Frederic Henry Hedge.

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UC-NRLF



1 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA.



GIFT OF

GEORGE MOREY RICHARDSON.




Received, ^August, 1898.
^Accession No. "/ /*) "4 /* H Class No. |

iaaaQEi^^EscEK^









m



jftetrical
CransiattottS

ana



Frederic H. Hedge

and

Annis Lee Wister



OF THB

UNIVERSITY




METRICAL TRANSLATIONS

AND POEMS



BY

FREDERIC H. HEDGE

AND

ANNIS LEE WISTER





BOSTON AND NEW YORK
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

iw, Camfcri&ge
1888



Copyright, 1888,
By FREDERIC H. HEDGE and ANNIS LEE WISTER.

All rights reserved.



The Riverside Press, Cambridge :
Electrotyped and Printed by H. O. Houghton & Co.




CONTENTS



JW O 7 Y



BY FREDERIC H. HEDGE / &

TRANSLATIONS. PAGE [*

Song of the Angels ........... i

The Sunset .............. 3

Faust s Curse ............. 4

The Answer of the Spirits to Faust s Curse . . 5

The Easter Song ............ 6

Song of the Earth Spirit ......... 8

Prometheus .............. 9

Ganymede .............. n

My Goddess ....... ...... 13

Mahomet s Song ............ 16

Primeval Words ............ 19

Coptic Song ............. 21

Harz Journey in Winter ......... 22

Uncle Kronos ............. 26

The King in Thule ........... 28

The Fisher .............. 29

Mignon s Song ............ 31

To the Moon ............. 32

Spirit Greeting ............ 34

The Singer .............. 34

The Knight Toggenburg ...... ... 36

The Pilgrim ............. 4



iv Contents



Longing 42

The Castle by the Sea 43

The Dream 45

From Heine 46

From La Motte Fouque" 47

Liitzow s Wild Chase 48

Luther s Hymn 50

ORIGINAL POEMS.

The Class of "Twenty-five" on their Fortieth

Anniversary 52

The Class of 1825 on their Fiftieth Anniversary . 54

Florence in November 56

The Idealist 57

The Northern Lights and the Stars 59

Passion Hymn 61

Sursum Corda 62

E Profundis 63

The Morning Star 64

Christmas Hymn 66

BY ANNIS LEE WISTER.

TRANSLATIONS.

Soothing Days 71

The Goldsmith s Daughter 72

May-Dew 75

Departure 77

Autumn Colors 78

A Song of Spring 79

Song 82

Phantoms 83

A Winter Night 85



Contents



Autumn 86

Autumn 87

The Postilion 88

Antique Art 9 1

Day-Dawn 9 1

The Giant s Plaything 9 2

Spring and Autumn 96

The Three Suns 97

Morning in Spring 99

Two Coffins ioo

Spring ioi

The Bridal Night 103

April, 1844 . . 104

To the Moon 107

Remorse i9

Autumn Thoughts no

Morning ITI

Visions i*3

A Song of Winter 114

Mysterious Hours 114

Spring Yearnings 1 1 5

Westward "6

Beauty "8

Before Sunrise 119

Evening by the Sea 120

The Imprisoned Admiral 120

The Sunlight s Golden Glow 123

Summer Night 124

Opening Spring 126




BY FREDERIC H. HEDGE





TRANSLATIONS
BY FREDERIC H. HEDGE

SONG OF THE ANGELS

FROM FAUST.

RAPHAEL.

HE sun with brother orbs is sound
ing

Still, as of old, his rival song,
As on his destined journey bound
ing

With thunder-step he sweeps along.
The sight gives angels strength, though

greater

Than angels utmost thought sublime ;
And all Thy lofty works, Creator,
Are grand as in creation s prime !

GABRIEL.

And fleetly, thought-surpassing, fleetly

The earth s green pomp is spinning round,

And paradise alternates sweetly
With night terrific and profound.



^Translations?



There foams the sea, its broad wave beating
Against the steep cliff s rocky base,

And rock and sea away are fleeting
In never-ending spheral chase.

MICHAEL.
And storms with rival fury heaving

From land to sea, from sea to land,
Still as they rave a chain are weaving

Of linked efficacy grand.
There burning desolation blazes,

Precursor of the thunder s way ;
But, Lord, Thy servants own with praises

The gentle movement of Thy day.

ALL THREE.

The sight gives angels strength, though
greater

Than angels utmost thought sublime ;
And all Thy lofty works, Creator,

Are grand as in creation s prime.




THE SUNSET
FROM FAUST.

sinks, he vanishes, the day is

done.
Yonder he speeds, and sheds new

life forever.
Oh, had I wings to rise and follow on
Still after him with fond endeavor !
Then should I see beneath my feet

The hushed world s everlasting vesper,
Each summit tipped with fire, each valley s

silence sweet,

The silver brook, the river s molten jas
per;
And naught should stay my God-competing

flight,
Though savage mountains now with all

their ravines,
And now the ocean with its tempered

havens,
Successive greet the astonished sight.

The God at length appears as he were sink
ing,
But still the impulse is renewed ;

I hasten on, the light eternal drinking,
The day pursuing, by the night pursued ;



SEranstotons




Above the sky, beneath the ocean spread.
A glorious dream ! Meanwhile the sun has

sped.

In vain the spirit plies her active wings
While still to earth the earth - born body
clings.



FAUST S CURSE

HOUGH the torn heart a moment s

healing

Imbibed from that familiar strain,
And what remained of childish feel
ing

Echoed the dear old time again ;
Yet cursed be henceforth all that borrows

A magic lure to charm the breast,
That prisoned in this cave of sorrows

Would dazzle us or lull to rest.
Cursed before all the high opinion

With which the mind itself deludes ;
Cursed be Appearance whose dominion
Its shows on human sense intrudes;
Cursed all that to Ambition caters

With honor and a deathless name ;
Cursed all that as Possession flatters,
As wife and child, and goods, and game.



Cursed when with hope of golden treasure

He spurs our spirits to the fight,
And cursed be Mammon when for pleasure

He lays the tempting pillow right.
Cursed be the grape s balsamic potion,

And cursed be Love s delicious thrall,
And cursed be Hope, and Faith s devotion,

And cursed be Patience more than all !



THE ANSWER OF THE SPIRITS TO FAUST S
CURSE




O! Wo!
Destroyed it thou hast,

The beautiful world
With the blow of thy fist
To ruin hast hurled.
This hath a demigod shattered.
The fragments to nothing we ve scattered.

Sadly we the lost surrender.
Fairer now,

Earth s son in splendor
Rarer, now,
Oh, re-create it !

In thine own bosom build it again !
New life beginning,



Thought clearer winning ;
Then celebrate it
Songs with new cheer !



THE EASTER SONG

FROM FAUST.
CHORUS OF ANGELS.

HRIST has arisen !
Joy ye dispirited
Mortals whom merited
Trailing inherited
Woes did imprison !

CHORUS OF WOMEN.

Costly devices

We had prepared,
Shroud and sweet spices,

Linen and nard.
Wo f the disaster !

Whom we here laid,
Gone is the Master,

Empty his bed !







TJNIVEB3ITY
Tr



CHORUS OF ANGELS.

Christ has arisen !
Loving and glorious,
Out of laborious
Conflict victorious.
Hail to the Risen !

CHORUS OF DISCIPLES.

Hath the inhumated,

Upward aspiring,
Hath he consummated

All his desiring ?
Is he in growing bliss

Near the creative joy ?
Wearily we in this

Earthly house sigh.
Empty and hollow, us

Left he unblest ?
Master, thy followers

Envy thy rest.

CHORUS OF ANGELS.

Christ hath arisen
Out of Corruption s womb

Burst every prison !
Vanish death s gloom !



Active in charity,
Praise him in verity !
His feast prepare it ye !
His message bear it ye !
His joy declare it ye !

Then is the Master near,

Then is he here.



SONG OF THE EARTH SPIRIT

FROM FAUST.

N floods of life, in action s storm,

Above, beneath,
To and fro I am weaving
Now birth, now death,
A deep ever heaving, ^
With change still flowing,
With life all glowing,
The roaring loom of time I ply,
And weave the live garment of Deity.




SCransIattons




PROMETHEUS

!)Y ! veil thy heavens, Zeus !
With clouds and mist,
And exercise,
As boys lop thistle-heads,
Thy strength on oaks and mountain-tops !

My earth here below

Thou must still let stand,

And my hut which thou buildedst not,

And here my hearth

Whose glow thou enviest.

Nothing poorer I know

Beneath the sun than you Gods !

Your majesty

Ye nourish sparely

With sacrifice,

And breath of prayer,

And soon would starve

Were not children and beggars

Fools of hope.

When a child, unknowing
Which way to turn,
I raised to the sun



io



My wandering eye
As if there above
Were an ear to listen
To my complaint,
A heart like mine
To pity the oppressed.

Who helped me repel

The Titans insolence ?

Who rescued me from death ?

Who from bondage redeemed me ?

Hast thou not done it

Thyself, my heart ?

Heart of mine holy-glowing,

Glow dst young and good, betrayed.

Shall I render thanks

To the sleeper on high ?

I honor thee ? For what ?

Hast thou assuaged ever

The pangs of the burdened ?

Hast thou ever dried

The tears of distress ?

Who moulded me to manhood ?

Omnipotent Time,

Eternal Fate,

My lords and thine.



1 1



Didst fancy forsooth
That I would hate life,
Would flee to the desert,
Because not all my
Dream-blossoms ripened ?

Here I plant me,
Form men in my image,
A race, my equals,
To suffer, to weep,
To enjoy and be glad,
And thee not to heed,
Like me.

GOETHE



GANYMEDE

OW in morning splendor
Thou round me glowest,
Spring beloved !
How through my heart thrills

The holy joy

Of thy warmth eternal,

Infinite Beauty !

Oh, might I clasp thee

Within these arms.




12 ^Translation*

Lo ! on thy breast here

Prone I languish.

And thy flowers and thy grass

Press themselves on my heart.

Thou coolest the torturing

Thirst of my bosom,

Love-breathing morning-wind.

Warbles the nightingale ;

Wooing she calls from the misty vale.

I come ! I come !

Whither ? Ah ! whither ?

Up, upward it draws me,

The clouds are floating

Downward, the clouds stoop,

Bend to love s yearning,

Here ! Here !

In your embraces

Upward !

Embracing, embraced, up !

Up to thy bosom,

All-loving Father.

GOETHE



13




MY GODDESS

O which of the Immortals
Is the highest prize due ?
I quarrel with no one,
But I assign it

To the ever-active,

Ever novel,

Jove s wondrous daughter,

His pet child,

Fantasy.

For to her he conceded
The humors all,
Which else he reserves
For himself alone,
And has his pleasure
In the darling.

Rose-wreathed now,

With lily-stalk

She may tread the flower-valleys,

Command summer-birds,

And with bee-lips

Suck from blossoms

Light, nourishing dew.*



14



Now again

With streaming hair

And eye of gloom

She may rave with the wind

Round walls of rock,

And thousand-colored

Like morning and evening,

And ever changing,

Like moon-glimpses,

Appear to mortals.

Let each and all
The Father praise,
The old, the high,
Who with mortal man
Vouchsafed to couple
This beautiful
Unfading spouse.

For to us hath he joined her,

To us alone,

With heavenly bonds,

And bound it upon her

In joy and sorrow

To swerve from us never,

A partner true.



15



Ever the other
Indigent tribes
Of the child-abounding,
Life-breathing earth
Wander and pasture
In dim fruition,
And heavy dull pains
Of their momentary
Bounded existence,
Bowed by Necessity s
Pitiless yoke.

But to us he hath given,
Oh, joy ! his aptest
Delicate daughter;
Entreat her kindly
As one beloved,
And grant her the honors
Of the lady of the house.
And let not the aged
Stepmother, Wisdom,
Affront the dear soul
With frowns reproving.

Yet know I her sister,
The elder, the graver,
My quiet friend.
With the light of life only



16



May she depart from me,
The noble inciter,
Comforter Hope!

GOETHE



MAHOMET S SONG




EE the rock-born spring !

A joy-bright thing,
Like a starry eye ;
High o er clouds
Friendly spirits

Nursed his childhood
In the bush amid the cliffs.

Youthful, fresh

From the clouds he dances down,
Down upon the marble rocks,
And shouts back again

Toward heaven.

Through mountain passes
He chases the gay pebbles
And, with early leader-step
Marching, sweeps along with him
His brother fountains.



SErattslatiotttf 17

In the valley down below
Flowers spring beneath his step ;
The meadow lives
By his breath.

But no valley s shade detains him,
And no flowers
That cling about his knees
And flatter him with eyes of love.
Tow rd the plain his course he steers
Serpentining.

Brooklets nestle

Fondly to his side; he enters

Now the plain in silvery splendor

And the plain his splendor shares.

And the rivers from the plains

And the torrents from the mountains

Shout to him and clamor : Brother !

Brother, take thy brothers with thee,

With thjee to thy ancient father,

To the everlasting ocean,

Who with outstretched arms awaits us.

Arms, alas ! which vainly open

To embrace his loving children.

For the greedy sand devours us ;

In the dreary waste the sunbeams

Suck our blood, or else a hill



OF r



1 8 2Draniation0

To a pool confines us. Brother !
Take thy brothers from the plain,
Take thy brothers from the mountains,
Take them with thee to thy sire !

Come ye all, then !

Now in grander volume swelling

All his kindred

Bear their sovereign Prince aloft,

And in rolling triumph he

Gives names to countries ; cities

Start to life beneath his feet.

Irrepressibly he rushes,

Leaves the city s naming spires,

Domes of marble, a creation

Of his wealth, he leaves behind.

Cedar palaces the Atlas
Bears upon his giant shoulders,
Over him a thousand banners
Rustle waving in the breeze,
Testifying of his glory.

Thus he bears along his brothers,
And his treasures, and his children ;
Thundering joy, he bears them on
To the waiting father s heart.

GOETHE



19



PRIMEVAL WORDS
ORPHIC.




?|S on that day which launched thee

into being
The sun related stood to every

planet
Thy life commenced, and with that doom

agreeing

Obeys till now the impulse which began it.
Such must thou be, thyself thy fate decree

ing ;

Thus did the sibyl say, the prophet sang it ;
Nor time nor force that inwrought type can

sever
Which through thy life unfolds itself forever.



Yet hath this fixed a movable enfolded,
That round us, with us moves, our path

pursuing;
Not by ourselves alone, by others moulded,

We learn to do as we see others doing.
And Fortune rules, now lauded, and now
scolded ;



20 Cranslation*

Youth sports with life, its graver cares

eschewing.

Until the fullness of the years invite it,
The lamp doth wait the flame that shall ignite

it.

"Epws.

It comes at length, from highest heaven de

scending,

Whither of old from chaos void it flew,
Nearer it comes, its light wings earthward

bending,
And brow and bosom with spring gales

doth woo ;

Now seeming to depart, now hither tending.
Then pleasure grows to pain, so wild, so

new.

And while with fickle aims the many palter,
The true heart worships at one chosen altar.



And thus it stands as in the stars we read it
Once more. Condition, law; and all our

willing

Is willing only because Heaven decreed it.
That will prevails each wilder impulse still

ing

Each fond caprice ; the idols that mislead it
The heart renounces, Duty s law fulfilling.



21



With show of freedom now the years sur

round us
While straiter limits than before have bound



us.



Strait be the limits Duty s law enforces,
Let walls of adamant around us rise ;
Yet know I one whose flight in triumph

courses

High over all, and time and space defies.
Hail to thee Hope ; thy airy being s sources
Are sun and mist, thy path the boundless

skies,
By thee impelled, no age, no zone can bind

us;

Wave but thy wing, and aeons lie behind us.

GOETHE



COPTIC SONG

EAVE to the learned their vain dis

putations,
Strict and sedate let the peda

gogues be,
Ever the wise of all ages and nations
Nod to each other, and smile and agree ;




22 ^Translations

Vain the attempt to cure fools of their folly,
Children of wisdom abandon it wholly,

Fool them and rule them, for so it should be.

Merlin the old in his tomb ever shining,
Where as a youngling I heard him divining,

Similar counsel confided to me ;
Vain the attempt to cure fools of their folly,
Children of wisdom abandon it wholly,

Fool them and rule them, since fools they
will be.

Mountains frequented by Indian adorers,
Crypts, the resort of Egyptian explorers,

All that is sacred confirms the decree ;
Vain the attempt to cure fools of their folly,
Children of wisdom abandon it wholly,

Fool them and rule them, for so it must be.

GOETHE



HARZ JOURNEY IN WINTER



S soars the hawk
On heavy morning clouds
With downy pinions resting,
Intent on prey,
Soar thou my song !




23



For a. God hath to each

His path prescribed,

Where the happy rush swift

To the joyful goal.

But he whose heart is

Shrunk with misfortune,

He vainly struggles

Against the strong bond

Of the iron thread

Which only the too-bitter shears

Shall one day sever.

To awful thickets

Press the wild game,

And together with the sparrows,

Long since the wealthy

Have slunk to their bogs.

T is easy following
Where Fortune leads,
Like the comfortable train
On mended ways, after
A prince s entrance.

But who goes apart there ?
His path is lost in the bush,
Behind him the thicket .
Closes together,



24



The grass stands straight again,
The desert devours him.

His wounds who shall heal

To whom balm became poison ?

Who out of love s fullness

Drank hatred of men.

First despised, then a despiser,

Devouring in secret

His own worth in

Unsatisfied selfhood.

Is there, Father of Love,

A tone in thy psalter

That can speak to his ear ?

Oh, comfort his heart !

Ope Thou his clouded eye

To the thousand springs

That beside him in the desert

Gush for the thirsting.

Thou who Greatest

Joys in abundance,

So that each one s cup runneth over,

Bless the brothers of the chase,

On the track of their game,

In youthful wantonness

Of frolic slaughter,

Late avengers of the mischief



25



Against which vainly

For years the peasant

Strove with his club.

But envelop the lone one

In thy gold clouds ;

With wintergreen entwine, Love !

Till blossoms the rose again,

The moist locks of thy poet.

With torch dimly gleaming

Thou lightest him

In his goings by night

Over ways that are fathomless,

Through fields that are desolate.

With the thousand-colored morning

Thou laugh st to the heart of him.

With the biting storm

Thou bearest him aloft.

Winter-streams from the rocks

Pour into his palms,

And an altar of sweetest thanksgiving

Is to him the dreaded mountain s

Snow-piled summit

With spirit-ranks crowned

By boding nations.

Thou * standest with unexplored bosom
Mysteriously revealed *
l The Brocken.



26



Above the astonished world,
And gazest through clouds
On their realms and their glory
Which thou enrichest from the veins
Of thy brothers beside thee.

GOETHE



UNCLE 1 KRONOS
(Time as a stage-driver; Life, a day s journey.)

URRY thee, Kronos !

On with thy rattling trot !

Down-hill goes the way ;

Thy loitering sickens
My dizzy brain.
On, over stock and stone !
Jolt as it may,
Bear me swift into life !

Now again with
Breath-exhausting stride,
Hard the up-hill way.
Up, then ! and tarry not,
Striving, hoping, still up !

1 In the German, Schwager, brother-in-law, a slang
term applied to stage-drivers.




27



Wide, high, glorious the view !
Prospect of life all around !
From mountain to mountain afar
Broods the eternal mind,
Eternal life presaging.

Sidewise the hut s shady covert
Thee invites,

And a solace-foretokening look
On the threshold of yonder maid.
Solace thee ! Me too, maiden,
Bless with the foaming draught,
Bless with thy health-beaming eye !

Down, then ! More swiftly descend !
See ! the sun now sinks ;
Quick, ere it set, ere chilly age
O ertake me on the moor
Ere my toothless jaws chatter
And my shambling limbs fail.

Drunk with the sun s last ray,
Whirl me ! A sea of fire
Flush in my swimming eyes
Whirl me dazzled and reeling
Into Hell s nocturnal gate !

Sound, O driver, thy horn !
Clatter with echoing tramp



28




That Orcus may know we are coming ;
That the host may be at the door
To give us friendly reception.

GOETHE



THE KING IN THULE

HERE lived a king in Thule,

A truer never breathed,
To him his mistress duly
A golden cup bequeathed.



That cup, his choicest treasure,
He drained at every bout ;

His eyes ran o er with pleasure
Whene er he drank thereout.

His day of life declining,
His towns he reckoned up,

All to his heirs resigning,
All but the golden cup.

Once more he held high wassail

With all his chivalry
In his ancestral castle,

His castle by the sea.



29



The old toper ere he perished
There drank life s parting glow,

Then flung the cup he cherished
Into the wave below.

He saw it falling, drinking,

And sinking in the sea,
His eyes the while were sinking,

Ne er another drop drank he.

GOETHE



THE FISHER

HE water rushed, the water swelled,

A fisher seated nigh
Cool to the heart his angle held,
And watched with dreamy eye.



And as he sits and watches there,
Behold ! the waves divide ;

With dripping hair a woman fair
Uprises from the tide.

She sang to him, and thus she sued,
" With human arts, oh, why,

Why lurest thou my favored brood
In daylight s glow to die ?




30



" Ah, knewest thou how cheerily

The little fishes fare,
Thou d st dive with me beneath the sea
And find contentment there.

" Doth not the blessed sun at noon

His face in ocean lave ?
Doth not the ripple-breathing moon
Look lovelier in the wave ?

" Doth not the deep-down heaven invite

The moist transfigured blue ?
Doth not thine own fair face delight,
Seen through the eternal dew ?"

The water rushed, the water swelled,

It laved his naked feet ;
The fisher s heart with longing thrilled

As when true lovers greet.

She sang to him, she spake to him,

With him then all was o er,
She half compels, while half he wills,

And straight is seen no more.

GOETHE




Cranstoton* 31



MIGNON S SONG

;]NOW ST thou the land that bears

the citron s bloom ?
The golden orange glows mid ver
dant gloom,
A gentle wind from heaven s blue azure blows,
The myrtle low, and high the laurel grows,
Know st thou the land P 1

Oh, there ! oh, there !
Would I with thee, my best beloved, repair.

Know st thou the house, the columns stately

line?

The hall is splendid and the chambers shine,
And marble statues stand and look at me ;
Alas ! poor child, what have they done to thee ?
Know st thou the house ? l

Oh, there ! oh, there !
Would I with thee, my guardian dear, repair.

Know st thou the mountain with its cloudy

slopes ?
The mule his way through mist and darkness

gropes ;

l Literally, " Know st thou it vjell ? " But the word
"well," in this case, does not answer to the German
* Wohl.



32



In caverns dwells the dragon s ancient brood,
Tumbles the rock and over it the flood,
Know st thou the mountain ? 1

There ! oh, there !
Our pathway lies ; O father, let us fare !

GOETHE

V

TO THE MOON



OON that fittest wood and dell

With thy misty light !

Once again thy magic spell

Frees my spirit quite.



Comforting o er all the scene
Broods thy tranquil ray,

Like a friend, whose eye serene
Smiles upon my way.

Echoes come of grief and glee ;

Each remembered tone
All the past comes back to me,

Wandering here alone.

Flow, flow on, beloved stream,
Ceaseless is my woe ;




iLranslanons



So fled love s delicious dream,
Truth and honor so !

Gone the joy that once was mine,
Gone, but precious yet !

Reft of all I vainly pine,
Vainly would forget.

River, rush the vale along !

Rush and never stay ;
Suit thy murmurs to my song;

Dear to me alway,

Whether through the wintry night
Raves the swelling flood,

Or, to make the springtide bright,
Feeds each opening bud.

Happy he who without hate
Shuns the world s rude noise,

Link d to one who shares his fate,
And with him enjoys

What by multitudes unguessed,

Or unheeded quite,
Haunts the mazes of the breast

In the silent night.

GOETHE.



34



SPIRIT-GREETING

E stands upon the turret high,

The hero s noble wraith,
And to the skiff that passeth by,
" Fair speed the voyage ! " he
saith.




" Behold these sinews were so strong,

This heart so strong and wild,
Such pith did to these bones belong,
So high the board was piled.

" One half my life I stormed away,

One half in rest I drew ;
And thou, thou mortal of to-day,
Thy mortal path pursue ! "

GOETHE



THE SINGER




HAT strains are these before the

gate ?

Upon the bridge what chorus ?
Go, bring the minstrel hither straight,



And let him play before us !


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Online LibraryFrederic Henry HedgeMetrical translations and poems → online text (page 1 of 4)