Frank Ellwood Esshom.

Pioneers and prominent men of Utah online

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P. Pratt, Luke S. Johnson, William Smith, Orson Pratt, John

F. Boynton and Lyman E. Johnson.

In 1837 and 1838 four of the Twelve apostatized, namely,
John F. Boynton, disfellowshipped Sept. 3, 1837, at Kirt-
land, Ohio; Lyman E. Johnson and Luke S. Johnson, excom-
municated April 13, 1838, at Far West, Missouri; and Wm.
E. McLellin, excommunicated May 11, 1838, at Far West.

July 8, 1838, John Taylor, John E. Page, Wilford Woodruff
and Willard Richards were called by revelation to fill the
places of those who had fallen. Elders Page and Taylor
were ordained Dec. 19, 1838; Wilford Woodruff April 26,

1839, at Far West, Missouri; and Willard Richards April 14,

1840, at Preston, England.

In the meantime other vacancies occurred. David W. Pat-
ten was killed in the Crooked River battle, in Missouri, Oct.

25, 1838, and Thos. B. Marsh was excommunicated for apos-
tasy, March 17, 1839. at Quincy, 111. To fill the two vacan-
cies occasioned thereby, George A. Smith (ordained April

26, 1839, at Far West, Mo.) and Lyman Wight (ordained
April 8, 1841, at Nauvoo, 111.), were chosen.

William Smith was rejected as an Apostle, at the general
conference held at Nauvoo, In October, 1845, and finally ex-
communicated from the Church, Oct. 12, 1846. John E. Page
was disfellowshipped, Jan. 9, 1846, at a council meeting held
at Nauvoo, 111. Amasa M. Lyman, who had been ordained an
Apostle, Aug. 20. 1842, at Nauvoo, and Ezra T. Benson, or-
dained July 16. 1846, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, were chosen to
fill the vacancies.

The reorganization of the First Presidency in December,
x!847, with three of the Apostles (Brigham Young, Heber C.
Kimball and Willard Richards), and the excommunication of
Lyman Wright for apostasy, Feb. 12, 1849. made four va-
cancies in the Council of the Twelve. These were filled Feb.
12, 1849, at an important council meeting held in the "Old
Fort," Great Salt Lake City, when Elders Charles C. Rich,
Lorenzo Snow, Erastus Snow and Franklin D. Richards were
ordained Apostles.

The next vacancy occurred May 13, 1857, when Parley P.
Pratt was assassinated near Van Buren, Arkansas. George
Q. Cannon was chosen to fill the vacancy, being ordained an
Apostle Aug. 20, 1860, Great Salt Lake City, Utah.

In October, 1867, Amasa M. Lyman was dropped from the
Council of the Twelve; and Joseph F. Smith, who had pre-
viously been ordained to the Apostleship, was chosen to fill
the vacancy, Oct. 6, 1867, at a general conference.

Geo. A. Smith was chosen as first Counselor to Pres. Brig-
ham Young, after the demise of Heber C. Kimball in 1868.
Elder Brigham Young, Jr., who previously had been or-
dained an Apostle, was chosen to fill the vacancy, being sus-
tained as a member of the Council of the Twelve at the gen-
eral conference held Oct. 9, 1S68.

Elder Ezra T. Benson died Sept. 3. 1869, at Ogden, Utah.
Albert Carrington was chosen to fill the vacancy, and was
ordained an Apostle, July 3, 1870, in Salt Lake City.

Orson Hyde, who had acted as president of the Twelve
Apostles, from the reorganization of the First Presidency in
1847, to October, 1875, died Nov. 28, 1878, at Spring City,
Sanpete Co., Utah. At the annual conference, held April 7,
1879, Elder Moses Thatcher was chosen to fill the vacancy.

After the death of Pres. Brigham Young, in 1877, the
Twelve Apostles presided over the Church nearly three years.
Daniel H. Wells and John W. Young, who had acted as Pres.
Brigham Young's Counselors, were sustained by the Church
as Counselors to the Twelve.

Another reorganization of the First Presidency took place,
Oct. 10, 1880, at the general conference held in Salt Lake
City, three of the Apostles (John Taylor, Geo. Q. Cannon atid
Joseph F. Smith,) being chosen to constitute said Presidency.
This caused three vacancies in the Council of the Twelve,
two of which were filled Oct. 27, 1880, by the ordination of
Francis M. Lyman and John Henry Smith to the Apostleship.



PIONEERS AND PROMINENT MEN OF UTAH



1281



Orson Pratt, the last surviving member of the first Coun-
cil of Twelve Apostles, died in Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 3,
1881. The vacancy occasioned by his demise, and the va-
cancy left since October, 1880, was filled by the calling of
George Teasdale and Heber J. Grant to the Apostleship.
These brethren were called by direct revelation, through
Pres. John Taylor, and were ordained in Salt Lake City, Oct.

16, 1882.

Charles C. Rich died at Paris, Bear Lake Co., Idaho. Nov.

17, 1883, and the vacancy caused thereby, in the Council, was
filled by the ordination of John W. Taylor to the Apostleship
Oct. 16, 1883.

After the death of Pres. John Taylor, July 25, 1887. the
Twelve Apostles acted as presiding Council of the Church
tor about one year and nine months, during which time
Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith occupied their former
positions as members of the Council of Twelve Apostles.

At the general conference, held in April, 1889, the First
Presidency was reorganized, with Wilord Woodruff as
President. The vacancy in the Council of the Apostles caused
thereby, as well as that occasioned by the excommunication
of Albert Carrington, in November, 1885, and a third vacancy
caused by the demise of Erastus Snow. May 27, 1888, were
filled at the general conference, held in October, 1889, by the
calling of Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund and Abra-
ham H. Cannon to the Apostleship.

Abraham H. Cannon died in Salt Lake City, July 19, 1896,
and Moses Thatcher was dropped from his position as one of
the Twelve Apostles, Nov. 19, 1896. The two vacancies thus
occasioned were filled at the general conference held in Salt
Lake City, in October, 1897, when Matthias F. Cowley and
Abraham Owen Woodruff were sustained as members of the
Council of Twelve Apostles.

After the death of Pres. Wilford Woodruff, Sept. 2, 1898,
the Twelve Apostles once more became the presiding Coun-
cil of the Church, and Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith
were returned to their former positions among- the Twelve
Apostles. But the Apostles only retained the presidency a
few days. Sept. 13, 1898, the First Presidency was organ-
ized the fifth time since the organization of the Church, Lo-
renzo Snow, Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith being the
three Apostles chosen to form the new Presidency. This
caused a vacancy in the Council of the Apostles, which was
filled at the general conference, held in Salt Lake City, Oct.
9, 1898, when Rudger Clawson was sustained as one of the
Twelve Apostles.

Franklin D. Richards, President of the Twelve Apostles,
died at Ogden Utah, Dec. 9, 1899; and the vacancy thus caused
in the quorum was filled April 8, 1900, when Reed Smoot was
sustained as one of the Twelve Apostles.

Hyrum M. Smith was ordained to the Apostleship Oct. 24,
1901 following the promotion of Apostle Anthon H. Lund to
the position of second Counselor in the First Presidency,
Which had occurred on the 17th of the same month.

Rudger Clawson became second Counselor to President
Lorenzo Snow Oct. 7. 1901; but the death of the President
three days later released him from the First Presidency, and
he again took his position in the quorum of the Twelve

Brigham Toung, Jr., died at Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake
County,. Utah, April 11, 1903; and on the 6th of the next
October, George A. Smith was sustained in the Apostleship to
fill the vacancy. On the same date, Francis M. Lyman was
sustained as the successor of Brigham Young, Jr., in the
presidency of the quorum.

Abraham Owen Woodruff died June 20, 1904, at El Paso,
Texas; and on the 7th of the following month, July, Charles
W. Penrose was ordained an Apostle to complete the quorum.

Marriner W. Merrill died at Richmond, Utah, Feb. 6. 1906,
and on April 8, 1906, George F. Richards, Orson F. Whitney,
and David O. McKay were sustained as members of the
quorum of Twelve Apostles, to fill the vacancies caused by
the death of. Apostle Merrill and by the removal of John W.
Taylor and Matthias F. Cowley from the quorum.

A vacancy caused by the death of George Teasdale was
filled Oct. 6, 1907, when Anthony W. Ivins was sustained in
the Apostleship.

Joseph F. Smith, Jr., was chosen an Apostle April 10,
1910 to complete the quorum after the promotion of John
Henry Smith to the position of second Counselor in the First
Presidency.

James E. Talmage was ordained to the Apostleship Dec. 8,
1911, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the promotion of Charles
W. Penrose to the position of second Counselor to Joseph
F. Smith, President of the Church.

The Council of the Twelve Apostles now (1913) stands as
follows: Francis M. Lyman, president, Heber J. Grant, Rudger
Clawson, Reed Smoot, Hyrum M. Smith, George A. Smith,
George F. Richards. Orson F. Whitney, David O. McKay,
Anthonv W Ivins, Joseph F. Smith, Jr., and James B. Tal-
mage.

PRESIDING PATRIARCHS

Joseph Smith, Sr., father of the Prophet Joseph Smith, was
the first Patriarch in the Church. He was ordained to that
high and holy calling, Dec. 18, 1833, at Kirtland, Ohio, under
the hands of the Prophet Joseph, Oliver Cowdery, Sidney
Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams. Father Smith continued
as Patriarch until his death, which occurred at Nauvoo, 111.,
Sept. 14, 1840. In an important revelation, given through the
Prophet Joseph, Jan. 19, 1841, Hyrum Smith, Father Smith's
eldest living son, who then acted as second Counselor in the
First Presidency, was called to succeed his father as Pa-
triarch.

"And again, verily I say unto you; Let my servant William (Law)
be appointed, ordained, and anointed, as a counselor unto my servant
Joseph, in the room of my servant Hyrum. that my servant Hyrum
may take the office of Priesthood and Patriarch, which was ap-
pointed unto him by his father by blessing and also by right. Doc.
and Cov. 124:91.

Hyrum Smith "received" the office, Jan. 24, 1841, and kept
it until his martyrdom in Carthage Jail, 111., June 27, 1844.
His brother William Smith, who was also a member of the
11



Council of Twelve Apostles, succeeded him by virtue of his
birthright, or age, but he apostatized. At the general con-
ference, held in October, 1845, he was rejected as an Apostle
and as a Patriarch. He was finally excommunicated from
the Church, Oct. 12, 1845.

After the rejection of William Smith, the Patriarchal
office, according to the hereditary order, belonged to Asahel
Smith (a brother of Joseph Smith, Sr.), who had been or-
dained a Patriarch at Nauvoo in 1844; but his health being
poor, he is not known to have magnified his office as a
Patriarch. Soon afterwards (July 20, 1848; he died at lowa-
ville, Wapello Co., Iowa.

John Smith, another brother of the late Joseph Smith, Sr.,
who had previously been ordained a Patriarch at Nauvoo,
was ordained presiding Patriarch in the Church, Jan. 1,
1849, at Great Salt Lake City, under the hands of Brigham
Young and Heber C. Kimball. He had been sustained as a
"Patriarch in the Church" as early as the general confer-
ence, held at Winter Quarters, April 6, 1847.

Uncle John Smith, as he was familiarly called, died May
23, 1854, in Great Salt Lake City. John Smith, eldest son of
the martyred Hyrum Smith, to whom the Patriarchal Priest-
hood descended direct from his father, was chosen as his
successor. At the time of his father's death he was too
young to receive the office. He was ordained presiding Pa-
triarch, Feb. 18, 1855, in Great Salt Lake City, by Pres. Brig-
ham Young.

John Smith died Nov. 6, 1911. at Salt Lake City; and on
April 6, 1912, his son Hyrum G. Smith was chosen to suc-
ceed him as Presiding Patriarch of the Church.

FIRST COUNCIL, OF SEVENTIES

The organization of the first quorum of Seventy was com-
menced at Kirtland, Ohio, Feb. 28, 1835. Nearly all the first
members consisted of men who had distinguished themselves
for their faithfulness as members of Zion's Camp. When the
quorum was fully organized the following were chosen to
act as its seven presidents: Hazen Aldrich, Joseph Young,
Levi W. Hancock, Leonard Rich, Zebedee Coltrin, Lyman
Sherman and Sylvester Smith.

Questions arose among some of the brethren in regard to
the corresponding grades of the Seventies and High Priests,
and it was ascertained that five or six of the seven presi-
dents had previously been ordained High Priests. The
Prophet Joseph Smith, in a meeting held in the Kirtland
Temple, April 6, 1837. counseled these brethren, namely,
Hazen Aldrich, Leonard Rich, Zebedee Coltrin, Lyman" Sher-
man and Sylvester Smith, to join the High Priests'. .
quorum, which five of them did, and the following named
Elders were chosen to fill the vacancies thus created in the
First Council of the Seventies: John Gould, in place of
Hazen Aldrich; James Foster, in place of Leonard Rich;
Daniel S. Miles, in place of Zebedee Coltrin; Josiah Butter-
field, in place of Lyman Sherman; Salmon Gee, in place of
Levi W. Hancock, and John Gaylord, in place of Sylvester
Smith.

In the summer of 1837 it was ascertained that Levi W.
Hancock, who was in Missouri at the time of the April
meeting, was not a High Priest, and he was therefore re-
ceived back into his former position as one of the First Seven
Presidents of Seventies, at an important meeting held at
Kirtland. Ohio, Sept. 3, 1837. John Gould, one of the newly
appointed presidents, was asked by the Prophet Joseph to
join the High Priests, which he did. After these changes
the First Council of Seventies stood as follows: Joseph
Young, Levi W. Hancock, James Foster. Daniel S. Miles, Jo-
siah Butterfield, Salmon Gee, and John Gaylord.

Jan. 13, 1S38, John Gaylord, together with many others,
was excommunicated from the Church by the High Council
at Kirtland, Ohio, for rising up in rebellion against the
Church authorities. Elder Henry Herriman was called and
ordained Feb. 6, 1838, to fill the vacancy in the First Council
of Seventies.

In a meeting of the Seventies, held at Kirtland, Ohio,
March 6, 1838, the council withdrew their fellowship from
Salmon Gee for neglect of duty and other causes. Elder
Zera Pulsipher was chosen and ordained to fill .the vacancy
the same day. The foregoing information about the Seven-
ties is obtained from the original record of Seventies kept
at Kirtland, Ohio.

After these two changes the council stood unchanged until
the Church had removed to Nauvoo, 111. It appears that
James Foster, instead of gathering with the Saints, settled
at Jacksonville, Morgan Co., 111., and had no direct communi-"
cation with his brethren. Prior to the October conference,

1844, he was dropped from his position by the council of the
Seventies. In the following spring (1845), Albert P. Rock-
wood was called to fill the vacancy caused by the removal of
Foster.

Josiah Butterfleld retained his standing as one of the seven
Presidents until a misunderstanding arose between the
Prophet Joseph and him, and he was finally cut off from the
Church, Oct. 7, 1844, at the general conference held at Nau-
voo, for neglect of duty, etc. The vacancy was filled the
same day by the appointment of Jedediah M. Grant as one
of the council of the Seventies, but he was not ordained
until some time afterwards.

Elder Daniel S. Miles died a faithful man in the early part
of 1845, in Hancock County. 111., and the vacancy occasioned
by his death was filled by Elder Benjamin L. Clapp, in April,

1845. Elder Albert P. Rockwood, Benjamin L. Clapp and
Jedediah M. Grant were ordained to the positions to which
they had been elected Dec. 2, 1845.

After the demise of Willard Richards in 1854, Elder Jede-
diah M. Grant was selected by President Brigham Young to
fill the office of second Counselor in the First Presidency,
thus leaving another vacancy in the council of Seventies.
Elder Horace S. Eldredge was called, at the October confer-
ence, 1854, to fill that vacancy, and was ordained about the
same time in Great Salt Lake City.



1282



PIONEERS AND PROMINENT MEN OF UTAH



Elder Benjamin L. Clapp, after living some years in Great
Salt Lake City, removed his family to Ephraim, Sanpete Co.,
where he had some difficulty with Bishop Warren S. Snow.
After investigation before the Council of Seventies, he was
dropped from his position in the council, and finally ex-
communicated from the Church at the general conference,
held in Great Salt Lake City, April 7, 1859. Elder Jacob
Gates was called to fill the vacancy at the April Conference,
1860, but, being absent on a mission to Europe, he was not
ordained until October, 1862, some time after his return
home.

Elder Zera Pulsipher transcended the bounds of the Priest-
hood in the ordinance of sealing, for which he was cited to
appear before the First Presidency of the Church, April 12.
1862. It was there voted that he be rebaptized, reconfirmed
and ordained to the office of a High Priest, or go into the
ranks of the Seventies. Subsequently he was ordained a
Patriarch. Elder John Van Cott was called to fill the va-
cancy in the council of the Seventies, at the October con-
ference, 1862.

Albert P. Rockwood died in Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake
Co., Nov. 26, 1879, and at the April conference, 1880, Elder
"Wm. W. Taylor was called to fill the vacancy and soon after-
wards ordained one of the First Seven Presidents of Sev-
enties.

The vacancies caused by the death of Pres. Joseph Young,
July 16, 1881, and of Levi W. Hancock, June 10, 1882, were
filled by the ordination of Abraham H. Cannon as one of the
First Seven Presidents, Oct. 9, 1882, and Seymour B. Young
as another, Oct. 16, 1882.

Elder John Van Cott died Feb. 18, 1883. Christian Daniel
Fjeldsted was called to fill the vacancy. He was ordained
April 28, 1884, after his return from a mission to Scandinavia.

The demise of Elder Wm. W. Taylor, Aug. 1, 1884, caused
another vacancy, which was filled Oct. 7, 1884, by the ordi-
nation of John Morgan as one of the First Seven Presidents.

Horace S. Eldredge died in Salt Lake City, Sept. 6, 1888,
and the vacancy caused thereby was filled by the calling of
Brigham H. Roberts to act as one of the council, at the Octo-
ber conference, 1888.

Abraham H. Cannon having been ordained an Apostle In
October, 1889, George Reynolds was sustained as one of the
First Seven Presidents of Seventies, at the April conference,
1890.

Elder Henry Herriman died at Huntington, Emery Co.,
Utah, May 17, 1891. Elder Jacob Gates died at Provo, Utah
Co., April 14, 1892. The vacancies caused by the demise of
those two veteran presidents were filled by the selection of
Jonathan G. Kimball and Rulon S. Wells as members of the
First Council of Seventies. The former was sustained at the
general conference, held in October, 1892, and the latter at
the general conference, held in April, 1893.

Elder John Morgan died at Preston, Idaho, Aug. 14, 1894.
At the following October conference, Edward Stevenson was
chosen to fill the consequent vacancy in the council.

Elder Edward Stevenson died in Salt Lake City, Jan. 27,
1897; and at the general conference of the Church, held in
Salt Lake City, in October, 1897, Joseph W. McMurrin was
chosen to fill the vacancy. He was ordained by Apostle An-
thon H. Lund in Liverpool, England, Jan. 21, 1898.

Christian D. Fjeldsted died Dec. 23, 1905, at Salt Lake
City; and, at the general conference of the Church, held at
Salt Lake City April 6, 1906, Charles H. Hart was chosen to
fill the vacancy thus caused in the council.

George Reynolds died Aug. 9, 1909. and at the next general
conference, Oct. 6. 1909, Levi Edgar Young was chosen to
complete the council.

The council now (1913) stands as follows: Seymour B.
Young, Brigham H. Roberts, Jonathan G. Kimball. Rulon S.
Wells, Joseph W. McMurrin, Charles H. Hart, and Levi Edgar
Young.

PRESIDING BISHOPRIC

Edward Partridge, the first Bishop of the Church, was
called to that position Feb. 4, 1831, by revelation.

"And again, I have called my servant Edward Partridge, and give
a commandment, that he should be appointed by the voice of the
church, and ordained a bishop unto the church, to leave his mer-
chandise and to spend all his time in the labors of the church."
Doc. and Cov. 41:9.

Later, when other Bishops were ordained, he became
known as the first or presiding Bishop. June 6. 1831, at
solemn meeting, held at Kirtland, Ohio. Isaac Morley and
John Corrill were ordained and set apart as counselors to
Bishop Partridge.

In a letter written by the First Presidency at Kirtland,
Ohio, to Wm. W. Phelps and others, in Missouri, under date
of June 25, 1833, the following occurs: "Let Brother Isaac
Morley be ordained second Bishop in Zion, and let brother
John Corrill be ordained third. Let Brother Edward Part-
ridge choose as counselors in their place, Brother Parley P
Pratt and Brother Titus Billings, ordaining Brother Billings
to the High Priesthood."

Owing to the persecutions which befell the Saints in Mis-
souri, these appointments were not made; but at a meeting
held at Far West, Mo., Aug. 1, 1837, Titus Billings was elect-
ed Bishop's counselor, in place of John Corrill; and at a
conference held at the same place, Nov. 7, 1837, Edward Part-
ridge "was nominated to still act as Bishop"; after which he
nominated Isaac Morley and Titus Billings for his counselors,
and they "were unanimously chosen."

These three constituted the head Bishopric of the Church
during the lifetime of Bishop Partridge.

Bishop Edward Partridge filled his responsible position
faithfully, in the midst of the most severe persecutions,
until his death, which occurred at Nauvoo, 111., May 27, 1840.

In a revelation given through Joseph the Prophet, Jan.
19, 1841, George Miller was called to the-positlon of Bishop,
in place of Edward Partridge, deceased.

'T therefore say unto you. I seal upon his head the office at a
ilsnopric. like unto my servant Edward Partridge, that he may re-
ceive the consecrations of mine house, that he may administer



blessings upon the heads of the poor of my people, saith the Lord.
Let no man despise my servant George Miller, for he shall honor
me." Doc. and Cov. 124:21.

In the same revelation (Doc. & Cov., 124:141), the Lord
says: "I give unto you, Vinson Knight. Samuel H. Smith and
Shadrach Roundy, if he will receive it, to preside over the
Bishopric."

From the documents at our command at present, we are
unable to learn whether or not the above named brethren
officiated in the callings whereunto they were called; but at
the general conference, held in October, 1844, at Nauvoo,
111., Newel K. Whitney (who had been called by revelation
to act as Bishop at Kirtland, Ohio, Dec. 4, 1831, was sus-
tained as "first Bishop," and George Miller as "second
Bishop" in the Church.

"And the duty of the bishop shall be made known by the com-
mandments which have been given, and the voice of the conference.

"And now, verily I say unto you, my servant Newel K. Whitney is
the man who shall be appointed and ordained unto this power. This
is the will of the Lord your God, your Redeemer." Doc. and Cov.
72:7-8.

From that time till his death Newel K. Whitney was recog-
nized, and after April, 1847, sustained by the voice of the
general conference, as presiding Bishop of the Church. He
had no regularly appointed Counselors; but recognized
Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball as his chief coun-
selors and advisers.

Bishop Newel K. Whitney died in Great Salt Lake City.
Sept. 23, 1850. At the general conference of the Church, held
in April, 1851, Edward Hunter, who had been ordained a
Bishop in Nauvoo in 1844, was sustained as presiding Bishop.
It appears, however, that he was not ordained and set apart
to that position till a year later. Like his predecessor, he
received immediate advice from Presidents Brigham Young
and Heber C. Kimball, and chose no other counselors until
October, 1856, when, at the general conference, held in Great
Salt Lake City, Leonard W. Hardy was sustained as first
and Jesse C. Little as second counselor to Bishop Edward
Hunter.

Counselor Jesse C. Little resigned his position as coun-
selor. At the general conference held in Salt Lake City, in
October, 1874, Robert T. Burton was sustained as second
counselor to Bishop Hunter. He was ordained and set apart
to this position, Sept. 2, 1875, after his return from a mission
to England.

Bishop Edward Hunter died in Salt Lake City, Oct. 16, 1883.
At the general conference, held in April, 1884, Wm. B. Pres-
ton, who had previously presided over the Cache Stake of
Zion, was sustained as presiding Bishop, with Leonard W.
Hardy as his first and Robert T. Burton' as his second coun-
selor.

Counselor Leonard W. Hardy died in Salt Lake City, July



Online LibraryFrank Ellwood EsshomPioneers and prominent men of Utah → online text (page 275 of 293)