Friedrich Schiller.

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But it, alas . was vain.

MARQUIS.

Not wholly so.
I go to wait upon her. If she be
The same in Spain she was in Henry's Court,
She will be frank at least. And if I can
Read any hope for Carlos in her looks —
Find her inclined to grant an interview^
Get her attendant ladies sent away —



8C III.] DON CARLOS. 13

CARLOS.

Most of thetn are my friends— especially
The Countess Mondecar, whom I have gain'd
By service to her son, my page.

MARQUIS.

'Tis well ;
Be you at hand, and ready to appear,
Whene'er I give the signal, Prince.

CARLOS.

I will,—
Be sure, I will :— and all good speed attend thee !

MARQUIS.

I will not lose a moment ; so, farewell.

[Exeunt severally.

Scene III.

The Queens Residence in Aranjuez. — The Pleasure Grounds,
intersected by an Avenue, terminated by the Queens Palace.

The Queen, Duchess of Olivarez, Princess of Eboli, a7}d
Marchioness of Mondecar, all advancing from the avenue

QUEEN {to the Marchioness).
I will have you beside me, Mondecar.
The Princess, w'ith these meny eyes of hers,
Has plagued me all the morning. See, she scarce
Can hide the joy she feels to leave the country.

EBOLI.

'Twere idle to conceal, my Queen, that I
Shall be most glad to see Madrid once more.

MONDECAR.

And will your Majesty not be so, too ?
Are you so griev'd to quit Aranjuez ?

QUEEN.

To quit — this lovely spot at least, I am.
This is my world. Its sweetness oft and offc
Has t-ftined itself around my inmost heart.
Here, nature, simple, rustic nature greets me,
The sweet companion of my early years —
Here I indulge once more my childhood's sports,



14 OON CARLOS I'ACT I

And my dear FraQce's gales come blowing here
Blame not this partial fondness — all hearts yearn
For their own native land

EBOLI.

But then how lone,
How dull and lifeless is it here ! We might
As well be in La Trappe.

QUEEN.

I cannot see it.
To me Madrid alone is lifeless. But
What saith our Duchess to it?

OLIVAREZ.

Why, methinks,
Your Majesty, since kings have ruled in Spain,
It hath been still the custom for the Court
To pass the summer months alternately
Here and at Pardo, — in Madrid, the winter.

QUEEN.

Well, I suppose it has ! Duchess, you know
I've long resign "d all argument with you.

MONDECAR.

Next month, Madrid will be all life and bustle.
They're fitting up the Plaza Mayor now.
And we shall have rare bull-fights ; and, besides,
A grand Auto da Fe is promised us

QUEEN.

Promised ? This from my gentle Mondecar !

MONDECAR.

Why not ? 'Tis only heretics they bum !

QUEEN.

1 hope my Eboli thinks otherwise !

EBOLI.

What, I ? I beg your Majesty may think mo
As good a Christian as the Marchioness.

QUEEN.

Alas ! 1 had forgotten where I am. —

No more of this ! We were speaking, I think,

About the country ? And methinks this mouth



SC. in. J DON CARL03 15

Has flown away with strange rapidity
I counted on much pleasure, ver}' much,
From our retirement here, and yet I have not
Found that which I expected. Is it thus
With all our hopes ? And yet I cannot say
One wish of mine is left ungratified.

OLIVAREZ.

You have not told us. Princess Eholi,

If there be hope for Gomez, — and if we may

Expect ere long to greet you as his bride ?

QUEEN.

True — thank you, Duchess, for reminding me !

[Addressing the Princess
I have been ask'd to urge his suit with you.
But can I do it ? The man, whom I reward
With my sweet Eboli, must be a man
Of noble stamp indeed.

OLIVAREZ.

And such he is,
A man of mark and fairest fame, — a man
Whom our dear monarch signally has graced
With his most royal favour.

QUEEN.

He's happy in
Such high good fortune ; but we fain would know.
If he can love, and win return of love.
This Eboli must answer.
EBOLi [stands speechless and confused, her eyes bent on the
ground; at last she falls at the queen's /eet)

Gracious Queeu '.
Have pity on me ! Let me — let me not, —
For Heaven's sake, let me not be sacrificed

queen
13e sacrificed! I need no more. Arise!
Tis a hard fortune to be sacrificed.
I do believe you Puse. And is it long
Since you rejected Gomez" suit ?

EBOLI

Some montho —
Before Prince Carlos came from Alcala



16 DON CARLOS. [aCT I

QUEEN (starts and looks at her with an inquisitive glance}.
Have you tiied well the grounds of your refusal ?

EBOLi [ivith energy).
It cannot be, my Queen, no, never, never, —
For a thousand reasons, never!

QUEEN.

One's enough.
You do not love him That suffices me.
Now let it pass. [To her other ladi&i

I have not seen the Infanta
Yet this morning. Pray bring her, Marchioness.

OLiVAREZ (looking at the clock).
It is not yet the hour, your Majesty.

QUEEN.

Not yet the hour for me to be a mother !

That's somewhat hard. Forget not, then, to tell me

When the right hour does come.

[A Page enters and ichispers to the first lady, who there-
upon turns to the Queen.

OLIVAREZ

The Marquis Posa,
May 't please your Majesty.

QUEEN.

The Marquis Posa !

OLIVAREZ.

He comes from France, and from the Netherlands,
And craves the honour to present some letters
Entrusted to him by your royal Mother.

QUEEN.

Is this allow 'd?

OLIVAREZ [hesitating).
A case so unforeseen
Is not provided for in my instructions
"\Mien a Castilian grandee, with despatches
Fi'om foreign Courts, shall in her garden find
The Queen of Spain, and tender them —

QUEEN.

Enough ;
I'll venture, then, on mine own proper peril.



SC. IV. J DON CARLOS. IT

OLIVAREZ.

May I, your Majesty, withdraw the while?

QUEEN.

E'en as you please, good Duchess !

[Exit the Duchess, the Queen gives the Pcuje a sign, vsho
thereupon retires.

Scene IV.

The Queen, Princess Eboli, Marchioness of ]\IoNDECAii,
and Marquis of Posa.

QUEEN.

I bid you welcome, sir, to Spanish ground !

MARQUIS.

Ground, which I never with so just a pride
Hail'd for the countiy of my sires, as now

QUEEN [to the two ladies).
The Marquis Posa, ladies, who at Eheims
Coped with my father in the lists, and made
My colours thrice victorious ; the first,
That made me feel how proud a thing it was
To be the Queen of Spain ajid Spanish men.

[Turnintj to the Mahqlib
When we last parted in the Louvre, sir.
You scarcely dreamed that I should ever be
Your hostess in Castile.

MARQUIS

Most true, my liege !
For at that time I never could have dream VI
That France should lose to us the only thin<T
We envied her possessing.

QUEEN.

How, proud Spaniard !
The only thing ! And you can venture this—
This, to a daughter of the House of Yalois !

MARQUIS.

I venture now to say it, gracious Queen,
Since now you are our own.

QUEEN

Yom* journey hither
Has led y3u, as I hear, thro" France What news

c



18 DON CARLOS [ACT I.

Have you brought -with you from my honour'd .'notlier.
And from my dearest brothers ?

MARQUIS (handinrf letters).
I left your Royal Mother sick at heart,
Bereft of every joy, save only tliis.
To know her daughter happy on the throne
Of our imperial Spain.

QUEEN.

Could she be aught
But happy, in the dear remembrances
Of relatives so land — in the sweet thoughts •

Of the old time, when Sir, you've visited

Full many a court in these your various travels.
And seen strange lauds and customs manifold ;
And now, they say, you mean to keep at home,
A greater prince, in your retired domain.
Than is King Philip on his throne — a freer.
You're a philosopher : but much I doubt
If our Madrid will please you. We are so —
So quiet in Madrid.

MARQUIS.

And that is more
Than all the rest of Europe has to boast.

QUEEN.

I've heai'd as much. But all this world's concerns
Are well nigh blotted from my memory.

To Princess Eboli
Princess, methinks I see a hyacinth
Vender, in bloom. Wilt bring it to me, sweet V

[The Princess r/oes towards the place, the Queen softly
to the Marquis.
I'm much mistaken, sir, or your arrival
Has made one heart more happy here at court

MARQUIS.

I have found a sad one — one that in this world
A ray of sunshine

EBOLI.

As this gentleman
Has seen so many countries, he, no doubt
Has much of note to tell us



SC. IV.] CON CARLOS. 19

MAKQUIS.

Doubtless aaid
To seek adventures, is a knight's first duiy —
But his most sacred is to shield the fair.

JIOKDECAR.

From giants ! But there are no giants now!

JIARQUIS.

Power is a giant ever to the weak.

QUEEN.

The chevalier sa.js, -well. There still are giants ;
But there are knights no more.

MARQUIS.

i\ot long ago.
On my return from Naples, I became
The ^\itness of a very touching stoiy.
Which ties of friendship almost malvc my o\\ti
Were I not fearful its recital might
Fatigue your Majesty

QUliEN.

Have I a choice ?
The Princess is not to be lightly balked.
Proceed. I too, sir, love a story dearly.

MARQUIS.

Two noble houses in Mmmdola,

Wearied of jealousies and deadly feuds.

Transmitted down from Guelphs and Ghibellines,

Through centuries of hate, from sire to son,

Piesolved to ratify a lasting peace

By the sweet ministry of nuptial -ties.

Fernando, nephew of the gi-eat Pietro,

And fair Matilda, old Colonnas child.

Were chosen to cement this holy bond.

Nature had never for each other form'd

Two fairer hearts. And never had the world

Approved a wiser or a happier choice.

Still had the youth adored his lovely bride

In the dull limner's portraiture alone.

How tbrill'd his heart, then, in the hope to lind

The truth of all that e'en his fondest dreams

Had scarcely dared to credit in her picture !

c 2



21) TON CARLOS T'ACr I.

In Padua, where his studies held him bound,

Fernando panted for the joyful hom%

"WTien he might murmur at Matilda's feet

The fii'st pure homage of his fervent love.

[The Queen grows more attentive ; the Maequis con-
tinues, after a short jMuse, addressing himself
chiejiy to Princess Eboli.

Meanwhile the sudden death of Pietro's wife,

Had left him free to wed. With the hot glow

Of youthful blood the hoary lover drinks

The fame that reach'd him of Matilda's charms.

He comes — he sees — he loves .' The new desire

Stifles the voice of nature in his heart.

The uncle woos his nephew's destined bride,

And at the altar consecrates his theft.

QUEEN.

And what did then Fernando ?

MARQUIS.

On the wings
Of love, unconscious of the fearful change,
Delirious with the promis'd joy, he speeds
Back to Miraudola. His flying steed
By stai'-light gains the gate. Tumultuous sounds
Of music, dance, and jocund revelry
Ring from the walls of the illumin'd palace.
With faltering steps he mounts the stair ; and, now
Behold him in the crowded nuptial hall.
Unrecognised ! Amid the reeling guests
Pietro sat. An angel at his side —
An angel, whom he knows, and who to him.
Even in his dreams, seem'd ne'er so beautiful.
A single glance reveal'd what once was his, —
P».eveal'd what now was lost to him for ever.

EBOLI.

O poor Fernando !

QUEEN.

Surely, sir, your laio
Is ended ? Nay, it must be.

MARQUIS

No, not quite.



EC. IV.] DON CARLOS. 21

QUEEN.

Did you not say, Fernando was your fric:. i ?

MARQUIS.

I have no dearer in the world.

EBOLI.

But pray
Proceed, sir, with your stoiy.

MARQUIS.

Nay, the rest
Is very sad — and to recall it sets
My sorrow fresh abroach. Spare me the sequel.

[A general silence
QUEEN {turning to the princess eboli).
Surely the time is come to see my daughter,
I prithee, princess, bring her to me now !

[The Princess withdrmvs. The Marquis heclions a Page
The Queen ojicns the letters, and appears surprised
The Marquis talks icith Marchioness JMondecar
The Queen having read the letters, turns to the Mar-
quis ^cith a penetrating look.
queen.
You have not spoken of Matilda I — She
Haply was ignorant of Fernando's grief?

marquis.
Matilda's heart has no one fathom'd yet —
Great souls endure in silence.

queen.
You look around you. Who is it you seek ?

marquis.
Just then the thought came over me, how one,
Whose name I dare not mention, would rejoice,
Stood he where I do now.

queen.

And who's to bla;ae:
That he does not ?

marquis {interrupting her eagerly).

My liege ! And dare I ventuiv?
To intei-pret thee, as fain I would ? He'd liud
Forgiveness, then, if now he should appear



S3 DON CARLOS. [ACT I.

QUEEX (alarmed).
Now, IMarquis, now ? ^Yhat do you mean by thib ":

MARQUIS.

Might lie, then, hope ?

QUEEN.

You terrify me, Marquis.
Surely he will not

MARQUIS.

He is here alreadv.

Scene V.

The Queen, Carlos, Marquis Posa, Marchioness Mondscar

TTfie two latter go toivards the Avenue.

CARLOS {on his knees before the queen).

At length 'tis come — the happy moment's come,

And Charles may touch this all -beloved hand.

queex.
What headlong folly's this ? And dare you break
Into my presence thus ? Arise, rash man !
We are obsen-ed ; my suite are close at hand.

CARLOS.

I will not rise. Here will I kneel for ever,
Here will I lie enchanted at your feet,
And grow to the dear ground you tread on ?

queen.

Madman !
To what nide boldness my indulgence leads !
Know you, it is the Queen, your mother, sir.
Whom you address in such presumptuous strain ?
Ivnow, that myself will to the King, report
This bold intrusion

CARLOS.

And that I must die I
Let them come here, and drag me to the scaflFold I
A moment spent in paradise, like this.
Is not too dearly purchased by a life.

QUEEN.

But then your Queen ? —

CARLOS (risijig).

God, I'll go, I'll go 1
Can I refuse to bend to that appeal V



60. r.j



DON CARLOS. «8



I am your very plaything. INIotlier. mother,
A si<TU, a transient glance, one broken word
From those dear lips can bid me live or die.
What would you more ? Is there beneath the suii
One thing I would not haste to sacrifice,
To meet your lightest wish ?

QUEEN.

Then fly !

CARLOS.

God ?

QUEEN.

With tears I do conjure you, Carlos, fly !
I ask no more. fly ! before my court,
My guards, detecting us alone together,
Bear the dread tidings to your fathers ear

CARLOS.

I bide my doom, or be it life or death.
Have I staked every hope on this one momen'^
Which gives thee to me, thus at length alone.
That idle fears should balk me of my pui-pose ?
No, Queen! The world may round its axis roll
A hundred thousand times, ere chance again
Yield to my prayers a moment such as this.

QUEEN.

It never shall to all eternity.

Unhappy man ! What would you ask of me ?

CARLOS.

Heaven is my witness, Queen, how I have struggled,

Struggled as mortal never did before.

But ail in vain ! My manhood fails — I peld .

QUEEN.

No more of tliis — for my sake — for my peace —

CARLOS.

You were mine own, — in face of all the world, —
Affianced to me by two mighty ci'owns,
By Heaven and nature plighted as my bride,
But Philip, ci-uel Philip, stole you from me

QUEEN.

He is your father I

CARLOS

And he is your husband !



24 DON CARLOS. I ACT 1,



L



QUEEN.

And giv3s to you, for an inheritance,
The mightiest monarchy in all the world !

CARLOS.

And you, as mother !

QUEEN.

Mighty Heavens ! You rave

CARLOS.

And is he even conscious of his treasure ?
Hath he a heart to feel and value yours ?
Ill not complain — no, no, I will forget,
How happy, past all utterance, I might
Have heen with you, — if he were only so
But he is not — there, there the anguish lies !
He is not, and he never — never can be.
0, you have robb'd me of my paradise.
Only to blast it in King Philip's arms !

QUEEN.

Horrible thought !

CARLOS.

yes, right well I know
Who 'twas that knit this ill-starr'd marriage up
I know how Philip loves, and how he wooed.
What are you in this kingdoai — tell me, what?
Piegent, belike ! Oh, no ! If such you were,
How could fell Alvas act their murderous deeds,
Or Flanders bleed a martyr for her faith ?
Are you e'en Philip's wife ? Impossible —
Beyond belief. A wife doth still possess
Her husband's heart. To whom doth his belong ?
If e'er, perchance, in some hot feverish mood.
He yields to gentler impulse, begs he not
Forgiveness of his sceptre and grey hairs ?

QUEEN.

Who told you that my lot, at Philip's side.
Was one for men to pity ?

CARLOS.

My o\vn heart !
Which feels, with burning pangs, how at my side
It had been to be envied



SC, v.] DON CARLOS. 25

QUEEN.

Thou vain man !
What if my heart should tell me the reverse?
How, sir, if Philip's watchful tenderness, '
The looks that silently proclaim his love,
Touch 'd me more deeply, than his haughty son's
Presumptuous eloquence ? What, if an old man's
Matured esteem

CARLOS.

That makes a difference ! Then,
Why then, forgiveness ! — I'd no thought of this ;
I had no thought that you could love the King.

QUEEN.

To honour him's my pleasure and my wish.

CARLOS.

Then you have never loved ?

QUEEN.

Singular question !

CARLOS.

Then you have never loved ?

QUEEN.

I love no longer !

CARLOS.

Because your heart forbids it, or your oath ?

QUEEN.

Leave rae ; nor ever touch this theme again.

CARLOS.

Because your oath forbids it, or your heart "?

QUEEN.

Because my duty — but, alas, alas !
To what avails this scrutiny of fate,
Which we must both obey ?

CARLOS.

Must — must obey?

QUEEN.

'Wlmt means this solemn tone?

CARLOS.

Thus much it means :
That Carlos is not one to yield to must,
Where he hath power to ivill ! It means, besides,
That Carlos is not minded to live on,



26 DON CARLOS. I ACT I,

The most uiiliappy mail in all this realm,
When it would only cost the overthroiv
Of Spanish laws to be the happiest.

QUEEN.

Do I interpret rightljr? Still you hope ?
Dare you hope on, where all is lost for ever ?

CARLOS.

I look on nought as lost — except the dead.

QUEEN.

For me— your mother, do you dare to hope?

[She fixes a penetrating look on him, then continues
icith dignity and earnestness.
And yet why not ? A new elected monarch
Can do far more — make bonfires of the laws
His father left — o'erthrow his monuments —
Nay, more than this — for what shall hinder him ? —
Drag from his tomb, in the Escurial,
The sacred corpse of his departed sire,
Make it a public spectacle, and scatter
Forth to the winds his desecrated dust.
And then, at last, to fill the measure up,

CARLOS.

Merciful Heavens, finish not the pictui's !

QUEEN.

End all by wedding with his mother.

CARLOS.

Oh!

Accursed son !

[He remains for some time paralysed and speechUsi
Yes, now 'tis out, 'tis out !
I see it clear as day. 0, would it had
Been veil'd from, me in eS'eiiastiug darkness !
Yes, thou art gone from me — gone — gone for ever
The die is cast; and thou art lost to me.
Oh in that thought lies hell; and a hell, too,
Lies in the other thought, to call thee mine.
Oh misery ! I can bear my fate no longer,
My veiy heart-strings strain as they would burst

QUEEN.

Alas, alas I dear Charles, I feel it all,

The nameless pang that rages in your breast ;



SC. V.l DON CARLOS. 27

Your pang3 are infinite, as is your love,

And infinite as Loth will be the glory

Of overmasteiing both. Up, be a, man,

Wrestle with them boldly. The prize is worthy

Of a young warriors high, heroic heart ;

Worthy of him in whom the virtues flow

Of a long ancestry of mighty Idngs.

Courage ! my noble Prince ! Great Charles's grandson

Begins the contest ^rith undaunted heart.

Where sons of meaner men would yield at once

CARLOS.

Too late, too late ! God, it is too late !

QUEEN.

Too late to be a man ! Carlos, Carlos !
How nobly shows our virtue, when the heart
Breaks in its exercise ! The hand of Heaven
Has set you up on high, — far higher. Prince.
Than millions of your brethren. All she tooK
From others, she bestow'd with partial hand
On thee, her favourite ; and millions ask.
What was your merit, thus before your birth
To be endowed so far above mankind ?
Up, then, and justify the ways of Heaven ;
Deserve to take the lead of all the world.
And make a sacrifice ne'er made before.

CARLOS.

I will, I ^vill:— I have a giant's strength
To win your favour ; but to lose you, none.

QUEEN.

Confess, my Carlos, I have harshly read thee ;

It is but spleen, and waywardness, and pride,

Attract you thus so madly to your mother !

The heart you lavish on myself, belongs

To the great empire you one day shall rule.

Look, that you sport not with your sacred trust I

Love is your high vocation ; until now '

It hath been wrongly bent upon your mother :

Oh, lead it back upon your future realms,

And so, instead of the fell stings of conscience,

Enjoy the bliss of being more than man.



28 DON CARLOS. [ACT t

Elizabeth has been your earliest love,
Your second must be Spain. How gladly, Carlos,
Will I give place to this more worthy choice !
CARLOS {overpoivered by emotion, throics himself at her feet).
How great thou art, my angel ! Yes, I'll do
All, all thou canst desire. So let it be.

\He rises
Here, in the sight of heaven I stand, and swear —
I swear to thee, eternal— no, great Heaven ! —
Eternal silence only, — not oblivion.

QUEEN.

How can I ask from you, what I myself
Am not disposed to grant ?

MARQUIS [hastening from the alley).
'The Kins!

QUEEN.

Oh God !

MARQUIS.

Away, away ! fly from these precincts. Prince.

QUEEN.

His jealousy is dreadful — should he see you

CARLOS.

ni stay.

QUEEN.

And who will be the victim, then ?
CARLOS [seizing the marquis hy the arm).
Away, away ! Come, Roderigo, come !

[Goes and returns.
What may I hope to carry hence with me ?

QUEEN.

Your mother's friendship.

CARLOS.

Friendship ! Mother !

QUEEN.

And

These tears with it — they're from the Netherlands.

[She gives him some letters. — Exit Carlos ivith the Mar-
quis. The Queen looks restlessly round in search of
her ladies, who are nowhere to he seen. As she is about
to retire up, the King enters.



6C. VT.] DON CARLOS. QQ

SCRNE VI

The King, the Queen, Duke Alva, Count Lerma, Do?ainoo,
Ladies, Grandees, icJio remain at a little dislance.

KING.

How, Madam, alone ? — not even one of all

Your ladies in attendance ? Strange ! Where are they ?

QUEEN.

My gracious lord !

KING

Why thus alone, I say ?

[To Jn:< Attendants
111 take a strict account of this neglect.
'Tis not to be forgiven. Who has the charge
Of waiting on your Majesty to-day ?

QUEEN.

be not angry ! Good, my Lord, 'tis ]
Myself that am to blame — at my request
The Princess Eboli went hence but now.

KING.

At your request !

QUEEN.

To call the nurse to me,
With the Infanta, whom I long'd to see.

KING.

And was your retinue dismissal for that ?
This only clears the lady first m waiting.
Where was the second ?

MONDECAR [tcho Jias returned and mixed in)': ih4}
other ladies, steps forward).

Your Majesty, 1 il'ol

1 am to blame for this.

KING.

You are, and so
I give you ten years to reflect upon it.
At a most tranquil distance from Madrid.

{The Marchioness steps back iveeping General silencd
The bystanders all look in confusion towards the Queen



«



30 DON CARLOS. [aCT I.

QUEEN.

What weep you for, clear Marchioness ?

\To the Kino
If 1'
Have err'd, my gracious Liege, the crown I wear,
And which I never sought, should save my blushes
Is there a law in this your kingdom, Sire,
To summon monarchs' daughters to the bar '?
Does force alone restrain your Spanish ladies ?
Or need they stronger safeguard than their virtue ?
Now pardon me, my Liege ; 'tis not my wont
To send my ladies, who have served me still
With smiling cheerfulness, away in tears.
Here, Mondecar.
{She takes off her r/irdle and presents it to the Marchioness

You have displeased the King,
Not me. Take this remembrance of my favour,
And of this hour. I'd have you quit the kingdom.
You've only err'd in Spain. In my dear France,
All men are glad to wipe such tears away.
And must I ever be reminded thus ?
In my dear France it had been otherwise.

[Leaning on the Marchioness and coverimj her face

KING.

Can a reproach, that in my love had birth,

Afflict you so ? A word so trouble you.

Which the most anxious tenderness did prompt ?

[He turns toivards the Grandees
Here stand the assembled vassals of my throne.
Did ever sleep descend upon these eyes.
Till at the close of the returning day
I've pondered, how the hearts of all my subjects
Were beating 'neath the furthest cope of Heaven?
And should I feel more anxious for my throne,
Than for the partner of my bosom '? No !
My sword and Alva can protect my people.
My eye alone assures thy love.

queen.

My Liegf)
If that 1 have otfended —




Online LibraryFriedrich SchillerThe works of Frederick Schiller, translated from the German (Volume 3) → online text (page 2 of 37)