G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

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Dea. Lorenzo-B. Riddell 4 (1), second son of George 3 (1), was born
in Coleraine, Mass., April 25, 1831 ; married July 4, 1855, to Caroline
Frace, and has issue four children, of whom hereafter. He is deacon of
the Presbyterian Church in Canisteo, N. Y. ; carries on the business of
undertaker and retail dealer in furniture. He has a good home, pleas-
antly situated on Academy Street. Has been intimately associated with
his brothers in business.

Dr. LeRoy Riddell 4 (1), third son of George 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Sept. 11, 1833; married Eunice L. Pratt, Dec. 17, 1863, and
has issue four children, of whom hereafter. He is a graduate of Uni-
versity Medical College, New York city (1863), and is engaged in the
practice of medicine and surgery, in company with his brother George, in
Canisteo, N. Y., where he has an extensive patronage. He is pleasantly
situated near the Canisteo Academy, on Academy Street. He was an
owner in the "Riddell House," at Bradford, Penn., burned in 1878, but
being rebuilt.

William Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of George 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Feb. 21, 1836; married Helen Jones, daughter of David
Jones, advocate, of New York, March 26, 1867, and has issue three chil-
dren, of whom hereafter. He is a dealer in dry goods and groceries, in
Canisteo, N. Y.; is prosperous, and owns a splendid residence near those
of his brothers, on Academy Street.

Lemuel-Clark Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of George 8 (1), was born in Can-
isteo, N. Y., March 6, 1839, and died Aug. 23, 1868. He was in the



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 261

employ of the Erie Railroad Company ; was a man of great business ca-
pacity, and much esteemed by all who knew him. Unmarried.

Joseph-Marion Riddell 4 (1), youngest son of George 3 (1), was born
in Canisteo, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1842; married Agnes Louder, Oct. 11, 1871,
and has the care of his mother at Canisteo. He has no children ; owns a
farm.

William-G. Riddell 4 (5), eldest son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Dec. 20, 1828; married Semira Bemis, of Whittingham, Vt.,
Oct. 30, 1854, and had issue. He died at Boston, March 24, 1859. His
widow is still living in Charlestown.

John Riddell 4 (3), second son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Coleraine,
Mass., Oct. 7, 1830 ; married Martha-Ann Clark, of Boston, Oct. 5, 1857,
and resided in Charlestown, Mass , where he died Oct. 3, 1859. His
widow has married a Mr. Bassett. Mr. Riddell had issue one daughter.

Sophronia Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born in
Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 4, 1832; died Aug. 1, 1851.

George-E. Riddell 4 (3), third son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine. Mass., and died young, unmarried.

HolllS-T. Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., March 11, 1837; died unmarried.

Elizabeth-C. Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born
in Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 27, 1839; died unmarried.

Mary-E. Riddell 4 (5), third daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., June 2, 1842 ; died young.

Allll-E. Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole-
raine, Mass., Jan. 9, 1845 ; was married to Albert Robertson, of Ley den,
Mass., July 3, 1864; died in Coleraine, Aug. 22, 1868.

Mary- Jane Riddell 4 (6), youngest daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born
in Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 30, 1849; died unmarried.



Charlotte-Helen Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (4), wa
born in Chittenango, N. Y., May 26, 1818.

Frances-Lucretia Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (4).

Henrietta-Sophia Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Robert 3 (4), was
born in Chittenango, 1ST. Y., April 25, 1821.

Jemima Riddell 4 (2), fourth daughter of Robert 3 (4), was born in
Chittenango, N. Y., April 26, 1823; died July 6, 1823.

Nancy-Marion Riddell 4 (1), fifth daughter of Robert 3 (4), was born
in Chittenango, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1823.



Allgeline-Fidelia Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of David 8 (1), was
born in Chittenango, N". Y., Jan. 31, 1819.

William-Wallace Riddell 4 (6), eldest son of David 3 (1), was born in
Chittenango, N. Y., Oct. 20, 1820.

Hannah-Maria Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of David 3 (1), was born
in Chittenango, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1829 ; died Dec. 25, 1830.

Robert-David Riddell 4 (5), second son of David 3 (1), was born in
Chittenango, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1834.



Sophia-R.-M. Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Thompson 8 (1), was
born in Hamilton, Mich., in June, 1836.



262 RIDDELLS OF COLEEAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2.

Thompson Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Thompson 3 (1), was born in
Hamilton, Mich., Jan. 31, 1845.

FIFTH GENERATION.

Johll-Schrager Riddell 5 (4), eldest son of John 4 (2), was born in
New Orleans, La., April 2, 1837 ; died June 7, 1837.

Dr. Sanford-Schrager Riddell 5 (2), son of John 4 (2), was born at
New Orleans, La., Aug. 22, 1838; married, December, 1866, Josephine,
daughter of Roswell K. Bourne, of Cincinnatus, N. Y., and resides at
Chippewa Falls, Chippewa County, Wis. His literary education \v;is
obtained in the academic department of the University of Louisiana,
whence he graduated in March, 1860. He has been a resident of New
Orleans, Cincinnatus, and Norwich, N. Y. He has made a special study
of uterine diseases. During his youth for many years, lie prepared and
performed the experiments at his father's chemical lectures, and assisted
at his various analyses and microscopical researches, and in perfecting the
binocular microscope (first invented by his father). While still a lad he
discovered, described, and named a new polygonum, " Polygonum nova
aureliensia" He is a member of the New Orleans Academy of Science,
elected when twenty-one years of age; of the Chenango County (N. Y.),
Medical Society ; of the Chippewa Falls Medical Society, of which he
was one of the organizers, and for some time secretary and treasurer ;
also, of the Chippewa County Medical Society, into which the Falls so-
ciety merged. He is also a member of the American Medical Association.
His contributions to professional literature consist of a few minor articles
to medical journals. At the age of twenty-two he was called to the chair
of chemistrv and metallurgy in the New Orleans Dental College ; was as-
sistant to the Texas State Geologist, in 1860. He was three months in the
Rebel army, but refused to serve after the capture of New Orleans. He
was afterwards captain of a company in the Fifth Louisiana White In-
fantry, United States Army. Mr. Riddell is regarded as a man of scien-
tific ability seldom excelled, and is eminent as a medical practitioner.

Edward-Henry Riddell 5 (1), third son of John 4 (2), was born in New
Orleans, La., Nov. 18, 1841 ; married to a French lady in New Orleans.

John-William Riddell 5 (5), fourth son of John 4 (2), was born in New
Orleans, La., Dec. 2, 1844; unmarried.

Lephe-Ellgeilia Riddell 5 (2), eldest daughter of John 4 (2), was mar-
ried to York A. Woodward, a banker, of New Orleans, where they reside.

Mary- Angelica Riddell 5 (7), second daughter of John 4 (2), was born
at New Orleans, La. ; was married to Robert F. Hogsett, of New Or-
leans ; deceased.

Adelaide Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of John 4 (2), was born at New
Orleans, La.; married Albert P. House, and resides at New Orleans.

Robert-B. Riddell 5 (f>), fifth son of John 4 (2), was born at New Or-
leans, La.

Peter-G. Riddell 5 (1), sixth son of John 4 (2), was born at New Or-
leans, La.

Jeffei'SOn-D. Riddell 5 (1), seventh son of John 4 (2), was born at New
Orleans, La.

Leplie-Ann Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of Samuel 4 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1846; was married to Charles Bentley, and lives
at Hastings, Mills County, la.



BIDDELLS OF COLEBAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, WO. 2. 263

Mary-Jane Riddell 6 (8), second daughter of Samuel 4 (1), was born in
Preston, N. Y., Jan. 13, 1848; was married to Elisha Lewis, and lives in
Chautauqua County, N. Y.

Slisail-Lovina Riddell 5 (5), third daughter of Samuel 4 (1), was born
in Preston, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1850 ; was married.

Emma Riddell 5 (1), fourth daughter of Samuel 4 (1).

Addie-D. Riddell 5 (1), fifth daughter of Samuel 4 (1).

Harriet-Georgiana Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of George 4 (2), was
born in Palmyra, Wis., July 2, 1851 She has acquired a good English
education, and has also become a teacher of vocal and instrumental music.
She is a cultured and accomplished young lady, but in a delicate condi-
tion of health. Unmarried in 1874.*

Frank-Darling Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of George 4 (2), was born in
Palmyra, Wis , April 5, 1854; married, and has settled at Rochelle, 111.
He is a telegraph operator, and skilled in his profession.



Alirelia Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 4 (2), was born in
Bennington, Vt., in 1839.

Henry Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of Thomas 4 (2), was born in Benning-
ton, Vt., in 1842.

Theodore Riddell 5 (1), second son of Thomas 4 (2), was born in Ben-
nington, Vt., in 1845.

Robert-H. Riddell 5 (7), eldest son of Henry 4 (1), was born in Ben-
nington, Vt., April 2, 1859; married, and has issue one son (1884). Mr.
Riddell is a dry-goods merchant in Boston, Mass.

Sally Riddell 5 (2), eldest daughter of Henry 4 (1), died young.

Florence Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Henry 4 (1), died young.

William-C. Riddell 5 (7), second son of Henry 4 (1), was born Dec.
13, 1868. In college at Ann Arbor, Mich.

Marlo-H. Riddell 5 (1), third son of Henry 4 (1), was born May 28,
1871-2.

Chester Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of George 4 (3), was born in Canisteo,
N. Y., Feb. 14, 1855; died April 17, 1855.

Lizzie-E. Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of George 4 (3), was born in
Canisteo, N. Y., April 11, 1856; unmarried in 1878.

Sarah-Tavlor Riddell 5 (2), second daughter of George 4 (3), was born
in Canisteo, N. Y., Jan. 10, 1859 ; died March 20, 1872.

Carrie-Lee Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of George 4 (3), was born in
Canisteo, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1867.

Frank Riddell 5 (2), second son of George 4 (3), was born in Canisteo,
N. Y., Aucr. 13, 1870.

William-C. Riddell 5 (8), third son of George 4 (3), was born in Can-
isteo, N. Y., Nov. 9, 1876.

Scott Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born in Canisteo,
N. Y., July 11, 1855.

* Mrs. Riddell. the mother of these children, married, secondly, to Simon Bunker,
and is said to be "a lady in every respect," and is highly esteemed by all whose
respect is worth having.



264 RIDDLES OF CHABLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS.

Sarah Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born in Can-
isteo, N. Y., May 27, 1859.

Lemuel Riddell 5 (2), second son of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born is Canis-
teo, N. Y., in December, 1868.

Laura-E. Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born in
Canisteo, N. Y., July 15, 1871.

Pratt Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in Canisteo,
N. Y., Oct. 20, 1864.

John Riddell 5 (6), second son of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in Canisteo,
N. Y., Jan. 14, 1866.

Elmira Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in Can-
isteo, N. Y., Nov. 12, 1868.

Harriet Riddell 5 (4), second daughter of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in
Canisteo, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1874.



Nettie-M. Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of William 4 (4), was born in
Canisteo, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1868.

George Riddell 5 (4), eldest son of William 4 (4), was born in Canis-
teo, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1870.

Sarah-A. Riddell 5 (4), second daughter of William 4 (4), was born in
Canisteo, X. Y., Aug. 9, 1876.



RIDDLES OF CHARLESTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

Edward Riddle 1 (1) was a well-known auctioneer many years in Bos-
ton ; his parentage is not known to me. The family could have provided
necessary particulars, but declined to do so. He married Charlotte,
daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Cutter, Sept. 30, 1841, and fixed his
residence in Charlestown, Mass. He went to England with a commission
from the United States Government. Was a man of popularity ; highly
esteemed. Deceased.

William Riddle 1 (1), brother of the above, was many years in Boston,
but went to California, and died there in the autumn of 1881, unmarried.

James Riddle 1 (1), brother of the preceding, was sometime of Bos-
ton, but removed to California, and died there in 1881, leaving a daughter.

Cordelia Riddle 1 (1), sister of the preceding, was an actress for many
years. She made her debut at the Arch-street Theatre, Philadelphia, as
Albert, in " William Tell," Jan. 23, 1834. She is now (1883) Mrs. San-
ford, living at Newport, R. I., and very feeble.

Eliza Riddle 1 (1), sister of the preceding, (born in Philadelphia (?),
made her first appearance as an actress, on the stage of the Walnnt-streel
Theatre, Philadelphia, in 1823, as Charles, in "Laugh When You Can."
Her first engagement in Xew York, though she was extremely youthful,
won for her the attention and commendation of the people. She nexl
appeared as Emily YVorthington; then as Rosalie Somers Paul ( k - Wan-
dering Boys") Virginia; and for her benefit, in October of that year, as
Cora and Little Fickle. After an absence from New York for more than



RIDDLES OF CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS. 265

a quarter of a century, during which, as Mrs. William Smith,* — the name
of her husband, — she had played with remarkable success at Philadelphia
and Boston, and ranked with the first favorites of the day, particularly in
comedy of every grade. She re-appeared in 1856, at Laura Keen's Thea-
tre, and at Barton's in 1857-8, in the line of middle-aged, fashionable
dowagers, country women, and Abigails of every degree, with credit to
herself and satisfaction to the public. She last played in New York at
the Winter Gardens, in 1859-60. She took her farewell of the stage at
the Howard Athenaeum, Boston, in 1861. She died in Boston, of a lin-
gering and painful illness, in 1861, leaving a daughter, Mrs. Sedley Brown,
who has since become a favorite comedienne. Kate Field is a daughter
of one of the sisters of Edward Riddle, but I do not know which one.
Her father was J. M. Field.

SECOND GENERATION.

Elizabeth-Cutter Riddle 2 (1), eldest daughter of Edward 1 (1), was
born in Boston (or Charlestown), Mass., Sept. 28, 1842.

Ckarlotta-Cordelia Kiddle 2 (1), second daughter of Edward 1 (1),
was born in Charlestown, Mass., Oct. 5, 1847.

Edward-Cutter Riddle 2 (2), eldest son of Edward 1 (1), was born in
Charlestown, Mass., Oct. 10, 1849, and was for many years engaged in
trade in Boston.

Prof. George-Peabody Riddle 2 (1), second son of Edward 1 (1), born
in Charlestown, Mass., in 1851, and displayed an inclination for the the-
atrical profession at the age of four, having come from a family which for
three generations has been represented on the American stage. When
five years of age he saw played "Midsummer Night's Dream," which
gave him singular emotions and greatly inspired his genius; he was when
a child a promoter of amateur theatricals, and was his own manager.

His parents insisted that he should take a course at Harvard College
before going upon the stage, but while at the University dreams of a the-
atrical career continually intruded upon his scholastic routine. At length
Fechter came to Boston, and to him the aspirant for dramatic honors con-
fided his hopes, with such result, that the great actor offered him a place
in his company. How to satisfy his dearest ambition, and, at the same
time, to comply with his parents' desire that he should graduate in due
form was the problem that presented itself to the enthusiastic student.
He thought he might become an actor, and still keep up his college stud-
ies. This plan he submitted to President Eliot, in a note, which drew
forth a reply so characteristic that a quotation must be given : —

" March 29, 1872.
" Dear Sir, — It would be quite impossible for you to be an actor, and, at the same
time, keep up your college studies and take a degree. You cannot burn a candle at
both ends. The stage is a very laborious and exigent profession. That you chose
it at the age of four is not an argument for choosing it at twenty-four. I remem-
ber having a conviction at that age that I might be a farmer. Let me advise you
strenuously to complete your education — so far, at least, as to go through college
and to see a little more of real life before you commit yourself to the calling of an
actor."

Excellent advice, for heeding which, Mr. Riddle now has his reward.
But the dramatic instinct must needs be satisfied, and, while still an

♦Eliza Riddle, born in Philadelphia, made her debut Jan. 14, 1835, as Julia in
" Hunchback," at Walnut-street Theatre. Was she identical with the above Mrs.
Smith ?



266 RIDDLES OF CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS.

undergraduate, we find young Riddle giving readings in private houses.
Among his auditors were Longfellow, the poet, and Professor Pierce, the
mathematician, both of whom gave him the strongest encouragement to
persevere in the dramatic career. At this period he formed the acquain-
tance and received the encouragement of Edwin Booth.

On leaving college in 1 874, Mr. Riddle sought a manager under whom
to give readings. Mr. Redpath was first applied to, but at first actually
refused to listen to him. After much persuasion, Redpath consented to
hear him read, premising, by way of encouragement, "I've got to take
the nine o'clock train, and you'll have to hurry."' Redpath Listened and
allowed himself to miss his train. Mr. Riddle made his debut as a reader
in October, 1874, at the Meionaon, and achieved a success, receiving the
warm welcome of the press of the city. At this time he began the study
of Romeo, and went to New York to secure an opening there on the
stage, but no manager would listen to him. Coming back to Boston, Mr.
Riddle made bold to address himself to Mr. Tompkins, of the Boston
Theatre. That gentleman, having a Saturday "off" night the following
week, it was arranged then and there that Mr. Riddle should play Romeo
to Mrs. Thomas Barry's Juliet. The audience was large, and the perform-
ance a pecuniary success. The general verdict of the critics was that
Mr. Riddle's Romeo was creditable to an amateur, but his voice, still his
weak point, was pronounced "too light, and lacking in body." The
following month Mr. Riddle played Titus to the Brutus of Edwin Booth.
At the conclusion of the play Mr. Booth took him before the curtain to
share the generous applause of the audience. It was on this night that
Mr. Booth said to Mr. Tompkins, "That young man will be famous."
After this appearance, Mr. Riddle went to New York, where he gave
readings at the Union Square Theatre of an afternoon. Opinions differed
in New York as to his merits as a reader. William Winter criticised
him severely ; and the general verdict of New York critics, as opposed to
that of Boston, was that Mr. Riddle could not read. However, the read-
ing was scarcely over when Mr. Palmer, of the Union Square Theatre,
made him an offer to join his stock company, and at the same time came
a similar offer from Mr. Field, of the Boston Museum. Mr. Riddle ac-
cepted the Boston offer, and entered the Museum company as "walking
gentleman," and then, in very reality, began to learn his trade.

He made his debut in the season of 1875-6 as Capt. Dudley Smooth, in
"Money." The part was a failure, but, although unsuccessful at the Mu-
seum, Mr. Riddle learned a good deal. The verdict of the critics regard-
ing his voice remained unchanged. He was in the situation of Demos-
thenes when that stammering young man was told he could never become
an orator.

Heartily discouraged, yet impelled by his love of the dramatic art to
persevere, Mr. Riddle -went to Montreal, where he found an opening in a
newly-formed stock company. He made his first appearance on the Mon-
treal stage as Manuel, in the "Romance of a Poor Young Man." He
fairly jumped into popularity in the Canadian city, and received a hand-
some benefit from an enthusiastic audience. At Montreal Mr. Riddle took
all sorts of parts. He was by turn, walking or leading man, villain, and
old man. This varied experience, playing a new part nearly every night.
was of immense benefit to him. It was there that he acquired an aptitude
for the speedy acquisition of parts. He was engaged at Montreal for a
second season, but the people got wearied of their toy, the new stock



BIDDLES OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. 267

company, and from Montreal Mr. Riddle went to Philadelphia, and ob-
tained an engagement to play at the Chestnut-street Theatre. The first
question addressed him, on arriving, by the manager, was, " Mr. Riddle,
have you any voice?" "Let us settle that now," replied Mr. Riddle;
" let me go on the stage and recite something to you." The trial was
satisfactory, and he was engaged forthwith. That was a Friday, and the
following Monday Mr. Riddle appeared as Clifford, in the " Hunchback."
The Philadelphia press gave him a favorable verdict, and he remained at
the theatre five weeks, when, being out of the bill, he came to Boston on
a visit. During that visit Professor Pierce invited him to give a reading
at his house in Cambridge on an afternoon. President Eliot was of the
little company assembled in Professor Pierce's parlor, and took occasion
to ask Mr. Riddle to accept the place of substitute to Professor Baxter,
the instructor in elocution, who was then ill. Mr. Riddle declined out-
right, for he had, as he thought, fairly entered on his dramatic career, but
President Eliot, in his quiet way, said : " I will give you two days to con-
sider the matter," thus implying that he was not ready to take " No" for
an answer. The result was that Mr. Riddle assented, and became in-
structor of elocution at Harvard, a position he still holds. The place has
been of the greatest value to him, in that by training the voices of others
he has been able to overcome his old defect of insufficient voice. Since
his return to Boston, Mr. Riddle has given readings throughout New Eng-
land, and has achieved great and merited success.

Mr. Riddle appeared at the Boston Theatre in 1881, playing Claude to
Miss Mary Anderson's Pauline, and his performance was a great success,
the audience being the largest ever seen in the theatre. He was the chief
actor in the tragedy of "CEdipus" in the Greek drama at Harvard Univer-
sity, and proved such a success that his fame was established. Mr. Rid-
dle's acting has been criticised as more modern than Greek, some contend-
ing that, in the Greek drama, there was little passion and forceful acting ;
but Mr. Riddle's conception of his part has received the approval of high
classical authority, the hearty praise and commendation of learned and
enthusiastic classical scholars. It is not a little curious that the classical
glory which has come to the venerable university, should have come by
the first actor graduated therefrom.



RIDDLES OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

Richard Riddle 1 (1), descended from Scottish ancestors, was born in
Dublin, Ireland, about 1802; married Catherine Eustes, and had issue six
children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle came to Boston, Mass., many
years ago, and engaged in the blacksmith and carriage-building business.
He died about 1879-80, and was succeeded in the business by his two
sons, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle had brothers in Ireland.

SECOND GENERATION.

Sarah Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Richard 1 (1), was married to Wil-
liam Conners, of Maine; resides in Boston,



268 BIEDELS OF DOUGLASS. MASSACHUSETTS.

John Riddle 2 (1), a son of Richard 1 (l),is in the blacksmith and car-
riage business, in company with his brother, in Boston, Mass., unmarried.

Mary Riddle' 2 (1), a daughter of Richard 1 (1), was the wife of Thomas
Dolen ; deceased.

Catherine Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Richard 1 (1), now keeping a
hair store and wig manufactory in the city of Boston, where she has long
been established ; unmarried.

Patrick Riddle 2 (1), a son of Richard 1 (1), is in the carriage and
blacksmith business in Boston.

Richard Riddle 2 (2), youngest son of Richard 1 (1), has been many
years a book-keeper for dry-goods houses.



RIEDELS OF DOUGLASS, MASSACHUSETTS.

[French Branch.]

Jollll-H. Riedel 1 (1) was one of the two brothers who sailed from
France for America, presumably about 1760. Of his early life nothing is
known. He served in an American cavalry regiment during the war of
the Revolution, and passed the latter years of his life in Douglass, Mass.
Whether he was a resident of that town at the time of his enlistment, or
settled there after the expiration of his term of military service, is not
recorded. He married an English lady named Clark, and had issue four-



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 36 of 103)