G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

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Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 35 of 103)
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Gordon, of Ballymeath, Ireland, was born March 14, 1698, and came with
his three brothers to America in 1718. He married Mary Thompson, a
lady of Scottish extraction (she was born in 1706, and died May 27, 1759),
and had issue, of whom hereafter. He settled in Londonderry, N. H.,
alongside of many Scotch-Irish families. He was surveyor of highways
in Londonderry in 1748, 1749; and in 1753 was "haward." His name
does not appear on the tax-list or town records of Bedford, and he prob-
ably never lived there. He removed to Coleraine (now Franklin County),
Mass., and joined a Scotch-Irish settlement there ; bought a large tract of
land and built a spacious house, that was for many years used as a tavern
for the accommodation of the traveling public. Mr. Riddell was a man
of gigantic proportions, and of symmetrical form ; a man of formidable
strength, but of mild disposition. His eyes were blue, and his complexion
fair. There are many traditions preserved in the family, among his de-
scendants, respecting his great feats of strength, one of which was the
shouldering of a cannon on muster-day, which was considered a Hercu-
lean feat. He was notorious as a bold Indian-fighter. Many of his de-
scendants are very large men. He died at Coleraine, Sept. 14, 1787, aged
(according to date on grave-stone) 79 years; if born in 1698 (as per rec-
cords from Ireland), he was 89 years old at his death. His tombstone
stands near the northern extremity of the old burying-ground at Cole-
raine, nearly concealed with rank briars, and bears the following inscrip-
tion : —

" All you advanced in years,
You healthy and robust,
Are tott'ring round the grave,
And soon must turn to dust."



254 BIDDJELLS OF COLEJi'A/.\h\ MASSACHUSETTS, XO. 2.

SECOND GENERATION.

Gavin Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Robert 1 (1), was born in London-
derry, N. EL, Feb. 22, 1753; married Margaret Taggart, in 1782, and had
issue eleven children, of whom hereafter. He removed from Londonderry
to Coleraine, Mass., with his parents, and kept a public-house there. He
was a soldier of the Revolution, and many traditions are preserved among
his descendants concerning his prowess in his frequent skirmishes with
the Indians, who grievously infested those regions at that early time. He
died July 29, 1812.

Robert Riddell" (2), second son of Robert 1 (1), was born in London-
derry, N. H., Jan. 27, 1758; married Jemima Long, in 1784, and removed
to Sullivan Countv, N. Y. Mrs. Riddell was from Shelburne, Mass., born
Feb. 20, 1760, and' died in New York, Sept. 18, 1822. They had issue
eight children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell died Aug. 11, 1808, aged
50 years.

Susannah Riddell' 2 (1), only daughter of Robert 1 (1), was born in

Londonderry, N. H., in 1759; married Edwards, and had children,

all of whom are deceased. She died previous to 1852.

THIRD GENERATION.

Capt. John Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Gavin' 2 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Dec. 15, 1783; married Lephe Gates,* in 1806, and had issue
ten children, of whom hereafter. He was educated at Deerfield Academy.
In 1805, he taught school at Norwich, now Preston, Chenango County,
N. Y. In 1807, with his family, consisting of his wife and one son, he re-
moved to a farm about one mile west of Preston Corners, where he built
a home and permanently settled. The house stood about eighty rods
northwest of the house occupied by his son Samuel T., in 1852. During
the winter of 1815-16, Mr. Riddell taught school in his own district. He
held the office of constable and Justice of the Peace, receiving his com-
mission from the Governor of the State. Subsequently he was frequently
elected to the office of supervisor, and ever enjoyed the entire confidence
of his townsmen. He was chosen captain of the militia, at that time an
office of considerable respectability, and his commission from Governor
Tompkins is still (1852) preserved among the family papers. Captain
Riddell was tall and rather slim ; he had light blue eyes and dark hair ;
was noted for his large stock of general information, being an extensive
reader all his days. As a leading, public-spirited man, he was highly es-
teemed, and was long a reliable and very useful public servant. He died
May 10, 1833, deservedly lamented by all who knew him.

Susanna Riddell 3 (2), eldest daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole-

* Lephe Gates, the mother of the above-mentioned family, was a daughter of
Peter Gates, who married Mary Allen, both from Groton, Mass. ( ?), — then of Ley den,
Mass. Lephe was born Nov. 22, 1787. "Under circumstances (says her son
William) peculiarly embarrassing, after the death of her husband, she proved
herself a woman of peculiar energy of character, and her efforts in behalf of the
family, at that time composed chiefly of young children, are not likely soon to be
forgotten by them. During the time of her greatest perplexity, after her husband's
death, she seemed to receive great consolation from reading the Bible, and actually
read the whole through in five months." She used to tell, with apparent satisfac-
tion, of spinning one hundred and thirty-nine knots of yarn in a day, in early life,
besides attending to the household duties; this was done in 1826. She was enjoy-
ing good health in 1852, and had the care of two of her grandsons from New
Orleans, educating at the North.



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 255

raine, Mass., in 1787; married to Nathan Noyes, of Preston, N. Y., and
had issue. In 1822, the family removed to Perrington, N. Y., and in
April, 1833, to Novi, thence to Plymouth, Mich. Her sons were judges,
lawyers, and doctors, — all distinguished. Mrs. Noyes died at Marshall,
Mich., in 1850.

Robert Ritldell 3 (3), second son of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Coleraine,
Mass., in 1789; married Sarah Stewart, and settled at Wilmington, Vt.
For a time after the death of his father he remained at home, but subse-
quently kept public-houses in several places. At one time he owned and
carried on the wadding-factory in Wilmington ; was sheriff in his County,
and tilled several positions of responsibility. He was a man of large size,
partaking, it is said, somewhat of the energetic character of the Taggarts,
from whom he descended on his mother's side. He was a man of undis-
turbable good nature. He was living in 1852, but died several years ago.
I have made a great effort to collect a more complete account of this
branch, but the descendants of Robert cannot be prevailed upon to pro-
vide the statistics of their families ; it is presumed that they shun pub-
licity. There were eight children, of whom hereafter.

Thomas Riddell 3 (1), third son of Gavin' 2 (1), was born in Coleraine,
Mass., in 1791 ; had no family.

Jane Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., in 1792; no family.

Harriet Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., in 1793 ; no family.

George Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Coleraine,
Mass., Jan. 12, 1796; married Mary Babcock (she was born Dec. 9, 1800),
in 1822, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He moved from
Coleraine to Canisteo, N. Y., in 1837, and died there July 26, 1845 ; his
widow is now (1879) living.

Mary Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Feb. 8, 1798; was married, first, to Benjamin Clark, by Avhom
she had five children; and secondly, to John McClary, by whom she had
three children. She lived at Onondaga, N. Y.

Lovilia Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., July 8, 1802 ; was married in Coleraine, Mass., Nov. 21, 1822,
to Lemuel Clark, of Tully, N. Y., and had issue twelve children. Died
March 12, 1859, and was buried in Onondaga Valley Cemetery, N. Y. Mr.
Clark was born March 26, 1799, and died Sept. 21, 1869.

(xavill Riddell 3 (2), fifth son of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Coleraine'
Mass., in 1804; married Arminda Babcock, and had issue nine children'
of whom hereafter. In 1852 he was living at Coleraine, then the only one
of the name (except his children) living there.

Caroline Riddell 3 (1), sixth daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., in November, 1806; was married to Mr. James Clark, of
Onondaga County, N. Y., and died March 14, 1859. Buried on the same
day as her sister Lovina, in the Onondaga Cemetery. No issue. Hus-
band living in 1884, at Alden, N. Y.

Polly Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Dec. 16, 1785 ; was married to Frederick Pratt, of Sullivan,
N. Y., in 1808, and had issue seven children; she died at Fayetteville, N.
Y., July 15, 1848. Mr. Pratt was a farmer.

Sally Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Cole-



256 RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2.

raine, Mass., Feb. 23, 1787; was married to Uriah Aldrich, in 1809, and
had issue. She was living in Cazenovia, N". Y., in 1852. He was a black-
smith.

Jemima Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in
Coleraine, Mass., May '28,1788; was married in 1810, to Heman Williams,
and had issue. She was living in Pittsfield, Mich., in 1852.

Martha Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in
Coleraine, Mass., May 17, 1790 ; was married in 1811, to James Matthews;
lived in Syracuse, N. Y., in 1852, and had four children. Mr. Matthews
was a manufacturer of salt; he died before 1852.

Robert Riddell 8 (4), eldest son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Coleraine,

Mass., Oct. 5, 1792 ; married in 1817 to , and had issue^ye children,

of whom (with one son born of a second Avife, whom he married in 1833)
hereafter. He was living on a farm in Chittenango, N. Y., in 1852.

David Riddell 3 (1), second son of Robert' 2 (2), was born in Coleraine,
Mass., Jan. 28, 1794; married in 1817, to , and had issue four chil-
dren, of whom hereafter. He was a leather manufacturer at Chittenango,
N. Y., in 1852.

Susan Riddell 3 (3), youngest daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in
Coleraine,* Mass.. Sept. 15, 1795; died July 4, 1808, at Sullivan, N. Y.

Thompson Riddell 3 (1), youngest son of Robert 2 (2), was born in
Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 2, 1798; married in 1823, and in 1838; the names
of his wives have not reached me. He had issue two children, a son and
daughter, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was a farmer in Hamilton,
Allegan County, Mich., in 1852.

FOURTH GENERATION.

Prof. John-Leonard Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of John 3 (1), was born
in Leyden, Mass., Feb. 20, 1807; married, first, to Mary E. Knock, and
by her had two children ; secondly, to Ann Hennefin, and had issue sev-
eral children, of whom (with the preceding) hereafter. In the autumn of
1807, he was taken by his parents to Preston, N. Y., where, according to
his own diary, written in 1834, they "moved into a log-house on the mid-
dle of the farm; this house was surrounded at the time by a wilderness,
but it had the advantage of being near an excellent fountain of water."
He spent a portion of the years 1826-7, at the Oxford Academy ; subse-
quently he went to the "Rensselaer School," at Troy, N. Y., where he
obtained the degree of A. B. ; subsequently, A. M. * In 1830 he com-
menced giving lectures on the sciences of chemistry, botany, and geology,
occupying between four and five years, embracing many cities in the Uni-
ted States and Canadas. In 1835 he was appointed "Adjunct Professor
of Chemistry and Botany in the Cincinnati Medical College." From this
college he received the degree of M. D.

In 1836, he was appointed professor of chemistry in the Medical College
of Louisiana, at New Orleans ; in 1852, he was connected with the medi-
cal department of the University of Louisiana, under the patronage of
the State, at which date he held that chair. He was engaged by a com-
pany in 1838, to lead an exploring expedition into Texas, with the
object of discovering gold and silver mines; he spent three months in
the wilds of Texas with this company, penetrating nearly to the



* It is presumed that all the children of Robert- (2) were born in Coleraine, Mass.,
in want of proof to the contrary.



BIDDELLS OF COLEBAIXE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 257

supposed locality of the mines ; but becoming more and more annoyed
by the Comanche Indians, judged it hazardous to remain very long.
It was found no easy matter to discover, in so short a time, a mine, con-
cerning which many conflicting statements had been made ; yet the object
of the company was in part realized, since they had obtained a knowledge
of the general mineral character of the country. For his services Mr.
Riddell received one share in the rights of the company, equivalent to
ten thousand acres of Texas lands.

On his return to New Orleans, he learned of his appointment, by the
President of the United States, as " Melter and Refiner" in the branch
mint; this office he held till 1849. His contributions to science, in the
meantime, had been of a varied nature. In 1835, at Cincinnati, O., he
published a catalogue of plants, entitled "A Synopsis of the Flora of the
Western States," including eighteen hundred different species, which may
truly be styled one of the pioneers in the botany of the West. Subse-
quently he published a catalogue of the plants of Louisiana, comprising
some twenty-three hundred species. In the West, in Louisiana, and in
Texas, he was the discoverer of numerous new species, and has, by the
consent of botanists, left his name indelibly impressed on the science, in
the genus named for him, Riddellia.

In 1845 he published "A Monograph of the Dollar," including facsimile
impressions of between five and six hundred varieties of American and
Mexican dollars and half-dollars, both genuine and counterfeit; with the
assay of each, and if counterfeit, pointing out the method of detection.
The original coins were obtained from Boston, New York, and the mints
of Philadelphia and New Orleans. He was author of numerous other
small publications, principally delivered as lectures, and published by his
auditors and students, such as " Orrin Lindsay's Aerial Navigation," deliv-
ered before the People's Lyceum of New Orleans, in 1847; "Constitution
of Matter," in 1846, published in the New Orleans Medical and Surgical
Journal; introductory lecture on "The Natural Sciences," published in
1852, by the medical students of the University of Louisiana, also in the
Medical Journal. In 1836, his thesis on "Miasm and Contagion" was
published in Cincinnati, and republished in Boston ; in which he advocated
the theory that "organized and living corpuscles of various kinds" were
the agents of communication in contagious diseases, and in this he was
one of the earliest to adopt that theory, which has long since become set-
tled. While an officer under the government, he published a short historic
account of the mint and its operations, together with the coining process.

In 1844 he was one of five commissioners appointed by the Governor
and Legislature " to devise some means to protect New Orleans from in-
undation." In 1852 he was giving his attention principally to microscopy,
and observations connected with the animalculae and algae found in the
swamp-waters in the vicinity of New Orleans. His widow was living in
New Orleans in 1873. I do not know the date of his death. His son
Sanford promised the complete genealogy and history of his father's fam-
ily, but the MSS. seem to have been lost in the mails.

Lephia-Maria Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 3 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1809 ; was married in 1829, to Ruel Crumb, and
had issue four children. She resided at Onondaga, N. Y.; died Nov. 5,
1840.

Julia- Anil Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of John 3 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., July 19, 1812 ; was married in 1830 to J. S. Brown, of
17



258 EIDDELLS OF COLEJRAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2.

East Troy, Wis., and had six children. Her husband was a blacksmith,
formerly from Sherburne, N. Y. ; born July 4, 1808.

Sauford-Alleil Riddell 4 (1), second son of John 3 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., April 9, 1816; died Aug. 25, 1823.

Samuel'Taggart Riddell 4 (1), third son of John 3 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., July 4, 1818; married Lucy A. Beckwith in 1844, and
has issue, of whom hereafter. He was named after his great-uncle, Sam-
uel Taggart, d. d., who was a distinguished clergyman of Coleraine,
Mass., the author of "Taggart's View," and for many years a member of
Congress. Mr. Riddell was, during the years 1840-1-2, foreman in the
melting and refining department, in the United States branch mint at
New Orleans, La. He resided for a time at Preston, but moved to East
Troy, Wis., in 1844; he returned to Preston, and was living on the old
homestead farm in 1852. He was living in Turner, Mills County, la., in
1876.

Dr. George Riddell 4 (2), fourth son of John 3 (1), was born in Pres-
ton, N. Y., June 3, 1822 ; was married by Rev. J. T. Goodrich, Oct. 10, .
1847, to Miss Harriet M., daughter of Andrew and Philena-Davis (Bow-
dish) Darling, of Preston, N. Y., and went back to New Orleans, where
he was then employed in the mint. After attending the academies at
Oxford and Norwich, N. Y., he taught school, both public and select, in
various places ; in the spring of 1844 he was elected town superintendent
of schools for the town of Preston ; he soon after commenced the study
of medicine, spent three successive winters in New Orleans, attending
medical lectures, and in 1848 received the degree of M. D. from the Uni-
versity of Louisiana. In 1840 he spent some time in the practice of
his profession in Oxford, N. Y. ; in 1851 he moved to Palmyra, Jefferson
County, Wis., and practised there for many years ; there he built a beau-
tiful house, which was surrounded by tasteful gardens, adorned with rare
flowers and shrubbery. He separated from his wife, and married a youug
lady while living at the latter place, his first wife retaining the house, and
Mr. Riddell assisting in the support and education of his children. He
l'emoved to Rome, some nine miles from Palmyra, and practised there
some three or four years, at the end of which time he went to Chippewa
Falls, Wis., and seems to have entered into partnership with his nephew,
Dr. Sanford S. Riddell; it is presumed that he now (1878) resides at the
latter place, although he has never favored me with a reply to my com-
munications.

Lo villa Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of John 3 (1), was born in Pres-
ton, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1824 ; was married in January, 1848, to J. Denison Mar-
ion, of Preston, Conn., and is now living at Preston Corners, N. Y. Mr.
Marion is a blacksmith by trade ; is constable and collector (1852) of the
town of Preston. Lovina lived with her aunt Loviua from 1832 to 1842,
after which she attended the academy at Onondaga Hollow. Subse-
quently she attended the Norwich Academy, and a select school at Plym-
outh, then the academy at Oxford ; in the meanwhile taught school in
several places.

Margaret-Jaiie Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of John 3 (1), was born
in Preston, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1826 ; died Sept. 20, 1845, at Preston, unmar-
ried.

Prof. William-P. Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of John 3 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., Oct. 1, 1828, and was only five years old when his father
died. From 1838 he lived with his sister, Mrs. Brown, for nearly five



RIDDELLS OF COLEIiAlXE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 259

years, while his mother was at New Orleans. From Oxford Academy he
went to Amherst College, Massachusetts; thence in 1848, to Yale College,
New Haven, Conn., where he received, in 1851, his degree of A. B.; he
was there one of the five presidents of the Lionian Society. In 1852 he
was at New Orleans, a student of chemistry and the natural sciences,
with his brother John in the University; and in the winters of 1851-2,
he gave a short course of lectures on chemistry at the Louisiana College
in New Orleans. He compiled a genealogical sketch of this branch of
the Riddell family in 1852, which has been the basis of the present article
in this work; much, however, has been added concerning several branches
of the family. Mr. Riddell was shot while near his residence in Houston,
Tex., by an assassin in 1872. He married Sarah-Glenn Chalmers, of Aus-
tin Tex., and had two children. He is said to have been a stalwart-built
man, broad-shouldered and full-chested, a regular athlete. He had dark
hair and blue eyes; a receding forehead, and regular features; was social
and kind-hearted.

Susaii-A. Riddell 4 (4), youngest daughter of John 3 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., March 24, 1831; was married in March, 1852, to Henry
P. Marion (brother to the husband of her sister Lovina), and in that year
was living on a farm in Preston, Conn. He was superintendent of
schools for the town, also a Justice of the Peace and town collector.
Susan, in 1838, went with her mother to New Orleans and remained there
five years, returning in 1843. She attended school at Plymouth; also at
Oxford Academy for two years. In 1849 she returned to New Orleans in
company with her brother John and family, and remained till the follow-
ing summer. She then returned and lived with her mother until her
marriage.



William Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Robert 8 (3), was born in Wilming-
ton, Vt. (?), in 1814; died in 1816.

Thomas Riddell 4 (2), second son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil-
mington, Vt. (?), in 1816; married , and had issue several children,

of whom hereafter. It is said he carries on the tin-ware and stove business
at Bennington, Vt., and that he has been a prominent man there.

EllOS Riddell 4 (1), third son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wilmington,
Vt., in 1818, and in 1852 was in Boston, Mass. Resides in Olean, N. Y.
No family.

Sarah Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil-
mington, Vt., in 1823; was married to Oskar L. Shafter, and had issue.
Mr.Shafter was a graduate of the Harvard Law School, and esteemed
one of the best lawyers in the State of Vermont; was candidate for gov-
ernor in 1848. He lived in a pretty, octagonal house, situated on a lot
ornamented with shade trees, some distance from the street. He was
said to be " a man of plain habits and frank disposition."

Mary Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil-
mington, Vt., in 1826 ; married Franklin Lamb ; secondly, Addison Read,
and lives in Hastings, Neb.

William Riddell 4 (3), fourth son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil-
mington, Vt., in 1829, and was of Boston in 1852; married Carrie Thayer,
and has issue. Lives in Buffalo, N. Y.

Samuel-Taggart Riddell 4 (2), fifth son of Robert 8 (3), was born in
Wilmington, Vt., in 1833; married Lucretia Clark ; no issue. Resides in
Fernandina, Florida.



260 R1DDELLS OF COLEBAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2.

\

Henry Riddell 4 (1), sixth son of Robert 8 (3), was born in Wilming-
ton, Vt., March 6, l!^37 ; married Emily C, daughter of Mario R. Crosby,
and has issue ^ue children. Was of Wilmington in 1852.



Dr. George Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of George 8 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass.. Aug. 30, 1823; married Carrie Shurtleff, April 2, 1854, and

by her had issue three children. His first wife died June 4, 1864, aged 31
years. He married, secondly, Aug. 28, 1865, Mary E. Warner, and In-
ner has three children, of whom (with the other children) hereafter. He
attended medical lectures at Castleton, Vt., and graduated at the Univer-
sity of New York, in the Medical College at New York city, March 10,
1853. He has practised medicine and surgery in Canisteo, N. Y., since
his graduation, in company with his brother. He and brothers built a
large hotel in Bradford, Penn., in the spring of 1878, called the "Riddell
House," which was open only a little more than four months, when it was
burned. Their loss above insurance was about thirty thousand dollars ;
they are rebuilding at a cost of about forty thousand dollars. He says:
" My brothers and I are remarkable for nothing except we all work to-
gether, never disagree on any business transaction, and have always been
as one family."

Mary Riddell 4 (3), eldest daughter of George 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Aug. 11, 1825; died October, 1825.

Mary-Lovina Riddell 4 (4), second daughter of George 3 (1), was born
in Coleraine, Mass., Feb. 15, 1827; was married at Canisteo, N. Y., June
19, 1851, to Jonathan Quick. She died April 26, 1852, leaving an infant
ten days old.

Harriet-Arminda Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of George 3 (1), was
born in Coleraine, Mass., Dec. 27, 1828; died at the age of 16, unmarried,
March 10, 1845.



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 35 of 103)