Friedrich Schiller.

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His heart, in calm and jiroud repose,
Soon e'en to love begins to close.

Alas ! truth's elenr and brilliant rays

Are not for ever glowing ;
How blest is he whose heart ne'er pays

For gift from knowledge flowing !
So tliou the worldling's gaze shoiildst bias
To the enthusiast's steadfast mind I



BREADTH AND DEPTH.

FuiiL many iu tlie -world we find

To whom notliiug seems e'er a mystery ;

And when anglit pleases or charms the mind,
They're able to give all its history.

To hear them speak, one could ne'er have denied

That they had won the long-wished-for bride.

In silence, however, they quit the earth,

Their life leaves behind it no traces : —
Let him who to something that's great would give
birth, —

To something that time ne'er effaces, —
With jjatience collect, and tmweariedly,
In the smallest point, boundless energy.

The stalk the region around it fills

With branches luxuriant and slender ;
The foliage glitters, and balms distils,

But fruit it can never engender.
The kernel alone, in its narrow space,
The pride of the forest, the tree, can embrace.



THE GUIDES OF LIFE*

Two kinds of gcJiie there are, through life's mazy path-
ways to giiide thee ;
Happy art thou if they stand, join'd into one by thy
side !

One with his gladdening sport beguileth thy tedious
journey,—
Duty and fate become light, when thou'rt upheld by
his arm.

fjaughing and talking the while, he on to the chaam
conducts thee.



Orij^innlly entitled ' The Beautiful and the Sublime.'



AKCHIMEDES ANT) THE STXJDENT. 243

Wliere, on eternity's sra, tremblinj; mortality stauils,
Tliere does the Otber receive thee, with solemn resolve
and in silence,
And "with his giant-like arm bears thee across thu
abyss.
Ne'er to one only devote theo ! Thine h')nor ne'er tliiuU
of coufidina:
Into the hands of the first, nor to t'lc other thj
bliss !



ARCHIMEDES AND THE STUDENT.

To Archimedes once camo a yonth, who for knowledge
was thirsting,
Saying, " Initiate mo into the science divine.
Which for my country has borne forth fruit oi sncl\
wonderful value.
And which the walls of the town 'gainst the Saml:uca *
protects. "

"Call'st thou the science divine? It is so," the wise
man responded ;
"But it was so, my 6o.n, ere it avail 'd for the town.
Wouldst tlu.u have fruit from her only, e'en mortals
with that can i)rovicle thee ;
Wouldst thou the goddess obtain, seek not the woman
in Her ! "



HUMAN KNOWLEDGE.

Since thou roadest in her what thou thyself hast there
written.
And, to gladden the eye, placest her wonders in
gi-oups ;—
Since o'er her boundless expanses thy cords to extend
thou art able,
Thou dost think that thy mind wonderful Nature can
gnisp.

• The rnme of a macliinc used in sicgce, employed by j^Iarcelius
af^in»t Syruciisc.



244 THE T-WO PATHS OF VIKTUE.



Thus the astronomer draws his figtires over the
heavcus,
So that he may with more ease traverse the iufiuite
space,
Knitting together e'en suns that by Sirius-distance are
parted,
Making them join in the swan and in the horns of the
ball.
But because the firmament shows him its glorious
sui'face,
Oan he the *pheres ' mystic dance therefore decipher
aright ?



THE TWO PATHS OF VIRTUE.

Two are the pathways by which mankind can to virtTie
mount upward ;
If thoii shouldst find the one barr'd, open the other
will lie.
'Tis by exertion the Hajjpy obtain her, the Suffering by
l^atience.
Blest is the man whose kind fate guides him along
upon both I



HONORS.



As the column of light in the waves of the brook is
reflected,
Bright as from its o^vn glow, flameth the border with
gold ;
But by the sti-eam are the waves hui-ricd on, — through
the glittering pathway
Each thrusts the other along, swift, as the former, to

So 13 a mortal that perishes lighted by splendor of
honors, —
Not himself, but the place, through which he wan-
dereth, shines.



245

ZENITH AND NADIR.



'^KERKsoEATi:R tliou wand'rcst in space, thy Zenith anc.
Nadir
[Tiito the heaven knit thee, unto the axis of earth.
Howsoever thou actest, let heav'n be mov'd by thy
purpose,
Let tlie aim of thy deeds traverse the axis of earth I



DEPARTURE FROM LIFE.

Two are the roads that before thee lie open from life to
conduct thee ;
To the Ideal one leads thee, the other to Death.
See that while yet thou art free, on the first thou com-
mencest thy journey,
Ere by the merciless Fates on to the other thou'rt led !



THE CHILD IN THE CRADLE.

Happy infant I to thee au infinite space is the cradle.
When to man's age thou shalt come, narrow thou'lt
think the wide world !



THE IMMUTABLE.

TiirE incessantly hastcneth on — he seeks for perfection.
If thou art true, thou canst cast fetters eternal on him.



THEOPHANIA.

When the happy appear, I forget the Gods in the
heavens ;
But before me they stand, when I the suffering see.



246

THE HIGHEST.

Seek'st tliou tlie Highest, the Greatest ? In that the
plant can instruct thee ;
What it unwittingly is, be thou of thine own free will !



IMMORTALITY.

Dread'st thou the aspect of Death ! Thou wishest to
live on for ever?
Live in the Whole, and when long thou shalt have
gone, 'twill remain !



VOTIVE TABLETS.

That which I learn'd from the Deity, — that which
through lifetime hath help'd me.
Meekly and gratefully now, hei-e I suspend in his
shrine.

DIFFERENT DESTINIES.

Millions busily toil, that the human race may continue ;

But by only a few is propagated our kiutl.
Thousands of seeds by the autumn are scatter'd, yet
fruit is engeuiler'd
Only by few, for the most back to the element go.
But if one only can blossom, that one is able to scatter
Even a bright living world, fill'd with creations
eterne.

THE ANIMATING PBINCIPLE.

NowHEKE in the organic or sensitive woi-ld ever kindles
Novelty, save in the liow'r, noblest creation of life.

TWO DESCKIPTIONS OP ACTION.

Do what is good, and Humanity's godlike jjlant thou
wilt nourish ;

Plan what is fair, and thou'lt strew seeds of the god-
like around.



VOTIVE TABLETS. iJ47

RIFFERENCR OK STATION'.

Even the moral woild its uobUity l)oast.s — vulgar
naturi's

Reckon by that 'wliicli they do ; ikjUU; hv that ^vluch
they are.

WORTH ANl^ THE WOKTHV.

Ik thou anything lunit, let mo have it, — I'll pay what is
proper ;
If thou auy thing art, let us our spirits exchange.

THE MORAL FORCE.

Ik i\\ovifecVst not the beautiful, still thou with reason
canst iviU it ;
And as a si:)irit canst Jo, that which as mau thou canst
not.

PARTICIPATION.

E'en by the hand of the Avicked can truth be worki:ig
with vigor ;
But the vessel is iill'd by what is beauteous alone. "

TO *

Tell me all that thou knowest, and I \\iil thankfully
lu-ar it !
But wouldst thou give me Ihi/scif, — Lt me, my friend,
be excus'd !



TO



* *



Wouldst thou teach me the tnith ? Don't take the
troul)le ! I wish not,
Through thee, the thing to observe, — but to see Hue



through the thing.



TO



Thee would I clioose as my teacher and friend. Tliy
living example
Teaches me, — thy teaching word wakens my heart
linto life.



248 VOTIVE TABLETS.

THE PRESENT GENERATION.

Was it always as now ? This race I truly can't
fathom.
Nothing is young but old age ; youth, alas ! only is
old.

TO THE MUSE.

What I had been without thee, I knoAv not — yet, to my
sorrow,
See I what, without thee, hundreds and thousands nOTV
are.

THE LEARNED WORKMAN.

C^e'er does he taste the fruit of the tree that he rais'd
■with such trouble ;
Nothing but taste e'er enjoys that which by learning is
rear'd.

THE DUTY Ol^ ALL.

Ever strive for the Avhole ; and if no whole thou canst
make thee,
Join, then, thyself to some whole, as a subsex-vieut
limb!

A PROBLEM.

Let none resemble another ; let each resemble the
highest !
How can that happen ? let each be all complete in
itself.

THE PECULIAR IDEAL.

What thou thinkest, belongs to all ; what thou feel'st,
is thine only.
Wouldst thou make him thine own, feel thou the God
whom thou think'st !

TO MYSTICS.

That is the only true secret, which in the presence of
all men
Lies, and surrounds the" for aye, but which is wit-
pess'd by none.



VOTIVE TABLETS. 249

THE KEY.

WoiTLDHT tliou la)o^v thyself, observe the actions of
others.
Wouldst thou other men know, look thou witliin thine
own heart.

THE OBSERVER.

Stern rs my conscience, thou seest the points wherein
I'm deficient ;
Therefore I've always lov'J thee, as my own couscicncJ
I've lov'd.

^nSDOM AND ri'.CDENCE.

WouldSt thou, my friend, moiint up to the highest
summit of wisdom.
Be not dc'tirr'd by the fear, prudence thy course may
deride :
That short-sighted one sees but the bank that from thee
is liying,
Not the one which ere hmg thou wilt attain with bold
flight

THE AGREEMENT.

Both of us seek for truth — in the world Avithout thou

dost seek it,

I in the Losom within ; both of us therefore succeed.

If the eye be healthy, it sees from Avithout the Creator ;

And if the heart, then within doubtless it mirrors the

Avorld.

POtilTICAIj PRECEPT.

All. that thou doest is right ; but, friend, don't carrj
this jirecept
On too far, — be content, all that is right to eflfect.
It is enough to true zeal, if what is existing be perfect;
False zeal always would find finish'd perfection at
ouce.



250 VOTr\'E TABLETS.

MAJESTAS POPTJX,!.

Majesty of tbe nature of man ! In cro-nJs shall I seek
thee
'Tis with only a few that thou hast made thine abode.
Only a few ever count ; the rest are but blanks of no
value,
And the prizes are hid 'neaih the vain stir that they
make.

TO A WORIiD-REFORMER.

" I HAVE sacrific'd all," thou sayest, " that Man I might
succor ;
Vain the attempt ; my reward was i^ersecution and
hate."
Shall I tell thee, my friend, how I to humor him
manage ?
Trust the proverb ! I ne'er have been deceiv'd by it
yet.



Thou canst not sufficiently prize Humanity's value ;

Let it be coin'd in deed as it exists in thy breast.
E'en to the man whom, thou chancest to meet in life's
narrow pathwav,
If he should ask it of thee, hold forth a succoring
hand.
But for rain and for dew, for the general welfare of
mortals,
Leave thou Heaven to care, friend, as before, so e'en
now.

MY ANTIPATHY.

i have a heartfelt aversion for crime,— a two-fold aver-
sion.
Since 'tis the reason why man prates about virtue so
much.
"What! tliou hatest, then, virtue ?"— I would that by
all it were practis'd.
So that, God willing, no man ever need speak of it
more.



VOTIVE TABLETS. 251

TO ASTRONOMERS.

Prate not to nie so much of suns autl of nebulous
bodies ;
Think ye nature but great, in that she gives theo to
count ?
Though your object may be the sublimest that space
liolds within it,
Yet, my good friiiids. the snbhme dwells not iu
regions of sijace.

ASTRONOMICAIi AVlilTIXGS.

Oh, iiow infinite, how unspeakably great, are the
heavens!
Yet by friv(<litv'.s hand do\vnward8 the heavens are
pull'd!

THE BEST STATE.

"How can I know the best state?" Iu the way that
thou know'st the best woman ;
Namely, my friend, that the world ever is silent of
both.

MY FAITH.

Which religion do I acknowledge? None that tliou
namest.
"None that I name ? And why so ?" — Why, for reli-
gion's own sake!

INSIDE AND OUTSIDE.

*' God alone sees the heart" — and therefore, since He
alone sees it,
Be it our care that we, too, something that's worthy
may see.

FRIEND AND FOE.

Dearly I l<jve a friend ; yet a foe I may turu to my
profit ;
Friends show me that which I cdii : foes teach me
t]^at^^hich I s/iotild.

lilGHT AND COLOR.

Thou that art ever the same, with the Cliangeless One
take up tliy dwelling!
Color, thou changeable one, kindly descend upon
man I



252 VOTITE TABLETS

BEAUTEOUS INDIVIDUALITX.

Thou in trutli shoiildst be oue, yet not witli the whole
shouldst thou be so,
'Tis through the reason thou'rt oue, — art so with it
through the heart.
Voice of the whole is thy reason, \mt thou thiue own
heart must be ever ;
If in thy heart reason dwells, evermore hajjpy art
thou.

VARIETY.

Many are good and wise ; yet all for one only reckon,
For 'tis conception, alas, rules them, and »ot a fond
heart.
Sad is the sway of conception, — from thousandfold vary-
ing figures,
Needy and empty but one it is e'er able to bring.
But where creative beauty is ruling, there life and enjoy-
ment
Dwell ; to the ne'er-changing One, thousands of new
forms she gives.

THE THREE AGES OP NATURE.

Life she receiv'd from fable ; the schools deprived her of
being,
Liifa creative again she has from reason receiv'd.

GENIUS.

Understanding, indeed, can repeat Avliat already ex-
isted, —
That which Nature has built after her she, too, can
build.
Over Nature can Reason biiild, l)ut in vacancy only :
But thou Genius, alone, Nature in Nature canst
form.

THE IMITATOR.

Good from the good, — to the reasc<n this is not hard of
conception ;
But the genius has pow'r good from the bad to
evoke.
'Tis the conceiv'd alone, that thou. Imitator, canst
practise ;
Food the conceiv'd never is, save to the mind that
conceives.



TOTIVE TABLETS. 253



OENIAXilTY.



How (loos tlie fTr;iuns make itself kaowu? la the way
that ill nature
Shows the Creator Himself, — e'en in the iufiuite
whole.
Clear is the rether, and yet of dei^th that ue'er can he
fathom 'd ;
Seen by the eye, it rumaiiLS evermore closM to the
sense.

THE INQCriKERS.

Mex now seek to explore eaeh thing from within and
■without too ;
How eanst thou make thy escape. Truth, from their
eager pm-suit ?
Tliat thoy may catch thee, ■with nets and jjoles extended
tiiey seek thee ;
But A\ith a spirit-Uke tread, glidest thou out of the
throng.

THE DIFFICULT UXIOX.

Whv are taste and genius so seldom met Avith united?
Taste of strength is afraid, — genius despises the rein.

CORRECTNESS.

Free from blemish to be, is the lowest of steps, and the
higliest ;
Weakness and greatness alone ever arrive at this
point.

THE LAW OF NATURE.

It has ever been so, my friend, and ■will ever remain so:
Weakness has rules for itself, — vigor is crowu'd ■svith
success.

CHOICE.

If thou canst not give pleasure to all by thy deeds and
thy kno-wledge,
Give it then, unto the few ; many tt) please is but vain.

SCIENCE OF MUSIC.

liBT the creative art breathe life, and the bard furnish
spirit ;
But the Boul is expressed by Polyhyrobia alone.



254 VOTIVE TABIiETS.

LANGUAGE,

Why cau the living spirit be never seen by tlie spirit ?
Soon as tlie soul 'gius to speak, then can the Bonl
speak no more !

TO THE POET.

Let thy speech be to thee what the body is to the lov=
Beings it only can part, — beings it only can join.

THE MASTER.

Other masters one always can tell by the words that
they utter ;
That which he wisely omits, shows me the master of
style.

THE GIRDLE

Aphrodite preserves her beauty conceal'd by her girdle ;
That which lends her her charms, is what she covers—
her shame.

the DIIiETTANYE.

Merely because thon hast made a good verse in a lan-
guage poetic,
One which composes for thee, thon art a poet, for-
sooth !

the babbler of art.

Dost thon desire the good in Art ? Of the good art thon
worthy
Which by a ne'er ceasing Avar 'gainst thee thyself is
produced ?

the philosophies.
Which among the philosophies will be enduring ? I
know not.
But that philosophy's self ever may last is my hope.

the favor op the muses.
Fame with the vulgar expires ; but. Muse immortal,

thou bearest
. Those whom thou lov'st, who love thee, into Mnem-
I mosyne's arms.

homer's head as a seal.
Trusty old Homer ! to thee I confide the secret so ten-
der;
Por the raptures of love none but the bard should e'«i
know.



256

THE BEST STATE-CONSTITUTION.

I CAN recognize only ns snch, the ouo that enables
Each to think what is right, —but that he thinks bo
carets not.



TJ LAWGIVERS.

Ever take it fcr graiite<l, tluit man collectively Tvishes
That which is right ; but tako care, never to think
bo of one !



THE HONORABLL,

Ever honor the whole ; iiuliviiluals only I honor ;
In imlivibluals I always discover the whole.



FALSE IMPULSE TO STUDY.

Oh, how many new foes against truth ! My very sou!
bleecU'th
WTjeu I behold the owl-race now bursting forth to
the light.



THE FOUNTAIN OF SECOND YOUTH.

Trust m?, 'tis not a mere tale, —the fountain of youth
really runneth,
Runneth for ever. Thou ask'st, Where ? In the
poet's sweet art !



THE CIRCLE OF NA TURE.

AiiL, thou gentle one, lies embrac'd in thy kingdom ; the
greybeard
Back to tho days of his youth, childish and childlike,
returns.



S56

WE GENIUS WITH THEINVERTED TGRCri,

Lovely he looks, 'tis true, witli the light of his torcli
now extinguished ;
But remember that death is not sesthetic, my friends )

THE VIRTUE OF WOMAN.

Man of virtue has need ; into life -with boldness K.
plunges,
Ent'ring ■with fortune more sure into the hazardous
strife ;
But to woman one virtue suffices ; it ever is shining
Lovingly forth to the heart: so k-t it shiue t-} thfl
eye!



THE FAIREST APPARITION.

If thou never hast gazed upon beauty in moments cv.
sorrow.
Thou canst with truth never boast that thou tru,.
beauty hast seen.
If thoix never hast gazed upon gladness ia beauteouv
features,
Thou canst with truth never boast that thou trus»
gladness hast seen.

THE FORUM OF V^OMAN.

Woman, nevei judge man by his individual actions ;
But upon mau, as a whole, pass thy decisive decree.



FEMALE JUDGMENT.

Man frames his judgment ou reason ; but woman on lovfi
founds Jier verdict ;
If her judgment loves not, woman already has judg'd.



257

THE IDEAL OF WOMAN.

Woman in evorvthing yields to man ; but in that ^vbich
is 1'i;.j!h's^,
Even the manliest man yields to the woman most
■weak.
But that liigl)ost,^-wbat is it? The gentle radiance of
triumph
As in tl y brow upon me, beauteous Amanda, it
beams.
When o'er tlie bright shining disk the clouds of affliction
are fleeting,
Fairer the image appears, seen through the vapor of
gold.
Man may think himself free ! thou art so, — for thou never
knowest
What is the meaning of choice, — know'st not neces-
sity's name.
That which thou givost, thou always giv'st wholly ; but
one art thou ever,
Even thy tenderest^sjund is thine liarm_onious self.
Youth everlasting dwells here, with fullness that never is
exhausted,
And with the flower at once pluck'st thou the ripe
golden fruit.



"EXPECTATION AND FULLFILLME NT.

fyrc- life's ocean the youth with a thousand masts
daringly launches ;
Mute, in a boat sav'd from wreck^ enters the greybeard
the port.



THE COMMON FATE.

3ke how we hate, how we quarrel, how thought and how
feeling divide lis !
But thy locks, fi-iend, like mine meanwliile aw
bleach Huing fnet.



258
HUMAN ACTION.

Where the pathway begins, eternity seems to lie open
Yet at the narrowest point even the wisest man stops.



THE FATHER.

Work as mnch as thou wilt, alone thou'lt be standing
for ever,
Till by nature thou'rt joined forcibly on to the Whole,



LOVE AND DESIRE.

BlGHTLY said, Schlosser ! Man loves what he has ; what
he has not, desireth ;
H'one but the wealthy minds love ; poor minds desir(?
alone.



GOODNESS AND GREATNESS.

Only two virtues exist. Oh, would they were evei
united !
Ever the good with the great, ever the great with the
good !

THE IMPULSES.

Fear with his iron staff may urge the slave onward for^
ever ;
Rapture, do thou lead me on ever in roseate chains 1



NATURALISTS AND TRANSCENDENTAL
PHILOSOPHERS.

Enmity be between ye ! Your union too soon is
cemented ;
Ye will but learn to know truth, when ye divide
iu the search.



259
GERMAN GEN/US.

Stkive, O Giiinaii, for P.omun-like strength and foi
(h-cciiiii-like licHuty !
Thou art successful iu both ; ne'er has the Gaul had
success.



TRIFLES

THE EriO HEXAMETER.

GiDDrLT onward it bears thee -with resistless impetuous
billows ;
Nauglit but the ocean and air seest thou before or
behind.

THE DISTICH.

Ik the Hexameter rises the fountain's watery eolumn,
In the Pentameter sweet falling iu melody down.

THE EIGHT-LINE STANZA.

Stanza, by love thou'rt created, — by love all-tender and
yearning ;
Thrice dost thou bashfully fiy , thrice dost with long-
ing return.

THE OBEIilSK.

On a pedestal lofty the sculijtor iu triumph has rais'd
me.
" Stand thou," spake he, — and I stand proudly and
joyfullv here.

THE TKIUJIPHAIi ARCH.

** Fear not," the builder exclaim'd, " the rainbow that
stands in the heavent* ;
I will extend thee like it, into infinity far 1 "



260 GERMANY AND HER PRINCES.

THE BEAUTIFUL BRIDGE.

Under me, over me, hasten the waters, the chariots, my
builder
Kindly has siiffer'd e'en me, over myself, too, to go !

THE GATE.

Let the gate open stand, to allure the savage to pre-
cepts ;
Let it the citizen lead into free nature with joy.

ST. peter' s.

If thon seekest to find Immensity here, thou'rt mis^
taken ;
For my greatness is meant greater to make thee thyselil



GERMANY AND HER PRINGE8.

Thou hast produced mighty monarchs, of whom tliow

art not unworthy.

For the obedient alone make him who governs them

great.

Bnt, O Germany, try if thou for thy rulers canst make it

Harder as kings to be great, — easier, though, to be men I



TO PROSELYT/SERS.

" Gi\Ti me only a fragment of earth beyond the esirth'^
limits," —
So the godlike man said, — "and I will move it -^th
ease."
Only give me permission to leave myself for oua
moment.
And without any delay I will engage to be yr ars.



THE CONNEGT/NG MEDIUM.

How does nfitnre proceed to unite t'^e high <tnd the
lowly
In mankind ? ^he commnndsi faulty "tween them to
Btandl



2G1

THE MOMENT.

DouBTLLSS an rjjocli important haa with the ceiitizr,
risen ;
But tho moment, so great, finds but a race of small
■worth.



GERMAN COMEDY.

Fools wo may have in plenty, and simi^letons, too,
by the dozen ;
But for comedy theso uevcr m;iko iiso of themaelves.



BOOKSELLER'S ANNOUNCEMENT.

Naught is for man bo important as rightly to know
his own i>urpose ;
For but twelve grosclieu, liard cash, 'tis to be bought
at my shop !



DANGEROUS CONSEQUENCES.

Deeper and bold; r truths be carLful, my fneuds, of
avowing;
For as soon as ye do, all the world ou ye will fall.



GREEKI8M.

Scarce bos the fever so chilly of galomauia departed,
Wheu a more burning attack iu Grecomama breuks

out.
Greekism, — what did it mean ? — 'Twas harmony, reason

and clearness !
Patience, good gentlemen, pray, ere ye of Greekism

speak !
'Tis f<«r au excellent cause ye are lighting, and all

that I as.c i ir
la that with reason it ne'er may be a laughing-stock

made.



^6^

THE SUNDAY CHILDREN.

Yhars has the master been lab'ring, bat always witliout
satisfaction ;
To an ingenious race, 'twonld be in vision conferred.
What they j^esterday learnt, to-day tlie^^ fain "would ba
teaching :
Small compassion, alas, is by those gentlemen shoTvii!



THE PHILOSOPHERS.



PUPIL.

I AM rejoic'd, worthy sirs, to find you in pleno
assembled :
For I have come down below, seeking the one needful
thing.

AEISTOTIiE,

Quick to the point, my good friend ! For the Jena
Gazette comes to hand here.
Even in hell, — so we know all that is passing above.

PUPIL.

So much the better ! So give me (I will not depart
hence without it)
Some good principle now, — one that will always
avail !

FIRST PHILOSOPHEK.

< '•iji.io, erf/o sum. I have tliought, and therefore
I have existence !
If the first be but true, then is the second one sure.

PUPIL.

As I think, I exist. 'Tis good ! But who always is
Thinking ?
Oft I've existed e'en when I have been thinking of
naught.



THE rniLOSOPHERS. 2G3

SECOND PHILOSOPHER.

^inco there aro things that exist, a thing of all things
Tliero mast needs b.; ;
In thj thing of ail tilings dabble wo, just as we
are,

THIRD PHlIiOSOPHER.

Just the reverse, say I. Besides myself there is
nothing ;
Ev'rythingelse that there is, is but a bubble to me.

FOURTH PHILOSOPHER.

Two kinds of thiugs I allow to exist, — the world and the
spirit ;
Naught of others I know ; even these signify one.

FIFTH PHILOSOPHER.

I know naught of the thing, and know still less of the
spirit ;
Both but appear unto me ; yet no appearance they are.

SIXTH PHILOSOPHER.

I am I, and settle myself, — and if I then settle

Nothing to be, well and good — there's a nonentity
form'd.

SEVENTH PHILOSOPHER.

There is conception at least ! A thing conceiv'd there


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