G. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) Ridlon.

History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 online

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and eyes; was featured like his mother; was steady, industrious, kind-
hearted, and a professed Christian.

Asenath-F. Ridloil 6 (1), second daughter of John 5 (14), was born in
Hollis, Me., Dec. 11, 1829, and has always lived at home with her parents;
a maiden-lady of many virtues.

Stephen Ridloil 6 (7), second son of John 5 (14), was born in Hollis, Me.,
Sept. 28, 1840; died Feb. 25. 1843.



James-Allen Ridloil 6 (16), eldest son of Humphrey 5 (1), was born in
Albion (?), Me., Nov. 28, 1831 ; married Elizabeth-Rachel, daughter of Ezra
and Sarah (Doe) Wiggin, of China (she was born in China, Me., May 5,
1837, and died Jan. 2, 1871), by whom he had six children. He married,
secondly, April 4, 1871, Orvilla, daughter of Ira and Sally (Balcom)
Shorey, of Palermo, Me. (she was born in China, Nov. 27, 1847), by
whom he had issue two (possibly others) children, of whom, with those of
first wife, hereafter. Mr. Ridlon is a shoe-maker and farmer. He is well
informed. Does not resemble the Ridlon family.

Pelena-F. Ridloil 6 (4), eldest daughter of Humphrey 5 (1), was born
in Albion (?), Me., Jan. 26, 1833 ; was married to Miles S. Leonard, and
has issue.

AlbiiUi Ridlon 6 (1), second daughter of Humphrey 5 (1), was born in
Albion (?), Me., June 30, 1835 ; was married to George M. Wiggin, and
has issue.



RIDLONS OF CLARENDON, VERMONT. 701

Jollll-Wesley Ridloil 6 (22), second son of Humphrey 5 (1), was born in
Albion (*?), Me., Jan. 15, 1S38 ; married and has issue three children, of
whom hereafter. He has lived on the homestead farm with his parents,
in Albion.



Mary-A. Ridlon 6 (33), eldest daughter of Ira 5 (1), was born Dec. '25,
1833, and died Dec. 22, 1837.

Oraville-A. Ridloil 6 (1), second daughter of Ira 5 (1), was born Sept.
25, 1839, and died Nov. 2, 1860.

Lizzie-W. Ridlon 6 (11), third daughter of Ira 5 (1), was born June 8,
1842, and died Aug. 19, 1860.

Alfred-B. Ridloil 6 (2), only son of Ira 5 (1), was born in Durham, Me.,
Sept. 21, 1846; married firstly, Lucy C. Irish; secondly, Jan. 9, 1873,
Mary A. Goodwin, of Reading, Mass., by whom he has issue four sons, of
whom hereafter. Mr. Ridlon served in the war of the Rebellion about
four years, being in many engagements and hard marches; receives a pen-
pension for injuries sustained in the service. Carpenter by trade. Resides
in Franklin, N. H. He is of medium height, slender build, and has dark
complexion.

Maria-S. Ridloil 6 (1), youngest daughter of Ira 5 (1), was born Dec.
28, 1851; was married to Charles-Hiram Libbey, March 28, 1870.



Olive-O. Ridloil 6 (6), eldest daughter of Jonathan 5 (5), was born in
Clarendon, Vt., April 1, 1831 ; was married to Noah Fisk, of Danby, a
carpenter, Nov. 10, 1852, and lives near her birth-place.

George-M. Ridloil 6 (8), eldest son of Jonathan 5 (5), was born in
Clarendon, Vt., May 28, 1834; married Delaney Shearman, of Wells, Rut-
land County, July 13, 1859, and has issue two children, of whom hereafter.
Mr. Ridlon carries on a lai - ge dairy-farm near the place of his birth. He
was the first member of this branch of the family with whom correspond-
ence was opened respecting this genealogy ; the family was not aware
that they had any kindred of their name, until they saw my advertisement
in a Vermont newspaper. George is of medium height, broad-shouldered,
and muscular; has brown hair and beard. He seems to be a kind-hearted,
genial, well-informed man.

Fl*eelove-T. Ridloil 6 (1), second daughter of Jonathan 5 (5), was born
in Clarendon, Vt., Dec. 18, 1843 ; was married in 1866, to George T. Pha-
lon, of Cuttingsville, Rutland County, merchant, and is supposed to be
living there.

Elizabeth Ridlon 6 (12), third daughter of Jonathan 5 (5), was born in
Clarendon, Vt., Jan. 4, 1847.

Edgar-J. Ridlon 6 (1), youngest son of Jonathan 5 (5), was born in
Clarendon, Vt., May 9, 1852.

Jollll-H. Ridlon 6 (23), eldest son of Thomas 5 (5), was born in Claren-
don, Vt., Dec. 20, 1835; married Adelaide, daughter of Lovings and
Betsey Seamans, of Tinmouth, March 10, 1862, and has issue two children,
of whom hereafter. Mason by trade. Resembles his Ridlon ancestors.

Lorada-C. Ridloil 6 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 5 (5), was born in
Clarendon, Vt., Dec. 31, 1837; was married Dec. 25, 1856, to Julius C.
Gilmore, a farmer, in Rutland.

Paulina- W. Ridlon 6 (5), second daughter of Thomas 5 (5), was born
in Clarendon, Vt., Feb. 16, 1837; was married Dec. 25, 1864, to George



702 BIDLONS OF CLARENDON, VERMONT.

W. Potter, a farmer, of Castleton, and died in Illinois, whither she had
emigrated in April, 1868.

Delilall-B. Ridloil 6 (1), third daughter of Thomas 5 (5), was born in
Clarendon, Vt., April 5, 1841 ; was married Oct. 26, 1861, to James D.
Everest, a farmer in Clarendon.

Eddie Ridloil 6 (1), second son of Thomas 5 (5).

Mary Ridloil 6 (34), fourth daughter of Thomas 5 (5).

Elldora Ridloil 6 (1), fifth daughter of Thomas 5 (5).

Vesta Ridloil 6 (1), sixth daughter of Thomas 5 (5).

Alvin Ridloil 6 (2), third son of Thomas 5 (5).

Dr. Jollll-F. Ridloil 6 (24), eldest son of Noel 5 (1), was born in the
southwestern part of the town of Clarendon, Vt., Nov. 24, 1852, and was
named for his two grandfathers, "John-Joshua," but he disliked his mid-
dle name, and changed it to Frederick. He commenced to attend the
district school in his eighth year, walking two miles each way; the term
lasted thirteen weeks, and the great distance made his attendance very
irregular. He continued at school during the summer and winter terms
until his twelfth year, when he was kept at home for work on the farm.
In his fourteenth year his father was killed, and he became virtually the
head of the household; to the extent, at least, that nothing was done
without his consent, and what he advised was carried forward. At this
time his highest ambition, founded on the best type of manhood he knew
of, was to become a clerk in a country store, and afterwards to have a store
of his own. With this end in view the homestead was rented, in 1867,
and the family took lodgings at Poultney, Vt., that he might attend Lans-
ley's Commercial College; he graduated from this institution in May fol-
lowing (1868), having been taught commercial arithmetic, commercial law,
and bookkeeping. He also imbibed a desire for a higher education, but
without any definite end in view, and on the following September found
himself at Uncle Jake Spaulding's Barre Academy, at Barre, Vt., which
at that time had the reputation of being the best school of the kind in
the State. After a year in this academy he gave up study, and commenced
canvassing for a book entitled " Our Great, New West." This proved
disagreeable business, and he gave it up, and engaged as clerk in a store
at Granville, N. Y., for one hundred and twenty-five dollars a year and
board. About this time his mother, who had been his guardian, was mar-
ried, and their property (the farm in Vermont had been sold in 186S) was
divided, and he assumed absolute control of his share, amounting to about
eleven thousand dollars. At the end of his engagement in the store, he
went to Momence, 111., to visit his mother, and while there (summer of
1870), he joined a civil-engineer corps, on the Chicago, Danville, and Vin-
cennes Railroad, and carried " level-rod " for some weeks. In October,
1870, he came East, and began fitting for college, at Goddard Seminary
(then called Green Mountain Central Institute), at Barre, Vt., under L.
L. Barrington. Here he worked hard, and by reading Latin and Greek,
during the summer vacation, did his three years' course in two, graduat-
ing in" June, 1872, and delivering the first Latin oration ever delivered in
that institution. From the latter place he went to Tufts College, enter-
ing the class of '76. He did only enough studying during his freshman
year to keep his place in his class. He joined the A X society, which
was made up of the "good fellows" of the college, and took a leading
part in all the amusements to be found. On Saturday he always dined









~*2T.




RIDLONS OF CLARENDON, VERMONT. 703

at Parker's (Boston), and went to see the Zaostaske Sisters, or Ada Rich-
mond, at the Howard Athenaeum, or Lydia Thompson's troup, at the Globe.
He knew many of the city " sports," and had friendly bouts with " the
gloves " with Sol Aaron, and most of the " fraternity" of Howard Street.
He spent a good deal of money, and just before the end of the year, was
called before the faculty and mildly disciplined. Appreciating their consid-
eration, he reformed, and during his sophomore year worked hard. Two
weeks before the end of the year, however, he was again called before the
faculty, and accused of breach of rules, of which (he says) he was not
guilty. An example was wanted, and having no proof but his own state-
ment, and having a bad reputation the year before, he was expelled from
the college. Stung by this injustice, he went to Chicago, 111., and en-
tered the University of Chicago ; by working hard during all the sum-
mer vacation, he made up some junior studies, and was allowed to enter
the senior class of '75. He now gave up his connection with the © A X
society, and became a A K E. He made up the remainder of his junior
studies, and was so successful in his senior work that he was chosen class-
poet on class day, and had the salutatory oration awarded him at com-
mencement day ; thus having the satisfaction of receiving the degree of
A. B. from a college of a higher standing than that from which he had
been expelled, and that a year sooner. As he now looks back, his expul-
sion from Tuft's College seems to him the most fortunate thing that ever
occurred to him. He now became a member of Momence Lodge 481, of
Free and Accepted Masons. His graduating oration was upon the infalli-
bility of the Pope, and because he treated the subject in what seemed to
him a purely logical and scientific way, he was roundly denounced as a
Catholic, in a speech made by an ex-president of the college, at the alum-
ni-dinner. " Hereafter," he said, " we shall see to it that no Roman
Catholic graduates from our (Baptist) institution." The following Sep-
tember found him in New York city, studying medicine at the College of
Physicians and Surgeons, with Prof. E. C. Seguin as preceptor. He took
the three years' course and graduated in March, 1878. In June following
the University of Chicago conferred tipon him the degree of A. M. He
entered the competitive examination for interne at St. Luke's Hospital,
and gained the position, going on duty July 1, 1878, and serving as assis-
tant-surgeon, assistant-physician, house-surgeon, and house-physician till
April 1, 1880. In the midst of this service he was married. The New
York Evening Express pi'inted the following : " Special dispatch — New-
port, June 4 (1879). At the hour of eleven this forenoon Trinity Church
was well filled with the elite of this place, to witness the performance of
a marriage ceremony in the upper ranks of fashion. The high-contract-
ing parties were Dr. J. F. Ridlon, of New York city, and Miss Emily C.
Robinson, daughter of Madame M. J. Robinson, of Newport and New
York. The ceremony was performed by Rev. George J. Magill, rector of
Trinity. The ushers were Messrs. R. O. Harris and F. E. Cabot, of Bos-
ton, and George F. Crane and Dr. Walter Mendelson, of New York.
There were four bridesmaids : Miss A.M.Harris, of Boston, Miss Ernestine
Houget, of New York, and Miss Josie Gorton and Miss Annie Gorton, of
Newport. The bride was elegantly attired in heavy corded white silk
dress, en train, with tulle veil, and a profusion of orange-blossoms. She
carried a magnificent boquet of white roses. After the wedding a recep-
tion was held at Madame Robinson's cottage. Numerous elegant and
costly gifts were received by the bride. The happy couple leave this af-



704 RIDL0N8 OF CLARENDON, VERMONT.

ternoon on a month's wedding tour, after which they will settle in their

new home, in New York." From the Home Journal (New York) we
quote the following extract: "The bridesmaids wore white French organ-
die, beautifully trimmed with white satin. Their tulle veils were arranged
to form turbans on the head, being fastened at the back with a bunch of
roses, and caught at the neck in the same manner. The boquets of jacque-
minol and tea-roses were the gift of the groom. The groom and ushers
wore frock-coats and light trousers, with boutonnieres to match the brides-
maids' boquets. Immediately after the ceremony, the favored guests re-
paired to Madame Robinson's cottage, in Catherine Street, where a colla-
tion was spread. The table and room were beautifully decorated with
flowers. The ceremony of cutting the wedding-cake was novel and pret-
ty. The bride sat on an ottoman, while the four bridesmaids held the
rake over her head, the officiating clergyman, of course, wielding the
sacrificial knife. Telegrams and letters of congratulation, and presents
were showered upon the happy couple."

On leaving the hospital, April 1,1880, Dr. Ridlon began practice in
that part of the city known as Washington Heights. In April, 1881, he
was appointed on the attending staff of St. Luke's Hospital as assistant
orthopordic surgeon ; and in June following as assistant-surgeon to the
New York Orthopordic Dispensary and Hospital. In May. 1 VS -L he gave
up his general practice, and moved into the centre of the city, in order to
devote himself entirely to surgery, especially as applied to the treatment
of deformities by mechanical means. In October, 1882, he was appointed
first clinical assistant to the chair of orthopordic surgery of the medi-
cal department of the University of the city of New York, and since,
during the sessions, has lectured twice a week on the subject of ortho-
pordic surgery. In June, 1883, he was appointed attending surgeon to
the dispensary of the University Medical College. Of medical societies
he is a member of the County Medical Society and the Parthological
Society.

From his first school attendance to his graduation, Dr. Ridlon proved
himself a very proficient student, and his rapid advancement in his pro-
fession, since he commenced practice, shows conclusively that his skill and
judgment are something quite remarkable for one of his years and ex-
perience. He was converted while attending school in Vermont, and
became connected with the Methodist Church there, but has continued
to modify his religious views, and says he is now as near an Agnostic as
anything. He has issue three children, of whom hereafter. The accom-
panying steel engraved portrait was kindly furnished by Dr. Ridlon for
this book, at a cost of seventy-five dollars, and is a very fine work of art.

Eininet-N. Ridlon" (1), second son of Noel 5 (1), was born in Claren-
don, Vt., Aug. 29 ; died Dec. 15, 1859.

Charles Ridlon 6 (7), third son of Noel 5 (1), was born in Clarendon,
Vt., July 81, 1861 ; died May 9, 1863.



Ada Ridlon (1), eldest daughter of John 5 (15), was born in Claren-
don, Vt. ; was married to N. B. Potter, in 1861.

John Ridlon (25), eldest son of John 5 (15), was born in Claren-
don. Vt., and deceased when young.

Jerome Hidloil (4), second son of John 5 (15), was born in Claren-
don, Vt., and deceased when young.



MIDLONS OF HOLLIS, MAINE. 705

Ol*en-M. Ridley 6 (2), eldest son of David 5 (3), was born in Bangor,
Me., Feb. 19, 1847; died Jan. 3, 1854.

Mary-J. Ridley 6 (35), eldest daughter of David 5 (3.), was born in Ban-
gor, Me., Oct. 24, 1849; was married to Henry W. Russell, of Corinth,
Oct. 26, 1862, and died Feb. 8, 1873.

Annie-C. Ridley 6 (1), second daughter of David 5 (3), was born in
Bangor, Me., Nov. 5, 1851; was married in Corinth, March 13, 1870, to
L. D. Cole, and died Dec. 19, 1872.

Loilisa-A. Ridley 6 (1), third daughter of David 5 (3), was born in
Bangor, Me., Jan. 29, 1853 ; was married in Corinth, March 13, 1871, to
Edwin A. Cole, and died Sept. 21, 1873.

Lizzie-E. Ridley 6 (13), fourth daughter of David 5 (3), was born in
Bangor, Me., Oct. 11, 1857, and died Dec. 4, 1873.

Ada-F. Ridley 6 (2), fifth daughter of David 5 (3), was born in Corinth,
Me., May 29, 1860, and died in Bangor, Nov. 28, 1873.

Bertha-G. Ridley 6 (1), sixth daughter of David 5 (3), was born in
Corinth, Me., May 9, 1863, and died July 22, 1864.



James-Greeilleaf Ridlon 6 (17), eldest son of James 5 (7), was born in
Hollis, Me., April 23, 1847 ; married Mary F., daughter of Elisha and
Lovina (Haley) Davis, and lives on the homestead farm of his grand-
father, now owned by his uncle Joseph. He is tall, broad-shouldered,
raw-boned, muscular ; has dark-brown hair, and in features of face and
movements resembles the old Ridlon ancestors. He is a quiet, indus-
trious, honest man, respected citizen and Christian. No issue.

Joseph-Henry Ridlon 6 (10), second son of James 5 (7), was born in
Hollis, Me., Aug. 28, 1848, and lives at home with his mother, on the old
Nicholas Ridlon farm, about half a mile south of Bonnie Eagle Village,
now owned by Mrs. Ridlon and her sons. Joseph resembles his father in
every respect. He is tall, very broad, and square-shouldered, somewhat
stooping, moderate in movements, and naturally of a serious, reflective
mind. He is a hard-working, steady, highly-esteemed young man, and
devoted Christian.

Willie-Hopkinsoil Ridlon 6 (15), youngest son of James 5 (7), was born
in Hollis, Me., in February, 1852, and died unmarried, in 1874. He was
in delicate health from a child, and could do no heavy work. He spent
his time mostly in clerking in grocery stores, until his strength so far
failed him that he was compelled to retire to his mother's home, where
he endured with great patience a long and painful illness. He was quite
tall, but slender ; walked with bowed head, like his father ; was always
conscientious and honest, and left an untarnished reputation.



Frank Ridlon 6 (4), only son of Joseph 5 (4), was born in Gorham,
Me., and is now in business with his father, at Gorham Village. He was
formerly a clerk in the city of Portland. Was educated for commercial
pursuits, and is an efficient business manager, book-keeper, and financier.

Mary-Susan Ridlon 6 (36), only daughter of Joseph 5 (4), was born in
Gorham, Me.; was married Sept. 22, 1880, to Nathan-Clifford Cummings,
grandson of Judge Nathan Clifford, formerly of the United States Su-
preme Court.

Emma-Frances Ridlon 6 (1), only child of Jesse 5 (1), was born in
Limington, Me., Feb. 3, 1847, and died Oct. 27, 1850.
45



706 IZIDLOXS OF 1IOLLIS, MAINE.

Jeimie-Fraiices Ridlon 6 (3), eldest daughter of John 5 (16), was born in
Paw Paw, Mich., Nov. 30, 1855 ; was married to Sylvester M. Hess, and
resides at Lawrence, Mich.

Addie-Blanck Ridlon 6 (1), second daughter of John 5 (16), was born
in Paw Paw, Mich., Sept. 28, 1861 ; was married to J. H. Yund, and lives
at Grand Island, Neb.

Charles- AlplieilS Ridlon 6 (8), a son of John 5 (16), was born in Paw
Paw, Mich., Aug. 20, 1864.



Emma-F. Ridloil 6 (2), eldest daughter of Alpheus 5 (1), was born in
Salem, Mass., March 17, 1852 ; died May 28, 1860.

Nellie Ridloil 6 (2), second daughter of Alpheus 5 (1), was born in Har-
mer, O., Feb. 28, 1860 ; was married to Jerome H. Smith, March 1, 1882,
and lives at Avondale, O. Has issue.

Btary-N. Ridloil 6 (37), youngest daughter of Alpheus 5 (1), was born in
Harmer, O., March 8, 1861. Single in f883.



Franklin-Deinick Ridloil 6 (5), eldest son of Robert 5 (6), was born
in Standish, Me. (?), Feb. 8, 1843 ; married Sarah A., daughter of Moses
and Phebe Wood, of Limington, and has issue seven children, of whom
hereafter. He resides at Steep Falls Village, Standish, and is engaged in
the lumber-mills there. He enlisted at the age of twenty-one in the
Maine Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered into the Thirtieth Regiment
(Company I), Jan. 6, 1864, for service in crushing the Southern Rebellion.

Andrew-Bryant Ridlon 6 (2), second son of Robert 5 (6), was born
(presumably) in Standish, Me., Dec. 16, 1845 ; married Eva F., daughter
of Luke Rich, of Standish, Jan. 1, 1866, and has issue three children, of
whom hereafter. He was mustered into the Thirtieth Regiment Maine
Infantry, — in the same company with his brother, — Jan. 6, 1864, and
served in the Union army in the Rebellion. Resides at Steep Falls Vil-
lage.

Robert-Herbert Ridlon 6 (8), third son of Robert 5 (6), was born in
Standish, Me. (?), Aug. 25, 1852; married Sarah, daughter of Freedom
and Catherine (Pendexter) Berry, of Cornish, and has issue three children,
of whom hereafter.



Clarence Ridlon (1), eldest son of Isaac 5 (6), was born in Liming-
ton, Me., March 1, 1858.

Minnie-H. Ridlon 6 (1), eldest daughter of Isaac 5 (6), was born in
Limington, Me., Aug. 5, 1860.

Jane-E. Ridlon 6 (6), second daughter of Isaac 5 (6), was born in Lim-
ington, Me., Nov. 25, 1866.

Mary-M. Ridlon 6 (38), third daughter of Isaac 5 (6), was born in Lim-
ington' Me., Jan. 31, 1869.

Nellie Ridlon 6 (2), fourth daughter of Isaac 5 (6), was born in Liming-
ton, Me., Dec. 15, 1872.

Rev. Nathaniel-Townsend Ridlon 6 (7), eldest son of Samuel 5 (4),
was born in Hollis, Me., Nov. 16, 1837 ; married Rhoda A., daughter of
Ezra Fluent, of Waterborough, June 19, 1855, and settled as a carpenter
at Moderation Village, near his birth-place, on Saco River. He worked
at his trade till his twenty-fourth year, when, having been converted in



RIDLONS OF HOLLIS, MAINE. 707

an extensive refownation, which prevailed in town two years previously,
he commenced to preach the Gospel ; his first attempt was at Lovell,
Me., in the autumn of 1861. He became a member of the " York and
Cumberland Christian Conference," and was ordained in the Christian
chapel, — which he had built, — in Hollis, during a session of conference
held there. He supplied several pulpits, and worked with his tools during
the week, until his settlement as pastor of the church at Northampton,
N. H., where he was continued about seven years ; he removed from that
place to Saco, to accept the pastoral charge of the Christian Church in
that town, where he has continued rising ten years as a successful shep-
herd of the flock. He retains his taste for mechanical pursuits, and
spends considerable time in building stairs and cabinet-work. He acquired
skill as an architect in early years, and still draws plans for houses.
Within a few years he has studied dentistry, and being settled in a rural
district some miles from town, he has a considerable patronage in this
profession. He is a good singer, and sometimes teaches music in winter.
He has chosen to live a quiet and unobtrusive life, and is not widely
known as a preacher.

Having no children, and enjoying uniformly excellent health, he has
always been comparatively free from pressing cares and confinement at
home ; hence the current of his life flows smoothly onward. As a public
speaker he always delivers himself fluently without notes, and is a very
ready and acceptable preacher. His theological views are well settled
and held firmly. In personal appearance and temperament he has all the
prominent characteristics of the old Ridlon stock, supplemented with an
overshoot woven from the maternal family loom. Strong of will impul-
sive; is passionate, sometimes mirthful and jocose. He has been president
of his conference, and is a progressive, rising preacher. Hair black and
wavy, eyes gray, complexion florid.

Rev. Gideoil-Tibbetts Ridlon 6 (1), second son of Samuel 5 (4), was born
in Hollis, York County, Me., July 1, 1841 ; married Lydia-Ellen, twin daugh-
ter of John and Lydia (Ridlon) Sawyer, Sept. 30, 1860, and has had issue four
children, of whom hereafter. He worked on the homestead farm, attend-
ing school in winter, until his fifteenth year, when he went to the city to
learn the iron machinist's trade ; this business he followed, being employed
in several cities in Maine, and in traveling to introduce cotton-spinning
machinery into new mills in the South and West, until his twenty-fourth
year, when, having been converted the winter previous, he commenced
preaching as an evangelist, traveling from place to place about two years,
and was ordained and settled as paster over a Christian church he had
gathered in Harrison, Me., where he continued nearly four years, during
which time he baptized about one hundred and forty members.

His next settlement was at Salisbury Point, Mass., where he bestowed
his labors one year; he then commenced evangelistic work at Amesbury,
Mass., gathered a church, and was continued there about three years, till
the financial revulsion of 1873 so reduced the resources of the new society



Online LibraryG. T. (Gideon Tibbetts) RidlonHistory of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884 → online text (page 93 of 103)