Frank S[tockton] Dobbins.

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REESE LIBRARY-

OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,

Class No.



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aws;




The Ansona



Page 68



FRONTISPIECE.




T\^V-»o»o—7^VB



THE ANSONS




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flSIATIG (9EMPLES.



HY

REV. FRANK S. DOBBINS.





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PHILADELPHIA



American Baptist publication Society,

14-20 Chestnut Street.



I







THE ANSONS



rv



ASIATIC TEMPLES.



REV. FRANK S. DOBBINS.




PHILADELPHIA :

AMERICAN BAPTIST PUBLICATION SOCIETY,
1420 Chestnut Street.



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HQINALTOBfc

:TAlNEO ^55^y

T041994 Jf/£



REFSE



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1885, by the

AMERICAN BAPTIST PUBLICATION SOCIETY,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



CONTENTS.



PAGE.

CHAPTER I.
Setting Out on the Journey 7



CHAPTER II.
A Tricycle Trip to Asakusa, Tokio 23

CHAPTER in.
An Afternoon in Shiba, Tokio 38

CHAPTER IV.
A Jin-riki-sha Jaunt to Dai Butz 54

CHAPTER V.
Over the Mountains to Kioto 71

3



4 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VI.
The Sacred City op Kioto 86



CHAPTER VII.
To the Land of Teas and Queues. 102

CHAPTER VIII.
From Shanghai to Pekin 118

CHAPTER IX.
The story op " Chinese Gordon." 137

CHAPTER X.
Housekeeping in Canton 152

CHAPTER XL
In the Land op the White Elephant 171

CHAPTER XII.
Under the Shadow of Shway Dagon 187

CHAPTER XIII.
From Rangoon to Madras 205



CONTENTS. 5

PAGE

CHAPTER XIV.
Juggernaut and Kali 221

CHAPTER XV.
Overland Through India 242

CHAPTER XVI.
In Moslem Lands 260

CHAPTER XVII.
The Invalid's Journey Home 274




THE

ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.



CHAPTER I.

SETTING OUT ON THE JOURNEY.

rpHE Hoyt Mission Band had just closed its
meeting. As the little folks stood about,
putting on their coats and hats, it was very-
evident that something had greatly excited
them. There was an unusual bustle and stir,
as the tongues were wagging in a much livelier
manner than during the meeting just closed;
and there was good reason for it, as we shall

Bertie and Bessie Anson had been living in
Alton for six years past. Their father was the
Pastor of the First Church. Just before coming
to Alton he had been greatly moved by the



8 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

speech of a returned missionary, and had de-
termined to give himself to the work of win-
ning the Chinese to Christ. But his physician
told him that he was not strong enough to stand
a life-long residence in that country, and he was
forced to give up his cherished purpose.

When he settled in Alton, he determined to
become better acquainted with the work of
foreign missions, and to try to awaken in his
people an interest in them. So he set for
himself a course of study on the geography
and history of Asia, and began to read of the
manners of the strange peoples occupying that
continent. He found this an excellent diversion
from his ordinary studies. Of course, his little
boy and girl, then eight and six years old, be-
came interested also in their papa's books and
maps and pictures.

The people did not care much for missions, as
Mr. Anson soon learned ; but the reason of this
was, that they knew scarcely anything about
them. The first thing he did was to buy a



SETTING OUT ON THE JOURNEY. i)

Magic Lantern and a number of slides, and
with the aid of these he gave a series of Friday
evening lectures. Of course, the people came to
see the pictures, and soon began to care more for
the salvation of the idolaters. After a little
while the young folks planned to organize a
Mission Band, and to take up in earnest the
study of missions. Mr. Anson presided at
their meetings, and gave the little folks the
benefit of his own learning. The Band had
made such progress, that in four or five years
they had made imaginary journeys in almost
every country of Asia. They had held festivals,
given entertainments, and prepared "Japanese
tea-parties," all in addition to the gift of quite
a sum of their own money to the missionary
workers in Swatow.

Mr. Anson had a pet project; for this he had
been carefully saving his money during the six
years past. It looked as if he would have to
wait a great many more years before he would be
able to carry out his plan, when he received news



10 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

of the death of a relative, to whom he had once
rendered important services, who had left him
nearly five thousand dollars. At once his mind
was made up that he should take his family and
make the long wished for tour of the temples
and missions of the East. In this way, he felt
that he could become well acquainted with the
missionaries and their fields of labor; and so,
perhaps, be of as much service to the Master
in stirring up the hearts of Christians at
home, as if he had gone to China as a mis-
sionary.

This it was that had caused such a stir among
the members of the Hoyt Mission Band, for
Bertie and Bessie had just told them of the
intended journey.

" Oh, how I wish that I was going ! "
"Won't you write us long letters and tell us
all that you see?" "When will you go?"
"They won't eat you up, will they, out there?"

How the questions poured out ! It seemed
wonderful that it was to be a real journey; that



SETTING OUT ON THE JOURNEY. 11

with their own eyes Bertie and Bessie were to
see the temples and the mission chapels of which
they had read in Little Helpers and The Helping
Hand; that they were to go about among the
queer folks of whom the missionaries had
written.

The days of preparation quickly passed by,
and the Anson family were ready to start on
their journey around the world. Mr. Anson
had determined to burden himself with just as
little baggage as possible. So we see the family
party, on a bright Monday morning, seated in
the Pullman car, dressed in rough and tumble
suits, and ready to enjoy, to the full, their
journey from the very beginning. To Bertie
and Bessie it was a new experience to travel
for more than a few hours. " It was just like
a picnic," Bessie said, as the porter brought
them their great lunch basket. When night
came, their seats were drawn together, mat-
tresses and sheets and blankets spread over
them, and a bed pulled down from the ceiling



12 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

of the car, and curtains hung before them.
Then Bertie and his papa climbed up into
the upper berth, while Bessie and her mamma
slept in the lower one. It was a long while
before the children could get to sleep; they
were so excited with the leaving home, and
were so often disturbed as trains rushed past
them. It was a night and an experience that
they never forgot.

The party stopped for a day in Chicago, to get
rested and to prepare for the journey across
the prairies and mountains to San Francisco,
where they were to take the steamer for Japan.
At Ogden they stopped again, to go up to Salt
Lake, and to see the great Mormon city. After
a ride of a little more than six days and nights
in the cars, they reached San Francisco. Here
Bessie took the chance of writing to one of her
friends who occupied the same seat with her in
school, and who was the Secretary of the EToyt
Mission Band:



setting out on the journey. 13

"Occidental Hotel, San Francisco.

" My Dear Nellie : Oh, how I wish that
you and all the girls could be with me ! It all
seems so funny. We are awfully tired of riding
in the cars. I would like to tell you about the
Indians we saw, and their babies, ' pappooses/ as
they call them; they were awfully dirty, I
thought, and their papas and mammas were not
any cleaner. When somebody said, ' There's
an Indian/ oh, how it made my heart jump!
But I don't feel half so afraid now. And then
the Chinamen ; we saw more and more of them
the nearer we came to California. They look so
clean (papa says it is only on the outside), and
they go about so quietly. But, how funny their
talk seems. 'Supposee, missie, you wanchee one
cup tea, me catchee. , 'You, Melican girlee?'
'Me sabee.' They call this 'pidgeon English/
or business English.

"We climbed up, up, up the mountains from
Nebraska, then we went down the Rockies, and
then right up and over the Sierra Nevadas. At



14 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

one place they took us on board a great ferry-
boat, locomotive, cars, and all. The cars do not
come right into San Francisco, but they run into
Oakland and out on a great wharf several miles
long ; then the people get into two-storied ferry-
boats, and are taken over the bay into the city.
Bertie says that a man told him that there are
three railroads across the continent now, one up
north, through Dakota to Oregon, one down
south, through New Mexico and Southern
California, and the one we came on, through
Nebraska, Wyoming, Nevada, and so to San
Francisco.

"On Tuesday, a girl named Rubie Larrison
came to see us with her papa, who is a deacon in
the church here. I like her very much, and I am
going to see her some day at her home. Last
Sunday, we went to church in Oakland, and I
sat with Rubie. In the evening, we went to the
Chinese Mission School ; it was a queer Sunday-
school. Every class had just one pupil and one
teacher. The Chinamen all dress just as they do



SETTING OUT OX THE JOURNEY. 15

in China, with their ' pig-tails/ and all. They
sing in Chinese mostly. I had all I could do to
keep from laughing at them. Papa is going to
take one of the Chinese ( boys' with him on the
steamer; his name is Ah Ching. He has been
very sick, and the missionary teacher wants to
keep him out of the steerage. By going with
papa he can be in the cabin most of the time.

"The folks that we have met tease us about
being sea-sick, and they ask us to try all sorts of
things to keep off sea-sickness. Papa went to
the doctor's yesterday, and he gave him some
powders in a tin box. We all have to take them ;
they taste just like salt. They are marked
Bromide of Sodium; but I don't know what
that is.

"Well, I must not write any more, because it

is bedtime. Please give my love to all the girls.

"Your friend,

Bessie Anson."

It took some time to make all the arrange-
ments for the sea voyage. State-rooms had to be



16 THE ARSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

secured, money had to be exchanged, tickets
bought, and every so many other little things to
be attended to. Under the guidance of Rubie
Larrison and her papa, the children went to
Woodward's Gardens and to the Cliff House, to
see the seals come up out of the sea and climb
up the rocks. At another time they went to
the smelting works, and saw them refining gold
and silver; and then, to the Mint, where it was
turned into coin. On another day, guided by a
policeman, they went through "China-town,"
among the opium dens, and into the "joss-
houses," where the children saw for the first time
the idols of the heathen. It seemed a strange
thing to find so many heathen temples in Chris-
tian America. In one of these temples, three
idols sat side by side; they represented Buddha
past, present, and to come; and all parts of the
temple, as well as the idols, were decorated with
color and gilding. While the children were in
the "Joss-house of the Three Precious Budd-
has," a poor woman came in, and, kneeling with



SETTING OUT ON THE JOURNEY. 17

her head to the floor, began to mumble over her
prayers. It brought the tears to Bessie's eyes,
and filled the hearts of all with sadness, that she
should be praying to the wooden idols that could
not hear, while a loving, living Saviour stood
waiting to help her.

Mr. Anson found out that quite a number of
missionaries were to sail on the same steamer
with his own party ; and, as he had some letters
of introduction to officials of the Steamship
Company, he managed to have it arranged that
his party and the missionaries should have rooms
close together, and that they should eat at the
same tables. He was also able to get into the
good graces of the captain, through the influence
of these friends, and so received many little
kindnesses during the voyage. Among the mis-
sionaries were a gentleman and his wife, who
had lived twenty- five years in China, and
another and his wife, who had lived a short
time in Japan, and who were going back again
with their little son, a child of three years old.

B



18 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

The rest were all new to the work ; they were a
medical missionary and his wife, and four young
ladies and two young gentlemen. This made a
very pleasant company; and Mr. Anson was
delighted that he had such a chance of becoming
well acquainted with the missionaries.

Finally the day came for starting on the long
voyage of three or four weeks across the Pacific
Ocean. The steamer's decks were crowded with
friends, who had come aboard to say a last good-
bye. Here and there might be seen a lady
passenger, looking with envious eyes upon
those who were so fortunate as to have friends
to bid them a farewell. Then the bell rang the
hour, a Chinese cabin-boy beat the gong, and the
officers called out: "All aboard and all ashore."
The great ropes were drawn in, the gangway
drawn up, the tug was made fast to the steamer,
the pilot took his place, the command was given,
and the great vessel was towed out into the bay.
Then the tug's ropes were cast off, the whistles
blew a farewell, the engineer's bell was rung,



SETTING OUT ON THE JOURNEY. 19

the great screw began to turn, and, by its own
power, the steamer moved grandly down the
bay. As they passed, the whistles of the smelt-
ing-works blew a farewell to the missionary
party, who had visited them a few days pre-
vious.

As everything had been arranged in the state-
rooms the Anson party were to occupy, they re-
mained upon deck, determined to see the last of
the land. Very little motion was felt, and our
friends were congratulating themselves upon
their comfortable feelings. Just as the vessel
passed through the Golden Gate, out upon the
Pacific Ocean, the motion of the swell began to
be felt, and when well across the bar, the rolling
and pitching began. One after another went
below to find a place to lie down. Bessie
was quite amused as little Charlie wanted to
know what made the water jump up to the
clouds and then away down again, and what
made him feel so funny. By-and-by, the
"Oh mys" were heard, as one or another suf-



20 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

fered the distresses of sea-sickness. The Anson
family kept up very well, thanks to the medi-
cine which they had taken by the doctor's direc-
tion, though it did not entirely prevent the sick-
ness.

Bertie soon made friends with the officers and
passengers, and, boy like, asked any number
of questions. He pried into everything. For
awhile he stood watching the wheelman, after
the pilot had gone ashore ; then he looked into
the coops where the sheep, and the ducks,
chickens, turkeys, and pigeons were kept; then
through the hatchways he watched the work-
ing of the engines.

After awhile, the purser came on deck and
began to talk with him. After a little banter
about his not being sick, the purser began to
talk of the passengers. Bertie had always
looked upon missionaries as a sort of heroes,
and was much taken aback when the purser
ventured to sneer at them and their work.

As the days passed by and he became better



SETTING OUT ON THE JOURNEY. 21

acquainted with the parser and with some of the
passengers, more doubts were put into his mind,
and he, himself, began to doubt if the mission-
ary work was really of any use, and to wonder
if it was not all folly, after all. He could not
tell these thoughts to his father, he felt, and so
he determined that he would carefully watch the
missionaries and listen to their talk, and so see
if they were in earnest; and that when he went
through Japan and China he would see for
himself as to the real state of the heathen, and
just what good or evil the missionaries might be
doing. He might have told his father all about
his doubts; but, with the conceit so common to
boyhood, he preferred to see for himself and to
reason the thing out alone.

Every morning and evening, the missionaries
and the Anson family gathered together in a
corner of the dining-room for " family prayers."
On Sundays, they gained the great privilege of
having service in the "Social Hall." Often
they would cluster about the piano and sing



22 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

some of the grand old gospel hymns; and on
warm, pleasant nights would draw their chairs
together upon the deck and send the sweet
sounds out upon the air. They seemed greatly
to enjoy each other's company; though they
belonged to different denominations, they were
one in their trust in Christ, and one in wish-
ing to give his gospel to the heathen. So day
after day passed, varied by storms and calms,
yet one day very much like every other. On
the twentieth day of the voyage, the captain
assured the passengers that they should see
land on the morrow, and, with this joyous
expectation, they "turned in" early.



CHAPTER II.

A TRICYCLE TRIP TO ASAKUSA, TOKIO.

~D RIGHT and early the next morning, Bertie
rose and went on deck, half expecting to
see land close at hand. Nothing was to be seen,
however, but the same great circle where sea and
sky seemed to come together. Just then the
quartermaster came to the captain's cabin, and
called out:

" Land ahead, sir."

"Where?" said Bertie.

"Right off there. Can't you make it out,
sir?"

Bertie looked and looked in vain. Finally,
he went to his state-room and brought his glasses,
but even then he could not see it. Just then
the captain came from his room.

" Where is the land, captain ? I can't see it."

The captain scanned the horizon before them.



24 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

"Why, right there. Just keep looking at
that point, a little above the horizon ; you can
only tell it from the waves, because they move,
while it is steady. You will soon see more of it."

After breakfast, when they came on deck
again, they could see, quite plainly, a point
stretching up into the sky.

"It is Fuji-yama, the great mountain of
Japan," said one of the missionaries who had
been over to Japan before.

As the forenoon passed away, birds came
flying about the vessel — not the gulls which
had always been flying about the stern of the
steamer all the voyage across the ocean — but
land birds. The saw-like line of the horizon
became more distinct, as they came nearer to
the mouth of the bay of Yedo; they passed many
Japanese fishing junks with their square sails;
and off to the south they could see a long trail
of smoke left by a steamer, which had dis-
appeared below the horizon.

For several days the crew had been busy



A TRICYCLE TRIP TO ASAKUSA. 25

polishing up the brasses, and scouring and scrub-
bing generally; now every rope was coiled up
nicely, the covers were taken from the furniture,
the carpet's covering removed, and the whole
vessel was put in holiday trim.

While yet some distance down the bay, the
steamer was sighted, and a signal gun was fired
from an American man-of-war, which announced
to the people of Yokohama the arrival of the
American mail steamer. Soon the bay was all
alive with little boats, sculled by almost naked
boatmen; and little steam launches were seen
rushing towards the steamer as she came up
to her buoy and was made fast. The gangway
was lowered, and people began to go and
come.

Among the first to come aboard were some
missionaries from Yokohama, who sought those
who were to join their mission in Japan. These
all went off together. Shortly after, the Anson
family took their places in a hotel launch, and
were very quickly in their rooms, overlooking the



26 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

bay, where they could see the steamer riding at
her buoy nearly a mile from shore.

Bertie and Bessie were impatient to go out
into the native town; but as in the excitement
of getting to land they had eaten no "tiffin" —
as they call the noonday luncheon in the East —
they were compelled to wait a little while.
While they were at tiffin, a Japanese servant
brought in a card to Mr. Anson, saying:

" Gentleman, he want see you."

Mr. Anson found it to be an old college friend,
who had been in Japan for about six years past,
and who had seen his name in the list of pas-
sengers just arrived. At once he asked Mr.
Anson to his home; but Mr. Anson feared that
this might put his friend to considerable trouble,
as his "bungalow" was small, so he declined;
but gladly accepted the offer of guidance.

When the family were all together, they began
to talk over their plans with Mr. Benton. He
advised them to spend two or three days sight-
seeing in Tokio, the capital, then to proceed



A TRICYCLE TRIP TO ASAKUSA. 27

overland to Kioto, turning aside on the way to
see the gigantic idol, Dai Butz ; from Kioto they
could proceed to Kobe, where they would take
steamer for Shanghai, China. After consider-
able discussion, they decided on adopting this
route. For this afternoon they concluded to
stay within the foreign settlement, to go to the
book stores and get a map of Japan, a guide
book, and some other supplies. They found
that the houses and stores of the foreigners
were built mostly of stone and tiles, with tile
roofs; that there were no sidewalks, and that
people of almost all nationalities were to be
seen going to and fro. In their rambles they
passed by several large stone buildings, from
whose windows came a delightful fragrance.
Into one of these Mr. Benton took them, and
they saw several hundred women standing before
charcoal fires in stone braziers, kneading some
sort of leaves. This they found to be the tea-
leaves, and they were being "re-fired" before
packing them in boxes to send to America.



28 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

At an early hour the next morning, the party
were at the railroad station, accompanied by Mr.
Benton, who was to be their guide in Tokio.
After a ride of eighteen miles, they reached
the capital. Here a friend of Mr. Benton's
met them at the station. They were soon
seated in their jin-7'iki-shas, a carriage holding
one or two persons, and pulled by two Japanese
coolies. Mr. Benton's friend, Mr. Granger, had
brought his tricycle, which had seats for two,
and he invited Bertie to sit beside him, so that
he might explain to him the persons and places
that they passed.

So they trundled along up the Ginza Avenue,
by the side of the street cars, under the wires
from which the electric lights were suspended,
and by houses that were half foreign looking.
It seemed to Bertie and Bessie that they had
need of a half-dozen pairs of eyes apiece to see
all the curious objects that they passed. Up one
street and down another, it seemed a perfect
maze, and yet the sun steadily shone upon their



A TRICYCLE TRIP TO ASAKUSA. 29

backs, so that they knew they were not going
around and around.

"Where are you taking us to?" Bertie asked
Mr. Granger.

" To the great Temple of Asakusa, the temple
that is more crowded with worshipers than any
other temple in the city."

" Why do you go to the temple? Are there
not other things more worth seeing?" Bertie
asked.

"No," said Mr. Granger; "the temples of
Asakusa and of Shiba, where we are going
this afternoon, are the most famous sights of
Tokio. While we are up in this part of the
city we may run over to Uy6no Park and see
the Government Museum ; but you will soon see
that the temples are far more curious and inter-
esting."

" Of course," said Bertie, " I have heard of
temples ; but I really do not know just what
they are. What kind of a place is this temple
of — what do you call it ? "



30 THE ANSONS IN ASIATIC TEMPLES.

"A temple is not like a Protestant church in
America, but rather like the Eoman Catholic
cathedrals and shrines. You know that Bud-
dhism — to which these temples belong — and
Roman Catholicism are, in some respects, as
much alike as two peas in the same pod.
Within the temple grounds, as you will see,
there is quite a collection of buildings — the
temple proper, the priests' houses, a preaching
hall, and the like; but you will soon see for
yourself."

Mr. Granger and Bertie were in the lead, and


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