G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

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Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 61 of 103)
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jured in 1854, by a fall through the hatchway of an india-rubber factory,
that he died twenty-four hours after. Seven children.

John Ridley 5 (5), second son of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at Mickley,
Northumberland, Feb. 5, 1805, and had deceased in 1852. No account of
a family.

William Ridley 5 (2), third son of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at Mick-
ley, Northumberland, Dec. 13, 1806, and when last heard from by relatives
in New York, was at Berks, Berkshire, Eng.

James Ridley 5 (3), fourth son of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at Mickley,
Northumberland, Aug. 27, 1808, and when last heard from was in Mel-
bourne, Australia.

Elizabeth-Rowland Ridley 5 (1), eldest daughter of Cuthbert 4 (3),
born at Mickley, July 28, 1810.

Jane Ridley 5 (1), second daughter of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at Mick-
ley, July 28, 1812.

Susanna Ridley 5 (2), third daughter of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at
Micklev, July 4, 1814.

Henry Ridley 5 (3), fifth son of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at Mickley,
Sept. 19, 1816, and died Oct. 22, 1816.

Charles Ridley 5 (2), sixth son of Cuthbert 4 (3), was born at Mickley,
Dec. 29, 1818, and died previous to 1854. No mention of a family.



John Ridley 5 (6), eldest son of Cuthbert 4 (5) and his wife, J. Charl-



RIDLEYS OF MICKLEY FARM, NORTHUMBERLAND. 463

ton, married and had two sons, of whom hereafter. Resides somewhere
in Northumberland.

Thomas Ridley 5 (3), second son of Cuthbert 4 (5).

Margaret Ridley 5 (1), eldest daughter of Cuthbert 4 (5), was married
to a Mr. Lodge.

Mary Ridley 5 (2), second daughter of Cuthbert 4 (5).

Henry Ridley 5 (4), third son of Cuthbert 4 (5).

Isabella Ridley 5 (5), third daughter of Cuthbert 4 (5), wife of

Weddell.

Elizabeth Ridley 5 (2), fourth daughter of Cuthbert 4 (5).

Susan Ridley 5 (4), fifth daughter of Cuthbert 4 (5).

Ann Ridley 5 (2), sixth daughter of Cuthbert 4 (5), was married to G.
Swan, and had a son and daughter; died in 1869. The former, Robert
Swan, is a barrister-at-law.



John Ridley 5 (7), eldest son of John 4 (4), was born at Hylton, near
Sunderland, County of Durham, May 26, 1806. His father died when he
was only five years of age, leaving him and one sister to be brought up
by his mother, who being a most remarkable woman, faithfully applied
herself to the instruction of her children. At the age of fifteen this lad
did a man's work in the flour-mill, contriving also to read everything he
could find. His mother's house was a home for the itinerant preachers
of the day, who all took especial notice of the clever boy, and assisted in
his development. At the age of seventeen he became a local preacher,
and was noticed as full of promise. At his mother's death, when he was
thirty, she was under his care. He married the daughter of Mr. Pybas,
who was at the head of a large school for boys, well known in the north
of England ; this was at West Bolton, near Hylton, his birthplace. In
1840 he went to Australia as one of the earliest colonists. The story of
his venture is worthy a place in this book. Feeling more energy than could
find scope in a small country village, he made it a matter of earnest prayer
that he might be sent to some place where he was needed and could work
and in some way fulfil his eai'ly aspirations to become a missionary. From
that day the way opened to Australia, and the first thing he heard when
the ship touched land was that a public meeting had been called to con-
sider how the wheat of the first good harvest was to be ground, as there
was no mill. The meeting was unnecessary, for within a month John
Ridley's mill was up and at work. A year or two later he met a still
greater need by inventing a machine for reaping the corn, and gave it to
the colony without reserving patent rights. In all works on the colony
this machine is recognized as one of the chief agents in its advancement.
Testimonials, expressive of the appreciation of the people of the colony,
— including a piece of plate presented in London, — were tendered Mr.
Ridley, and a county there bears his name. He lived at Close House,
near Hexham, Northumberland, but for the last twenty years at 19 Belsize
Park, Hampstead. He is said to resemble the portrait of Bishop Ridley,
the martyr, and to be extremely like him in character. He is ad-
vanced in theological views, and now spends all his time and not a little
money in the gratuitous circulation of literature advocating the liberal
theology as against the eternity of punishment, a dogma from which he
suffered greatly in his early years. He had issue five children, of whom
hereafter.



464 BIDLEYS OF MIGKLEY FAIlM, XORTHUMBERLAND.

Esther Ridley (1), eldest daughter of John 4 (4), was born at Hylton,
near Sunderland.

Ann Ridley 5 (3), second daughter of John 4 (4).
Susan Ridley 5 (5), third daughter of John 4 (4).

SIXTH GENERATION.

Elizabeth- Agues Ridley 6 (3), eldest daughter of Cuthbert 5 (6), was
boru in New York city, Nov. 20, 1834. Unmarried and living in New
York.

Cuthbert-Weatherby Ridley 6 (7), eldest son of Cuthbert 5 (6), was
born in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 15, 1837 ; married Lydia Weeks in Jan-
uary, 1864, and has one child, of whom hereafter. He resides in Wash-
ington, D. C.

Charles-Henry Ridley 6 (3), second son of Cuthbert 5 (6), was born
in Stamford, Conn , Sept. 25, 1839, and died Aug. 27, 1857.

James-Dent Ridley 6 (4), third son of Cuthbert 5 (6), was born at
Stamford, Conn., Sept. 20, 1841 ; married Annie O'Hare in 1872, and has
two children, of whom hereafter. Resides in New York city.

Rowland-Weatherby Ridley 6 (1), fourth son of Cuthbert 5 (6), was
born in Stamford, Conn., Nov. 26, 1843, and is now (1883) in the druggist
business, 2364 Fourth Avenue, corner 128th Street, New York city ; un-
married.

Sarah-Jane Ridley 6 (1), second daughter of Cuthbert 5 (6), was born
at Stamford, Conn., Feb. 5, 1846. Resides in New York city; unmarried.

Jonathan-Trotter Ridley 6 (1), fifth son of Cuthbert 5 (6), was born
at Stamford, Conn., Nov. 8, 1849; married Susanna Gill in July, 1871, and
has Jive children, of whom hereafter. He resides at Mount Vernon, N. Y.



John Ridley 6 (8), eldest son of John 5 (6). > These reside in

Cuthbert Ridley 6 (8), second son of John 5 (6). ) Northumberland.

Anne-Eleanor Ridley 6 (1), a daughter of John 5 (7), was born at Close
House, near Hexham, Northumberland, in the year 1839, and with her
sister, of whom hereafter, spends much of her time in the promotion of
various philanthropic and literary undertakings, and hopes to keep up the
tradition of the Ridley name and be true, in small or great ways, to the
motto of the family, " Constance Fideo" She lives with her father in Lon-
don; manifests a deep interest in the history of her family, and has kindly
furnished me with the genealogy.

Jane-Taylor Ridley 6 (2), a daughter of John 5 (7), was born at Close
House, near Hexham, Northumberland, in 1845, and resides with her sis-
ter in London, in the house of their aged father. See preceding sketch.

SEVENTH GENERATION.
Nellie Ridley 7 (1), a daughter of Cuthbert 6 (7), was born in Wash-
ington, D. C.

James Ridley 7 (5), eldest son of James 6 (4). \ New York c i ty

Jonathan Ridley 7 (2), second son of James 6 (4). ) J '

Cuthbert Ridley 7 (9), eldest son of Jonathan 6 (1). ]
Fannie Ridley 7 (1), eldest daughter of Jonathan 6 (1). Reside at
Mary Ridley 7 (2), second daughter of Jonathan 6 (1). > Mount Ver-
Joseph Ridley 7 (1), second son of Jonathan (1). non, N. Y.

Agnes Ridley 7 (1), third daughter of Jonathan (1). J



RID LEYS OF BECKLEY, SUSSEX, ENGLAND. 465



RIDLEYS OF BECKLEY, SUSSEX, ENGLAND.

Williillll Ridley 1 (1), parents' names unknown, was born at Beckley,
Sussex, Eng., Oct. 22, 1784; married Sarah Newble (she was born May
27, 1781?) Oct. 31, 1806, and had issue four children, of whom hereaf-
ter. Mr. Ridley was a farmer. He married, secondly, Rebecca Fiddler,
and thirdly, Margaret Cornwallis, by whom one son. He emigrated to
America in company with the son last mentioned, and has not since been
heard from. His first wife was buried at Beckley, aged 35.

SECOND GENERATION.

Harriet-N. Ridley 2 (1), eldest daughter of William 1 (1), was born at
Beckley, Eng., July 24, 1807, and died in Sydney, Australia; was the
wife of Henry Larkins.

William Ridley' 2 (2), eldest son of William 1 (1), was born at Beckley,
Eng., in September, 1808 ; married, and sailed for America the following
day.

James Ridley 2 (1), second son of William 1 (1), was born at Beckley,
Eng., May 13, 1811; married Margaret Quinn, in the parish of St. Law-
rence, Sydney, Australia (she was of Dublin, Ireland), in 1842, and has
had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Ridley emigrated to
Sydney from Gravesend, in the ship "Palmyra," in 1838. He was em-
ployed in a soap- manufactory ; then ten years in Kent Brewery, and then
twenty-one years on the railway of New South Wales. He is now an old
man, living with his children at Redfern, Sydney, Australia.*

Sarall-Allll Ridley' 2 (1), second daughter of William 1 (1), was born
at Beckley, Eng., in December, 1809 ; was married to John Payne, of
Sussex, farmer, and died in that County about 1844.

Thomas Ridley 2 (1), a son of William 1 (1), by his third wife, mar-
ried in England, and accompanied by his parents, sailed for America, but
nothing has been heard from any of them since.

THIRD GENERATION.

Harriet Ridley 3 (2), eldest daughter of James 2 (1), was born in Syd-
ney, Australia, and died in 1859, aged 18.

Margaret-Matilda Ridley 3 (1), second daughter of James' 2 (1), born
in Sydney, was married to William Waterman, and has issue.

James Ridley 3 (2), eldest son of James 2 (1), was born in Sydney,
Australia.

Daniel Ridley 3 (1), second son of James- (1), was born in Sydney,
Australia.

Charlotte Ridley 3 (1), third daughter of James 2 (1), was born in
Sydney, Australia; twin to Daniel.

Joshna(?) Ridley 3 (1), third son of James 2 (1), was born in Sydney,
New South Wales, Australia, and is employed in a government situation.

Rebecca Ridley 3 (1), fourth daughter of James 2 (1), was born in
Sydney, Australia, and lives at home.

* James Ridley, of Redfern, Sydney, says Beckley, Sussex, the ancestral home
of this family, was twelve miles from any post-office at the time he left England.
The family of Cornwall, or Cornwallis, with which the Ridleys intermarried, came
to America before 1837; they formerly lived about twelve miles from Beckley.

30



466 RID LEYS OF BURY ST. EDMUND'S, ENGLAND.



Constance Ridley* (1), fifth daughter of James' 2 (1), was born in
Sydney, Australia.

Ambrose Ridley 3 (1), fourth sun of James 2 (1), was horn in Sydney,
Australia, and is now (1884) at home with his aged parents.



RIDLEYS OF BURY ST. EDMUND'S, ENGLAND.

The Ridleys have been tanners at Bury St. Edmund's for a long period
of time, and moved and added the tan-yards there to their business at
Soham, about one hundred and fifty to one hundred and seventy years
ago. Early in the sixteenth century, a Richard (or Henry) Ridley was
head of the tan-yard firm at Soham, and had a son.

Lancellot Ridley' 2 (1), who carried on the tannery business at Soham
and St. Edmund's. From him descended directly

John Ridley 3 (1), who moved the entire business to Bury St. Ed-
mund's. He married Mary , and had issue two sons (probably other

sons and daughters), of whom hereafter. He died Sept. 3. 1779, aged
70; his wife died in 1781, and was buried in the same ground.

John Ridley 4 (2), son of John 3 (1), became head of this family, and
of the tan-yard firm. He married and had issue two (probably others)
sons, of whom hereafter.

Rev. Thomas Ridley 4 (1), son of John 3 (1), was divinity minister,
from whom descended Thomas Ridley and others, of Ipswich.

FIFTH GENERATION.

John Ridley 5 (3), Esq., eldest son of John 4 (2), was born at Bury St-
Edmund's, and became a magistrate for that borough. He was a promi.
nent and learned man. He married, had issue, and died in 1853, aged 73.

William Ridley 5 (1), second son of John 4 (2), was born at Bury St.
Edmund's, May 28, 1786(?); married in 1811 to Maria, eldest daughter of
Thomas Dixon, of County of Essex, and had issue eleven children, of
whom hereafter. He was a "substantial and highly respected miller,"
and a biographical notice of him was published in an English journal at
the time of his death, June 3, 1852. His wife died May 7, 1837. Mr.
Ridley was 66 years of age.

SIXTH GENERATION.

John Ridley 6 (4), a son of John 5 (3), was born at Bury St. Edmund's;
married his second cousin, named Ridley, and had issue a daughter (prob-
ably other issue), who was married to a Mr. Ridley of Reading. His first

wife dying, he married, secondly, Catherine E. , who is now living.

Mr. Ridley is a magistrate of Bury, now old and infirm; his memory so
impaired he could not aid me in my researches. It is though the pos-
sesses the family records.

Thomas-Dixon Ridley 6 (1), eldest son of William 5 (1), was born
March 22, 1814, at Hartford End, Essex, Eng. ; married June 17, 1841,
Lydia, eldest daughter of William C. Wells, of Chelmsford, Essex, brewer,
and had issue fioe children, of whom hereafter. He died F'eb. 10, 1882.
Occupation not known; supposed to have been a miller.



BID LEYS OF BUBY ST. EDMUND'S, ENGLAND. 467

Rev. William Ridley 6 (2), second son of William 5 (1), was born at
Hartford End, Essex, Eng., Sept. 14, 1819; married Isabella, daughter of
the Rev. Joseph-Rogerson Cotter, rector of Donoughmore, and senior
prebendary of Cloyne Cathedral, County Cork, Ireland, April 11, 1850,
and by tbat lady had issue eight children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Ridley
received his education at King's College, London, his father having
intended him for the legal profession. For some time after taking his
degree he continued his legal studies with great success, but he met with
conscientious difficulties which caused him to abandon that profession.
On one occasion he caught a thief in the act of stealing his purse, and
turned him over to the authorities, but when the case came before the
court he refused to be sworn, on conscientious grounds, and incurred a
heavy fine for his so-called contumacy. After this he determined to
devote himself to missionary work, and applied to the London Missionary
Society, wishing to go to the Pacific Islands. His services were declined,
but soon after, however, in 1849, he met Dr. Lang in London, and ac-
cepted an offer to become one of the professors in the Australian College.
He went to Australia with Dr. Lang in the " Clifton," arriving at his
destination early in 1850. He was ordained in the Presbyterian Church
by Dr. Lang, in connection with the synod of New South Wales, and
became professor of Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. Aided by an able staff
of professors, the new college flourished, and many citizens of Sydney
remember with gratitude Mr. Ridley's conscientious tuition. Whilst
fulfilling the duties of his professorship he devoted much of his time to
the work of the ministry. He took charge of a new church at Balmain,
holding two services every Sabbath ; at the same time he was active in
the church-extension work in various parts of the colony. When the
Australian College ceased to occupy its high position, he assumed the
pastoral care of Brisbane, Portland Bay, and Manning River, successively.
Then he resolved to devote himself fully to missionary work, which had
been the dream of his youth. He accordingly went among the aborigi-
nes of the north-west of the colony, and of southern Queensland, partic-
ularly among the Namoi tribes. He seems to have been a natural linguist,
and acquired a complete mastery of many dialects, and in later years
published a grammar of the Kamilaroi tongue, with one on other
languages, which received the approval of the most distinguished philolo-
gists in Europe; and an edition of this work was published by the
government for the Philadelphia Exhibition of 1876. His self-denying
labors were not without fruit of a moral and religious character. He so
endeared himself to the aborigines, among whom he preached the gospel,
that to this day (1878) the blacks of Namoi show the most enthusiastic
demonstrations of joy at the mention of Mr. Ridley's name. During his
missionary tours through the colony, he found many families from the
Highlands of Scotland, who could not understand an English discourse,
and with characteristic energy he acquired so good an acquaintance with
the Gaelic as to be able to preach the gospel to them. The cares of an
increasing family now caused the withdrawal of Mr. Ridley from his field
of usefulness among the natives, and he returned to Sydney, where he
became connected with the Empire newspaper. He was for many years
a valued contributor to the newspapers published in Sydney, and was at
one time principal editor of the Evening JSfeios. Notwithstanding the
pressing duties of a journalist's position, he was unremitting in his atten-
tion to his ministerial profession. He was the founder of a station at



468 EIDLETS OF BURY ST. EDMUND'S, EXGLAXD.

Kogerah, Cook's River, and preached either there, or in one of the Sydney
churches, almost every Sabbath. He was an active participator in the
business of the Presbyterian Synod, and served on important committees.
His great attainments were highly appreciated when placed at the service
of the brotherhood of his church. For two years he assisted in editing
the Australian Witness. He was also appointed one of the theological
tutors of St. Andrew's College, and one of the examiners of candidates
for the ministry. He took his degree of M. A. at Sydney University in
1864. During the last year preceding his decease he was requested by
the Presbytery to enter upon a new work, one that might have daunted a
man of robust health. This was nothing less than the acquirement of the
Chinese language, in order to fit him to take charge of the Chinese mis-
sion in the city of Sydney. Mr. Ridley devoted one half of his time to
this great undertaking, persevering with his accustomed application until
he so far succeeded that he could write passages of Scripture in the lan-
guage, which he distributed amongst the Chinamen. He also acquired,
by private study and under the instruction of Ah Len, the Chinese mis-
sionary, an elementary knowledge of the spoken dialect. In fact, he had
translated and set to music some hymns which he sang with the Chinese
in their meetings for worship ; but it was a source of great sorrow to him
when he learned from Dr. Vrooman, a missionary of twenty years' expe-
rience in Canton, China, who visited Sydney, that his studies of the
language had been prosecuted by him in mistaken lines, owing to the
want of proper instruction and assistance. He spent considerable time
with this missionary during his stay in the colony, in order to improve
his knowledge of the Chinese language, and on the Sabbath before his
death saw him off on the steamer. It was a proof of the well-balanced
mind of Mr. Ridley, that, notwithstanding his enthusiasm for missionary
work among the Chinese, yet on political grounds he favored moderate
resti-ictions on emigration. In theology he was most liberal-minded. He
was intensely sympathetic in his appreciation of good men of all denom-
inations, and his broad views and spontaneous charity are manifest in the
religious writings of Mr. Ridley, published in the University Magazine.
His political views were distinctly liberal in home and foreign affairs.
He had a firm grasp of the principles of popular representative govern-
ment, and did not hesitate to apply them. His character, without any
exaggeration, was almost perfect, and a record of his acts of self-denying
kindness would fill a volume. He never made any enemy, and yet he
never tampered with principles in order to conciliate opponents. He
was a peace-maker in the highest sense of the word, in the church and
the world. His gentleness endeared him to all with whom he associated.
He was the soul of honor, and the embodiment of righteousness. Full
of religious earnestness and enthusiasm, he was thoroughly practical in
all his undertakings. He Avas never idle, and his death was undoubtedly
hastened by his over-devotion to what seemed to him duty. In his ser-
vice for his Master and his fellow-men, he was worn out, and in the midst
of great usefulness, having only three weeks before his death preached
from the text, "Put on the whole armor of God," he passed away
Sept. 26, 1878. On Saturday, the 21st, he appeared in full vigor of mind
and body; but on the following morning was stricken with paralysis, and
never rallied from the attack. His funeral was from his late residence,
"Lohort," and was attended by a large assembly of clergymen, members
of the press, and other well-known and distinguished citizens. Mr. Rid-



BIDLEYS OF BURY ST. EDMUND'S, ENGLAND. 469



ley, at his own request, was buried by the side of a favorite little daughter
who died many years ago. In his address at the funeral the Rev. Mr.
Patterson spoke warmly of the pure, blameless, and thoroughly Christian
life of the deceased, his unassuming character, and his self-denying labors
on behalf of those around him. Those who knew him were as confident
as they were that they lived, that Mr. Ridley's spirit was now with his
Saviour above.

The following verses were taken from the Town and County Journal
of Oct. 5, 1878 (an Australian newspaper), from which the preceding
notice was largely copied : —

"In Memokiam — Kkv. William Kidley, m. a.

" 'The world knows not its greatest men' — nor best!
And so our brother passed unto his rest,
Which darkly comes to all of mortal breath —
The solemn silence of the calm of death —
Like the good priest, who, in his Master's name,
' Did good by stealth, and blushed to And it fame,'
Has lived a life of usefulness and worth;
And through his toiling pilgrimage on earth,
Where 'en he saw a sorrow or a sin,
Saw — sorrowing for each — and tried to win
The sinner back to virtue ! and for grief
And want, gave active sympathy's relief!

" His was no narrow soul, that narrow saw,
But any Heaven, justified by law,
By vengeance only ! — but believed that God
Was Father always ! — and affliction's rod,
His minister, to train each child of time —
Nor make of earthly sin — eternal crime!

■' When far off Nainois' ancient heathen tribes,
Sunk dwindling 'midst the fellow-stockmen's jibes,
Thy manly spirit saw a fitting field,
Where the true ' missionary soul ' could shield
Thy sable brethren — and perchance, in time,
Sow seeds to ripen into faith sublime !
And now Kamilaroi's unlettered tongue,
Thus rescued from oblivion, has sprung-
Whatever know we of that dim, dark past,
Which science craves to save from out the vast
Mysterious deep of hoary ages gone,
Whose hieroglyphs are buried flint and bone.
Nor hath thy sympathy and kindness failed,
Nor been forgotten ! — to this day is hailed
Thy gentle memory, — and with fond acclaim,
The ' wild tribes ' loving honor Ridley's name !

" Servant of Christ, —thy long day's task is done,
(His soldiers fall not till the fight is won!)
And we who sorrowing, yield back to death thy dust,
Tell, earth has lost one more good man, and just. — r. a."

John Ridley 6 (5), third son of William 5 (1), was born at Hartford
End, Essex, Eng., and is now (1883) at Damerham, Wiltshire; unmarried.
He has made some investigation, and could undoubtedly provide much
additional genealogical information if he could find time to do so.

Maria Ridley 6 (1), daughter of William 5 (1), was born at Hartford

End, Essexj; was married Sept. 17, 1839, to Curling, and has issue.

Now (1883) a widow.



470 BWLEYS OF BUST ST. EDMUND'S, ENGLAND.

Annie Ridley 6 (1), daughter of William 5 (1), born at Hartford End,
Essex; was married June 15, 1841, to Joseph Tison, and has issue. Now
(1883) a widow.

Sarall-Dixon Ridley' 3 (1), a daughter of William 5 (1), born at Hart-
ford End ; was married March 5, 1846, to Mr. Nash, and has issue. Now
a widow (1883).

Elizabeth Ridley 6 (1), a daughter of William 5 (1), born at Hartford
End, Essex; was married April 29, 1854, to John Richardson, and has
issue. Now (1883) living; also her husband.

Catherine Ridley 6 (1), daughter of William 5 (1), born at Hartford
End, Essex ; was married Aug. 11, 1841, to Joseph L. Prentice, and has
issue. Now (1883) a widow.

Susanna Ridley 6 (1), a daughter of William 5 (1), born at Hartford
End, Essex ; was married July 31, 1845, to Manning Prentice, and has
issue. Now (1883) a widow.

Harriet Ridley 6 (1), a daughter of William 5 (1), born at Hartford



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 61 of 103)