Friedrich Schiller.

The works of Frederick Schiller, translated from the German (Volume 3) online

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Should be estrang'd from me, beyond all others, —
Because he once was better loved than they.
Though your state policy may knit together
What bands it pleases — 'tis a harder task
To burst such ties ! 1 will not hate another
For any one's command — and since I must
So speak — such dictates I will not endure.

KING.

Elizabeth ! you've seen me in weak moments —
And their remembrance now emboldens you.
On that strong influence you now depend,
Which you have often, with so much success,
Against my firmness tried. But fear the more I
The power which has seduced me to be weak.
May yet inflame me to some act of madness.

QUEEN.

What have I done ?

EING (takes her hand).

If it should prove but so—
And is it not already? If the full
Accumulated measure of your guilt
Become but one breath heavier — should I be
Deceived — [Lets her hand go.

I can subdue these last remains
Of weakness — can and will — then woe betido
Myself and you, Elizabeth !



SC. IX.] 1)0* CARLOS. 137



Have I committed ?
Shall blood be shed.
Heaven!



What crime

KING.

On my own account theu

QUEEN.

And has it come to this ?



KING.

I shall forget myself — I shall
Regard no usage and no voice of nature —
Not e'en the law of nations.

QUEEN.

how much
I pity you !

KING.

The pity of a harlot !
INFANTA [clinging to her mother in terror)
The King is angry, and my mother weeps.

[King pushes the child violently from the Queek
QUEEN [tvith mildness and dignity, but uith faltering voice).
This child I must protect from cruelty —
Come with me, daughter. [Takes her m her arms.

If the King no more
Acknowledge thee — beyond the Pyrenees
111 call protectors to defend our cause. {Going.

king {emharrassed).
Queen!

QUEEN

I can bear no more — it is too much !
Hastening to the door, she falls uith her child on the
threshold

KTNG (running to her assistance).
Heavens ! What is that ?

INFANTA (cries out %vith terror).

She bleeds ! My rac ther bleeds !

[Runa out.
KING {anxiously assisting her).
0, what a fearful accident 1 You bleed ;



138 DON CAELOS | ACT IF.

Do I deserve this cruel punishment ?

Rise and collect yourself — Rise, they are coming !

They will surprise us ! — Shall the assembled court

Divert themselves with such a spectacle ?

Must I entreat you ?— Rise !

[She rises, supported hy the K:no

SCEKE X.

The former, Ax,va, Domingo entering alarmed. Ladies follow.

KING.

Now let the Queen
Be led to her apartment ; she's imwell.

[Exit the Queen, attended hy her ladies. Alva a»«i
DoMTNGO come forward.

ALVA.

The Queen in tears, and blood upon her face !

KING.

Does that surprise the devils who've misled me?

ALVA and DOMINGO.

We?

KING.

You, who have said enough to drive me mad,
But nothing to convince me.

ALVA.

We gave you
What we ourselves possessed.

KING.

May Hell reward you !
I've done what I repent of! Ah ! was hers
The language of a conscience dark with guilt ?

MAEQUis POSA [from without)
Say, can I see the Iving ?

Scene XI.

The former, Maequis Posa,

KISO ^starts up at tJie sound of his voice, and advances some

paces to meet hiw.\

Ah I here he comes. —



SC. XII.] DON CARLOS. 1 39

Right welcome, Marquis ! Duke ! I neea you now
No louger. Leave us.

[A.1.YA and Do^insGO look at each other with sile)K at>to-
nishment and retire.



Scene XII.
The King, and Mabquis Posa

MARQUIS.

That old soldier. Sire,
Who has faced death, in twenty battles, for you,
Must hold it thankless to be so dismiss'd.

KING.

'Tis thus for you to think — for me to act ;
In a few hours, you have been more to me,
Than that man, in a life-time. Nor shall I
Keep my content a secret. On your brow
The lustre of my high and royal favour
Shall shine resplendent — I \d\\ make that man
A mark for envy, whom I choose my friend.

MARQUIS.

What if the veil of dark obscurity

Were his sole claim to merit such a title ?

KING.

What come vou now to tell me ?

MARQUIS.

As I pass'd
Along the antechamber, a dread rumour
Fell on my ear, — it seemed incredible, —
Of a most angry quarrel — blood — the Queen >

KING.

Come you from her ?

MARQUIS.

I should be horrified
Were not the rumour false : or should perhaps
Your Majesty meantime have done some act-
Discoveries of importance I have made.
Which wholly change the aspect of atfairs.

Hov, now?



140 DON CARLOS, [ACT IV.

MARQUIS.

I found an opportunity
Td seize your son's portfolio, with his letters.
Which, as I hope, may throw some light —

[He gives the Prince's portfolio to the KiK(k
KING {looks throuqli it eagerly).

A letter
From the Emperor, my father. How ! a letter
Of which I ne'er remember to have heard.

[He reads it through, puts it aside, and goes to the
other papers
A drawing of some fortress— detach'd thoughts
From Tacitus — and what is here ? The hand
I surely recognise — it is a lady's.

[He reads it attentively, partly to himself, and partly
aloud.
" This key — the farthest chamber of the Queen's
Pavilion !" — Ha ! what's this ? — " The voice of love, — .
The timid lover— may — a rich reward." —
Satanic treachery ! I see it now.
Tis she — 'tis her own writing !



MARQUI-



The Queen's writing !



Impossible ! —

KING.

The Princess Eboli's.

MARQUIS

Then, it was true, what the Queen's page confess'd,
Not long since — that he brought this key and letter.

KING {graspittg the marquis's hand in great emotion).
Marquis ! I see that I'm in dreadful hands.
This woman — I confess it — 'twas this woman
Forced the Queen's casket ; and my first suspicions
Were breathed by her. Who knows how deep the priest
May be engaged in this ? I am deceived
By cursed villany

MARQUIS

Then was it lucky —

KING. '. . .'

J.Iarquis ! Marquis ! I begin to fear
I've wrong "d my wife



6C. XIT.J " DON CARLOS 141

MARQUIS.

If there exist, between
The Prince and Queen, some secret understandings,
They are of other import, rest assured,
Than those they charge her with. I know, for certain,
The Prince's prayer to be dispatched to Flanders.
Was by the Queen suggested.

KING.

I have thought so.

MARQUIS,

The Queen's ambitious. Dare I speak more fiilly ?

She sees, with some resentment, her high hopes

All disappointed, and herself shut out

From share of empire. Your son's youthful ardour

Offers itself to her far-reaching views

Her heart! — I doubt if she can love.

KING.

Her schemes
Of policy can never make me tremble.

MARQUIS.

Whether the Infant loves her, — whether we
Have something worse to fear from him, — are things
Worthy our deep attention. To these points
Our strictest vigilance must be directed.

KING.

You must be pledge for him.

MARQUIS.

And if the King

Esteem me capable of such a task,
I must entreat it be entrusted to me
Wholly without conditions.

KING.

So it shall.

MARQUIS.

That in the steps which I may think required,
I may be thwarted by no coadjutors,
Whatever name they bear.

KING.

1 pledge my word



142 DON CARLOS. [ACT IV.

You shall not. You have proved my guardian angel.
How many thanks I owe you for this service !

[Lerma enters — the King to him.
How did you leave the Queen ?

lerma.

But scarce recover 'd
From her deep swoon

[He looks at the Marquis doubtfully, and exit

MARQUIS [to the KING, after a pause).

One caution yet seems needful
The Prince may he advised of our design,
For he has many faithful friends in Ghent,
And may have partizans among the rebels.
Fear may incite to desperate resolves ;
Therefore I counsel, that some speedy means
Be taken, to prevent this fatal chance

KING.

You are quite right— but how?

MARQUIS.

Your Majesty
May sign a secret warrant of arrest,
And place it in my hands, to be employed,
As may seem needful, in the hour of danger.

[The IviNG appears thoughtful
This step must be a most profound state-secret
Until

KING [going to his desk and writing the warrant of arrest).

The kingdom is at stake, and now
The pressing danger sanctions urgent measures.
Here Marquis ! I need scarcely say — use prudence.

MARQUIS {taking the warrant).
'Tis only for the last extremity.

KING [layiny his hand on the shoulder of the marquis).
Go ! Go, dear Marquis ! Give this bosom peace.
And bring back slumber to my sleepless pillow.

[Exeunt at different sides.



SC. XI U.J PON CAHLOS. 143

Scene XIII,
A Gallery.

Carlos entering in extreme agitation, Count Leuma
meeting him

CARLOS.

I have been seeking you.

lerma

And I, your Highness.

CARLOS.

For heaven's sake is it ti-ue ?

LERMA.

What do you mean ?

CARLOS.

That the Kinc; drew his dagger— and that she
Was borne, all bathed in blood, from the apartment?
Now answer me, by all that's sacred — say
What am I to believe ? What truth is in it ?

LERMA.

She fainted, and so grazed her skin in falling .
That is the whole

CARLOS.

Is there no further danger ?
■ Count ! answer on your honour.

LERMA.

For the Queen
No farther danger — for yourself there's much !

CARLOS.

None for my mother ! Then kind Heaven I thank thee.
A dreadful rumour reached me, that the King
Raved against child and mother, and that some
Dire secret was discover 'd.

LERMA.

And the last
Ma\ })cssibly be true.

CARLOS.

Be time ! What mean you ?

LER.MA.

One warning have I given you, Prince, already,



144 PON CARLOS. [act IV.

And that to-day, — but you despised it. — now
Perhaps you'll profit better by a second

CARLOS.

Explain yourself.

LEEMA

If I mistake not, Prince,
A few days since, I noticed in your hands
An azure-blue portfolio, work'd in velvet
And chased with gold.

CARLOS (ivith anxiety).

Yes ! I had such a one.

LEEMA.

And on the cover — if I recollect —
A portFait set in pearls ?

CAELOS.

'Tis right — go on.

LEEMA.

I enter'd the King's chamber on a sudden,
And in his hands I mark'd that same portfolio,
The Marquis Posa standing by his side.

CAELOS (after a short silence of astonishment, hastily).
Tis false!

LEEMA {icannly).
Then I'm a traitor !

CAELOS [looking stedfastly at him).

That you are !

LEEMA

Well ! I forgive you.
CARLOS (paces the apartment in extreme agitation, at length
stands still before Kim).

Has he injured thee ?
What have our guiltless ties of friendship done,
That with a demon's zeal thou triest to rend them ?

LERMA.

Prince ! I respect the griel which renders you
So far unjust.

CARLOS.

Heav'n shield me from suspicion !



so. XIII.l DON CABLOS. 145

LERMA.

Aud I remember, too, the King's own words.
Just as I enter'd, he address'd the Marquis :
" How many thanks I owe you for this news."

CARLOS.

say no more !

LERMA.

Duke Alva is disgraced!
The great seal taken from the Prince Ruy Gouie^,
And given to the Marquis.

CARLOS [lost in deep thought).
Aud from me
Has he conceal'd all this ? Aud why from me ?

LERMA.

As minister all-powerful, the court

Looks on him now — as favourite unrivall'd !

CARLOS.

He lov'd me — lov'd me greatly : I was dear.
As his own soul is, to him. That 1 know —
Of that I've had a thousand proofs But shc-uld
The happiness of millions yield to one ?
Must not his country dearer to him prove
Than Carlos ? One friend only is too few
For his capacious heart. ' And not enough
Is Carlos' happiness to engross his love.
He offers me a sacrifice to virtue ;
And shall I murmur at him ? Now 'tis certain,

1 have for ever lost him.

[He steps aside and covers his face.

LERMA.

Dearest Prince .'
How can I serve you ?

CARLOS [without looking at him).
Get you to the King ;
Go and betray me. 1 have nought to give.

LERMA.

Will you then stay and brave the ill that follows ?
OAELOS {leans on a balustrade and looks forward with a vacant

gaze).
I've lost him now, and I am destitute I

L



146 DON CARLOS. [aCT IV.

LERMA (apjyroaching him with sympathizing emotioH\
And will you not consult your safety, Prince?

CARLOS.

My safety ! Generous man !

LERMA.

And is there, then.
No other person you should tremble for?

CARLOS [starts up).
Heavens I you remind me now. Alas ! My mother !
The letter that I gave him — first refused —
Then after gave him !

[He paces backwards and forwards with agitatioTi,
wringing his hands.

Has she then deserved
This blow from him ? He should have spared her, Lerina

[In a hasty determined tone
But I must see her — warn her of her danger —
I must prepare her — Lerma, dearest Lerma !
"Whom shall I send? Have I no friend remaining?
Yes ! Heaven be praised ! I still have one ; and now
The worst is over. [Exit quickly

LERMA [follows, and calls after him)
Whither, whither. Prince?

Scene XIV.
The Queen, Alva, Domingo.

ALVA

If we may be permitted, gracious Queen

queen.
What are your wishes ?

DOMINGO.

A most true regard
For your high Majesty, forbids us now
To watch in careless silence, an event
Pregnant with danger to your royal safety

ALVA.

We hasten, by a kind and timely waruinp.
To counteract a plot that's laid against you.



so. XrV.] DON CAJIT.OS. H7

DOMINGO.

And our warm zeal, and our best services,
To lay before your feet, most gracious Queen !

QUEEN {looki}uj at them icith astonishment).
Most reverend Sir, and you, my noble Duke,
You much surprise me. Such sincere attachment.
In truth, I had not hoped for from Domingo,
Nor from Duke Alva. — Much I value it.
A plot you mention, menacing my safety —
Dare I inquire by whom

ALVA

We must entreat
You will beware a certain Marquis Posa.
He has, of late, been secretly employ 'd
In the King's ser\-ice.

QUEEN.

With delight I hear
The King has made so excellent a choice.
Report, long since, has spoken of the Marquis,
As a deserving, great, and virtuous man —
The royal grace was ne'er so well bestow'd !

DOMINGO.

So well bestowed ! We think far otherwise.

ALVA.

It is no secret now, for what designs
This man has been employ 'd.

QUEEN.

How! What designs?
You put my expectation on the rack.

DOMINGO.

How long is it, since last your Majesty
Open'd your casket?

QUEEN.

Why do you inquire *?

DOMINGO.

Did you not miss some articles of value ?

QUEEN.

Why these suspicions? What I missed, was then
Known to the court ! But what of Marquis Posa?
Say, what connection has all this with him ?



148 DON CAKLOS. [aCT IV.

ALVA.

The closest, please your Majesty — the Prince
Has also lost some papers of importance ;
And they were seen, this morning, with the King,
After the Marquis had an audience of him.

QUEEN {after some consideration).
This news is strange indeed — inexplicable —
To find a foe, where T could ne'er have dream'd it.
And two warm friends, I knew not I possess'd !

[Fixing her eyes stedfastly upon th-am
And, to speak truth, I had well nigh imputed
To you, the wicked turn my husband served me.

ALVA.

To us!

QUEEN.

To you yourselves !

DOIUNGO.

Tons! Duke Alva I
QUEEN {her eyes still fastened on them).
I am glad to be, so timely, made aware
Of my rash judgment, — else had I resolved
This veiT day, to beg his Majesty
Would bring me, face to face, "ftith my accusers.
But I'm contented now. I can appeal
To the Duke Alva, for his testimony.

ALVA.

For mine ? You would not sure do that !

QUEEN.

Why not?

ALVA.

Twould counteract the services we might
Render, in secret, to you.

QUEEN.

How 1 m secret ?

[With stem digiii
I fain would know what secret projects, Duke,
Your Sovereign's spouse can have to form with .you,
Or, Priest! with you — her husband should not know ?
Think you that I am innocent, or guilty ?

DOiUNGO.

rtrange question I



SC. XV.] DON CARLOS. 149

ALVA

Should the Monarch prove uajust —
And, at this time ■

QUEEN.

Then I must wait for justice
Until it come — and they are happiest far
Whose consciences may calmly wait their right.

[Bows to them and exit. Domingo and Alva exeunt
on the opposite side.

Scene XV.

Chamber of Princess Eboli.

Princess Eboli. Cai^los immediately after

eboli.
Is it then true — the strange intelligence,
That fills the Court with wonder ?

CARLOS {enters).

Do not fear,
Princess ! I shall be gentle as a child

eboli
Prince, this intrusion !

CARLOS.

Are you angry still?
Offended sti]l with me

EBOLI.

Prince !
CARLOS {earnestly)

Are you angry ?
I pray you answer me.

EBOLI.

"V\1iat can this mean ?
You seem, Prince, to forget — what would you with me ?

CARLOS (seizing her hand with warmth).
Dear maiden I Can you hate eternally?
Can injured love ne'er pai-don ?

EBOLI (disengaging herself).

Prince ! of what
Would vou remind me ?



150 DON CARLOS. [acT XV.

CARLOS.

Of your kindness, dearest !
And of my deep ingratitude. Alas,
Too well I know it! deeply have I wronged thee —
Wounded thy tender heart, and from thine eyes,
Thine angel eyes, wrung precious tears, sweet maid !
But ah 1 'tis not repentance leads me hither.

EBOLI.

Prince ! leave me — I —

CARLOS.

I come to thee, because
Thou art a maid of gentle soul — because
I trust thy heart — thy kind and tender heart.
Think, dearest maiden ! think I have no friend,
No friend but thee, in all this wretched world —
Thou who wert once so kind, wdlt not for ever
Hate me, nor will thine anger prove eternal.

EBOLI {turning away her face).
0, cease ! No more ! For Heaven's sake ! leave me, Prince.

CARLOS.

Let me remind thee of those golden hours-
Let me remind thee of thy love, sweet maid —
That love which I so basely have offended i
O let me now appear to thee again
As once I was — and as thy heart portrayed me
Yet once again, once only, place my image,
As in days past, before thy tender soul,
And to that idol, make a sacrifice,
Thou canst not make to me.

EBOLI.

0, Carlos, cease !
Too cruelly thou sportest with my feelings !

CARLOS.

Be nobler than thy sex ! Forgive an insult !

Do what no woman e'er has done before thee,

And what no woman, after thee, can equal.

T ask of thee an unexampled favouf.

Grant rae — upon my knees I ask it of thee —

Grant me two moments with the Queen, my motht.r !

[He casts himself at her feet.



90. XVI.J DON CAHL08 151



Scene XVI

The former. Makquis Posa rushes in : behind him two
Officers of the Queens G-uard.

MABQUis [breathless and agitated, rushing between carios

and the princess).
Say, what has he confess'd ? Believe him not !

CARLOS {still on his knees, with loud voice).
By all that's holy

MARQUIS (interrupting him with vehemence)
He is mad! He raves !

listen to him not !

CARLOS {louder and more urgent).
It is a question
Of life and death, conduct me to her straight.

MARQUIS {dragging the princess /ro»i him by force).
You die, if you but listen.

[To one of the Officers, showing an order
Count of Cordova !
In the King's name, Prince Carlos is your prisoner.

[Carlos stands bewildered. T/i^ Princess utters a cry oj
horror, and tries to escape. The Officers are astounded.
— A long and deep jmuse ensues. The Marquis trem
bles violently, and with difficulty preserves his composure.

[To the Prince.

1 beg your sword. — The Princess Eboli

Remains — [To the Officers

And you, on peril of your lives.
Let no one with his Highness speak — no person —
Not e'en yourselves.

[He whispers a few words to one Officer, then turns to
tJie other.

I hasten, instantly,
To cast myself before our Monarch's feet,
And justify this step — [To the Prince

And Prince ! for you —
Expect me in an h»ur.

[Carlos permits hmiself to be led aivay without any signs
of consciousne&s, except that, in passing, he casts a



152 DON CAKLOS. [aCI IV

tanguid, dying look, on the Maeqcis. Tlie Princsss
endeavours again to escape: the Marquis pulls lur
hack by the arm.



Scene XVII

Princess Eboli, Marquis Posa

ebotj:.
For Heaven's sake let me leave tliis place —

MARQUIS (leads her forward: with dreadful earnestness).

Thou wretch!
What has he said to thee ?

EBOLI.

leave me ! Nothing !

MARQUIS (idth earnestness : holding her hack by force).
How much has he imparted to thee? Here
No way is left thee to escape. To none,
In this world, shalt thou ever tell it.

EBOLI {looking at him ivith terror).

Heavens !
What would you do ? Would you then murder me ?

MARQUIS {draidng a dagger).
Yes ! that is my resolve. Be speedy !

EBOLI.

Mercy !
What have I then committed ?

MAEQUis (looking towards heaven, points the dagger to her

breast).

Still there's time —
The poison has not issued from these lips.
Dash but the bowl to atoms, all remains
Still as before ! The destinies of Spain
Against a woman's life !

[Remains douhtingly in this position

EBOLI {having sunk down beside him, looks in hisfuce).

*Do not delay —
Why do you hesitate ? I beg no mercy —
I have deserved to die, and I am ready.



SC. XIX.] T>Oli CARLOS. 153

MABQUTS (letting Ms hand drop slowhj — after some reflection).

It were as cowardly as barbarous,

No ! God be praised ! — another way is left.

[He lets the dagger fall and hurries out. The Princess
hastens out through another door

Scene XVIII.

A Chamber of the Queen

The Queen to the CorrNTESs Fuentes. .

What means this noisy tumult in the palace ?

Each breath to-day alarms me ! Countess ! see

What it portends, and hasten back with speed.

[Eadt Countess Fuentes — The Peincess Eboli rushes in

Scene XIX.
The Queen, Princess Eboli.
EBOLI [breathless, pale, and uild, falls before the Queen).
Help ! Help ! Queen ! he's seized !

queen

^Vho?

EBOLI.

He's arrested.
By the King's orders given to Marquis Posa.

QUEEN

Who is arrested ? Who ?

EBOLI.

The Prince!

QUEEN.

Thou rav'st 1

EBOLI.

This moment they are leading him away

QUEEN.

And who arrested him ?

EBOLI.

The Marquis Posa.

QUEEN.

Then Heaven be praised, it wa^ the Marquis seized him !



154 DON CARLOS. pACT' IV

KBOLi'

Can you speaK: tlius, and with such tranquil mien ?
O Heavens ! you do not know — you cannot think —

QUEKN

The cause of his arrest! — some trifling error,
Doubtless arising from his headlong youth !

EBOLI.

No ! no ! I know far better. No, my Queen !

Remorseless treachery ! There's no help for him.
He dies [

QUEEN.

He dies !

EBOLI.

And I'm his murderer !

QUEEN.

What ! Dies ? Thou ravest ! Think what thou art saying ?

EBOLI.

And wherefore — wherefore dies he? Had T known
That it would come to this !

QUEEN (takes her affectionately by the hand).
dearest Princess,
Your senses are distracted, but collect
Your wandering spirits, and relate to me
More calmly, not in images of horror
That flight my inmost soul, whate'er you know
Say, what has happened ?

EBOLI.

display not, Queen,
Such heavenly condescension ! Like hot flames
This kindness sears my conscience. I'm not worthy
To view thy purity with eyes profane.
O crush the wretch, who, agonized by shame.
Remorse, and self-reproach, writhes at thy feet !

QUEEN.

Unhappy woman ! Say, what is thy guilt ?

EBOLI.

Angel of light ! Sweet saint ! thou little know'st
The demon, who has won thy loving smiles.
Know her to-day — I was the wretched thiof
Who plunder'd thee



BO, XIX. I DON CARLOS 155

QUEEN

What! Thou?

EBOLI.

And gaT6 thy letters



Up to the ffing !



QUEEN.

What! Thou?



EBOLI

And dared accuse thee !

QUEEN.

Thou ! Couldst thou this ?

EBOLI,

Kevenge and madness— love —
I hated thee, and loved the Prince !

QUEEN.

And did
His love so prompt thee ?

EBOLI.

I had own'd my love.
But met with no return.

QUEEN (after a pause).

Now all's explain'd !
Rise up ! — you loved him — I have pardon 'd you —
I have forgotten all. Now, Princess, rise !

[Holding out her hand to the Pbincess,

EBOLI.

No ! no ! a foul confession still remains
I will not rise, great Queen, till I

QUEEN.

Then speak
What have 1 yet to hear ?

EBOLI.

The King ! Seduction !

! now you turn away ! And in your eyes

1 read abhorrence. Yes : of that foul crime
1 charged you with, I have myself been guilty.

[Sh^ presses her burniriff face to the grou E cit Queen.
— A long pause. The Countess Olivarez, after some
minutes, comes out of the Cabinet, into uhich the



1^6 no^ CARLOS [act IV

QtTEEN entered, and finds the PrIiVcess still lying in
the above posture. She approaches in silence. On hear-
ing a noise, the latter looks up and becomes like a
mad person when she misses the Queen

Scene XX
Princess Eboli. Countess Olivarez.
eboli.
Heavens ! slie lias left me. I am now undone !

OLiVAHEZ {approaching her)
My Princess — Eboli !



Online LibraryFriedrich SchillerThe works of Frederick Schiller, translated from the German (Volume 3) → online text (page 9 of 37)