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Notes and queries: Chiefly relating to Interior Pennsylvania, Volume 2 online

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Historical and Genealogical.



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I She left a —
(deplore the low ._
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friend*



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In memory of
JOHN FRENCH,
Who depart-
ed this life
August the
7, 1783, aged
41 years.

Here lies the remains of

CAPT. JAMES FRENC

Died July 19, 1851,

Aged 74 years, 5 montl

and 98 days.

In memory of

MARGARET FRECK-

LBTON, who departed this

Life ApriMo, A. D., 1814,

Aged 67 years.

Designed

as a solemn tribute

of gratitude, love and respeoi

to the memory of

JAKE GRAHAM,

the affectionate, consort of

John Graham,

who departed this Hfe

January 2d, 18M,

Aged 51 years & 26 days.

Why do we mourn departed frier

[3 lines more beneath the groun

Here lieth the Body of
JAMES GRAHAM,
who departed this life
March the 2fcL 1786,
in the 56th year of hie age.



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William Hogao.
Michael Termon.



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_ l obsrin^r Aipjpaej

havefcen thoroughly explored by
he writers of this memoir, and their re-
searches have produced a work of exceptional
Yalae.

No candid mind, nnwarped by partisan
prejudice, can pernse these monthly papers
without reaching the conclusion, that no




Capital and <
advance of the rebel force;
ture, when all was doubt and nnc
Mr. Lincoln, a* he afterwards told his Cabi-
net, Towed to himself, and, he added, after
some hesitation, "to my Maker," that if
Lee was defeated and driven out of Mary-
land he would issue the proclamation. The
battle of Antietam followed, securing the de-
sired result, and calling the members of the
Cabinet together, he announced to them his
determination, and the next day the docu-
ment was issued. It is curious to read that
at this meeting he sought no advice except
as to certain changes in the phraseology of
she paper, but simply announced his con-
clusions and intentions.

It is very doubtful whether at this time
Mr. Lincoln, sound lawyer as he was, had
any faith in the legal efficacy of his procla-
mation. He probably relied upon the moral
effect of the paper, and the results which
wonld follow it as a war measure. No doubt
be foresaw the future adoption of an amend-
~ " i ich would ratify

and secure the
in a reply made
icago delegation
d, among other
1 a proclamation
o, especially as
iot want to issue
world will see
ve like the Pope's
" But he did
md enforce it as
ring it operatire
ited.

which we have
absorbing inter-
i them which are
discussing mat-
two years of tid-
ily to be writ-
cCleilan and his
In treating of
rough a tone of
In regard to this
ies, which must
feelings of those
owned Ms early
most, of course



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_ T _ _„ — itry. •" ' ?\

_, Indian who had pursued him the most)
closely, although stalwart, vigorous, and'
.practised in all the manly exercises of his
tribe, stopped short in his race, as if the ;
'chasm of death yawned beneath him, and,
.gazed in perfect admiration npon the glori-
'ous feat he saw his mortal enemy perform.
,He exclaimed, in his imperfect English,
"jCap'n Brady, good jump. Very good/
Injin no try." Brady heard these words as
he ascended the opposite bank. He was far
JEromany place of safety. The woods were
•thronged with his enemies. For tuna telv for
'himself, he had reached the side of the river
nearest Fort Mcintosh. Thither, as usual




arbiter 1
I'ehampions who desired to prove'
lfcW "the better man," yet withal he was
man of cheerful temper and by no meana
Quarrelsome; whilst he would not brook an
insult from others, he never sought a cause
lor difficulty in harmless mirth or during the
ifeours of enjoyment He felt a kindly inter-
est in all, and hated only "bullies" and In-
dians. There was the best relation, indeed,
we might call it attachment* existing be-
tween him and. several friendly Indians.
That attachment drose from many years in-
tercourse and faithful service.
< To return from this epiiode to the legend'
.Of McKee** Bocks. Brady is said to have
been lingering about them, watching lor In-
dians upon the northern bank of ths Ohio, 1
when a party of savages forced him to jump ' I
"a tremendous distance to avoid captivity.
A* the story runs, he had to throw away his
gun and plunge into the river, diving every
time he rose to the surface to avoid being
•hot. By this slow process he reached the •
northern bank, although repeatedly fired at, :
We give the story without vouching for its -
authemicity. Tel we see no reason why it.
may not be true.

• m • •„

DR. WM. PLUNKBTAND CHANCELLOR

PL.CNKBTT.

of the
y,"not
; saying
tnitein
Buffalo ,
Samuel
lunket,j
»y, and
Maclay
"unison

whose
or Ma-
aid not ;
i «to be
tteu, i;

r.6Q.\

1313 s !
Lyiseo

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Patrick



r«« f — « r -www where — ... __ — —
mvuM^i, preached a century before; the old
hnrch was gone bat Mr. Smyth pointed out
is lite.

The genealogy In the slip you tent me ia
correct, with the exception of the statement,
that Rev. Patrick Plunket had but one son ;
be certainly had at least two other sons than
'the dne mentioned, viz: Dr. Wm. Plunket,
and Robert Plunket, who came to this conn-;
.try. Robert had one daughter, Margaret,,
who married Samuel Simmons, and lived on
Pine creek, near Jersey Shore. She had
<threesons, Robert Plunket, Thomas Plunket
!and Samuel Simmons. Robert P. Simmons?




We had no thoughts of tricks like that,
Of doath and grave were shy.

Better to live a thousand years
Than think of once to die.

Two hopeful chaps we were, indeed.

With no great Itch tor Bin,
But tried to keep trie devil out,

Who. spiteful, would creep in.

You were Simon, and I was Sam.

Familiar like jou know.
As other sprigs were mostly ca^od.

As Tom, and Jim, and Joe.

Mow, this was surely slight enough.

To put us In a rage,
What man would ever the fardel bear

Soft soap w.v> ' not assuage.

No title then adorned our name.

No man would touch his hat.
Wo "Str." no • Mister" greeted us:

All were too big for that.

You stood before a printers case,
With types your stick to All,

For William Flndlay, Governor.
And old-school devils to kill.

With blarney keeu. and sawder soft,

To hide from public gaze
The sins a party may commit,

And close with loud huzza's.



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lad returned to ritwy m# re*
ported that Brady and bis paMjflpi peqlehed.
Notwithstanding the probability thai these
Indians had deserted, he determined to per-
severe, with a fnll knowledge of the terrible
death which awaited tym in case he was
taken. When he readied the neighborhood
of the main village, taking one man with
him, he waded to an Bland in the river and
concealed himself and follower among the
driftwood, which, had been thrown nponitin
large quantities by the stream during the ■
spring freshets. Here he staid all the day
upon the watch. During the morning he
conld see nothing, for it was dark and damp
from an immense fog rising from the river.



J




the father Xkfftoeft and Lewis, lAo
afterwards became so celebrated ai scoots.
Tfrej, after a long and fatiguing march
through the wilderness, reached the neigh-
borhood of one of the Snndasky towns jnst
after nightfall. Brady entered the village
disguised as an Indian. He mingled freely
with the Indians, and after making a thor-
ough reconnoiter returned to his two friends.
He told ihem that he believed that the sns-
I picion of the savages was * roused concerning
him, and that they must begin their march
at once. They traveled all night In the
morning they found the Indians were in full
pursuit of them. They traveled updn logs,
over hard and stony ridges, and avoided ail
traveled routes for the purpose of concealing
their trail.

At the end of three days they found them-
selves beyond immediate danger. They
lived, during this exciting march, and during
their retreat, upon parched corn and jerked
venison. They at length resolved to enjojr
a night's rest. Williamson kept guard
whilst the others slept. Brady snored so
loud that Williamson said afterwards he
might have been heard at Sandusky. He
was forced to awake him. Whilst they slept
Williamson detected the approach of a stray
Indiin, who came up close to them. The
sentinel fired and shot him. He fell for-
ward dead.

They suffered no further interruption, aud
reached Pittsburgh in safety, bringing im-
portant information concerning the inten-
tions and future movements <Jf the enemy.



• NOTES AND QUERIKS.

Historical, Biographical «&* U earn logical.



1



CCXXIV.



Vo again re-
s ago (2V. <fc
of the Presi-
i brief:

2-13.

0; settled .?



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Vol. II. No. 5.



NOTES and QUERIES.



HISTORICAL,
BIOGRAPHICALmGENEALOGICAL,



EDITED BY



WILLIAM H. EGLE, M. D., M. A.



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NOTES and QUERIES

HISTORICAL,
BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL



Yol.IL



1889.



No. 5.



NOTES AND QUERIES.



Historical, Biographical and Genealogical.

ccxxx.



Lutheran Parochial School. — In
1831, the Lutherans opened the Dauphin
Academy at Harrisburg. S. D. Finckel of
the Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, was
its principal. What is known of it ?



Harrisburo Charity in Other Days.
In Jnly, 1831, a public meeting was held in
aid of the sufferers "by the late fire at
Fayetteville, N. C," and a committee ap-
pointed to collect funds.

March 9, 1833, a meeting of citizens was
held in "aid to the Cape de Verd sufferers."

To both ot these worthy objects notable
collections were made.



THE CUMBERLAND VALLEY.



Contrlbntlon* to It* Biographical and
Genealogical History.



BucnANAN, John.

John Buchanan, second son of Andrew
and Margaret Buchanan, was a native of the
Marsh Creek settlement, now Adams county,
where he was born in 1734. He received a
fair English education. Dnring the French
and Indian war he served in the Provincial
ranks, and in the Revolutionary struggle
fought on the side of Liberty. On the 25th
of February, 1782, he was commissioned
collector of excise for the county of Cumber-
land, and on April 18, 1785, appointed
deputy surveyor. He died, while on a visit



westward, at Fort Ligonier, 24th March,
1793, in his fifty-ninth year.

CULBERT80N, ALEXANDER.

Alexander Cnlbertson, born in the north
of Ireland about 1721, came to Pennsvlvania
with his parents about the year 1740." They
were among the earliest settlers in "Emer-
son's Valley," Letterkenny township, Cum-
berland county. He was a man of courage
and intelligence and of prominence on the
frontiers. At the outset of the French and
Indian war he raised a company for the pro-
tection of the back settlements ; was a cap-
tain in the Provincial service in 1755 of the
"Lurgan Township" company, and after-
wards was attached to Col. Armstrong's bat-
talion. In the spring of the following year
the Indians having made inroads on* the
frontiers, be marched in pursuit of the
marauders, and overtook them near McCord'a
Fort A desperate right ensued, his company
defeated and himselt killed. A number of
the men who were made prisoners were in-
humanly massacred by their captors. This-
was in the month of April, 1756. Captain
Cnlbertson, left a wife Afargaret, and chil-
dren as follows:

i. Samuel, b, 1745.

ii. Robert

Hi. Alexander.

iv. John.

v. Joseph.

vi. James.



McCamant, James.

James McCamant (or McCalmont) the
son of James and Jean McCamant, waa
born in 1737 in Letterkenny township, Cum-



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berland, now Franklin coanty. His father,
James Me Cam ant, came irom the north of
Ireland a few months before the son was
bom. He was bom in 1684, and died July
% 1780, leaving a wife Jean, b. 1694, dying
May 4, 1794, and children, among others, as
follows:

t. James.

ii, Margaret

iii. John; m. and had John,

iv. Mary; m. James Montgomery and had
•James and other children.

v. Jean; m. Patrick Hartford.

The son James became a prominent person-
age upon the borders of Pennsylvania civiliza-
tion. Of stalwart form, and of undaunted
bravery, when the defeat of Braddock's
army caused the savages to pour down
upon the frontiers, he was a leader in
-many a pursuit of the blood-thirsty Indian.
And so when the thunders of the Revolution
reverberate 1 along the Kittatinny bills, he
-eagerly entered the contest for inde endence.
He served as a major in the patriot army,
and was at Long Island, Treoton, Brandy-
wine and Germantown. When peace settled
over the land he was one of the leading
spirits in securing the erection of the county
•of Franklin, and was appointed by the As-
sembly one of the commissioners to erect
-the court house and other public buildings
for the new county. In that body he
represented Franklin county from 1774
<o 1789. He was commissioned one
of the judges of the court of common
pleas for the county, September 23, 1789,
and under the constitution of 1790 appointed
by Gov. Mifflin an associate judge August
17, 1 791, a position be filled with ability un-
til bis death, which occurred on the 19th of
July, 1809, at his residence near Strasburg.
His remains lie buried in the grave yard at
Rocky Spring church. There are many in-
cidents narrated relating to the daring and
prowess of Major McCamant, but the duty
•of the biographer is simply to give the naked
facts. That he was brave, honorable and
upright none dare gainsay, and he left in the
records of his heroic life that which his de-
scendants may well prize.



HANOVER CHURCH.



Inscriptions In the Old Graveyard.



VIII.



In memory of



JOHN McELLHENY,
who died June 25th, 1806,
age 53 years, 10 m &
14 days.



In memory of

MARY McELHENNY,

died Joly 27, 1805,

aged 14 veirs and 6

months.

In memory of

THOMAS McELHENNY,

Died 3d of December,

181**, aged 1 year &

11 months.



In

memory of

HANNAH McELHENNY,

born

Julv 4th, 1781,

Died

June 27th, 1868,

aged

86 years, 11 mos., 23 ds.



In

memory of

JOHN,

only son of

Thomas McELHENNY, Dec*d

Born February 1777,

Died August 19, 1859,

Aged 82 years & 6 months.

In memory of

THOMAS McELHENNY, SB.,

who departed this life

Sept 1st, A. D. 1828,

Aged 84 years.

In memory of

MARY McELHENNY,

Died 4th of August, 1807.

Aged 74 years.



In

memory of

ESTHER, wife of

John McKlNNEY,

wha departed this life

February 23d, 1818,

Aged 75 years.

In
memory of



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811



SAMUEL McCLURE,

who departed this life

March 14, A. D. 1838,

Aged

25 years

&
1 month.



In

memory of

JAME8 McCLURE,

who departed this life

September the 1st, 1815,

Aged 35 years.

Also,

In memory of

JOHN McCLURE.

who departed thiB life

Angnst the 22nd, 1827,

Aged 46 years.

Sacred to the memory of

FRANCI8 McCLURE,

who departed this life

January 23rd >809,

In the 31st year of his age.

Sacred to the memory of

JAMES McCLURE,

Sen'r., who dtparted this life

November the 14th, 1805,

in the 72d year of his age.

In
memory
of MARGARET,
Daughter of
Wm. MONT-
GOMERY, who

departed

this life the 13th

December A. D. 1782.



MARY,
Daughter
of Wm. Mont-
gomery,
and wife of
John AYRES
who departed
this life Feb'y
9, 1783.



In memory of
MARY ANN PAL-
MER, Daughter of
John and Cathe-

rina Palmer,



who Departed

this life March 16,

1798,

Aged 15 years.

DAVID PETTECREW

Departed this Life

July 2nd, 1784, Aged

71 years.

In

memory of

ROBERT PORTEREIELD

who departed this life

June 22d, A. D. 1836,

id the 50th year of his

Blessed are the dead

which die in the Lord.

Rev. 14-13.

In

memory of

ANN PORTERFIELD,

who departed this life

December 2d, A. D., 1831,

in the 52d year

of her age.

Iu

memory

of-

THO'8 ROBINSON,

who departed

this life

December the 18th,

A. D. f 1780,

Aged 59 years.



NOTES AND QUERIES.

Historical, Biographical and Genealogical.

CCXXXL

Notable Orations. — Conspicuous
among all the excellent addresses and ora-
tions of the past decade of Centennial cele-
brations, are those delivered on April 30,
1889, in the cily of New York, by Bishop
Potter and Chauncey M. Depew. They are
"worthy to be read of all men."

Coenplanteb at Harbisbubg— On the
7th of February, 1791, Governor Mifflin sent
a circular letter to the sheriffs of Dauphin



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and other counties, requiring them to give
protection to Cornplanter and his party on
their retarn to the Seneca nation. It was
shortly after this that the noted chief tarried
over night at Harrisburg.



What Island ? On the 24th of May,
1792, an application was made to the Gov-
ernor, from James Fox and Hugh Mont-
gomery, of Pax tang township, Danphin
county, for the pre-emption of a small island
in the Susquehanna river, the first island
above Coxe's, containing three or four acres,
which was referred to the Surveyor General.
Is this island yet in existence, or have the
ice and floods washed it away?

Dates op Ratification op the Fed-
eral Constitution by the several States:

Delaware Dec. 3, 1787

Pennsylvania Dec 13, 1787

New Jersey Dec. 19, 1787

Georgia Jan. 2, 1788

Connecticut Jan. 9, 1788

Massachusetts Feb. 6, 1788

Maryland April 28, 1788

South Carolina May 23, 1788

New Hampshire June 21, 1788

Virginia June 25, 1788

New York Julv 25, 1788

North Carolina Nov. 21, 1789

From the foregoing it would seem that
North Carolina did not ratify until after the
election and inauguration of President
Washington.



Corrections to Sketches op Capt.
Sam. Brady.— The Hon. John Blair Linn
sends us the following corrections :

Part II., paragraph 1. Samuel Brady's
father did not go to Boston.

Paragraph 4. It was John Brady, brother
of Samuel, who took part in the battle of
Brand v wine, and CoL Cooke took John upon
his horse behind him and saved him.

Paragraph 10. Capt John Brady was
killed April 11, 1779. His son James Au-
gust 8, 1778.

Thos. Cling an, Esq., was a member of
Assembly from York county in the sessions
of 1788-*9, and 1789-'90. He took a con-
spicuous part in the contest over the bill for
the creation of Adams county.

He appears to have left the Marsh Creek
settlement after November, 1791.



I would like to have information as to hi*
subsequent life and place of death, and all
particulars. Edward McPherson,

May 8, 1889. Gettysburg, Pa.



Bad Genealogical Blunders. — The
Century for April contains a readable article
on the "Inauguration of Washington,*' the
superb illustrations making amends some-
what for the many errors of the writer,
Clarence W. Bowmen. There are, however,
two grave blunders in genealogy, which we
essay in this note to correct. Speaking of
Charles Thomson, Secretary of the Conti-
nental Congress, he says: "He bad just mar-
ried a young woman of fortune, who was the
aunt of President William Henry Harrison,
and the great-great-aunt of President Ben-
jamin Harrison;" and in a foot note
states, " Thomson was the father-in-law of
Elbridge Gerry." Now the truth of the
matter is as follows: Charles Thomson
married Hannah, the only child of Richard
Harrison, her mother being the daughter of
Isaac Norris, and the grand-daughter of
Thomas Lloyd, president of the Prov incial
Council of Pennsylvania. They all belonged
to the Society of Friends, and were in no-
manner related to the Harrisons ot Surrey,
England. As Charles Thomson left no
children, this destroys the remaining error.
Now Elbridge Gerry married a daughter of
JameB Thompson, merchant of New York,
no connection to the Secretary. Strange to-
state &pple ton's American Encyclopedia of
Biography make a similar blunder.



THIS DROLL FAMILY,

[We give the following genealogical refer-
ences, omitting the biographical data, in the
hope that additional information, especially
dates, may be secured, intending to utilize
the material gathered in a new volume of
Pennsylvania Genealogies:]

1. John Groll; b. Aagast 16. 1767; d.
November 14, 1825; m. October 5, 1790, by
Rev. Gehring, Elizabeth Metzoar; h.
October 14, 1767; d. April 5, 1882. They
had issue :

*. John; b. July 17, 1791; d. Oct 21,
1793.

it. Lydia; b. Oct 10, 1792; d. May 5,
1822; m. Dec 4, 1810, David Ettla and left
one child.

2. Hi John; b. May 17, 1797; m. Eliza
Catharine Lowman.



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SIS



3. iv. Abner; b. Sept 9, 1800; m. Rachel
Shelly.

4. v. Henry; b. January 11, 1807; m.
Mm v Oleweiler.

II. John Croll (John); b. May 17,1797;
d. October 12, 1873; m. March 26, 1822, by
Rev. Dr. Loch man, Eliza Catharine Low man,
b. JuoeS, 1803; d. Dec 12, 1881. They
hail issue:

i. George L , d. January 15, 1874; m.
Sarah Brown; d. September, 1882, and had
Dr. Mercer B., Rev. John, Edward L..
George. Rebecca B., Frank and Raymond.

ii. Henry W.

Hi. Elizabeth C.

n'v. Caroline L., d. s. p.

v. Svnan D.

vi. Maria L ; m. Rev. W. M. Baaro. D.
D., end had Rev. /. Cro% Dr. O/iarles, Rev.
William M., Eliza Croll, Mary 8., Maria,
George and Frederick.

vii. Annie M.

viii. EmmaH; m. J. P. Keller.

ix. Margaret 0. t d. s p.



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