G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

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Williamson County, Tenn., in 1809, and died young.

CJeorge-J.-M. Ridley 3 (5), second son of Thomas 2 (1), was born in
1811, and died before reaching man's estate.

Mary-M. Ridley 3 (3), second daughter of Thomas 2 (1), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., March 10, 1813; was married to George J.
Rhine, and resides in Texas.

Louisa-A. Ridley 3 (1), third daughter of Thomas' 2 (1), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., April 28, 1815 ; was married to Robertson
Horton in her native State, and removed to what is now Grenada County,
Miss. Her husband accumulated considerable wealth by farming, and died
Jan. 9, 1878, leaving eight children, one of whom is a lawyer at Grenada,
Miss.

Alexander Ridley 3 (1), third son of Thomas' 2 (1), was born in Wil-
liamson County, Tenn., in 1817, and died young.

* Mr. Ridley has run stage-lines, hotels, and served as chairman of Probate Court
frequently.



BIDLEYS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE. 501

Beiljamill-F. Ridley 3 (2), fourth son of Thomas- (1), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., March 16, 1819; married and had issue one
daughter, of whom hereafter. In the death of Benjamin this family be-
came extinct in the male line.



Dr. John-Clark Ridley 3 (4), eldest son of Moses 2 (1), was born on the
Harpeth River, Tenn., Oct. 7, 1810; married, firstly, June 16,1831, to
Caroline-Elizabeth, daughter of James and Nancy Morton ; secondly,
March 4, 1841, to Nancy-Allison, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Ridley,
of Tennessee, and thirdly, Nov. 6, 1855, to Livonia-Candette, daughter of
George-Martin and Martha-Louis Ridley. Mr. Ridley has had issue by
his two last wives, five children, of whom hereafter. He moved with his
father's family in 1818 to Stewart's Creek, Rutherford County; thence
in 1848 went to Madison County, Miss. In 1850 he went to Florida,
and settled the place called (in honor of his name) " Ridley ville," on the
Apalachicola River, in Gadsden County. He removed to Kerr County,
Tex., then unorganized ; in 1858 moved to DeWitt County, and thence, in
1864, returned to Kerr County, where he has since resided, and is en-
gaged in farming, having almost discontinued the practice of his pro-
fession.

Rev. George-Vincent Ridley 3 (6), second son of Moses- (1), was
born in Williamson County, Tenn., July 3, 1811; married July 14, 1806,
to Emma Canon, an old schoolmate (she was born April 22, 1812), and
had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. Entered Cumberland Col-
lege in 1829; was converted the same year and united with the Cumber-
land Presbyterian Church. Was impressed with a duty to preach the
Gospel, and entered Harpeth Academy in 1831, under the care of Rev.
James Otny, afterwards bishop of the Episcopal church. Was licensed
to preach in 1833, and occupied a circuit one year; then entered Cumber-
land College the second time. Had a trouble with his eyes, which almost
resulted in blindness. Taught school in 1835; ordained to the work of
the ministry in 1836. He is now living at Warrensburgh, Mo. He is a
staunch defender of the cause of temperance, having become a total
abstainer many years ago, when intoxicants were kept by the barrel in
almost every house.

Ridley 3 (1), third son of Moses 2 (1), was born in Rutherford

County, Tenn., May 7, 1813. No other information.

Washington-Green Ridley 3 (1), fourth son of Moses 2 (1), was born
in the County of Williamson, Tenn., Nov. 21, 1823; married Jane Carl-
ton, Oct. 10, 1849, and died in the Confederate army during the Rebellion,
April 5, J -862, leaving several children, of whom hereafter. He served in
the Mexican war under General Pillow; was at the siege of Vera Cruz.
He enlisted in the Confederate army in 1861, and served in the Second
Tennessee Regiment until the day of his death.

Lonisa-Abigail Ridley 3 (2), eldest daughter of Moses 2 (1), was born
in Williamson County, Tenn., April 9, 1815 ; was married April 2, 1835,
to Lewis Garner, and had three daughters. She is now living in the city
of Murfreesborough, Tenn.

William-Henry Ridley 3 (3), fifth son of Moses 2 (1), was born in
Rutherford County, Tenn., June 16, 1822, and died Aug. 13, 1823.

Sally-Blichanan Ridley 3 (3), second daughter of Moses 2 (1), was
born in Rutherford County, Tenn., Feb. 8, 1817 ; married to John C. New-
som, but had no children ; died Sept. 20, 1852.



502 BWLEYS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE.

Susan-Margaret Ridley 3 (1), third daughter of Moses 2 (1), was born
in Rutherford County, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1818; was married to Frank New-
som, and had several children; died April, 1877.

NarciSSa-FranceS Ridley 3 (1), fourth daughter of Moses 2 (1), was born
in Rutherford County. Tenn., Nov. 1, 1 *25 ; was married October, 1842,
to Dr. John C. Kirkpatrick, and resided near Murfreesborough. She has
had a family of children : died in February, 1863.

Saiimelleil-Jones Ridley 8 (1), fifth daughter of Moses 2 (1), was born
in Rutherford County, Tenn., Sept. 18, 1827; was married Nov. 27, 1849,
to Col. Karr Patterson, of Arkansas, a lawyer by profession, and repre-
sentative in the State Legislature. Has children. Now living at Smyrna,
Tenn.

Mary -Josephine Ridley 3 (4), sixth daughter of Moses 2 (1), was bora
in Rutherford County, Tenn., Nov. 16, 1829; was married April, 1858,
to H. M. Jones, of Arkansas, and had/?ue children.

Amanda-C. Ridley 3 (1), eighth daughter of Moses 2 (1), was born in
Rutherford County, Tenn., and died .June 23, 1835.



Samuel-Jones Ridley 3 (2), eldest son of James 2 (1), was born in
Davidson County, Tenn., and died without a family.

Hance-Haniilton Ridley 3 (1), second son of James 2 (1), was born in
Davidson County, Tenn., Sept. 1, 1808; married Sarah B. Everett, June
9, 1830; she had two daughters; died Sept. 17, 1834; and he married,
secondly, Sept. 19, 1839, to Amanda R. Joslin, and by her had issue eight
children, of whom, with other issue, hereafter. Mr. Ridley died Oct. 27,
1867, aged 57 years. He lived in Tennessee.

Sarah- Vincent Ridley 3 (3), eldest daughter of James 2 (1), was born
in Davidson County, Tenn.; was married to Moses R. Buchanan, her
cousin, and had twelve children.

George-Thomas Ridley 3 (7), third son of James 2 (1), was born in
Davidson County, Tenn., March 30, 1812; married to Mary W. Dodson,
Julv 3, 1834, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He died
April 18, 1862.

James Ridley 3 (2), fourth son of James 2 (1), was born in the County
of Davidson, Tenn.; married July 4, 1836, to Hannah Williams, and had
issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He resides near Thompson's
Station, Williamson County.

John-Buchanan Ridley 3 (5), fifth son of James 2 (1), was born in
Davidson County, Tenn., Feb. 17, 1818; married to Mary-Agnes Fitz-
gerald, Jan. 9, 1845, and has issue seven children, of whom hereafter.
He is a wealthy gentleman ; resident at Thompson's Station, Williamson
County, Tenn.

3Ioses-McNairy Ridley 3 (2), sixth son of James 2 (1), was born in
Davidson County, Tenn., March 18, 1816, and married twice : firstly,
Aug. 5, 1*41, to Ann E. Baker, and by her had issue tfdrteen children, of
whom hereafter ; secondly, Oct. 31, 1866, to Prudence Eason. The first
wife died Jan. 19, 1862. He resides seven miles east of the city of Nash-
ville, Davidson County, Tenn; farmer l>y occupation.

Anna Ridley 3 (1), only daughter of James 2 (1), was born in David-
son County. Tenn., and was married to Dr. Pleasant H. Mitchell; had
seventeen children. Residence, near Humboldt, west Tennessee.

Samuel-Jones Ridley 3 (3), youngest son of James 2 (1), was bora in
Davidson County, Tenn., and died young.



BIDLEYS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE. 503



George -Granville Ridley 3 (8), second son* of Henry 2 (1), was born
in Rutherford County, Tenn., March 6, 1817; married Sally McEwen, a
niece of Gov. Aaron V. Brown, and had issue, of whom hereafter (some
say Mr. Ridley married Rebecca McEwen).

Williaill-A. Ridley 3 (4), third son of Henry 2 (1), was born in Ruther-
ford County, Teun., March 6, 1819; married, firstly, to a daughter of
Maj. Thomas Anthony, by whom no issue; secondly, to a Miss Shillcut,
and had one child, of whom hereafter.

Samuel- Jones Ridley 3 (4), fourth son of Henry 2 (1), was born in
Rutherford County, Tenn., Feb. 4, 1812; married Sally McEwen (some
say Rebecca), twin sister to his brother's wife, and had issue one daughter,
of whom hereafter. He had charge of a celebrated battery in the Con-
federate army, during the Southern war, and fought with desperation at
the battle of Vicksburg, Miss., — his home, — where he was killed, after
all his men had fallen, while defending his guns with his revolver ; and
after his death-blindness came on he continued to strike with his sword
till he expired; his death occured May 16, 1863.

Dr. James-Allison Ridley 3 (3), fifth son of Henry 2 (1), was born in
Rutherford County, Tenn., Dec. 25, 1822; married, firstly, a Miss Rus-
worm, and by her had two sons, of whom hereafter ; secondly, a Miss
Copeland, by whom no issue; third, a Mrs. Vanleer, daughter of Hon.
James P. Clark, of Nashville, by whom no issue. He was captain in the
Confederate army, and fought bravely through the war from beginning to
its close; he was called "the brave old Captain Ridley" by the soldiers.
He did not receive a wound during the war though frequently exposed to
showers of lead. He is said to be "an uncompromising Democrat of the
Andrew Jackson stripe " ; and in 1873 was senator in the Tennessee Legis-
lature. Since the war he has discontinued the practice of medicine and
has turned his attention to farming ; resides near the city of Nashville.
Was considered a skillful physician but did not like his profession. He is
tall, erect, and commanding in person ; is possessed of strong intellectual
powers, and an active, spirited temperament. f

Nancy-Allison Ridley 3 (2), eldest daughter of Henry 2 (1), was born
in Rutherford County, Tenn., Nov. 19, 1823; was married, firstly, to her
cousin, John-Clark Ridley, March 4, 1841, and secondly, to Col. Valentine
S. Allen (he was born in North Carolina, Oct. 10, 1802; died Aug. 23,
1877), a lawyer by profession, who won distinction in public life. Mrs.
Allen is a woman who deserves more than a passing notice ; her experience
during the late war brought out remarkable traits of character. Her res-
idence was near Huntingdon, Tenn., and as her husband was prominent
as a public speaker in favor of the war, he retired before the Union army,
and she was left alone in charge of their large property, a place that was
much frequented by the Federal soldiers, who soon carried away nearly
everything available. Mrs. Allen had a very valuable young horse which
she managed to keep secreted by running him from county to county; the
Union soldiers swore they would have this horse, and she was equally de-

* James-Derick Ridley, eldest son of Henry 2 (1), was named in honor of a
man who shot an Indian when in the act of shooting or striking Mr. Ridley, the
father. This son died in infancy.

t Capt. James A. Ridley, had charge of a company from Rutherford County,
Tenn., in the Twenty -third Regiment, under General Cleburn ; was laid up with
rheumatism after the battle of Shiloh, returned to his command and fought as an
independent to the end of the war.



504 RIDLEYS OF BUT 1 1 K 11 FORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE.

termined they should not. "As soon as the Yankees had left Hunting-
don," says Mrs. Allen, "I sent for my ' Rocky Mountain' (the name of
her horse), and having heard of some Confederates who were to cross the
Tennessee River by night, I sent them a note requesting them to call and
see me before their departure. They rode up at eleven o'clock at night,
and found me with my three-year old stallion saddled and bridled ; I
mounted him and rode all night, reaching the river at day-break, and there,
unexpectedly, I found Colonel Allen." After remaining with her hus-
band several days she decided to return and try to save her house from
being burned. Colonel Allen purchased a horse and buggy for her, hoping
she would be able to collect and save her clothing which had been scat-
tered from place to place; but the Yankees took the team and what cloth-
ing she had at home, immediately on her return. She says: "I had some
meat buried in an old ash-hopper, and some salt and molasses under the
kitchen floor ; but one of my negroes who had watched me when these
things were hid (this negro's wife being Mrs. Allen's cook, was allowed
to live in a house in the yard, and all the bed-clothes belonging to the
mansion were hid there), approached my door the next morning with re-
volver in hand. I asked him mildly what he wanted, and was answered
with impudence and threats. I was determined to kill him if I could,
and ran into the house for my revolver, when a lady who was stopping
with me caught hold of me and said, 'for God's sake don't shoot ! I see a
hundred blue-coats waiting to see what you are going to do'; and in a
minute my house was surrounded by Yankees ; they found my revolver,
and I supposed I should be killed. The negro-woman, Anna, went to her
cabin and found it broken open, and the soldiers packing my bed-clothing
over the fence. I went out to beg them to spare me these, when one of
them drew his revolver, and cursing, threatened to shoot me. The fol-
lowing day they went out on the Jackson road, and my friends from
Huntingdon persuaded me to leave my home and go to town, which, hav-
ing packed what clothing my faithful dog could carry on his back, and
what I could carry, I did. That night old Captain Kidd, who was a Fed-
eral, came to the house where I was stopping, looking for a negro wait-
ing-man who had been our slave, and when he learned who I was, he said
he had heard that I was shamefully treated. I said I had suffered every-
thing but death. When he learned that my piano and some beds had
been left at my house, he politely offered to go with me and bring them
to town. When we had reached the house the front gallery was covered
with fodder-oats and beef-heads ; and the interior of the house was shame-
fully desecrated and dilapidated. When Captain Kidd saw the condition
of my house he exclaimed, 'Good God, what villiany ! Madam, I have
heard you are a perfect lady, and I see by your deportment that you were
well raised. I am sorry for you.' An old negro who had loved his mas-
ter and mistress, soon came in, when Captain Kidd said, ' old man, are
there horses and wagons here with which to take these things to town?'
He replied, 'No, master, the Yanks have cleared the place; twenty-two
fine horses and mules are gone.' 'Are there no oxen and wagon?' asked
the old captain. ' I don't know, master,' said the negro; 'I saw them in
the field last night.' The old negro found the oxen, and all that was in
my house was taken to town." Mrs. Allen says: "My great desire was to
get to my husband, and I determined to walk with a pack on my back as
a beggar ; but the day before I was to start on my journey, a lady friend
sent me a note telling me she would let me have a horse which she desired



BIDLEYS OF BUTHEBFOBD COUNTY, TENNESSEE. 505

to send to her husband over the river, and I gladly accepted her offer. I
sewed up a sheet and packed what clothing I had upon the horse ; then
went to a neighbor's to tarry for the night, and after a supper and break-
fast of opossum and sweet potatoes, with a lunch of the same food, I
started on my lonely journey with no companion but my faithful, intelli-
gent dog. I was in constant fear of being overtaken, and knowing I
must cross a long, dreary bottom, I rode to the door of Mr. Bartlett's
house and desired him to accompany me to the river, but he was afraid to
go; consequently I rode on till I came to a long bridge, when the horse
refused to go forward, and I was obliged to dismount and lead him a long
distance before I could find a place suitable to get on again. The day
was drawing to a close when I reached the river, and hailing the ferry-
man I soon found myself among acquaintances ; thence pressing forward,
attended by some soldiers, I reached Waverly at dark, and found Colonel
Allen at the hotel; he knew my dog and came out to meet me." After
boarding at Waverly several months, Mrs. Allen went to the home of her
mother, near Smyrna Depot, and while at dinner on Christmas day, — her
mother having made a feast, — the Union army advanced, and the shot
and shell whistled around the house on every' side. Colonel Allen, hav-
ing no good saddle, found a boy's saddle without stirrups, and without a
word of farewell escaped, leaving his wife without a dime in her pocket.
She then saw her mother's property destroyed and carried away, except
her money and a few things she had assisted in secreting. Her husband,
who had been employed in buying supplies for the Confederate army,
failed in health and retired from the service, took "the oath of allegiance,
and, with his wife, went back to his old home near Huntingdon. Finding
their mansion very much in ruins, it was rented, and they commenced
house-keeping in one of the negro cabins. Mrs. Allen says: "A neighbor
let Colonel Allen have some bacon and meal, and we made out after a
fashion, by no means pleasant; but I put on my best face to keep up the
spirits of my husband ; I reminded him that he was splendid at many
games of cards, when he remarked, ' wife, I '11 try it. I think I' 11 win
some coffee to-day ' ; and sure enough he brought me sugar, coffee, and
candles that night. I felt that I was rich, and was proud that my hus-
band had learned to play cards. We soon moved into our house, and as
there was much traveling on the Rosser ferry-road, I took in travelers and
made a pretty good start by working myself almost to death; determined,
however, that my husband should not know how hard it was for me to be
poor." Her husband had resumed the practice of his profession, but fail-
ing in health by lapse of age, and broken down by misfortune, he did not
long survive, and Mrs. Allen is now a widow, with no property save a res-
idence at Waverly. She is now living with her sister in the city of Mur-
freesborough, Tenn. The author has devoted considerable space to this
article to show the heroism of a noble-hearted woman and devoted wife ;
and to show the vicissitudes and misfortunes of war.

Mary -Jane Ridley 3 (5), second daughter of Henry 2 (1), was born in
Rutherford County, Tenn., Feb. 6, 1829; was married Nov. 8, 1855, to
Dr. James-Bromfield Ridley, of Jones County, Ga. (see " Ridleys of North
Carolina "), and has issue ; she is now a widow.

Sallie-E. Ridley 3 (4), youngest daughter of Henry' 2 (1), was born in
Rutherford County, Tenn., April 18, 1831; was married to her cousin,
Chamelius Huggins, a banker and lawyer in the city of Murfreesborough,
Tenn., and has several children. This family lives in affluence.



506 BIDLEYS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE.

FOURTH GENERATION.

Thoma8-B. Ridley 4 (4), eldest Bon of William 3 (2), was born in Wil-
liamson County, Tenn., July 9, 1832; died July 9, 1834.

Moses Ridley 4 (3), second son of William 3 (2), was born in William-
son County, Tenn., Sept. 5, 1834; died Nov. 29, 1835.

William-Thomas Ridley 4 (5), third son of William 3 (2), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., Aug. 8, 1836; married June 17, 1855, to Isa-
bella P. Holt (she was born Dee. 26, 1839, died April 20, 1874), and has
issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He is a farmer living near Frank-
lin, Tenn. ; was in the Twentieth Tennessee Infantry during the Southern
war; was private twelve months, then captain ; wounded several times,
and has not fully recovered from his injuries.

Johll-Beverly Ridley 4 (6), fourth son of William 3 (2), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., April 17, 1838; was in the Second Tennessee
(Confederate) Regiment, and was killed at the battle of Shiloh, while
fighting under the "Stars and Bars," April 7, 1862. A brave and faith-
ful soldier.

Hance-Hamilton Ridley 4 (2), fifth son of William 3 (2), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., Sept. 16, 1840, died April 2. 1843.

Michal-Ann Ridley 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (2), was born
in Williamson County, Tenn., Sept. 23, 1842; was married March 21,
1860, to John A. Buchanan, and lives on a farm in her native County.
Has issue seven children.

Jilllies-KllOX-Polk Ridley 4 (4), sixth son of William 3 (2), was born
in Williamson County, Tenn., Dec. 8, 1844; served as a private soldier in
the Twentieth Tennessee (Confederate) Infantry, known as "Bettle's Old
Regiment." Now living on a farm where he was born.

George Ridley 4 (9), seventh son of William 3 (2), was born in Wil-
liamson County, Tenn., Jan. 19, 1846; died Nov. 6, 1848.

Mary-K. Ridley 4 (6), second daughter of William 3 (2), was born Sept.
11, 1849, in Williamson County, Tenn.; died Aug. 15, 1851.

Julia Ridley 4 (1), twin daughter of William 3 (2), was born in William-
son County, Tenn., Aug. 11, 1849, and died July 2, 1853.

Minerva Ridley 4 (1), twin daughter of William 3 (2), was born in Wil-
liamson County, Tenn., An?. 11, 1849, and died Feb. 1, 1858.



William-Beverly Ridley 4 (6), eldest son of George 3 (3), was horn in
Williamson County, Tenn., "March 15, 1821, and died Dec. 16, 1851; pre-
sumably unmarried.

Martha Ridley 4 (1), eldest daughter of George 8 (3), was born in Wil-
liamson County, Tenn., Jan. 1, 1823; was married Dec. 15, 1840, to
William J. Alston, and died Aug. 25, 1848. Lived in her native County.

Elizabeth Ridley 4 (3), second daughter of George 3 (3), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., June 9, 1825; was married to Wilkin White-
field, Nov. 15, 1847.

Thomas-Jefferson Ridley 4 (5), second son of George 3 (3), was born
in Williamson County, Tenn., Nov. 15, 1827; married June 24, 1853, to
Martha- Wilson Buske, and had issue eight children, of whom hereafter.
He is a farmer in his native County.

Sarah-ColnmbU8 Ridley 4 (4), third daughter of George 3 (3), was
born in Williamson County, Tenn., Sept. 11, 1829; was married to Francis-
Marion Williams, Nov. 25, 1855, and died June 10, 1865, in her native
County.



BID LEYS OF BUTHEBFOBD COUNTY, TENNESSEE. 507

George-Robert Ridley 4 (10), third son of George 3 (3), was born in
Williamson County, Tenn., Oct. 5, 1881, and died May 2, 1863, in his
native County.

John Ridley 4 (7), youngest son of George 3 (3), was born in William-
son County, Tenn., June 11, 1834, and died Dec. 19, of the same year, in
his native shire.



Elizabeth- Young Ridley 4 (4), eldest daughter of George 3 (4), was
born in Maury County, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1820; was married March 15,
1843, to James M. Starkey ; died Feb. 7, 1844.

Livonia-Candette Ridley 4 (1), second daughter of George 3 (4), was
born in Maury County, Tenn., Nov. 11, 1824; was twice married: firstly,
Oct. 20, 1841, to Francis A. Price; secondly, Nov. 6, 1855, to John-Clark
Ridley.

Octavus-LeGrand Ridley 4 (1), eldest son of George 3 (4), was born
in Maury County, Tenn., May 12, 1824 (probably a mistake) ; died July
30, 1844.

Malinda-Caroline Ridley 4 (1), third daughter of George 3 (4), was
born in Maury County (?), Tenn., March 22, 1829; died Sept. 19, 1831.

Lydia-Ann-Rebecca Ridley 4 (2), fourth daughter of George 3 (4), was
born in Claiborne parish, La., March 8, 1831, and died March 12, 1832.

Thomas-James Ridley 4 (6), second son of George 3 (4), was born in
Maury County, Tenn., Sept. 13, 1833, and died June 24, 1835.

Volney-Barber Ridley 4 (1), third son of George 3 (4), was bom in
Maury County, Tenn., June 20, 1836. At the beginning of the Rebell-
ion he volunteered and joined the " Texan Rangers " under command of
Colonel Terry and remained with them till after the battle of Shiloh, Miss.,
April 7, 1862 (in which he distinguished himself by his bravery), when
he returned home on account of poor health. After remaining at home
a few months he joined " Baylors Ladies Texan Rangers," and died in
this command, from exposure, near Independence, Tex., in March, 1864.
One account says he died "June, 1864."

William-Rufus Ridley 4 (7), fourth son of George 3 (4), was born in
Maury County, Tenn., April 9, 1838; married June 7,1856, to Mary-
Francis, daughter of Judge English, of Little Rock, Ark. Address,
Frio Town, Tex. He has issue eight children, of whom hereafter.

Rev. George- Vincent Ridley 4 (11), fifth son of George 3 (4), Avas
born in Maury County, Tenn., March 21, 1840; married June 7, 1865, to
Sommie-Jerome Menilee (she is a niece of Col. John Thatcher, who was
an officer of the United States government at Vicksburg, Miss., in its early
settlement ; the whole family being distinguished for wealth and high



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 66 of 103)