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Notes and queries: Chiefly relating to Interior Pennsylvania, Volume 2 online

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Vol. H. No. %.



NOTES and QUERIES



HISTORICAL,
BIOGRAPHICAL m GENEALOGICAL,



EDITED BY



WILLIAM H. EGLE, M. D., M. A.



j



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. . TOTES m QUERIES:

[ HISTORICAL,

'. BIOGRAPHICAL ^GENEALOGICAL:



CHIFFLY RELATING TO



INTERIOR PENNSYLVANIA.



EDITED BY



WILLIAM HENRY EGLE, M. D., M. A.



THIRD SERIES.
Vol. II.



HARRISBURG, PA.:

HARRISBURG PUBLISHING COMPANY
1 89I.



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NOTES and QUERIES

HISTORICAL,
BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL.



Vol. II.



1887.



No. 1.



MOTES AMD QUJCB11S8.
Historical, Biographical and Geoaalogteal.



CXLVII.



"Raftimg Fifty Teabs Ago" is the
title of a series of napers published in the
Bath (N. Y.) Ptaindealer. They are
compiled from notes made by the author,
A. J. McCall, Esq , of Bath, in 1838. of a
voyage from Painted Post to Port De-
posit, on the Susquehanna. They are of
exceeding interest and Mr. McCall has
done well in thus giving these reminis-
cences of an almost forgotten occupation
in Pennsylvania.

HI8TOKT of toe Mennonites —We
learn from the Nicetown (Pa.) Signal
that Mr. D. K. Cassel, of Philadelphia,
has in preparation a history of the fol-
lowers of Menno Simon in Pennsylvania.
Among the topics treated might be men**
tiooed the following: Baptism in the
early centuries; the Mennonite meetings
in German town from 1683 down; the
names of the subscribers to the building
of the first Mennonite church In 1708, and
also those who subscribed for the rebuild
ing of the edifice in 1770; sketches of old
meeting houses; history of the Memo
nites of Virginia, Missouri and adjacent
States and Territories, and genealogical
matters connected with many of the
families of German town and vicinity, in-
cluding the Kolbs (now Kulp), Ritten-
houses, Key sere, Cassels and others We
hope that Mr. Cassell will extend his
work so as to give such records of mar-
riages and burials as he may be able to
secure. In this way bis work could be
made available for genealogical purposes.

TBI LO88 OF TBB LUZSRNK.

It is known to but few persons that ef-
forts at ship building were made on the



Susquehanna. During the war of 1812,
the excitement was at fever height, and
the patriotism of the people exceeded
Revolutionary times, save in a few sec-
tions where the war was denounced.
"Brittannia ruled the waves" then as
now, but her navy was her most vulner-
able part At this juncture large vessels
were constructed on the Ohio and Alle-
gheny, floated down the Mississippi to
New Orleans, where they were properly
equipped and manned ready for sea. We
are reminded of these facts in our his*
tory by the Reminiscences of Mr. D.
Yarrington in a recent number of the
WilKe8>Barre Record of the Times.
Speaking of his early recollections of
Wilkes Barrre, he says:

"During the war of 1812 the great ship
Luzerne was built on the river bank in
front of John W. Robinson's stone house.
I saw the launch. A thousand or more
people were present. The war spirit was
rampant at that time, and the people of
our town expected that the noble Luzerne
was going to assist in bringing the "Flag
of Great Britain" down. A few days
after the launch a t ufficient flood arose
and the ship was manned and started
down the river towards the ocean, but in
passing the Falls of Conewaga. she ran
on the rocks and lay there till the ice in
the river broke up next spring, when she
was totally destroyed."

What is known of this vessel's run on
the Susquehanna? There ought to be a
record somewhere. Can any of our read •
era give us light ?

TUB WORD "SUSQUBHANNA."
Its [Btymology Aaeordtog to Heckawaldar.

The Bsnnsyhania Magazine of History
and Biography for April publishes this
note:

Heckewelder, in his "Indian Names of
Rivers, Creeks and other Noted Places in



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Pennsylvania, together with their mean-
ing* &c, (original MS., Hist. Soc. Pa.)
states: ' 'The Indian, (Lenape) distinguish
the River which we call Susquehanna
thus: The North Branch they call
Mchwewamisipu, or to shorten it to'chwe*
wormink, from which we have made it
Wyoming. This word implies: th$ River
on which are extensive clear Flats. The
Six Nations, according to Py rise us [Mo-
ravian missionary] call it Qoh&nta, which
hath the same meaning.

"The West Branch they call Quenii-
chaehachgekhanne, but to shorten it they
say Qusnischachachki. The word implies:
the River which has the long reaches or
straight courses in it.

"From the lorks, where now the town of
Northumberland stands, downwards, they
have a name (this word I have lost)
which implies: the Great Bay River The
word 8usquebanna, properly Bisque-
hanne, from 8uku for mud, and hanne t a
stream, was probably at an early time of
the settling of this country, overheard by
some white person while tb* Indians
were at the time of a flood or freshet re-
marking: JuM Achtisquehanne or Bisque
hanne % which is: how muddy the stream is,
and therefore taken as the proper name
of the river. Any stream that has bes
come muddy, will at the time it is so, be
called Bisquehanna"

Recently the etymology of this stream
has been the cause of considerable con-
troversy. Possibly Heckewelder is cor*
rect, but his authority has been denied by
several who have made Indian names a
study. As the centuries recede, however,
our only recourse is to those who like
Heckewelder and others have left a rec-
ord of their studies in aboriginal nomen-
clature.



AM ANTI-MA8UNIO CALL.

[The following call for an Anti Masonic
Convention in 1885 is well worth re-
producing in Notes and Queries. It is a
portion of the record of that infamous
crusade which fifty and more years ago
defaced the proud escutcheon of our State
founded upon the spirit of tolerance. Of
the signers to this call, but one survives,
the venerable Samuel Shoch, a native of



Harrisburg, but for almost half a century
a resident of Columbia:]

Democratic Anti-Masonic State Conven-
tion. To meet at Harrisburg on Mon-
day, the ll&h day of December next, at
10 o'clock A. M.

In obedience to the direction of the
Democratic Anti-Masonic State Convene
tion of the 4th of March last, we do
hereby respectfully recommend a Demo*
cratic Anti- Masonic State Convention to
meet in the Court House, at Harrisburg,
on Monday, the 14th day of December
next, at 10 o'clock A M., to elect dele*
gates to the National Convention — to se-
lect Electors of President and Vice Presi*
dent of the United States, if deemed ad-
visable, and to propose and concert, with
the Anti Masonic party of other States,
the time and place of holding a National
Convention; and also to adopt such other
measures as shall be deemed best for the
promotion of the cause of Anti -Masonry
and the general welfare.

For the purpose ot electing delegates
to the State Convention, not exceeding in
number the Representatives in both
Houses of the General Assembly, the re-
spective Anti-Masonic County Commit-
tees are requested to call, at an early day,
County Conventions, or, if preferred,
County Meetings, ol the Democratic
citizens opposed to Freemasonry and all
other Secret Societies.

Joseph Wallace,
Samuel Sboch,
George W. Harris,
Francis Park 4,
Wm W. Jrwin,
Zbphaniah M'Lenegan,
Samuel Shouse,
John H. Ewing,
Chester Butler,
Harrisburg, Oct 21, 1885.

DAUPHIN COUNTY 8BTTLKB8 OH
LAEK JCRIlfi.

[Mr. Russell, of Erie, a few years ago

Sublished some interesting scraps of local
lstory. In writing of the early settle-
ments of the "Triangle," as Brie county
was then called, he says:]

The New England Yankees, as the
Reeds, Colt, Strong, Judson, Marvins,
Russells, and the Irish, headed by Wil*



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Ham Miles, the Blacks, Eings, Smiths,
Wilson, Lowrys, and others, were the
original founders of Erie county, and
made the first settlements and locations.
The Germans, always slow, did not dare
to go so far in the woods until some one
else had gone first The first Pennsyl-
vania German who penetrated these wilds
was Jacob Weis, from Dauphin county,
who came under the patronage of Colonel
Thomas Forater, who was agent for the
Harrisburg and Preequ* Isle Land Oom-

Croy, in 1797, to assist erecting and starts
g a set of mills at the mouth of Walnut
creek, in Fairview township, which he
faithfully did, and got the mills in opera*
tkm and made them successful. Jacob
then, with John McParland, a brother in
law of Colonel Forster, selected lands in
the southwest corner of Millcreek town-
ship, and spent their days there.

In 1800 George Baehler, from Dauphin
now Lebanon county, located la Erie,
was a man of business here until 1811,
and then removed to Hairisburg, and
died there in 1816.

In 1801 Christian and Jacob Ebersole,
from Lancaster county, with their fami-
lies, came here in search of homes. Jacob
located in Fairview and resided there un-
til 1810, when he sold out and removed to
Ohio. Christian Ebersole located in East
Millcreek, made a most excellent farm
out of the forests, and died there in 1835,
leaving a family of most excellent and
industrious citizens, who have ever main-
tained the reputation of strict integrity.
One son still lives with his sons in flar
borcreek. Por hoieety, industry, and
all tba*. goes to make good citizens, they
have ever been proverbial, and would
make property if tbey were put in a hoi*
low log topped up at both ends — if you
did not set it on fire.

The spring of 1802 had another addi-
tion in the person of John Riblet, 3r.,and
family, and John Zuck and family, from
Hagerstown, Md. They stlected good
lands for themselves and sons near Erie,
and they and their descendants have ever
maintained good homes on those grounds.
Two years later Conrad and George
Brown, and families, arrived and located,
and have been citizens ot Erie county
ever since, their families being still
among us. All of the above names and



people have done much to clear up the
forests and to advance the prosperity of
the county, and in looking over those
names it is a difficult matter to say if any
one has ever been guilty of breaking the
laws of the land, failed to pay his just
debts, or ever troubled the courts or jails.
These farmers and their descendants have
been a great addition to the wealth and
capital of our county, and such people
will always be successful. Their industry
has been rewarded with the good farms
and good homes to this day occupied by
them.

The-yeare 1805 and 1806 had another
addition in the persons of the Stoughs,
Zimmermanns and Ereiders, with large
families, who all took up lands and
made large improvements, but the Erei-
ders remained but a few years and left;
the others spent their lives h°re. In
1828 new additions were the 8banks,
Brennemann, Oxer, Haidlers and Mohrs,
and the next two years the Messrs.
Charles Ereider, Fickinger, and in 1831
Martin Warfel and family. In 1832 the
Wolf family, Hersheys, &c.

All these came here with money, and
judiciously invested it in our best Iannis g
lands, and made themselves permanent
homes. As farmers and citizens they
could not be excelled, and they have
added vastly to the improvement and
wealth of our county. Por the past
thirty years but very few of that nation-
ality have come in and located here, most
having gone to the Western prairie
country. But those names steady

given, and the Bntts, Gingrichs, Euhls,
hlwilers, Preys, Berets, Ripley s, &c,
have made some of our most successful
farmers and business men and capitalists
in the city and county. The original
stock has nearly all passed away, and lett
their families and successors in good cir-
cumstances, with unspotted reputations
for honesty, industry and good luoral
principles. And when we look back to
the first settlers, and consider the differ-
ent nationalities, we must have a great
respect for the Pennsylvania German
population of our county.

[In this connection, it would be well if
those interested in genealogy would, by
correspondence, secure what information
they can relating to these people of the



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same surname, who went out from this
locality sixty to eighty years ago. ]

CONTRIBUTIONS TO rBNKSYLVAHIA
BIOGRAPHY.



[We propose, from time to time, gath-
ering op all biographical data concerning
the more prominent Pennsylvania^ of
the long ago, especially those identified
with the early history of our State. Un-
der each sketch will be placed the initials
of those furnishing the same ]
Edmonds, William.

William Edmonds was born 24th Oo*
tober, 1708, at Col ford, Gloucestershire,
O. E. His father was a merchant, and
the family attached to the Established
Church. In his youth he learned f kin-
dressing in Monmouth. He immigrated
in 1736 to America, established himself
in business in New York, and in 1789
married Rebecca de Beauvoise, a French
Huguenot. She bore him four children
and died in 1749. Having united with
the Moravian congregation in New York
as early as 1741, after the death of his
wife be removed to Bethlehem. On 31st
March, 1755, he married Margaret, daugh-
ter of Henry and Eve An*hony, of New
York, who was born in 1721. In Octo-
ber of that year he was elected to the As*
sembly from Northampon county. In
1763 he removed to the neighborhood of
Nazareth, where be conducted a store,
and in 1772 took charge of the store opened
in that village. Here he died 15th Sep-
tember, 1186 His wife died in 1773 and
left one child, a daughter, Judith.

j. w. J.
Brockden, Charles.

Charles Brockden's name and auto*
graph are familiar to every student of the
early deed history of Pennsylvania, as
the lormer is endorsed on all patents cf
confirmation that were issued from the
Land Office in the interval between 1715
and 1767. He was born 3d April, 1688,
in the Parish of St. Andrew, London, O.
E., his parents beipg members of the
Established Church. After finishing his
education he was entered in an attorney's
office, who was disaffected to the reign-
ing monarch, William III. While pur-
suing his studies he accidentally over-



heard a conversation between his em-
ployer and a number of other persons,
in which a plot against the Government
was broached. At the close of the con-
ference young Brockdcn was discovered,
and a number urged that he be put to
death; but upon the representation of his
employer, that he was of too feeble in-
tellectual capacity to make use of his
knowledge, his lite was spared. It was
then decided that he should be sent out
of the country, but this project was not
executed until sometime after, when some
circumstances had re excited the fears of
the conspiiators. He was sent to Phila-
delphia in 1706 and placed in the office of
Thomas Story, the Penns' first Keeper
of the Great Seal and Master of the Rolls.
On Story's retiring from office in 1715,
Brockden succeeded him and continued
therein until September of 1767, when
the infirmities of old age rendered his
further incumbency unsatisfactory to
Governor John Penn, and he was re-
moved. Official relations with Count
Zinzendorfif, in 1742, proved the means of
bis attachment to the Moravians, and in
March ot 1743 he united with their con*
gregation on Race street. For upwards
of twenty years he approved himself an
eminently useful as well as devoted mem-
ber of that body.

From a letter of Bishop J. C. F. Cam*
merhofi to Zinzendorft, the following
anecdote is taken: • 'Recently while
Brother Brockden was visiting Brother
Reinke [pastor of the Moravian congre-
gation] Rev. [George] Wbitefleld came
in, and in the course of the conversation
Wbitefleld said to Brockden, *I perceive
you are urging me to unite with the
Moravians.' 'You are right,' replied
Brockden, 'I wish you were a Moravian,
not that I think it would add the weight
of one grain to their cause, but you
would find some rest and repose, which
in your present situation is impossible.
I pity you indeed, for you remind me of
those birds of the Malacca Islands which
being destitute of feet are forced to be al-
ways on the wing.' "

Brockden was twice married. His
first wife, Susan Fox, died in May, 1747,
and although professedly belonging to
the Society of Friends, was, in accord-
ance with her request, buried on her hus-



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band's farm. Fire of bit children by bis
second wife, Mary Lisle, were baptised
by Moravian clergymen — John, in Au-
gust of 1749; he died August 1756.
Charles, in September 1751; Mary, in
September 1752; Richard, in 1754, he
died July 1756; and John, in September
1756. A daughter by his first wife was
married in 1768 to Thomas Patterson.
Charles Brockden died 90th October 1769,
at his country seat '•Hospitality" near
Camden, and was buried in his family
burial ground. Charles Brockden Brown,
the novelist, {See Bgle'e tmn'a Genealo~
jriee, p. S26.) born January 1771, died
February 1810, was a grandson.

j. w. J.



BL.UB8TON'S LICENSES.

The Quit Rents paid to the Penns
were entirely devoted to the purchase of
presents for the Indians. Herewith I
have copied a letter written by Benjamin
Chambers to James Tilghman, Esq , sec-
retary ot the land office, which gives
some inside history into the character of
its author, and the reason he came into
possession ot the land at "Falling- water."

8ib: The Service done by Benjamin
Chambers for which the Honorable
Thomas Penn was pleased to give me
that tract of Land on Seder 8pring in
the Manor of Louder, on the west side
ot the Susquahannah, was for my going
one of the Principal Persons to turn off
Crisop [1J and Lord Baltimore's sur-
veyors, who were chaining up the River
Side on John Wright's Land, with a
Possey of men not Less than Thirty
that Crisop had with him, which Party
we ordered to take up tneir Cum pas and
Begon, or we would Breake it and make
them Begon to their cost, or word to that
Purpose; whereupon the went off on
tight. I also went one ot a party under
the command of Samuel Smith then
high Shiriff of Lancaster County to take
Crisop, and when he had gone pri-
vateley as near his Home as the
Bushes would permit, and daylight
Being feairly Brook, the Sheriff
thought as we seen some of them up that
it would not be rife* for us to storm his



house, least he should shoot some ot us
before we could get a hold of him, so he
ordered us to withdraw at that time,
which we did. Some time after Mr.
Wrignt and Mr. Samuel Blunstone had
an account that a general muster was ap
pointed at CUonelTligbey 's [2.], in order
to draught a large number of the Melisha
to go up to Cadores and Coneydeuhela
Settlement to Disstrain for Levies that
the were pleased to charge the Inhabi
tants there on which Account I was
chosen to go a Spy to Bring an account
of their proceedings. I went down the
East side of Susquahannah, and crossed
at Rock Run Ferrey [3 ], and went to
the muster in quest ot my Servent who
was seaf at home; but soon after I went
into the Company I was told that Crisop
had been there that Morning and was
gon down to Colonel Hairs to
meet the Governer of Maryland,
who was to come to the muster that day
to give his orders against Pennsylvania.
On heairing that Crisop was to com with
the Governer, as he knew me well, I knew
my doom was to go to Goal for Stoping
bis Lordship's Surveyors I allso thought
1 must be gone before the Governer and
Crisop came, and after Bnquiering after
my Servent I went to my Horse and to
Lead him to a pair of Bars before I could
mount. Rigbey seeing me about to go
sent men to bring me to him; he asked
me where I lived, I told him at the
Fawlling Spring [4] on Cannogogige in
Lancaster County, as it was then; he asked
me what I was after; I told him my ser-
vent that had Run avray. He asked me
when I left home, I told this day eight
days; he Replyed you Ride a good Horse
why were you so long on the Rode; £
told on my business I had to
Inquire at Every one I
met and to Advertise at every
public place, which detained me. He
asked me where I lodged the first Night,
again the second, which Learned me that
I must mak my Lodgings and the days
that I had taken to comu there; again he
asked me where I Lodged the last Knight,
I told him the Gentleman's House, and
that he came to the muster with me; he
sent for the man to Inquire if I had
Lodged there, be Replyed I had, which
was one sentence of truth proved in my



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feavour; he asked me if I had a pass, I
Replyed I had not he demanded my Reas
eon, I told him 1 was aqneoted with all



Online LibraryFrance) Société asiatique (ParisNotes and queries: Chiefly relating to Interior Pennsylvania, Volume 2 → online text (page 1 of 81)