Florence Daniel.

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The Healthy Life Cook Book

by

Florence Daniel

Second Edition

1915



A DELICIOUS PORRIDGE CAN BE MADE BY MIXING

ROBINSON'S "PATENT" GROATS "IN POWDER FORM"

::AND::

ROBINSON'S "PATENT" BARLEY "IN POWDER FORM"

IN EQUAL PROPORTIONS AND PREPARING IN THE USUAL WAY.




Preface


This little book has been compiled by special and repeated request.
Otherwise, I should have hesitated to add to the already existing number
of vegetarian cookery books. It is not addressed to the professional cook,
but to those who find themselves, as I did, confronted with the necessity
of manufacturing economical vegetarian dishes without any previous
experience of cooking. An experienced cook will doubtless find many of the
detailed instructions superfluous.

The original idea was to compile a cookery book for those vegetarians who
are non-users of milk and eggs. But as this would have curtailed the
book's usefulness, especially to vegetarian beginners, the project was
abandoned. At the same time, non-users of milk and eggs will find that
their interests have been especially considered in very many of the
recipes.

All the recipes have been well tested. Many of them I evolved myself after
repeated experiments. Others I obtained from friends. But all of them are
used in my own little household. So that if any reader experiences
difficulty in obtaining the expected results, if she will write to me, at
3, Tudor Street, London, E.C., and enclose a stamped envelope for reply, I
shall be glad to give any assistance in my power.

I desire to record my gratitude here to the friends who have sent me
recipes; to the graduate of the Victoria School of Cookery, who assisted
me with much good advice; to Cassell's large Dictionary of Cookery, from
which I gathered many useful hints; to the _Herald of Health_, which first
published recipes for the Agar-agar Jellies and Wallace Cheese; and to E.
and B. May's Cookery Book, from whence emanates the idea of jam without
sugar. Lastly, I would thank Mrs. Hume, of "Loughtonhurst," Bournemouth,
with whom I have spent several pleasant holidays, and who kindly placed
her menus at my disposal.

FLORENCE DANIEL.




Preface to Second Edition


This little cookery book was originally published for that "straiter" sect
of food-reformers who abstain from the use of salt, yeast, etc. But, owing
to repeated requests from ordinary vegetarians, who find the book useful,
I am now including recipes for yeast bread, cheese dishes, nutmeat dishes,
etc. I have put all these in the chapter entitled "Extra Recipes." To go
to the opposite extreme there is a short chapter for "unfired feeders."
Other new recipes have also been added.

The note _re_ Salads has been borrowed from E.J. Saxon, and the Vegetable
Stew in Casserole Cookery from R. & M. Goring, in _The Healthy Life_.

FLORENCE DANIEL.




_Everyday Fitness_

You want food you can eat every day, knowing that it is bringing you
nearer and nearer to real Fitness, the Fitness which lasts all day, and
survives even Sunday or a Summer Holiday.

'P.R.' Foods are Everyday Foods. They take the place of white bread, and
white flour biscuits, of expensive dairy butter, of sloppy indigestible
porridge, and so on. They are the Foods which keep you fit all the
time - you, and your husband, and the children. They are made along
absolutely scientific lines in a factory which is probably unique
throughout the world. They are the standard of pure food production. Their
daily use is the Direct Route to Fitness All the Time.

You ought to know about them, and try them. Send us *6d.* (P.O. or
stamps), and we will post you a splendid lot of samples and a budget of
practical information. Do it now.

Or we can send you our Special Trial Parcel, comprising all the principal
'P.R.' Products, carriage paid (in U.K.) for *5/-*.

The Wallace 'P.R.' Foods Co., Ltd., 81, Tottenham Lane. Hornsey. London, N.

* * * * *

*The Finest Coffee the World Produces -

'P.R.' COFFEE*

Choicest hill-grown berries, the pick of the world's finest plantations,
roasted by Electric Heat. Result: superb favour and freedom from ill
effects. Ideal for dyspeptics. Strongly recommended by the Author of this
Book. 1-lb. post paid 2/2, or

*Free Sample Canister* (to make 2 cups), from

The Wallace P.R. Foods Co., Ltd., 81, Tottenham Lane, Hornsey,

LONDON, N.

[Illustration]

* * * * *




Contents


I. UNFERMENTED BREAD

II. SOUPS

III. SAVOURY DISHES (AND NUT COOKERY)

IV. CASSEROLE COOKERY

V. CURRIES

VI. VEGETABLES

VII. GRAVIES AND SAUCES

VIII. EGG COOKERY

IX. PASTRY, SWEET PUDDINGS, JELLIES, &c.

X. CAKES AND BISCUITS

XI. JAM, MARMALADE, ETC.

XII. SALADS, BEVERAGES, ETC.

XIII. EXTRA RECIPES

XIV. UNFIRED FOOD

XV. WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, AND UTENSILS

XVI. MENUS, ETC.

INDEX

* * * * *

_HEALTHY LIFE BOOKLETS

Bound in Art Vellum. 1 s. net each._

1. THE LEAGUE AGAINST HEALTH. By Arnold Eiloart, B.Sc., Ph.D.

2. FOOD REMEDIES. By Florence Daniel.

3. INSTEAD OF DRUGS. By Arnold Eiloart, B.Sc., Ph.D.

4. THE HEALTHY LIFE COOK BOOK. By Florence Daniel.

5. NATURE VERSUS MEDICINE. By Arnold Eiloart, B.Sc., Ph.D.

6. DISTILLED WATER. By Florence Daniel.

7. CONSUMPTION DOOMED. By Dr. Paul Carton.

8. NO PLANT DISEASE. By Arnold Eiloart, B.Sc., Ph.D.

9. RHEUMATISM AND ALLIED AILMENTS. By Dr. H. Valentine Knaggs.

10. RIGHT DIET FOR CHILDREN. By Edgar J. Saxon.

11. SOME POPULAR FOOD STUFFS EXPOSED. By Dr. Paul Carton.

12. UNFIRED FOOD IN PRACTICE. By Stanley Gibbon.

13. THE TRUTH ABOUT SUGAR. By Dr. H. Valentine Knaggs.

14. HOW THE MIND HEALS AND WHY. By Florence Daniel.

15. OSTEOPATHY. By Florence Daniel.

16. A NEW SUGGESTION TREATMENT. By Dr. Stenson Hooker

17. HEALTH THROUGH BREATHING. By Olgar Lazarus.

18. WHAT TO EAT AND HOW MUCH. By Florence Daniel.

_Nos. 14, 15 and 18 are in preparation_.

LONDON: C. W. DANIEL, LTD., Graham House, Tudor Street, E.C.

* * * * *




I. - UNFERMENTED BREAD.


1. COLD WATER BREAD.

1-1/4 lb. fine wholemeal flour to 3/4 pint water.

Put the meal into a basin, add the water gradually, and mix with a clean,
cool hand. (Bread, pastry, etc., mixed with a spoon, especially of metal,
will not be so light as that mixed with a light cool hand.) Knead lightly
for 20 minutes. (A little more flour may be required while kneading, as
some brands of meal do not absorb so much water as others, but do not add
more than is absolutely necessary to prevent the fingers sticking.) Put
the dough on to a floured board and divide into four round loaves. Prick
with a fork on top.

The colder the water used, the lighter the bread, and if the mixing be
done by an open window so much the better, for unfermented bread is
air-raised. Distilled or clean boiled rain-water makes the lightest bread.
But it should be poured backwards and forwards from one jug to another
several times, in order to aerate it.

_Another method_ of mixing is the following: - Put the water into the basin
first and stir the meal quickly into it with a spatula or wooden spoon.
When it gets too stiff to be stirred, add the rest of the meal. Knead for
two minutes, and shape into loaves as above.

BAKING. - Bake on the bare oven shelf, floored. If possible have a few
holes bored in the shelf. This is not absolutely necessary, but any tinker
or ironmonger will perforate your shelf for a few pence. Better still are
wire shelves, like sieves. (This does not apply to gas ovens.)

Start with a hot oven, but not too hot. To test, sprinkle a teaspoonful of
flour in a patty pan, and put in the oven for five minutes. At the end of
that time, if the flour is a light golden-brown colour, the oven is right.
Now put in the bread and keep the heat of the oven well up for half an
hour. At the end of this time turn the loaves. Now bake for another hour,
but do not make up the fire again. Let the oven get slightly cooler. The
same result may perhaps be obtained by moving to a cooler shelf. It all
depends on the oven. But always start with a hot oven, and after the first
half hour let the oven get cooler.

Always remember, that the larger the loaves the slower must be the baking,
otherwise they will be overdone on the outside and underdone in the middle.

Do not open the oven door oftener than absolutely necessary.

If a gas oven is used the bread must be baked on a baking sheet placed on
a sand tin. A sand tin is the ordinary square or oblong baking tin,
generally supplied with gas stoves, filled with silver sand. A baking
sheet is simply a piece of sheet-iron, a size smaller than the oven
shelves, so that the heat may pass up and round it. Any ironmonger will
cut one to size for a few pence. Do not forget to place a vessel of water
(hot) in the bottom of the oven. This is always necessary in a gas oven
when baking bread, cakes or pastry.

It must not be forgotten that ovens are like children they need
understanding. The temperature of the kitchen and the oven's nearness to a
window or door will often make a difference of five or ten minutes in the
time needed for baking. One gas oven that I knew never baked well in
winter unless a screen was put before it to keep away draughts!

ROLLS. - If you desire to get your bread more quickly it is only a question
of making smaller loaves. Little rolls may be cut out with a large egg-cup
or small pastry cutter, and these take any time from twenty minutes to
half an hour.


2. EGG BREAD.

9 ozs. fine wholemeal, 1 egg, a bare 1/2 pint milk and water, butter size
of walnut.

Put butter in a qr. qtn. tin (a small square-cornered tin price 6-1/2d. at
most ironmongers) and let it remain in hot oven until it boils. Well whisk
egg, and add to it the milk and water. Sift into this liquid the
wholemeal, stirring all the time. Pour this batter into the hot buttered
tin. Bake in a very hot oven for 50 minutes, then move to a cooler part
for another 50 minutes. When done, turn out and stand on end to cool.


3. GEM BREAD.

Put into a basin a pint of cold water, and beat it for a few minutes in
order to aerate it as much as possible. Stir gently, but quickly, into
this as much fine wholemeal as will make a batter the consistency of thick
cream. It should just drop off the spoon. Drop this batter into very hot
greased gem pans. Bake for half an hour in a hot oven. When done, stand on
end to cool. They may appear to be a little hard on first taking out of
the oven, but when cool they should be soft, light and spongy. When
properly made, the uninitiated generally refuse to believe that they do
not contain eggs or baking-powder.

There are proper gem pans, made of cast iron (from 1s.) for baking this
bread, and the best results are obtained by using them. But with a
favourable oven I have got pretty good results from the ordinary
baking-tins with depressions, the kind used for baking small cakes. But
these are a thinner make and apt to produce a tough crust.


4. HOT WATER ROLLS.

This bread has a very sweet taste. It is made by stirring boiling water
into any quantity of meal required, sufficient to form a stiff paste. Then
take out of the basin on to a board and knead quickly with as much more
flour as is needed to make it workable. Cut it into small rolls with a
large egg-cup or small vegetable cutter. The quicker this is done the
better, in order to retain the heat of the water. Bake from 20 to 30
minutes.


5. OATCAKE.

Mix medium oatmeal to a stiff paste with cold water. Add enough fine
oatmeal to make a dough. Roll out very thinly. Bake in sheets, or cut into
biscuits with a tumbler or biscuit cutter. Bake on the bare oven shelf,
sprinkled with fine oatmeal, until a very pale brown. Flour may be used in
place of the fine oatmeal, as the latter often has a bitter taste that
many people object to. The cause of this bitterness is staleness, but it
is not so noticeable in the coarse or medium oatmeal. Freshly ground
oatmeal is quite sweet.


6. RAISIN LOAF.

1 lb. fine wholemeal, 6 oz. raisins, 2 oz. Mapleton's nutter, water.

Well wash the raisins, but do not stone them or the loaf will be heavy. If
the stones are disliked, seedless raisins, or even sultanas, may be used,
but the large raisins give rather better results. Rub the nutter into the
flour, add the raisins, which should be well dried after washing, and mix
with enough water to form a dough which almost, but not quite drops from
the spoon. Put into a greased tin, which should be very hot, and bake in a
hot oven at first. At the end of twenty minutes to half an hour the loaf
should be slightly browned. Then move to a cooler shelf, and bake until
done. Test with a knife as for ordinary cakes.

For this loaf a small, deep, square-cornered tin is required (price
6-1/2d.), the same as for the egg loaf. 3 ozs. fresh dairy butter may be
used in place of the 2 ozs. nutter.


7. SHORTENED BREAD.

Into 1 lb. wholemeal flour rub 4 ozs. nutter or 5 ozs. butter. Mix to a
stiff dough with cold water. Knead lightly but well. Shape into small buns
about 1 inch thick. Bake for an hour in a moderate oven.




II. - SOUPS.


Soups are of three kinds - clear soups, thick soups, and purées. A clear
soup is made by boiling fruit or vegetables (celery, for example) until
all the nourishment is extracted, and then straining off the clear liquid.
A little sago or macaroni is generally added and cooked in this. When
carrots and turnips are used, a few small pieces are cut into dice or
fancy shapes, cooked separately, and added to the strained soup. Thick
soups always include some farinaceous ingredients for thickening (flour,
pea-flour, potato, etc.). Purées are thick soups composed of any vegetable
or vegetables boiled and rubbed through a sieve. This is done, a little at
a time, with a wooden spoon. A little of the hot liquor is added to the
vegetable from time to time to assist it through.


1. BARLEY BROTH.

1 carrot, 1 turnip, 4 leeks or 3 small onions, 4 sprigs parsley, 4 sticks
celery, 1 tea-cup pearl barley, 3 qts. water. (The celery may be omitted
if desired, or, when in season, 1 tea-cup green peas may be substituted.)

Scrub clean (but do not peel) the carrot and turnip. Wash celery, parsley,
and barley. Shred all the vegetables finely; put in saucepan with the
water. Bring to the boil and slowly simmer for 5 hours. Add the chopped
parsley and serve.


2. CREAM OF BARLEY SOUP.

Make barley broth as in No. 1. Then strain it through a wire strainer.
Squeeze it well, so as to get the soup as thick as possible, but do not
rub the barley through. Skin 1/2 lb. tomatoes, break in halves, and cook
to a pulp very gently in a closed saucepan (don't add water). Add to the
barley soup, boil up once, and serve.

In cases of illness, especially where the patient is suffering from
intestinal trouble, after preparing as above, strain through a fine
muslin. It should also be prepared with distilled, or clean boiled
rain-water.


3. CLEAR CELERY SOUP.

1 head celery, 2 tablespoons sago, 2 qts. water.

Wash the celery, chop into small pieces, and stew in the water for 2
hours. Strain. Wash the sago, add it to the clear liquid, and cook for 1
hour.

For those who prefer a thick soup, pea-flour may be added. Allow 1 level
tablespoon to each pint of soup. Mix with a little cold water, and add to
the boiling soup. One or two onions may also be cooked with the celery, if
liked.


4. CHESTNUT SOUP.

1 lb. chestnuts, 1-1/2 oz. nutter or butter, 2 tablespoons chopped
parsley, 1 tablespoon wholemeal flour, 1-1/2 pints water.

First put on the chestnuts (without shelling or pricking) in cold water,
and boil for an hour. Then remove shells and put the nuts in an enamelled
saucepan with the fat. Fry for 10 minutes. Add the flour gradually,
stirring all the time, then add the water. Cook gently for half an hour.
Lastly, add the parsley, boil up, and serve.

It is rather nicer if the flour is omitted, the necessary thickness being
obtained by rubbing the soup through a sieve before adding the parsley.
Those who do not object to milk may use 1 pint milk and 1 pint water in
place of the 1-1/2 pints water.


5. FRUIT SOUP.

Fruit soups are used extensively abroad, although not much heard of in
England. But they might be taken at breakfast with advantage by those
vegetarians who have given up the use of tea, coffee and cocoa, and object
to, or dislike, milk. The recipe given here is for apple soup, but pears,
plums, etc., may be cooked in exactly the same way.

1 lb. apples, 1 qt. water, sugar and flavouring, 1 tablespoon sago.

Wash the apples and cut into quarters, but do not peel or core. Put into a
saucepan with the water and sugar and flavouring to taste. When sweet,
ripe apples can be obtained, people with natural tastes will prefer no
addition of any kind. Otherwise, a little cinnamon, cloves, or the yellow
part of lemon rind may be added. Stew until the apples are soft. Strain
through a sieve, rubbing the apple pulp through, but leaving cores, etc.,
behind. Wash the sago, add to the strained soup, and boil gently for 1
hour. Stir now and then, as the sago is apt to stick to the pan.


6. HARICOT BEAN SOUP.

2 heaped breakfast-cups beans, 2 qts. water, 3 tablespoons chopped parsley
or 1/2 lb. tomatoes, nut or dairy butter size of walnut, 1 tablespoon
lemon juice.

For this soup use the small white or brown haricots. Soak overnight in 1
qt. of the water. In the morning add the rest of the water, and boil until
soft. It may then be rubbed through a sieve, but this is not imperative.
Add the chopped parsley, the lemon juice, and the butter. Boil up and
serve. If tomato pulp is preferred for flavouring instead of parsley, skin
the tomatoes and cook slowly to pulp (without water) before adding.


7. LENTIL SOUP.

4 breakfast-cups lentils, 1 carrot, 1 turnip, 2 onions, 4 qts. water, 4
sticks celery, 2 teaspoons herb powder, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 oz.
butter.

Either the red, Egyptian lentils, or the green German lentils may be used
for this soup. If the latter, soak overnight. Stew the lentils very gently
in the water for 2 hours, taking off any scum that rises. Well wash the
vegetables, slice them, and add to the soup. Stew for 2 hours more. Then
rub through a sieve, or not, as preferred. Add the lemon juice, herb
powder, and butter (nut or dairy), and serve.


8. MACARONI SOUP.

1/2 lb. small macaroni, 2 qts. water or vegetable stock, 3/4 lb. onions or
1 lb. tomatoes.

Break the macaroni into small pieces and add to the stock when nearly
boiling. Cook with the lid off the saucepan until the macaroni is swollen
and very tender. (This will take about an hour.) If onions are used for
flavouring, steam separately until tender, and add to soup just before
serving. If tomatoes are used, skin and cook slowly to pulp (without
water) before adding. If the vegetable stock is already strong and
well-flavoured, no addition of any kind will be needed.


9. PEA SOUP.

Use split peas, soak overnight, and prepare according to recipe given for
lentil soup.


10. POTATO SOUP.

Peel thinly 2 lbs. potatoes. (A floury kind should be used for this soup.)
Cut into small pieces, and put into a saucepan with enough water to cover
them. Add three large onions (sliced), unless tomatoes are preferred for
flavouring. Bring to the boil, then simmer until the potatoes are cooked
to a mash. Rub through a sieve or beat with a fork. Now add 3/4 pint water
or 1 pint milk, and a little nutmeg if liked. Boil up and serve.

If the milk is omitted, the juice and pulp of two or three tomatoes may be
added, and the onions may be left out also.


11. P.R. SOUP.

1 head celery, 4 large tomatoes, 4 qts. water, 4 large English onions, 3
tablespoons coarsely chopped parsley.

This soup figures often in the diet sheet of the Physical Regenerationists
for gouty and rheumatic patients, but in addition to being a valuable
medicine on account of its salts, it is the most delicious clear soup that
I know of. To make: chop the ingredients to dice, cover closely, and
simmer until the quantity of liquid is reduced to one half.


12. P.R. BEEF TEA SUBSTITUTE.

1/4 pint pearl barley, 1/4 pint red lentils, 2 qts. cold bran water,
flavouring.

To make the bran water, boil 1 measure of bran with 4 measures of water
for not less than 30 minutes. Simmer together the barley, lentils, and
bran water for 3 hours. To flavour, put 4 ozs. butter or 3 ozs. nutter
into a pan with 1 lb. sliced onions. Shake over fire until brown, but do
not let them burn or the flavour of the soup will be spoilt. Add these to
the stock at the end of the first hour. Any other vegetable liked may be
chopped to dice and added.

Tomato may be substituted for the onion if preferred and no fat used.
Strain through a hair sieve, and serve the clear liquid after boiling up.


13. SAGO SOUP.

6 ozs. sago, 2 qts. stock, juice of 1 lemon.

Wash the sago and soak it for 1 hour. Put it in a saucepan with the lemon
juice and stock, and stew for 1 hour.


14. TOMATO SOUP.

1 qt. water or white stock, 1 lb. tomatoes.

Slice the tomatoes, and simmer very gently in the water until tender. Rub
through a sieve. Boil up and serve.


15. VEGETABLE STOCK.

To 4 qts. water allow 1 pint lentils, or rather less than 1 pint haricots.
In addition allow 1 carrot, 1 turnip, 1 onion, and 1/4 head of celery.
Clean apple peelings and cores, and any fresh vegetable cuttings may also
be added with advantage. For white stock, use the white haricot beans,
rice, or macaroni in place of lentils or brown haricots. Soak the pulse
overnight, and simmer with the vegetables for 4 hours. Any stock not used
should be emptied out of the stock pot, and boiled up afresh each day.




III. - SAVOURY DISHES.


The recipes following are intended to be used as substitutes for meat,
fish, etc.

The body needs for its sustenance water, mineral salts, [Footnote: I
allude to mineral salts as found in the vegetable kingdom, not to the
manufactured salts, like the ordinary table salt, etc., which are simply
poisons when taken as food.] fats and oils, carbo-hydrates (starch and
sugar), and proteids (the flesh and muscle-forming elements). All
vegetable foods (in their natural state) contain all these elements, and,
at a pinch, human life might be supported on any one of them. I say "at a
pinch" because if the nuts, cereals and pulses were ruled out of the
dietary, it would, for most people, be deficient in fat and proteid.
Wholewheat, according to a physiologist whose work is one of the standard
books on the subject, is a perfectly-proportioned, complete food. Hence it
is possible to live entirely on good bread and water.

Nuts are the best substitute for flesh meat. Next in order come the
pulses. After these come wholewheat and unpolished rice. Both nuts and
pulses contain, like flesh meat, a large quantity of proteid in a
concentrated form. No one needs more than 1/4 lb. per day, at most, of
either. (Eggs, of course, are a good meat substitute, so far as the
percentage of proteid is concerned.)


1. ALMONDS, ROASTED.

Take any quantity of shelled almonds and blanch by pouring boiling water
on them. The skins can then be easily removed. Lay the blanched almonds on
a tin, and bake to a pale yellow colour. On no account let them brown, as
this develops irritating properties. To be eaten with vegetable stews and
pies. (That is, with any stew or pie which contains neither nuts nor
pulse.)


2. CHESTNUTS, BOILED.

An excellent dish for children and persons with weak digestive powers. The
chestnuts need not be peeled or pricked, but merely well covered with cold
water and brought to the boil, after which they should boil for a good
half hour. Drain off the water and serve hot. They may also be boiled,
peeled, mashed and eaten with hot milk.


3. CHESTNUT SAVOURY.

Boil for 15 minutes. Shell. Fry in a very little nut fat for 10 minutes.
Barely cover with water, and stew gently until tender. When done, add some
chopped parsley and thicken with chestnut flour or fine wholemeal. For
those who prefer it, milk and dairy butter may be substituted for the
water and nut fat.


4. CHESTNUT PIE.

1 lb. chestnuts, 1/2 lb. tomatoes, short crust.

Boil the chestnuts for half an hour. Shell. Skin the tomatoes and cut in
slices. Well grease a small pie-dish, put in the chestnuts and tomatoes in


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Online LibraryFlorence DanielThe Healthy Life Cook Book, 2d ed → online text (page 1 of 6)