certain it is that men are ever minded
to quarrel more fiercely over things that are unreal
than those that are real. And these disputations are
not easy to make an end of, seeing that things
which do not exist cannot in any wise be proved.




THE EARL OF DURDANS PLAVETH AT THE GAME OF METAPHORS.



You may well wonder that men make use of
metaphors, for they are a sore peril to them against
themselves."

I demanded how this might be. The man of
law answered me, " A metaphor is in truth a sort of
a boomerang. This boomerang, you must know, is a



Of Metaphors and Harmful Weapons 15

weapon that certain wild men who dwell in lands on
the other side of the world have great skill in using.
When they throw it in battle it striketh the enemy
and then straightway returneth to him from whom it
departed. Thus the wild man saveth his weapon, but




SIR CAWMELL DE BANNERMAN ALSO PLAYETH AT METAPHORS.

if he be not skilled then the boomerang may chance
to come back and do him grievous hurt. In like
manner, when the leaders of the Buffs would do injury
to others by metaphors, they oftentimes get the greater
hurt themselves by reason of the recoiling back."



1 6 Froissart's Modern Chronicles

All these things which the man of law right
courteously shewed to me I did put in writing,
because I would not forget them. It was a marvel-
lous thing and of poor foundation that this mischief
should be among the Buffs to their undoing, but I
speak thereof as it was done and of the incidents
thereof.

But howbeit the leaders and the divers sections of
the party seemed to be so contrarious one to the
other, of a surety I am minded to think that after all
they did but differ as to how they might agree.



CHAPTER II

Of the opening of the Parliament of England by King Edward the
Seventh ; of the matters debated therein, and hoiv Sir Arthur
de Balfour did cause a change to be made in the manner of
procedure to the end that he and others might play at golf.

IN the year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred
and two, on the sixteenth day of January, on a
Thursday, began a parliament at Westminster holden
by King Edward the Seventh, at which time there
were assembled princes and prelates of the realm of
Britain to a great number, and also dukes, marquesses,
earls, viscounts, barons, and of every shire and town
a certain.

Thus the people assembled at Westminster, there
being present the King and the Queen, and there the
King did make speech to the lords and the commons
shewing what things the government might, could,
would, or should be about to do, if time permitted,

And when he had made an end of speaking the
commoners departed to their places, some to see how
much might be undertaken, and others to consider
how they might hinder them.

c v



1 8 Froissart's Modern Chronicles

Now it is to be remembered that in England the
Blues and the Buffs, albeit they fight fiercely when
they draw out into the country to encounter each
other, for the most part they contend only in disputa-
tions in the parliament house at Westminster. Therein
the Blues sit on the right-hand side of the Lord
High Chancellor, or Sir Speaker as the case may be,
and the Buffs on the left-hand side. But it is
strictly ordained that they shall in no wise, when


1 3 4 5

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