G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

. (page 1 of 103)
Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 1 of 103)
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HISTORY



OF THE




ncient ifliyeclales

SMS J



AND THEIR DESCENDANTS IN



NORMANDY, GREAT BRITAIN, IRELAND, AND AMERICA,



From 86O to 1884.



Comprising the Genealogy and Biography, for about
One Thousand Years, of the Families of



RlDDELL, RIDDLE, RIDLON, RIDLEY,



La,



FULLY ILLUSTRATED WITH ENGRAflNGS OF PORTRAITS, RESI-
DENCES, MONUMENTS, CO A TS-OF-ARMS, AND AUTO-
GRAPHS, ON STEEL, STONE, AND WOOD.



» • •



• • •



BY G. T. RIDLON,

Author of "Early Settlers of Harrison, Me.," "Burbank Geneai.ogJ',"*..'
"Hamblins of Beech Hill." and other Biographical
and Genealogical Works.



• •• •



» • . • •



1 • •



• . . . •



• •• .

• • » >



"That the generation to come might know them, even the children which should be born; who should
arise and declare them to their children." — Psahns 78 : 6.



MANCHESTER, N. II. :
PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR

1884.






VOX POPULI PR ESS :
HUSE, GOODWIN &. CO.,

LOW ELL, MASS.



. . : •













t « <
. . «





:

:..•■



I



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PORTRAITS.

PAGE

(i. T. Ridlon. (Author) Frontispiece

James-Muxes Riddell 61

Sir Walter-Buchanan Riddell, Bart 63

Sir Thomas-Milles Riddell, Bart 63

Gen. Henry P. A. Riddell 63

Capt. Thomas A. Riddell-Carre 63

Walter Riddell-Carre, Esq 63

Rev. James Riddell, Sr 63

Rev. James Riddell, Jr 63

Rt. Rev. William Riddell 147

James Riddle 158

Gen. William P. Riddle 225

Ma.t. Isaac Riddle 228

Col. George W. Riddle 233

John Q. Riddle . t 336

Hon. A. G. Riddle 371

Hon. George-Reed Riddle 371

Hon. Haywood-Yancy Riddle 371

Rev. Samuel-Hopkins Riddel 371

Col. John Riddle 299

Hon. Adam N. Riddle 305

Rev. Finley B. Riddle 371

Hamilton R. Riddle, m. d 371

John-Robert Riddle, m. d • 371

Rt. Rev. Nicholas Ridley, d. d 419

Mark Ridley, m. d 424

Rev. Gloster Ridley, d. d • 431

Sir Matthew-White Ridley, Bart 437

Samuel Ridlon 581

Rev. Isaac Ridley 581



VI



LIST OF lI.I.LSTRATIO\s.



Hon. Francis W. Ridlon
Jonathan Ridley .
Daniel M. Redlon, m. i».
'Dr. Nathaniel Redlon .
Rev. Nathaniel T. Ridlon
Robert Ridlon
Thomas Ridlon
John F. Ridlon, m. d. .
William Ridlon



PLATES AND VIEWS



Coats-of-Arms. (Eight sheets)

Tin: Haining .

Uiddell House

Friar's Carse .

Caa ers-Carre .

Tiviothead Cottage

Fenham Hall .

Swinburn Castle .

¥ ei.ton Park .

Cheeseburn Grange

Glen-Riddle Mills

Riddle's Banks

Old Riddle Mansion House

wlllimoteswick castle

Ridley Hall .

LTnthank Hall

M \ktyk's Memorial

Heaton Hall .

Parkend ....

Hillside Farm

Pinegrove Cottage



581
581
581
581
581
630
632
702
724



26

68

73

82

99

110

142

144

148

149

156

159

221

404

406

408

422

434

it:

633
675






TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Readers' Directory ....

List of Illustrations

Table of Contents ....

Introduction and Compendium

History of Illustrations .

Origin and Change of Surnames .

Family Christian Names

Heraldry ......

The Ancient Northmen, — Riddell Ancestry
Riddells of Arduamurchan
Riddells of Enfield ....

Riddells of Roxburghshire, Scotland
Riddells of Musilee, Scotland
Riddells of Berwick-on-Tweed
Riddells of Glen-Riddell, Scotland
Riddells of Grange, Scotland
Riddells of Granton, Scotland
Riddells of Beesborough, Scotland
Riddells of Camieston, Scotland .
Riddells of Newhouse, Scotland .
Riddalls of Ulster, Ireland
Riddells of Bermuda, "West Indies
Riddells of Lilliesleaf, Scotland .
Another Family ....

Riddells of Hawick, Scotland
Riddells of Galashiels, Scotland .
Riddells of Tiviotdale, Scotland .
Riddells of Glenmuick, Scotland .
Riddells of Old Meldrum, Scotland
Riddells of Aberdeen, Scotland
Riddells of Peterhead, Scotland .



PAGE

iii

v

vii

1

13

15

22

25

34

45

62

63

77

78

80

84

85

94

95

102

104

105

105

106

107

108

109

117

123

123

124



VII 1



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Riddels of Cushnie, Scotland

Riddells of Hermitage Castle, Scotland

Riddells of Liddesdale, Scotland

Riddells of Wanchope, Scotland

Riddells of Jedburgh, Scotland

Riddells of Selkirk, Scotland

Riddells of Stirling, Scotland

Riddells of Newcastle and Gateshead, England

Riddells of Swinburn and Felton, England

Riddells of Cheeseburn Grange, England

Kiddles of Troughend, England .

Riddles of Tweedmouth, England

Riddells of Parkmount, Ireland

Riddells of Ballinaraau, Ireland

Riddells of Ray, Ireland

Riddells of Glasslough, Ireland

Riddells of Richhill, Ireland .

Riddells of Strabane, Ireland

Riddells of Newton-Stewart, Ireland

Another Family ....

Riddells of Castlefinn, Ireland

Riddells of Ballyblack, Ireland

Riddells of Denmamora, Ireland .

Riddells of Ballyraeath, Ireland

Riddells of Ballyraony, Ireland

Riddells of Glanish, Ireland .

Riddells of Cornasoo, Ireland

Riddells of Annamacneal, Ireland

Riddles of York County, Pennsylvania

Riddells of Bedford, New Hampshire, No. 1

Riddells of Bedford, New Hampshire, No. 2

Riddells of Derryfield, New Hampshire

Riddells of Coleraine, .Massachusetts, No. 1

Riddells of Coleraine, .Massachusetts, No.

Riddles of ( 'harlestown, Massachusetts

Kiddles of Boston, Massachusetts .

Riedells of Douglas, Massachusetts

Riddells of Nantucket, Massachusetts

Riddells of Mouson, Massachusetts

Riddles of Alexander, New York .

Riddells of Schenectady, New York

Kiddles of Winchester County, New York

Riddles of Rochdale, New York .



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



IX



Riddel Is of Saratoga County, New York .
Riddells of Somerset County, New Jersey .

Riddells of Maryland

Riddells of Cecil County, Maryland
Riddells of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania
Riddells of Washington County, Pennsylvania
Riddells of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
Riddells of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania .
Riddells of Mifflin County, Pennsylvania
Riddles of Holmes County, Ohio .
Riddles of Dayton, Ohio ....

Riddles of Detroit, Michigan

Riddles of Caledonia, Illinois

Riddells of Brunswick County, Virginia

Riddells of Laurel Hill, Virginia .

Riddells of Pittsylvania County, Virginia .

Another Family ......

Riddells of Goochland County, Virginia
Riddells of Accomack County, Virginia
Riddles of Virginia and Tennessee
^ Riddells of Chatham County, North Carolina
Riddles of Riddle's Ferry, North Carolina .
Riddells of Orange County, Virginia .
Ruddells of Roanoke County, Virgiuia
Riddles of Union County, Kentucky
Ruddles of Ruddle's Station, Kentucky
Riddells of Pakenham, Cauada
Riddells of St. John's, New Brunswick
Riddles of Nova Scotia .
Ridley Family of England
Ridleys of Ridley Hall, England .
Ridleys, Lords of Ridley, England
Ridleys of Willimoteswick, England
Ridleys of Parkend, England .
Ridleys of Battersea England, No. 1
Ridleys of Battersea, England, No. !
Ridleys of Walltown, England
Ridleys of Alstonmoor, England .
Ridleys of Gateshead, England
Ridleys of Hexham, England .
Ridleys of Mickley Farm, England
Ridleys of Beckley, Sussex, England
Ridleys of Bury St. Edmund's, England



294

297

312

313

316

319

321

324

327

335

336

337

338

341

342

343

346

347

350

354

360

369

374

386

388

391

392

396

397

401

411

413

415

447

450

450

453

445

456

458

459

465

466



TABLE OF CONTEXTS.



Ridleys of Newark. England .
Ridleys of Winkfleld, England
Ridleys of Kimbolton, England
Ridleys of Newark-on-Trent, England .
Ridleys of Arthurstone, England .
Ridley Land-owners in Great Britain .
Ridleys of Southampton County. Virginia
Ridleys of Warwick County, Georgia .
Ridleys of Bnrk County, North Carolina
Ridleys of Rutherford County. Tennessee
Ridleys of Oxford, North Carolina
Ridleys of Wilkinson County, Georgia
Ridleys of Wake County, North Carolina
Ridleys of Truro, Massachusetts
Ridleys of New York City .
Ridleys of Cayuga County, New York
Ridleys of Duxbury, Vermont
Ridlers of Eastcomb, England
Ridlers of Boston, Massachusetts
Rhuddlan and Ridlaud Families
Ridlands of Sandsting, Shetland
Ridlauds of Charlestowu, Massachusetts
History of the Redlon and Ridlon Family
Ridloii Family Portraits
History of the Redlon Family
Redlons of York, Maine
Will of Magnus Redlon ....
Inventory of Magnus Redlon's Estate .
Inventory of John Redlon's Estate
Waymarks in Experience



471
473
473
475
478
480
482
490
4!»2
493
515
528
533
535
5C2
5C2
504
500
507
573



581
583
588
592
593
595
709






I



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM.



HISTORY OF THIS BOOK.



My early years were spent in the home of my paternal grandparents, — a place
where many members of our family connection resorted to discuss the history
of the past, — and from listening attentively to the conversation that passed
between those godly ancestors as they gathered around the ample hearthstone,
I became, at an early age, deeply interested in everything pertaining to the
history of my forefathers and their times. This interest increased with my
years, and I determined that at some future day I would fully acquaint myself
with the history of our family and its origin.

My grandfather was truly a patriarch, for he lived contemporary with eight
generations of his family. From his standpoint he could look backward and
remember three generations of his predecessors ; looking downward he could see
four generations of his descendants, and at the same time he himself was the
connecting link of this chain between the first three and last four generations,
making eight generations in all. This remarkable acquaintance with so many
of his family, supplemented by the possession of a wonderfully retentive mem-
ory, which remained unimpaired till he was more than ninety years of age,
qualified this venerable man in a peculiar manner to impart information respect-
ing the history and genealogy of his family connections. The elder members of
our family seemed pleased to advert to all the traditions known to their ances-
tors, and delighted to transmit them from father to son, always careful that
nothing should be lost. When these discussions were going on I used to draw
near my grandfather's knee and listen with the keenest relish to every word
spoken, frequently asking questions about the relationship between the various
cadets of our family mentioned in the conversation.

During those early years I noticed that frequent allusion was made to " Old
Uncle John" and "Old Uncle Abram" in a very emphatic way, — great stress
always being laid upon the word " old." This served to excite my curiosity and
rekindle the fires of interest, until, as a result of my inquisitiveness, I possessed
a very good traditionary outline of the history of my own branch of the family.
If I saw one of our surnames in a book or newspaper, it always awakened a
new interest and inspired a zeal to investigate more fully the genealogy of all
branches of our tribe.

While spending a few days at my grandfather's home in 1868, and discovering
the remarkable vividness of his memory, I availed myself of the opportunity to
make copious notes respecting the branches and sub-branches of our own line
of the family. I was especially careful to learn where all who had removed to



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM.



distant States, had settled as well as to gain a knowledge of the personal ap-
pearance and habits of the heads of the early families. On returning to my own
home I arranged and classified ray notes, — the first written basis of this book,
— and instituted an extensive correspondence at once, directing my attention
especially to the acquisition of genealogical information of the descendants
of my own ancestor direct, having no object beyond an attempt to make
out a tabular pedigree, to be framed and kept in my house. Failing to trace
by correspondence several branches broken from the parent stock, I found it
necessary to advertise freely in the newspapers in several States, hoping thereby
to find the "lost Joseph." In answer to these published inquiries I received
many communications from persons bearing our surname, whose families I could
not then connect with my own. Letters of this class continued to accumulate
as I extended the circle of my investigations, and I was soon aware that our
clan had become so numerous that my original plan would be impracticable;
hence, knowing by this time that there were in the United States several branches
bearing our surname, that were descended from as many distinct ancestors, I
abandoned my first plan and adopted one of a broader scope, namely, that of com-
piling a genealogy of all the American families, the orthography of whose names
seemed to point to a common derivation. Having fully matured my new plan,
I multiplied my queries by correspondence, circulars, and advertisements in
historical magazines and newspapers. My mind was now fully enlisted in the
work of research, and I decided to "leave no stone unturned" under which
there was the least hope of finding a link of our family chain that would add
to the interest of my proposed "book of chronicles."

Some families had early removed to the far west, others to Vermont and Mas-
sachusetts, and a few to the eastern section of Maine. More than seventy years
had elapsed since any communication had passed between the New England and
western families, and their address, in consequence of change of names in new
States, and removals, had been lost, and a long time passed before any infor-
mation concerning our western friends could be obtained. At length, however,
my advertisement reached them, and with the most inexpressible gladness they
reported themselves. I shall always remember with emotions of pleasure the
satisfaction I experienced when I read the first letter from a representative of
the family in Ohio, whither they had emigrated in the year 1800. I made haste
to acquaint my aged grandfather with the fact that several of his own cousins,
with whom he spent many pleasant days in his childhood, were still living, and
that they remembered him well. On hearing the intelligence the dear old man
was overcome with emotion and wept for joy. The communications that followed
were filled with touching reminiscences of the days when the several families
were living neighbors in New England.

During the years I was collecting the records of my own family connection,
great confusion was occasioned in consequence of the local mingling of the
families that were offshoots of different original stocks. Many descendants of
my ancestor had moved to the eastern part of Maine, and were soon living
alongside of families named Ridley, who had come from Cape Cod, Massachu-
setts, a few years previously: and having assumed that all were originally
from one ancestry, the Ridlon family soon changed their name to Ridley; this
mutation of the surname, supplemented by the frequent correspondence of ages
and Christian names between members of the two families, made it very difficult
to properly classify their records. The same embarrassment attended my
researches in the western and southern States. Many of my advertisements
were copied from western to southern newspapers, and I soon found myself in



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM.



possession of numerous pedigrees from a prolific family in Virginia, Tennessee,
and Georgia, of whom I previously had no knowledge ; these used the same
surname as many of my own kindred, but were evidently descended from
another stock. These southern families were wealthy, highly respectable, and
well allied by marriage with many of the most eminent families in the southern
States ; they were deeply interested in my undertaking, and were as anxious to
have their genealogy incorporated into my book as I was to publish my own ;
hence, to give general satisfaction, I again enlarged my plan, and encompassed
within the circle of my inquiries the history and genealogy of every family in
America known by our surname, not only in the United States, but in all the
British North American Provinces.

Thus my undertaking assumed broader proportions from time to time, as I
prosecuted my work of gathering records from the several American branches
of the connection, until I had canvassed the ground quite thoroughly. In com-
paring my records in order to arrange them for composition, I was not willing
to put the work to press without making a reasonable effort to learn how these
numerous families, descended from ancestors widely removed from each other
in their settlements in America, were related to each other in the old country ;
to learn, if possible, whether or not they all sprung from one common stock,
and where their progenitors lived. But the work appeared of too great a mag-
nitude, and as turned my mental vision toward foreign lands, with an intense
desire to trace the family line across the seas, insurmountable obstacles seemed
to arise before me; but while contemplating the subject there was another
favorable turn by the wheel of fortune, — a book fell into my hands, in which I
found the name and address of one of the family in England. I immediately
forwarded a letter to that gentleman, which resulted in the establishment of a
correspondence with several representative heads of families in England and
Scotland, which has been uninterruptedly continued ever since, hardly a week
having passed for eight years, in which letters were not crossing the ocean, to
and from this country.

As data of a very interesting character reached me from Great Britain, I
continued to amplify my plans and extend the limits of my search. My interest
grew with every new accession to my historical materials. I saw that my work,
if published as it then was, must present a fragmentary and disconnected
appearance; there would be confusion, uncertainty, and dissatisfaction in the
mind of every reader of such a book; and after much consideration and
weighing of the probabilities of success, I set my mind toward the consumma-
tion of a work so great, that, had I known its magnitude at the time, it
would never have been undertaken by one of so limited means as I have been
confined to during all the years of my investigation. But there was no limit
to the range of my examination commenced at that time, short of a history of
the family reaching back to the earliest ancestor of whom any account could
be found, and covering the centuries during a period of a thousand years. I
also enlarged the character of my inquiries, seeking to procure not only genea-
logical but biographical materials for my work. My correspondence had made
me aware that the family, from its earliest history, had been ornamented by
many distinguished men: that representatives of the old sept had filled impor-
tant civil and military stations, and hence it was desirable to preserve in a
family memorial a comprehensive account of their lives and services.

Anticipating discouragement from those who could not quite appreciate my
ambition and family pride, and wishing to evade the taunts and appellations
that are usually pronounced upon an enthusiastic antiquary, I kept my new



I.VTJiODUCTIOX A.YD COMPEXDIUM.



project to myself for a considerable time; but so many calls were made by
members of our .family in America, for the results of my original venture, that
a confession of my latest plans was my only apology for what seemed to
others an unnecessary delay on my part. "At my first answer no man stood
with' me." To my relatives and acquaintances my undertaking was "a castle
in the air," my "head was turned," and my "whole time was being wasted."
To a less determined mind the work would have seemed too much for one to
accomplish, but being confident from my previous success that I should not
fail, I asked my friends and correspondents to have patience, and, life being
spared, I would produce what had been promised. But, as I had anticipated,
many were unwilling to be identified with what appeared to be a "wild goose
chase," and at my solicitations for aid would ask, "What will all your labor
amount to?" "What will your book be good for if completed?" "How many
years will it take to finish the work?" etc., etc. Having become better
acquainted with the value of such a book than I was when my relatives "made
light of it " and manifested so much indiffereuce and stupidity, I shall now set
forth some of the valuable qualities found in a book of this class.

To me the fact that no attempt had ever been made to preserve in perma-
nent form our family history, seemed a sufficient inducement to justify me in
making very reasonable effort to procure the materials necessary for such a
book as would be of interest to the rising generation. Like all historians, I
soon learned that traditionary information, when transmitted by aged people
from generation to generation, becomes exaggerated and modified, and that if
those who may bear our family name in years to come would possess anything
like a correct knowledge of their progenitors, it must be handed down to
them by some accurate and enduring medium. The advanced state of civil-
ization seems to demand that every one, as he goes forth to mingle with his
fellow-men and assume the responsibilities of his generation, shall become
possessed of a fund of information sufficient to qualify him to converse intel-
ligently and instructively with those into whose society he must be constantly
thrown ; he should be acquainted with the constitution and history of his
country, and the principles of government. If, then, the history of the origin,
growth, and prosperity of nations be considered a subject worthy of study,
why should it be thought unimportant to know something of the inner circle,
of the parts and constituent elements that compose the nations and govern-
ments of the world? Certainly it is a worthy motive to wish to know the his-
tory of those family predecessors in whose veins flowed the same blood that
now animates our own frames ; those ancestors who have cut away the forests
to hew out homes for themselves and their children ; the fathers and mothers
to whom we are indebted for the names we bear. But, strange as it may
appear, there are hundreds of New England families that have no traditionary
knowledge of their ancestors; they do not know whether they were derived
from the Celts or Scandinavians ; they cannot tell the names of their grand-
parents. There is no excuse for such ignorance and stupidity, nor is it to be
commended as having any claims to respect. Such a state of indifference
respecting family history may have been " winked at " in colonial times, when
the advantages of education were so meagre that few learned to write, but it
is now unnecessary and inexcusable.

A well-arranged book of this class has value from several considerations, among
them the following which must commend themselves to all intelligent readers :
First, from the interest we are supposed to possess in the names we bear. Whose
interest is not involved in the family name by which they are identified? If



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 5

a member of the family whose name we bear is honored, our own respect is
gratified, and we instinctively feel our family pride rising within us; and, on
the other hand, when one of our kindred becomes the subject of disgrace,
we afterwards feel chagrined, and acknowledge our relationship with embarrass-
ing feelings. That sentiment of pride in a family name by which a distin-
guished and worthy ancestry was known, is both natural and commendable,
and should be cherished as sacred. In a good family history the virtues of
our ancestors and kinspeople are recorded, and in reading of these we are
inspired to noble ambition in the emulation of their examples, and in trying to
perpetuate in our families the characteristics for which our fathers were
deservedly esteemed while living, and lamented when gone; indeed, all thoughtful
persons feel inseparably identified with those who bear their names, and have an
honest desire to preserve the prestige of those families as a patrimony for the
rising generation.

Such a history has value, secondly, because of the respect we have for our
departed friends. Universal custom has caused all respectable families to feel
it a moral obligation to erect some monument to mark the places where their
dead are buried; it is a filial and sacred duty to thus preserve the names of
our parents, to record their ages and the times in which they lived, in such



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 1 of 103)