G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

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YYilliani-N. Riddle 6 (6), eldest son of David 5 (2), was born at Win-
chester, Va., and died in the year 1836, in childhood.

SllSau-N. Riddle 6 (2), second daughter of David 5 (2), was born at
Winchester, Va., Nov. 1, 1834; now (1884) living in Martinsburgh, West
Va. ; unmarried.

Rev. Matthew-Brown Riddle 6 (1), o. d., second son of David 5 (2),

was born (presumably) in Pittsburgh, Penn., Oct. 17, 1836; entered Jef-
ferson College in 1850; was graduated in 1852, salutatorian ; studied the-
ology at Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Penn., 1853-6; assist-
ant professor of Greek in Jefferson College, 1857-8; at New Brunswick
Theological Seminary, 1858-60 ; in Europe in 1860-1. He was licensed
to preach May 26, 1859; was chaplain of the three-months troops in 1861 ;
ordained and installed pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church at Hoboken,
N. J., April 15, 1862; removed to Newark, N. J., as pastor of Second
Reformed Dutch Church, March 2, 1865; dismissed from the Church in
1869; in Germany until September, 1871; has been professor of New
Testament Exegesis, at Hartford Theological Seminary (Conn.) since
1871, where he is now stationed. Dr. Riddle is regarded as an excellent
scholar, and an author of great weight ; lie has accomplished a remark-
able amount of literary work within the past few years. He was one of
the Committee on the Revision of the Bible.

Catherine-Burton Riddle' (4). third daughter of David 5 (2), was
born in Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 26, 1839; was married to G. Bogert
Vroom, and is now (1884) a widow.



MIDDLES OF YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 217

Alexander-Brown Riddle 6 (1), third son of David 5 (2), was born in
Pittsburgh, Penn., and died in infancy.
Elizabeth-Herran Riddle 6 (4), fourth daughter of David 5 (2), was

born (presumably) at Pittsburgh, Penn., Sept. 8, 1843, and was married
to Rev. Meade C. Williams, of Sandusky, 0. ; now (1884) living at
Princeton, 111. ; has five children.

Rev. David-H. Riddle 6 (4), fourth son of David 5 (2), was born (pre-
sumably) at Pittsburgh, Penn.. Jan. 28, 1845; was graduated at Jefferson
College in 1865 ; studied theology two years at Allegheny, Penn., and one
at Princeton; was licensed to preach in 1869, and ordained and installed
pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Falls Church,* in Fairfax County,
Va., in 1871.

Henry-A. Riddle 6 (1), fifth son of David 5 (2), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., June 8, 1848 ; married Martha Hunter, and is now a mer-
chant at Martinsburgh, W. Va. Has/bwr children, of whom hereafter.

SEVENTH GENERATION.

Elizabeth Riddle 7 (6), eldest daughter of George 6 (2), was born in
Allegheny, Penn., March 27, 1837 ; was married to Rev. William Wallace,
May 29, 1862, and has issue six children. Mr. Wallace is pastor of the
United Presbyterian Church, at Newville, Cumberland County, Penn.

James-Henry Riddle 7 (8), eldest son of George (2), was born at Al-
legheny, Penn., Feb. 24, 1839; married Rosanna Carson, of Franklin
County, Penn., Feb. 25, 1868, and has issue four children, of whom here-
after. Mr. Riddle resides at Spring Dale, Penn., and is a professional
accountant and clerk.

George-Denhnrst Riddle 7 (3), second son of George 6 (2), was born
at Allegheny, Penn., March 13, 1841; married Elizabeth, daughter of
Matthew and Nancy Day, Sept. 1, 1863, and has issue six children, of
whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle was formerly in the grocery trade, in Alle-
gheny City, but now holds the position of secretary of the Ben Franklin
Insurance Company.

Arianua-Rebecca Riddle 7 (3), second daughter of George 6 (2), was
born at Allegheny, Penn., July 2, 1843 ; was married to Thomas F. Mar-
shall (civil engineer), Nov. 17, 1871, and has issue.

Edward-Dallas Riddle 7 (2), third son of George 6 (2), was born at
Pittsburgh, Penn., Dec. 6, 1845 ; he is now serving as clerk, and lives at
home ; single.

Robert-Stewart Riddle 7 (3), fourth son of George 6 (2), was born at
Allegheny, Penn., Feb. 6, 1848 ; he is living at home, single ; farmer.

Joseph-Madison Riddle 7 (7), fifth son of George 6 (2), was born at
Allegheny, Penn., Feb. 4, 1850; lives at home, a single man ; farmer.

Mary-Ann Riddle 7 (6), third daughter of George 6 (2), was born at
Allegheny, Penn., Jidy 6, 1852 ; unmarried.



Williani-H. Riddle 7 (7), eldest son of John 6 (7), was born in Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Aug. 3, 1842; married Florence Fell, of Marietta, O., May
20, 1875 ; no issue. Mr. Riddle is a prominent banker in Pittsburgh ;

* The author visited Falls Church during the late war and found the ancient
structure where, tradition said, George Washington was married, in a dilapidated
condition, and used as a stable for cavalry-horses. The old church was some dis-
tance back from the turnpike, and in the midst of a burial-ground, after the English
style.



218 RIDDLES OF YOBE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

was initiated in the Allegheny Savings Bank ; thence removed to the
Tradesman's National Bank; and is now teller in the People's National
Hank. He is regarded as -a competent and trustworthy business-man,
highly respected and influential.

Albert-Findley Riddle 7 (2), second son of John 6 (6), was born in
Pittsburgh, Perm., April 23, 1*44 ; married to Martha Ogle, of Quincy, 111.,
Jan. 24, 1864, and has three children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle is
superintendent of Oil Works, Butler Street, near Sharpsburgh Bridge,
lie is an enterprising and competent man.

Charles-Elliott Kiddle 7 (2), third son of John'' (6), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Nov. 19, 1845; married Elizabeth Varnum, of Parker City,
Penn., Nov. 14, 1872; she died at Parker City, July 9, 1875; no issue.
Mr. Kiddle is an oil-merchant at Allegheny City, Penn.

James-MeKee Riddle 7 (9), fourth son of John 6 (6), was born at
Pittsburgh, Penn., Jan. 24, 1848 ; unmarried. He is in the brokerage
business in Allegheny City, Penn.

Emma- Adams Riddle 7 (1), eldest daughter of John 6 (6), was born at
Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 25, 1850; was married to Lewis-Patterson Irwin,
of Allegheny, Penn., Sept. 27, 1870, and resides in the latter city.

Frailk-Costen Riddle 7 (1), fifth son of John 6 (6), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., May '24, 1852; traveling agent.

John-Weaver Riddle 7 (8), sixth son of John 6 (6), was born in Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Feb. 6, 1855; was formerly a lawyer at Allegheny City, but
now living at Quincy, HI., whither his father's family have removed within
a few years. Unmarried in 18=79.

Ida Riddle 7 (1), second daughter of John 6 (6), was born at Pittsburgh,
Penn., Nov. 3, 1856; unmarried 1879.

Rohert-Mowrey Riddle 7 (4), eighth son of John 6 (6), was born at
Pittsburgh, Penn., Nov. 19, 1858; he is now (1879) agent for an insurance
company.

Lewis-Hamnet Riddle 7 (1), ninth son of John 6 (6), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Nov. 10, 1860; at home.

Harry-Freemoiit Riddle 7 (1), tenth son of John 6 (6), was born at
Pittsburgh, Penn., Nov. 15, 1861; at home.



Alice-Holmes Riddle 7 (1), eldest daughter of William 6 (5), was born
at Rensselaer, Mo., Dec. 5, 1853.

Mary-V. Riddle 7 (7), second daughter of William 6 (5), was born at
Rensselaer, Mo., Oct. 7, 1856.

Mason- Wilkesoil Riddle 7 (1), eldest son of William 6 (5), was born
at Rensselaer, Mo.. Aug. 15, 1859.

Susan-Amelia Riddle 7 (4), third daughter of William 6 (5), was born
at Rensselaer, Mo., June 25, 1864.

Martha-Elliott Riddle 7 (2), fourth daughter of William 6 (5), was
born at Rensselaer, Mo., May 20, 1866.

Annie Riddle 7 (1), fifth daughter of William 6 (5), was born at Rens-
selaer, Mo., Oct. 12, 1868.

John-Travis Riddle 7 (9), second son of William 6 (5), was born at
Rensselaer, Mo., July 18, 1871.

EIGHTH GENERATION.

Harry •('. Riddle 18 (2), eldest son of James' (8), was born at Spring
Dale, Penn., Feb. 4, 1869.



BID DELLS OF BED FOB D, NEW HAMFSHIBE, NO. 1. 219

Mary Riddle 8 (8), eldest daughter of James 7 (8), was born at Spring
Dale, Penn., Feb. 4, 1872.

George- Ross Riddle 8 (4), second son of James 7 (8), was born at Spring
Dale, Penn., Nov. 6, 1874.

Rebecca-M. Riddle 8 (2), second daughter of James 7 (8), was born at
Spring Dale, Penn., March 17, 1876.

Walter-D. Riddle 8 (1), eldest son of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., July 27, 1864.

Evalyn Riddle 8 (1), eldest son of George 7 (3), was born in Pittsburgh,
Penn., Nov. 17, 1866.

Bessie Riddle 8 (1), second daughter of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Feb. 3, 1869.

Ariaillia Riddle 8 (4), third daughter of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., June 30, 1873.

Grace Riddle 8 (1), fourth daughter of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Jan 12, 1871; died Oct. 8, 1877.

Clarence Riddle 8 (1), second son of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts-
burgh, Penn., Jan. 13, 1876; died Dec. 29, 1877.



Joseph Riddle 8 (8).

Albert Riddle 8 (3). !■ Children of Albert 7 (2), of Pittsburgh, Penn.
Clara Riddle 8 (1).



RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1.

[Gawk Branch.]

Gawn Riddell 1 (1), supposed to have been born at Ballymeath, County
Londonderry, Ireland, May 16, 1688; came to America in 1718. He
married Mary Bell, a lady of Scottish descent (she was born in 1804),
and had issue six children, of whom hereafter. He was a brother of
Hugh, Robert, and John, who came over from Ireland at the same time.
See "Riddells of Coleraine, Massachusetts," and of "Ballymeath, Ire-
land." His name appears on a petition to the Governor of New Hamp-
shire, for a charter for the town of Bedford, May 10, 1750; also tything-
man in Bedford the same year. In 1750, a road was laid out from
William Kennedy's land to the brook near "Ghan Riddell's house." In
1751 "Gan" was constable; also took " invoice same year for 40 shillings
old tenor." In 1753 "Gan" was surveyor of highways; in 1754, tything-
man; in 1756, selectman and clerk of the market; in 1757, constable; in
1759, committee to build a meeting-house; 1761, surveyor of highways;
1770, collector of taxes; 1773, committee to examine town-accounts;
1775, subscribed the vote about Rev. John Houston, — in all these years
he was a taxpayer in Bedford. He lived in a house east of "Riddell's
Mill," — which mill was owned by him in 1754, — upon the site of the
present (1874) house of S. C. Damon, and had large tract of land, which
he divided among his sons.*

* During the autumn of 1876, the author of this book visited Bedford, N. H.,
and in company with John A. Riddle, Esq., a descendant in the fourth degree from



220 BID DELLS OF BEDFOBD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1.

"Rev. Mr. Houston's and Gawn Riddle's farms joined each other.
One Saturday they met and had some sharp and unneighborly talk to-
gether about their fences and cattle. Some townsmen were present and
heard their altercation. On the next day (Sabbath) Mr. Riddle was
punctually at meeting. Some of his neighbors, who had heard the con-
test on the day before, looked astonished, and said, 'Mr. Riddle, we
thought you would not be at meeting to-day, to hear your neighbor
Houston preach, after having such a quarrel with him.' Said Mr. Riddle,
'I'd have ye to know, if I did quarrel with my neighbor Houston yes-
terday, I did not quarrel with the gospel.'" — History of Bedford. He
died Dec. 29, 1779, and his head-stone stands in the cemetery at Bedford
Centre. The following is a facsimile of his autograjm: —

SECOND GENERATION.

Lieut. John Riddle 2 (1), eldest son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bed-
ford, N. H., March 26, 1754; married Mary McAffee, and secondly,
Sarah Hartshorn, and had by them eleven children, of whom hereafter.
He built and resided in mill house, now (1884) occupied by Mr. Isaac C.
Cutler. In 1780 he was surveyor of highways; 1781, ensign; 1784, com-
mittee to do what shall be needful to be done on "Scataquog bridge";
1785, surveyor of highways and committee on county bridge ; same
year, pew No. 4 in meeting-house sold to him for $36; 1786, tyth-
ingman, juryman, committee to build a pound, and "lieutenant." He
was a volunteer in the Revolution, and signed the "Association Test,"
which read as follows: "We the subscribers do hereby solemnly engage
and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our power, at the risk of our
lives and fortunes, with arms, oppose the hostile proceedings of the
British Fleets and Armies against the United American Colonies." Mr.
Riddle fulfilled his promise by entering the active service. He was a
millwright by trade, and built nearly all the mills that were in operation
in this section of the country at that time. He was a very industrious,
hard-working man. He died Nov. 18, 1812.



Gawn, visited the place where the early Ricldells settled; we climbed "Riddle's
Hill," a beautiful elevation overlooking Bedford village, and there we could see the
farms given by Gawn to his sons; beautiful lands now under a high state of culti-
vation, stretching away over hills and through valleys nearly as far as the eye
could reach. We visited the cemetery where the Riddle fathers rest, and there saw
the elegant granite tomb, erected and owned by the family. Mr. Riddle pointed
out to me the lands owned by the ancestors of the family, and the homes of those
families who were intermarried with the early generations; we visited the old Rid-
dle mansion, where several generations of this family were born, and viewed many
relics and antique articles of furniture that had long been in the family. The por-
traits in oil of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Riddle were seen, and a curious cane brought
from Russia, with which Mr. Riddle walked in his latter years. This ancient
residence is situated upon an elevated and commanding position; is large and im-
posing, and embosomed in a beautiful grove of maples. A large green lawn sur-
rounds the house, guarded by a circular wall of stone. The farm connected with
this house is large and valuable, now owned and occupied by the three brothers,
Isaac N., John A., and Silas A. Riddle; all unmarried. (See view of the Riddle
mansion.)







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RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 221

David Riddle' 2 (1), second son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bedford, N.
H., in 1756; married Mary Dunlap in 1798, and had issue Jive children,
of whom hereafter. He settled near the place of his birth, in a house he
erected on the hill where John D. Riddle lived in 1852, north of the mill.
He was a soldier of the Revolution, and drew a pension. In 1774-5, he
was pound-keeper; 1786, town voted to allow him four shillings for an en-
dorsement on a corn note. He died Dec. 18, 1889, and was buried at
Bedford Centre.

Susanna Riddle 2 (1), only daughter of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bed-
ford, N. H., 1759, and died in Bedford, Nov. 4, 1841, aged 82 years. She
married Solomon Hutchinson ; they removed to Maine, and reared a large
family. One child lived in Belfast.

Hugh Riddle' 2 (1), third son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bedford, N.
H., in 1761. He married Ann M. Houston, sister of Rev. John Houston,
first minister of Bedford ; built and lived in a brick house about two miles
south of the mill, known in 1884 as the Willard Parker house. He had
issue seven children, and died Aug. 17, 1833. He was a soldier of the
Revolution, entering the army when seventeen years old ; was with Gen-
eral Stark at the battle of Bennington.

Capt. Isaac Riddle' 2 (1), fourth son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bed-
ford, N". PL, June 10, 1762 ; married, first, Ann Aiken, in 1788; secondly,
Margaret McGaw, in 1806. He built and lived in a house near the meet-
ing-house at Bedford, one-half mile east of what was known as " Riddle's
Mill," now known as the "Riddle Homestead." (See plate in this book.)
He was for many years an active, public-spirited citizen of his town ; and
for a long time was extensively engaged in the lumber business, and one
of the first proprietors of navigation by locks and canals on the Merri-
mack River. He superintended the building of the canals and locks be-
longing to the " Union Lock and Canal Company," and in company with
Maj. Caleb Stark, he built and owned the first canal-boat that ever floated
on the waters of the Merrimack. It was named the "Experiment "; was
built at Bedford Centre, and drawn three miles on wheels by forty yokes
of oxen, to "Basswood Landing," so called, at which place it was launched
in the presence of the townspeople, who had gathered to witness the
novelties of the day. This boat was loaded, and sailed to Boston, and
the following notice relative to her arrival was taken from the Boston
Centinel of 1812: "Arrived from Bedford, N. H, canal-boat 'Experi-
ment,' Isaac Riddle, captain, via Merrimack River and Middlesex Canal."
Upon her arrival at Boston, she was received amid cheers and the firing
of cannon. From this commenced a large and extensive inland naviga-
tion on the Merrimack River, which continued until 1845, when it was
interrupted by the railroads. He built factories at Souhegan, afterwards
called "Riddle's Village," where, in company with his sons, William P.,
James, and Isaac, under the firm-name of Isaac Riddle & Sons, he carried
on an extensive manufacture of cotton, wool, and nails, until the estab-
lishment was destroyed by fire in 1829. Mr. Riddle filled many offices,
having been civil magistrate of his town, as well as their representative
to the State Legislature. His life was a proof of his energy and active
disposition. According to the " History of Manchester," when he became
of age he had about fifty dollars in his pocket, mostly saved from his
earnings during military service. He went to Newburyport, Mass., to pur-
chase a stock of goods ; these were transported on drays, or dray-carts,
drawn by one or two horses, — if by two horses, in tandem teams, — as



222 F.IDDELLS OF BEDF01W, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1.



truck- wagons were not then in use. He occupied for a store-house the
front room of his mother's dwelling, and trade increased until he was ena-
bled to commence the manufacture of potash. But the funds were want-
ing to purchase a new kettle at an expense of thirty dollars. Emboldened
by conscious integrity, without money or city friends, he started for Bos-
ton. On arriving at Medford, he was met by Maj. John Pinkerton, who
was a man of the same stamp, the pioneer of trade in Derry, who gave
him a note of introduction, and the desired utensil was secured. This
line of manufacture proved lucrative ; the potash was taken to Boston
with ox-teams, and bartered as an article of export for imported goods.
After some years had elapsed he purchased a lot of wild land at Bedford
Centre, and erected a spacious mansion. By his indomitable business en-
ergy and perseverance he added acre to acre, and farm to farm, until he
owned lands in several towns.

Mr. Riddle's house was literally a home for ministers, strangers, and a
wide circle of acquaintances ; and these were entertained with a hospital-
ity and attention only found under the influence of the old-school gentle-
man. By generosity and many acts of kindness, he gained the respect of
a wide-spread community. Often called upon to render pecuniary assist-
ance, many instances are worthy of note. Judge Ebenezer Webster, of
Salisbury, when on his way to Amherst to attend county court, usually
passed the night at his house. On one occasion he spoke of his embar-
rassment on account of his son Daniel, then at college, and asked assist-
ance, which was promptly rendered by the loan of money. Being one of
the stockholders in the Concord Bank, the officers often made application
to him for aid in order to meet the exigencies of the times; such calls he
always effectually answered, he frequently being obliged to make a jour-
ney to Portsmouth, and obtain money in his private capacity.

In 1814, during the war with Great Britain, a public call was made by
Governor Gilman, of New Hampshire, for volunteers from that class of
citizens who were exempt from military duty in the ranks of the militia,
to form themselves into companies for home-defence, in case of sudden
invasion ; this call was responded to by a veteran band of men, number-
ing about sixty, of fifty years of age and upwards, under the command of
Capt. Isaac Riddle. He was prepared himself for military service, as pre-
viously intimated, as a volunteer soldier in the Revolution, under Colonel
Nichols, and did duty at the important post of West Point, in 1780.

About 1817, an accident occurred which is still cherished in grateful re-
membrance. Mr. Riddle was returning from " Pembroke muster," Avhen,
seeing a ferry-boat nearing the fatal plunge of Hooksett Falls, crowded
with people, without a moment's pause he sprung from his chaise, plunged
into the stream, and, when all were expecting instant death, his courageous
arm caught the rope attached to the boat, and thus saved thirty lives.

He had married a third wife, Mrs. Mary Vinall, of Quincy, Mass., an
accomplished lady, belonging to one of the best families in the State,
being a sister of the first governor, Levi Lincoln, and Captain Lincoln,
one of the party who destroyed the tea in Boston harbor in 1773. Mrs. Rid-
dle kept among her relic-treasures the axe with which her brother opened
the memorable chests of tea. Mr. Riddle built a spacious mansion-house at
Quincy, where, in the sunshine of earthly prosperity, he passed his last days.
His death, which occurred Jan. 26, 1830, was very sudden, caused from the
effects of a slight wound received at the time his factory was burned at
Souhegan. He was buried with Masonic honors, and his remains interred



BID DELLS OF SEDFOIiD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. I. 223



in the family tomb at Bedford. He had a family of eight children, of
whom hereafter.

William Riddle' 2 (1), fifth son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bedford, N.
H., July 5, 1765; married Janet Gilchrist in 1791, and lived on a part of
the homestead with his mother. He was upwards of twenty years town-
treasurer, and held the office of civil magistrate. He was frequently one of
the selectmen of the town, and was seven times its representative to the
General Court. At one time there were rumors afloat in his town that re-
flected upon the character of Rev. William Pickells, who had formerly
preached in Philadelphia (a native of Wales), but then the minister in
Bedford, where he had been very popular. The story soon created such
bitter opposition, and the contest waxed so warm between his enemies
and friends, that Lieut. John Orr offered to lay a wager of fifty dollars
that the charges were true. The wager was taken by the preacher's friends,
and William Riddle was chosen as agent for the parties, to proceed to
Philadelphia and investigate the charges, for it was in that city where ru-
mor located his pretended crimes. Mr. Riddle's report was to be final.
He went to Philadelphia on horse-back, being on the journey two weeks,
investigated the matter fully, found the charges untrue, and returning
reported the result. There was great exultation on the part of the win-
ners, and they gathered at the store of Isaac Riddle, Esq., to rejoice over
the victory. Mr. Riddle was designated to go to Mr. Orr's and get the
wager; he accordingly waited on that gentleman, and made known the
result of his investigations. Without making a remark, Mr. Orr went to
his money-drawer and paid the wager. Mr. Riddle took the money back
to the winners, and it was spent at the counter in treating the company.
Mr. Riddle was a man of great probity of character, firm, steadfast, and
unwavering in the undertakings of life. He was a lover of peace and
highly respected by all who knew him, always sustaining the unbounded
confidence of his friends. He had a family of nine children, of whom
hereafter. He died July 14, 1838, and was buried at Bedford Centre.

THIRD GENERATION.

Oawil Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of John- (1), was born in Bedford, N.
H., June 29, 1776; married Dollie French, had issue three children, and
died in July, 1837, aged 61 years. He lived on a part of the homestead,
and held many offices in town; he was selectman in 1822, '24, '25, '27, '28,
'30, and treasurer in 1833-4; after when his name is not found on the
Bedford records. He was a man of marked executive ability.

Molly Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of John' 2 (1), was born Dec. 11,

1778; married to Black, of Prospect, Me., in 1804, and resided in

said town.

Nancy Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of John 2 (1), was born Jan. 5,
1781 ; married William French, of Prospect, Me., in 1806, and resided in
said town ; died June 20, 1852.

Susanna Riddle 3 (2), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born in 1784;



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 30 of 103)