Friedrich Schiller.

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EBOLI.

I know your business,
Duchess, and you come hither from the Queen,
To speak my sentence to me — do it quickly !

OLIVAREZ.

I am commanded, by her Majesty,
To uke your cross aad key.
EBOLI [takes from her breast a golden Cross, and giviis
it to the duchess).

And but once more
May I not kiss my gracious Sovereign's hand ?

OLIVAKEZ.

In holy Mary's convent, shall you learn
Your fate, Princess.

EBOLI (with a flood of tears')
Alas ! then I no more
Shall ever see the Queen !

OLIVAREZ {embraces her with her face turned aivay).

Princess, farewell !
[She goes hastily away. The Princess foUoivs her as
far as the door of the Cabinet, which is immediately
locked after the Duchess. She remains a few
minutes silent and viotionless on her knees before it*
She then rises and hastens away, covering her face.

Scene XXI.
Queen, Marquis Posa.

QUEEN.

Ab ! Marquis, I am glad you're come at last !



SC. XXI.] DON CARLOS. 167

itiRQTJTS {pale, uith a disturbed countenance and
trembling voice, in solemn deep agitation, during
tJie whole Scene).
And is your Majesty alone ? Can none
Within the adjoining chamber overhear us ?

QUEEN.

No one ! But why? What news would you impart ?

[Looking at him closely, and drauing hack alarmed
And what has wrought this change in you ? Speak, Marquis 1
You make me tremble— all your features seem
So mark'd with death !

MAEQurs.

You know, perhaps, already —

QUEEN.

That Carlos is an-ested — and they add,

By you ! Is it then trae? From no one else ^

Would I believe it, but yourself.

MARQUIS.

'Tis true.

QUEEN.

By you ?

MAEQUIS.

By me ?
QUEEN (looks at him for some time doubtingly).
I still respect youi' actions
E'en when I comprehend them not. In this,
Pardon a timid woman ! I much fear
iou play a dangerous game.

MABQUIS.

And I have lost it.

QUEEN.

Merciful Heaven !

MAEQUIS.

Queen, fear not ! He is safe.
But I am lost myseK.

QUEEN.

WTiat do I hear ?

MAEQUIS.

Who bade me hazard all, on one chance throw ?

All '? And with rash, foolhardy conadence.

Sport with the power of Heaven ? Of bounded mind^



158 DON CARLOS. [ACT IV.

Man, who is not Omniscient, must not dare

To guide the helm of Destiny. — 'Tis just !

But why these thoughts of self? The hour is precious,

As life can be to man : — and who can tell

Whether the parsimonious hand of Fate

May not have measured my last drops of life?

QUEEN

The hand of fate ! What means this solemn tons ?
I understand these words not — but I shudder.

MARQUIS.

He's saved ! — no matter at what price — he's saved i
But only for to-day, — a few short hours
Ai-e his. let him husband them ! — This night
The Prince must leave Madrid.

QUEEN.

This very night ?

MARQUIS.

All measures are prepared. The post will meet him

At the Carthusian Convent, which has served

So long as an asylum to our friendship.

Here will he find, in letters of exchange.

All in the world that fortune gifts me with.

Should more be waiitiug, you must e'en supply it

In tmth, I have within my heart, full much

To unburthen to my Carlos, — it may chance

I shall want leisure now, to tell him all

In person, — but this evening you will see him,

And therefore I address myseK to you.

QUEEN.

for my peace of mind, dear Marquis, speak !
Explain yourself more clearly ! Do not use
This dark, and fearful, and mysterious language 1
Say, what has happened?

MARQUIS.

I have yet one thing,
A matter of importance, on my mind :
In your hands I deposit it. My lot
Was such, as few indeed have e'er enjoy 'd —

1 lov'd a Prince's son. My heart to one —

To that one object given — embraced the world !



XXI.] DON CAKL08. 169

I have created in my Carlos' soul,

A paradise for millions ! my dream

Was lovely! — But the will of Providence

Has summon'd me away, before my hour,

From this my beauteous work. His Roderigo

Soon shall be his no more, and friendship's claim

Will be transferr'd to love. Here, therefore, here

Upon this sacred altar — on the heart

Of his loved Queen — I lay my last bequest,

A precious legacy — he 11 find it here.

When I shall be no more.

[He tur?is away, his voice choked with grief

QUEEN.

This is the language
Of a dying man — it surely emanates
But from your blood's excitement — or does sense
Lie hidden in your language?

MARQUIS (has endeavoured to collect himself, and continues in
a solemn voice.)

Tell the Prince,
That he must ever bear in mind, the oath
We swore, in past enthusiastic days,
Upon the Sacred Host. I have kept mine —
I'm true to him, till death — 'tis now his turn —

QUEEN.

Till death ?

MARQUIS.

bid him realize the dream,
The glowing vision which our friendship painted;
Of a new — perfect realm ! And let him lay
The first hand on the rude unshapen'd stone.
Whether he fail or prosper — all alike —
Let him commence the work. When centuries
Have roird away, shall Providence again
Raise to the throne, a princely youth like him.
And animate again a fav'rite son
Whose breast shall burn with like enthusiasm.
Tell him, in manhood, he must still revere
The dreams of early youth, nor ope the heart
Of Heaver. 's all-teuder flower, to canker-worms
Of boasted reason, — nor be led astray



160 DON CAKLOS [aCT IV,

WTien, by the wisdom of tlie dust, he heat's
Enthusiasm, heavenly-boni, blasphemed.
I have already told him. —

QUEEN.

Whither, Marg^uis?
Whither does all this tend ?

MABQUIS.

And tell him farther,
T lay upon his soul the happiness
Of man — that -with my dying breath I claim,
Demand it of him — and \vith justest title.
I had design'd a new, a glorious morn,
To waken in these kingdoms : for to me
Philip had opeu'd all his inmost heart —
Call'd me his son — bestow'd his seals upon me —
And Alva was no more his counsellor.

He pauses, and looks at the Queen /or a few moments in
silence.
You weep ! — I know those tears, beloved soul !
O they are tears of joy ! — but it is past —
For ever past ! — Carlos or I ? The choice
Was prompt and fearful. One of us must perish .
And I will be that one. ask no more ! —

QUEEN.

Now, now, at last, I compi-ehend your meaning,
Unhappy man ' What have you done ?

MAEQUIS.

Cutoff
Two transient hours of evening, to secure
A long bright summer day ! I now give up
The King for ever. What were I to the King ?
In such cold soil, no rose of mine could bloom ;
In my great friend, must Europe's fortune ripen
Spain I bequeath to him, still bathed in blood,
From Philip's iron hand. But woe to him.
Woe to us both, if I have chosen wrong !
But no — no ! — I know my Carlos better —
'TvaU never come to pass ! — for this my Queen,
You stand my sui'ety. [^fi^r a silence

Yes ! I saw his love
In its first blossom — saw his fatal passion



6C. XXI.] nON CABLOS. 161

Take root in his young heart. I had full power
To check it ; but I did not. The attachment
"Which seem'd to me not guilty, I still nourisb'd-
The world may censure me, but I repent not,
Nor does my heart accuse me. I saw life
Where death appear'd to others. In a flame
So hopeless, I discem'd Hope's golden beam.
I wish'd to lead him to the excellent —
To exalt him to the highest point of beauty.
Mortality denied a model to me,
And language, words. Then did I bend his views
To this point only — and my whole endeavour
Was to explain to him his love.

QUEEN.

Your friend,
Marquis ! so wholly occupied your mind,
That for his cause you quite forgot my own —
Could you suppose that I had thrown aside
All woman's weaknesses, that you could dare
Make me his angel, and confide alone
In \'irtue, for his armour? You forget
What risk the heart must run, when we ennoble
Passion Arith such a beauteous name as this

MARQUIS.

Yes, in all other women — but in one,

One only, 'tis not so. — For you, I swear it.

And should you blush t' indulge the pure desire

To call heroic virtue into life ?

Can it affect Iving Philip, that his works

Of noblest art, in the Escurial, raise

Immortal longings in the painter's soul,

Who stands entranced before them ? Do the sounds

That slumber in the lute, belong alone

To him who buys the chords ? With ear immoved

He may preserve his treasure : — he has bought

The wretched right to shiver it to atoms,

But not the power to wake its silver tones,

Or, in the magic of its sounds, dissolve. —

Truth is created for the sage, as beauty

Is for the feeling heart. They own each other

And tills belief, no coward prejudice

M



\P)'-2 DON CARLOS. [aCT IV.

Shall make me e'er disclaim Then promise, Queeu.
That you will ever love him. That false shame.
Or fancied dignity, shall never make you
Yield to the voice of base dissimulation : —
That you will love him still unchanged, for ever.
Promise me this, O Queeu ! Here solemnly
Say, do you promise ?

QUEEN.

That my heart alone
Shall ever vindicate my love, I promise —

MARQUIS [drawing his hand back).
^ow 1 die satisfied — my work is done.

[He botes to the Queen, and is about to <jo.

QUEEN {follows him with her eyes in silence).
You are then going, Marquis, and have not
Told me how soon — and when — we meet again ?

MARQUIS [comes back once more, his face turned away)
Yes, we shall surely meet again !

QUEEN.

Now, Posa,
I understand you. Why have you done this ?

MARQUIS.

Carlos, or I myself!

QUEEN

No ! no ! you rush
Headlong into a deed you deem sublime.
Do not deceive yourself: I know you well :
Long have you thirsted for it. If your pride
But have its fill, what matters it to you
Though thousand hearts should break. ! now, at length
I comprehend your feelings — 'tis the love
Of admiration which has won your heart —

MARQUIS [surprised, aside).
^0 ! I was not prepared for this —

QUEEN [after a pause).

Marquis!
Is chero no hope of preservation ?

MARQUIS.

None



SC XXII.] t)ON CARLOS 163

QUEEN.

None ? consider well ! None possible !
Not e'en by me ?

MARQUIS.

None even, Queen, by thee.

QUEEN.

You but half know me — I have courage, Marquis -

MARQUIS.

I know it —

QUEEN.

And no means of safety ?

MARQUIS.

None!
QUEEN (turning aivay, and covering her face).
Go ! Never more shall I respect a man —

MARQUIS {casts himself on his knees before her in exidetit

emotion).
O Queen ! heaven ! how lovely still is life !

[He starts up and rushes out. The Queen retires into
her Cabinet.

Scene XXII.
Duke Alva and Domingo walking up and down in silence
and separately. Count Lerma comes out of the King's
Cabinet, and afterwards Don Raymond of Taxis, the Post-
master General.

LERMA

Has not the Marquis yet appeared ?

ALVA.

Not fet
[Lerma about to re enter the Cabinet

TAXIS [e7iters).
Count Lerma I Pray announce me to the Jung ?

LERMA.

His Majesty cannot be seen.

TAXIS.

But say
That I must see him : that my business is



164 DON CARLOS. [ACT IV.

Of urgent import to his Majesty.
Make haste — it will admit of no delay.

[Lekma enters ihe Cabinet.

ALVA.

Dear Taxis, you must learn a little patience
You cannot see the King.

TAXIS.

Not see him! Why?

ALVA.

You should have been consid'rate, and procured
Permission from the Marquis Posa first —
Who keeps both son and father in confinement

TAXIS.

The Marquis Posa ! Kight — that is the man
From whom I bring this letter

ALVA.

Ha! What letter?

TAXIS.

A letter to be forwarded to Brussels.
ALVA {attentively)
To Brussels ?

TAXIS.

And I bring it to the King.

ALVA.

Indeed ! to Brussels ! Heard you that, Domingo ?

DOMINGO {joining them).
Full of suspicion !

TAXIS.

And with anxious mien,
And deep embarrassment, he gave it to me.

DOMINGO.

Embarrassment ! To whom is it directed ?

T>XIS,

The Prince of Orange ana Nassau.

ALVA.

To William I
There's treason here, Domingo *

DOMINGO.

Nothing less I



SC. XXII. J DON CARLOS. 165

In truth this letter must, without delay,
Be laid before the King. A noble service
You render, worthy man — to be so finn
In the discharge of duty.

TAXIS.

Reverend Sir I
Tis but my duty

ALVA.

But you do it well.
LEKMA {coming out of the Cabinet, addressing taxis).
The King will see you. [Taxis gc-ea in.

Is the Marquis come ?

DOMINGO.

He has been sought for eveiywhere

ALVA.

'Tis strange !
The Prince is a state prisoner ! And the King
Knows not the reason why !

DOMINGO.

He never came
To explain the business here

ALVA.

What says the King ?

LERMA.

The King spoke not a word. [A noise in the Cabinet

ALVA.

Whart noise is that ?
TAXIS {coming out of the Cabinet).
Count Lerma ! [Both enter.

ALVA {to DOMINGO).

What so deeply can engage them

DOMINGO.

That look of fear ! — This intercepted letter •
It augurs nothing good.

ALVA

He sends for Lenua .'
Yet he must know full well, that you and I
Are both in waiting



166 DON CAKLOS. [aCT IV

DOMINGO.

Ah ! our day is over !

ALVA.

And am I not the same, to whom these doors
Flew open once ? But ah ! how changed is all
' Around me, and how strange !

[Domingo approaches the Cabinet door softly and re
mains listening before it.

ALVA (after a pause).

Hark !— All is still
And silent as the grave ! I hear them breathe.

DOMINGO.

The double tapestry absorbs the sounds !

ALVA.

Away ! there's some one coming. — All appears
So solemn and so still — as if this instant
Some deep momentous question were decided.

Scene XXIII.
The Pbince of Parma, the Dukes of Feria and Medina
SiDONiA, ivith other Orandees enter — the preceding.

PARMA.

Say, can we see the King ?

ALVA.

No!

PARMA



FERIA

The Marquis Posa, doubtless?

ALVA.



Wlio is with him ■.'



Every instant



He is i^xpected here.

fabma.

This moment we
Arrive from Saragossa. Thro' Madrid
Terror prevails ' Is the announcement truo ?

DOMINGO.

Alas, too true !



SC. XXllI.l DON CARLOS. 167

FERIA.

Tliat lie has been arrested
By the Marquis !

AI.VA.

Yes.

PARMA.

And wherefore ? Wliat's the cause ?

ALVA.

Wherefore ? That no one knows, except the King
And Marqjis Posa.

PARMA.

And without the warrant
Of the assembled Cortes of the Realm ?

FERIA.

That man shall suffer, who has lent a hand
To infringe the nation's rights.

ALVA.

And so say I !

MEDINA SIDONLA.

And I!

THE OTHER GRANDEES.

And all of us !

ALVA.

Who'll follow me
Into the cabinet ? 111 throw myself
Before the Monarch's feet.

LERMA (rushing out of the cabinet).

The Duke of Alva !

DOMINGO.

Then God be praised at last !

LERMA.

When Marquis Posa
Comes, say the King's engaged and he'll be sent for.

DOMINGO [to LERMA ; all the others having gathered round him,
full of anxious expectation.)
Count ! What has happen'd ? You are pale as death I

LERMA iJiastening away).
Fell viliany!



I OS DON CARLOS [aCT J^'

PARMA and FERTA.

What! what!

MEDINA SIDONIA.

How is the King ?

DOMINGO [at the same time).
Fell villauy ! Explain —

LERMA.

The King shed tears !

DOMINGO.

Shed tears !

AT,L [together uitli astonishment]
The King shed tears !
[The hell rings in the Cabinet, Count Lerma hastens in

DOMINGO

Count, yet one word
Pardon ! — He's gone ! We're fetter'd in amazement.

Scene XXIV.

Princess Eboli, Feria, Medina Sidonia, Parma, Domingo
and other Grandees.

EBOLI [hurriedly and distractedly).
Where is the King? Where? I must speak with him.

[To Febia
Conduct me to him, Duke !

FERIA.

The Monarch is
Engaged in urgent business. No one now
Can be admitted.

EBOLI.

Has he signed, as yet,
The fatal sentence? He has been deceived.

DOMINGO [giving her a significant look at a distance]
The Princess Eboli !

EBOLI [going to him).

What! you here; Priest?
The very n^an I want ! You can confirm
My testimony !

i^'i" .seizes his hand and ■would drag him into the Cabinet.



ACT v., SO. I.J DON CARLOS. 169

DOKTNGO.

I ? You rave Princess !

FERIA.

Hold back ! The King cannot attend vou now-

EBOLI.

But he must hear me — he must hear the truth r
The tnith ! — were he ten times a Deity !

DOMINGO.

Away ! You hazard every thing ! Stand back !

EBOLI.

Man ! tremble at the anger of thy idol.-
I have nought left to hazard.

[Attempts to enter the Cabinet ; Alva rushes out, his

eyes sparMing, triumph in his gait. He hastens to

DOMINGO, and embraces him.

ALVA.

Let each Church
Resomid with high Te Deums. Victory
At length is ours.

DOMINGO.

What !— ours ?
ALVA [to DOMINGO and the other Grandees).

Now to the King.
You shall, hereafter, hear the sequel from me.



ACT V

Scene I.

A Chamber in the Royal Palace, separated from a large fore-
court by an iron-barred gate. Sentinels walking up and
down.

(Carlos sitting at a table, with his head leaning forward on his
a7-ms, as if he were asleep. In the hack-ground of the Chamber
are some Officers, confined with him The Marquis Posa
enters, unobserved by him, and xihispers to the Officers, who
immediately withdraw. He hint self steps close up to Cablos,
and looks at him for a few mitiutes in silent sorrow. At last
hf makes a motion, which awanens him out of his stunor.



170 DON CARLOS. 'l^OT V.

Cablos rises, and seeing the Marquis, starts back. He
regards him for some time with fixed eyes, and draws Jtis
hand over his forehead as if he wished to recollect somi-
thing.

MARQUIS.

Caries i 'tis 1.

CARLOS {gives him his hand).
Com'st thou to me again ?
Tis friendly of thee, truly.

MARQUIS.

Here, I thought
Thou mightest need a friend.

CARLOS.

Indeed ! Was that
Thy real thought ? — joy unspeakable !
Right well I knew thou still wert true to me.

MARQUIS.

I have deserved this from thee.

CARLOS

Hast thou not ?
And now we imderetand each other fully,
It joys my heai't. This kindness, this forbearance
Becomes our noble souls. For should there be
One rash, unjust demand amongst my wishes,
Wouldst thou, for that, refuse me what was just ?
Virtue I know may often be severe.
But never is she cruel and inhuman.
! it hath cost thee much — full well I know
How thy kind heart vnth bitter anguish bled,
As thy hands deck'd their victim for the altar!

MARQUIS.

What raean'st thou, Carlos ?

CARLOS.

Thou, thyself, wilt now
f'ulfil the joyous course I should have run. —
Thou wilt bestow on Spain tliose golden days,
She might have hoped, in vain, to win from me.
I'm lost, for ever lost — thou saw'st it clearly. —
This fatdi love has scatter'd — and for ever —
All the bright early blossoms of my mind.



SC. I.] DON CAKL08. 171

To all thy great exalted hopes I'm dead.

Chance led thee to the King — or Providence, —

It cost thee but my secret — and at once

He was thine own — thou may'st become his angel :

But I am lost, tho' Spain perhaps may flourish.

Well, there is nothing to condemn, if not

My own mad blindness. O, I should have known

That thou art no less great, than tender-hearted.

MARQUIS.

No ! I foresaw not, I consider'd not

That friendship's genei'ous heart, would lead thee on,

Beyond my worldly prudence. I have err'd.

My fabric's shatter'd — I forgot thy heart.

CAKLOS.

Yet, if it had been possible to spare

Her fate — how intensely I had thank'd thee !

Could I not bear the burden by myself?

And why must she be made a second victim ?

But now no more, I'll spare thee this reproach.

What is the Queen to thee ? Say, dost thou love ner ?

Could thy exalted virtue e'er consult

The petty interests of my wretched passion ?

pardon me ! — I was unjust

MARQUIS.

Thou art so !
But not for this reproach. Deserved 1 one,

1 merit all — and then I should not stand

Before you as I do. [He takes out his portfolio

1 have some letters
To give you back, of those you trusted to me.

CARLOS [looks Jirst at the letters, then at the marquis, in

astordshnient).
How!

marquis.
I return them now, because they may
Prove safer in thy custody, than mine.

CARLOS.

What mean'st thou? Has his Majesty not read them ?
Have ttey not been before him ?

iCARQUIS.

VVTiat, these letters !



172 von CAKL08. [act V,

CAKL08.

Tliou didst not show them all then.

MAKQUIS.

Who hag said
That ever I show'd one ?

CAELOS (astonished).

Can it be so ?
Count Lerma

MAKQUIS

He ! he told thee so ! Now all
Is clear as day. But who could liave foreseen it?
Lerma ! O no, he hath not learned to lie.
'Tis true, the King has all the other letters.

CAELOS [looks at him Jong ivith speechless astonishmemt\
But wherefore am I here ?

MARQUIS.

, For caution's sake.

Lest thou should chance, a second time, to make
An Eboli thy confidant.

CARLOS [as if waking from a dream).
Ha! Now
I see it all — all is explain'd.

MARQUIS [goes to the door).

Who's there ?



Scene II.
Duke Alva. — The former.

LLVA (approaching the prince with respect, hut turning his
back on the marquis during the tvhole scene).
Prince, you are free. Deputed by the Iving,
1 come to tell you so.

[Carlos looks at the Marquis with astonishment
General silence.

And I, in truth.

Am fortunate, to have this honour first

CARLOS {looking at both with extreme amazement, after a, pause

to the duke).
I am imprison'd, Duke, and set at freedom.
Unconscious of the cause of one, or other.



SC. in.] DON CARLOS 173

ALVA.

As far as I know, Prince, 'twas through an errir,
To which the King was driven, by a traitor

CARLOS.

Then am I here by order of the King ?

ALVA.

Yes, through an error of his Majesty

CARLOS.

That gives me pain indeed. — But when the King
Commits an error, 'twouhl beseem the King,
Methinks, to remedy the fault in person.
I am Don PhiUp's son — and curious eyes,
And slanderous looks, are on rae. What the King
Hath done, from sense of duty, ne'er will I
Appear to owe to your considerate favour.
I am prepared to appear before the Cortes,
And will not take my sword from such a hand.

ALVA.

The King will never hesitate to grant
Your Highness a request so just. Permit
That I conduct you to him

CARLOS

Here I stay
Until the King, or all Madrid, shall come.
To lead me from my prison. Take my answer.

[Alva withdraws. He is still seen for some time lina«r
ing in the Court, and giving orders to the guards.

Scene III.

Caelos and Marquis Posa-

CARLOS [ajter the departure of the T>VKE,full of expectation and

astonishment, to the marquis).

What means all this ? — Inform me, Roderigo —

Art thou not, then, the Minister?

MARQUIS.

I was,
*18 thou canst well perceive —

\Going to him with great emotion
O Carlos ! Now



174 DON CART.OS. ACT V.

I have succeeded — yes — it is accomplish 'd —
'Tis over now — Omnipotence he praised,
To whom I owe success.

CARLOS.

Success ! What mean j ju ?
Thy words perplex me !

MARQUIS [takes his Jiand).

Carlos ! thou art saved —
Art free— but 1 [He stops slwrt.

CARLOS.

But thou



MARQUIS.

Thus to my breast
I press thee now, with friendship's fullest right,
A right I've bought with all I hold most dear.—
How great, how lovely, Carlos, is this moment
Of self-approving joy ?

CARLOS.

What sudden change
T mark upon thy features ! Proudly now
Thy bosom heaves, thine eyes dart vivid fire !

MARQUIS.

We must say farewell, Carlos ! Tremble not.
But be a man ! And what thou more shalt hear,
Promise me, not by unavailing sorrow,
Unworthy of great souls, to aggravate
The pangs of parting. I am lost to thee,
Carlos, for many years — fools say, for ever.

[Carlos u-ithdraws his hand, but makes no reply.
Be thou a man : I've reckon'd much on thee —
I have not even shunn'd to pass with thee
This awful hour — which men, in words of fear,
Have term'd the final one. I own it, Cai'los,
I joy to pass it thus. Come, let us sit —
I feel myself grown weary and exhausted —

[He approaches Carlos, icho is in a lifeless stupor, and
alloivs himself to be involuntarily drawn down by him.
Where art thou ? — No reply ! — I must be brief.
Upon the day that follow'd our last meeting



SC. III.] DON CARLOS. 1'75

At the Carthusian Monast'ry, the King

Call'd me before him. Wliat ensued, thou kiiowest,

And all Madrid. Thou hast not heard, however.

Thy secret even then had reach 'd his ears —

That letters, in the Queen's possession found.

Had testified against thee. This I leam'd

From his own lips — I was his confidant.

[He pauses for Carlos" ansiver, but he still, remains nilent
Yes, Carlos, with my lips I broke my faith —
Guided the plot, myself, that work'd thy ruin.
Thy deed spoke trumpet-tongued ; to clear thee fully
'Twas now too late : to frustrate his revenge,



Online LibraryFriedrich SchillerThe works of Frederick Schiller, translated from the German (Volume 3) → online text (page 10 of 37)