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Foreign Minister of the security of Belgium at Ger-
many's hands 78

August 2. British Cabinet defined its view of a casus belli
as the violation of Belgian neutrality or a German
naval attack on the undefended French coast . . . 157
August 2. France assured of conditional protectten by

Great Britain 157,448

August 2. Germany sent ultimatum to Belgium . . 79, 173
August. 2. Te Deum solemnized at Winter Palace, St.
Petersburg, and Tsar addressed multitude and the

Council and the Duma 189

August 2. Russian Foreign Minister addressed the Duma

on Russia's policy in the crisis 191-194

August 2. German troops committed violation of French

territory 118,120

August 2. Decision made to mobilize the British fleet . 162, 448



Chronological Table 485

DATE PACK

1914. August 2—3. Belgium refused to accede to Germany's

demand that she violate her neutrality 83

August 3. Germany declared herself in a state of war

with France 94, 1 1 8

August 3. Sir Edward Grey notified Parliament of the
exchange of letters in November, 19 12, between
Great Britain and France as to "conversations" be-
tween their military and naval experts 136

August 3. German proposals for securing British neutrality
communicated by German Embassy to the British
press 172

August 3. Bank Holiday extended for three days in Great

Britain 172

August 3—4. Germany entered Belgian territory ... 94

August 4. The Kaiser addressed the Reichstag on the
outbreak of hostilities and the Chancellor explained the
events leading thereto 42, 45

August 4. The Reichstag voted a war credit of five billion

marks 51,417

August 4. Germany assured Great Britain that she would

not annex Belgian territory . 54

August 4. The German Chancellor characterized the

Belgian neutrality treaty as "a scrap of paper" . 56, 461

August 4. British ultimatum presented to Germany . . 55

August 4. The German Foreign Secretary admitted the

justice of Belgium's stand as to her neutrality ... 60

August 4. The Belgian ambassador in Berlin demanded

his passports 61

August 4. The British Embassy at Berlin attacked by

the populace .... , 63, 464

August 4. Belgium appealed to Great Britain, France,

and Russia (as guarantors) for cooperation . . . 86, 174

August 4. Germany declared intention to use arms if

necessa'y against Belgium 86

August 4. Belgian Parliament convened to consider war

measures 87

August 4. Belgian guilt charged by the German Chancellor 92

August 4. Parliamentary obsequies of Jaures . . . . 116

August 4. The French Premier announced to the Cham-
ber the course of events leading to the war . . . , 120

August 4. British Expeditionary Force began concentra-
tion at Aldershot 162,448



486 The Great War

DATE PAGE

1914. August 5. British Prime Minister announced to the House

of Commons that a state of war had existed between
Great Britain and Germany since 11 p.m. August 4 174

August 5. Great Britain, France, and Russia pledged

support to Belgium 88

August 5. Belgium notified the Powers of violation of

her neutrality by Germany 88

August 5. Great Britain confiscated two Turkish battle-
ships 374, 382

August 5. Postal money-orders declared legal tender in

Great Britain 402

August 5. Plenary financial powers given French gov-
ernment 407

August 5—7. House of Commons debated war credit
and voted 500,000 additional soldiers and ^100,-
000,000 175, 181-182

August 6. The British ambassador left Berlin . . . 63, 466

August 7. First issue of British treasury-notes of one

pound and one half-pound 401

August 7. Banks re-opened after extended Bank Holiday

in Great Britain 403

August 17. Landing of British Expeditionary Force in

France announced 448

August 26. "National Defense" administration formed

in France 122

August 29. French Socialist declaration of attitude on war 122

September I. Austria-Hungary alleged to have agreed to
submit to mediation such of her demands as were
incompatible with Serbian integrity 21

December 2. The German Chancellor reported his efforts

to secure durable understanding with Great Britain . 53, 139

1915. May. Italian nation aroused against German prepon-

derance 129

May 25. The Italian government granted plenary power

as to financial measures for the war 427

May 28. German Chancellor charged Italian Cabinet

was corrupted by foreign gold i 24

June 2. Premier Salandra defends Italy's war against

Austria-Hungary 125

August 19. The German Chancellor referred in the

Reichstag to his efforts to secure friendly relations

with Great Britain 14 ^



INDEX

of many subjects presented in this 'volume
other phases appear in Volume I an J the Index
to that -volume may be profitably consulted.



Abdul-Hamid II, 251.

Agadir, 23.

Airships, 379-380, 385.

Albert I, third King of the Belgians, 68,

69, 70, 81, 83, 87-88.
Alexander, King of Serbia, 346.
Algeciras Conference, The, 23.
Alsace, 99.

Alsace-Lorraine, 21 i, 4.41, 443-
Andrassy, Count Julius, 6, 53, 98, 143
Angola, 140.

Anhault-Dessau, Prince of, 203.
Antwerp, 73, 74, 76, 92, 93.
Asquith, Herbert H., 133, 173, 174,

'7S-«78-
Austria-Hungary, press of incriminates
Serbia in the Sarajevo outrage, 4; im-
portant leading factions favor war against
Serbia, 4-6; the emperor's proclamation
ascribes to a fanatic the archduke's assas-
sination, 7; the war-party gains domi-
nant influence, 7-8 ; Baron Giesl urges
extreme measures against Serbia, loj
hurried hostile measures against Serbia,
1 1 ; the public manifests enthusiasm at
rupture of relations with Serbia, 12;
refuses to discuss with Russia her note
to Serbia, 13, 34; at instance of Ger-
many opens conference with Russia,
15-20; the press denies change in Ser-
bian policy of, 21; declares viar against
Serbia, 34; von Biilow submits final
concessions of to Italy, 131; expresses
%villingness to reopen conversations with
Russia, 153. The Army: Militarj' de-
cadency under the Holy Roman Empire,
230-231; creation of the Austrian Em-
pire, 231-232; non-German races, the
Hungarians, 233; reorganizes army after
defeat in 1866, 233, 429; military law
of 1 8 89, 234; annual contingent of



recruits under law of 1912, 237; peace
and war strength, 237; non-commis-
sioned officers of the active army, reserve,
and Landsturm, 238-239; the armies
of 1914, 239-244. The Na'vy: "cap-
ital" ships of, 374, 376, 377; battle-
ships of earlier tpye, 37S; otlier naval
constructions, 380; dockyards, 381;
personnel, 382; annual cost of, 386.
Wealth and debt of, 393; financial ar-
rangements for war, 419; Kriegsdar-
lehenskassen, 419-420; makes military
preparation, 430; orders general mobi-
lization, 434.
Auxiliary cruisers, 380.

Bagdad Railway, The, 23, 53.

Bebel, August, 104, 105, 106.

Belgium, Germany offers terms for re-
specting the integrity and independence
of, 49, 172, 173, 175; population and
military plans of, 64-65; economic
progress of, 64-66; Germany violates
her treaty engagement by invading, 68;
monarchs of, 68-69; reciprocates official
courtesies of Germany, 1911 and 1913,
69-70; asks Great Britain in 1913 for
assurance of respect of her neutrality,
72; increases army and fortifications,
1906, 1909, 1913, 73-74; calls up part
of reserves, 75, 447; declares her deter-
mination to defend her neutrality, 76,
161; orders mobilization, 76, 447; is
notified that France will respect neu-
trality of and that Germany has made
no similar pledge, 78, 161; Germany
presents ultimatum to, 79-80, 166, 173;
replies to Germany's uncompromising
ultimatum, 83-85; is offisred aid of
French troops, 85; Germany declares
a hostile purpose, 86; notifies Triple
4S7



488



The Great War



Entente powers of invasion of her terri-
tory by Germany and asks their coopera-
tion, 86, 174; Great Britain promises
assistance if aslced for, 87, 88; Parlia-
ment passes war measures, 88; notifies
the powers of Germany's violation of
her guaranteed neutrality, 88-89; united
to Holland, 353; establishes her inde-
pendence, 353; beginning of a national
army, 35 3; fortress defenses of," 356;
compulsory service enacted in 1909,
357; army law of 1913, 357; service,
strength, organization, officers, equip-
ment, 357-360; the army of 1 9 1 4, 360.

Berchtold, Count Leopold von, 7, 9, 13,
'5, '8. 19. 34. '35. 43o> 43^. 433.
434-

Bethmann-Hollweg, Theobald von, 36,

39. 41. 45. 50. 53. 54. 5^. 57. 63, 70,
75. 77, 9-. 135, '39. '4i. 142. '43.
445-

Bismarck, Prince, 100, 207, 209.

Bosnia, Archduke Francis visits and is
assassinated, 1-2; annexed by Austria-
Hungary, 234, 348; annual contingent
of recruits for the Austro-Hungarian
army, 237, 239; early acquired by
Serbia, 345.

Briand, Aristide, 103-104, 107.

Brussels, 69, 74.

Bulgaria, the kingdom founded, its decline,
a dependency of the Byzantine empire,
renewed independence and later subjec-
tion to Turks, 259-260; revolt in 1876,
261; Russian influence in, 261; Eastern
Roumelia united to, 261; Prince Ferdi-
nand elected ruler, 261; organization,
service, and strength of army of, 261-
266; early conquest of Serbia by, 345.

Bulow, Prince Bernhard von, 29, 131.

Burns, John, 171.

Cabinda, 1 40.

Caillaux, M., 107, 108, 109, 110.

Caillaux, Mme., 109-no.

Cambon, Jules, 153.

Cambon, Paul, 135, 150, 151, 152, 153,

154. 155. '57. 443-
Charles V, Emperor, 231.
Charles VI, 232.
Charles VH, 232.
Churchill, Winston S., 133, 137, 138,

"44. "45. 447-



Congo, the Free State, Belgian, and French,

141.
Cossacks, The, 317, 318, 320-322, 323,

324, 332.

Delbriick, Professor Hans, 52, 139, 140-

»4i-
Delcasse, Theophile, 59, 107.
Demburg, Doctor Bernhard, 89, 169.
Dreadnought, The, 371.
Dreyfus Case, The, 105, no.

Eastern Roumelia, united to Bulgaria, 261.
Elizabeth, Duchess of Bavaria, queen of

the Belgians, 68, 69, 70.
Entente, of Great Britain and France, 137;

of Great Britain and Russia, 137.
Enver Pasha, 252.
Er-Toghrul, 245, 246.

Finns, The, 313.

Flemish, The, stock in Belgium, 65.

Forgach, Count, 10, 11.

France, declares her purpose to respect
neutrality of Belgium, 76; offers Bel-
gium support of army to defend her
neutrality, 85, 88; Germany declares
war against, 94; the question of Alsace-
Lorraine, 99-100; domestic political ac-
tivity in, 1 01 -1 03; influence of Jaures,
104-105; Socialists in the government
of, 107; the "National" Cabinet, 107;
Briand's Cabinet of 191 3, 107; three
years' military service adopted in, loS,
114, 300; financial burdens, 109; the
Caillaux trial, 1 1 o ; Socialist gains in
191 4, 111-112; Senator Humbert scores
the military administration of, 1 15; mobi-
lizes her army, 11 7, 120,445; Germany
urges influence of to restrain Russia, 117;
Germany's ultimatum to Russia notified
to, 118; protests violation of frontier
by German troops, iiS; Gennany de-
clares state of war with, 118; Premier
■Vivani addresses the Chamber of Depu-
ties on the war question, 1 1 9- 1 2 1 ; the
Socialists give unanimous support to
war supplies, 122; entente of with Great
Britain, 135, 136, 137; seeks aid of
Great Britain, 150; declares to Russia
her determination to support her, 153;
urges Great Britain to declare her course
if Germany attacked her, 1 54; receives



Index



489



pledge of Great Britain's naval support,
August z, 157; engages to Great Brit-
ain to respect Belgian neutrality, 161;
the president and the premier visit Rus-
sia, 1S3-1S4; T/ii Army: Napoleon's
soldiers, 295; the amiy at outbreak of
Franco- Prussian War, 296; universal
service adopted, 1872, 296, 429; fron-
tier fortifications, 297-300; the Colo-
nial forces, 301; organization, officers,
strengtli, equipment, 302-311. The
Nai'y: "capital" ships, 376, 377;. earlier
type battleships, 378; other naval con-
structions, 379; auxiliary cruisers, 380;
dockyards, 381; personnel, 382; annual
cost, 386. Wealth and debt of, 393;
foreign investments of, 393; services of
the banks, 405; reserves of the Bank
of France, 407; extraordinary financial
powrers conferred on the government,
specie payments suspended and a mora-
torium decreed, 407-408; headquarters
of army corps, 448.

Francis Ferdinand, Archkuke, visits Sara-
jevo and is assassinated, 1-2; tlie Kaiser
attributed war to murder of, 43; Inspec-
tor-general of Austro-Hungarian army,
242.

Francis Joseph, Emperor, proclamatiun of,
respecting Sarajevo outrage, 7; the Kaiser
in address from the throne defends, 43;
confidence of people in, 243; orders
mobilization, 434.

Frederick, Burgrave of Nuremberg, 201.

Frederick I, 202,203.

Frederick tlie Great, 203-204.

Frederick William, Crown Prince of Ger-
many, 36, 57, 69.

Frederick William, the Great Elector,202.

Frederick William I. 202,203.

Friedjung Trial, the, 1 1 .

Frobenius, Colonel H., 57-59.

Gambia, 141.

Gemmenich, 86.

German East Africa, 141.

German Southwest Africa, 141.

German Stales, The, 209.

Germany, indications of official desire to
moderate Austria's attitude towards Ser-
bia, 7; seeks to facilitate understanding
between Russia and Austria, 12, ij,
14-15, 193 asserts IVett-politik, 22-23;



recognizes Russia's special interests in
Northern Persia, 23; plans railroad ex-
tension in Asiatic Turkey, 23; inter-
venes in Moroccan affairs, 2 3 ; Moroccan
setdemcnt an irritant to; 24; direction
of public opinion and settlement in,
25-26; alleged official, secret military
designs of, 25-27, 409; von Moltke
expresses his military morality, 27;
the Kaiser's opinion of Social Demo-
crats, 29; growth of Social Demo-
cratic representation, 30; Socialists hold
anti-war demonstrations, 31; but adopt
a national stand, 31-32; the Berlin popu-
lace exults at the rupture between Aus-
tria and Serbia, 32; writers of, call the
conflict the" German War,' "33; pledges
to Russia Austrian respect of Serbian
integrity, 34, 38; threatens mobilization
of her forces, 34; the Kaiser holds an
extraordinary council on July 29th,
35-38; asks British neutrality as price
of Germ.in respect for the neutrality
of Holland and integrity of domestic
France, 39; pledges friendship to Bel-
gium in barter for latter' s neutrality,
162; bids for Great Britain's neutrality,
168, 172, 174; Federal Council con-
venes on July 30th, 39; the Kaiser
addresses the people, 40; Bethmann-
Hollweg justifies the war, 4 1 ; the people
acclaim mobilization, 41, 446; the Kaiser
acknowledges the people's devotion, 41 ;
and addresses the Reichstag, 42-45; the
Chancellor explains to the Reichstag
the government's conduct, 45-50; the
Socialists vote war credits, 5 1 ; positively
assures Great Britain that she will not
annex Belgian territory, 54 ; and explains
her violation of Belgium as "a question
of life or death," 55, 61, 462; Great
Britain presents ultimatum to, 55 ; Chan-
cellor of characterizes treaty of neutral-
ity of Belgium "a scrap of paper," 56,
461; claims "discovery" of Anglo-
Belgian military plans, 59, 71; the
Kaiser exchanges cordial official courte-
sies with Belgian ruler, 1911 and 191 3,
69-70; in 1905 holds Belgian neutralitv
unquestioned, but evades in 191 1 and
1 9 14 a formal declaration of intention
to observe it, 70, 74, 78; in 1913 the
Chancellor in the Reichstag declares



490



The Great War



Belgian neutrality will be respected, 7 1 ;
seeks ground for hostilities against Bel-
gium, 74, 92-93, 96; Great Britain
asks intention of as to Belgian neutrality,
76; declines to pledge respect of that
neutrality, 161; violates neutrality of
Luxemburg, 76-77; presents ultimatum
to Belgium, 79-80; enters Belgian terri-
tory, 86, 174; proclaims martial law,
July 31st, 115; insists on localization
of Austro-Serbian contest, 117, 442;
notifies France of ultimatum to Russia,
118; Russia refuses her demand to
demobilize, 188; declares war against
Russia, 188; declares herself in a state
of war with France, 94, 118,' colonial
policy of suggested by Professor Del-
briick, 191 2, 140-141; suggests neu-
trality agreement with Great Britain in
191 2, 141-142; rejects her neutrality
agreement with Russia in 1890, 143;
declines Great Britain's suggestion in
1913 to retard naval construction, 145;
charges Great Britain with responsibility
for the war, 151. The Army : Its origin
and development of the Prussian army
and military system, 200-207; Prussian
organization the model of the imperial
army, 207; increases of strength since
1871, 207-208; organization, service,
strength, training, equipment in 19 14,
210-228; officers of recently called to
reform Turkish army, 252. The Na'vy:
"capital" ships, 374, 375, 377; bat-
tleships of earlier types, 378; relative
muzzle energy of battleship heavy guns
to those of Great Britain, 378-379;
other naval constructions, 379; auxiliary
cruisers, 380; dockyards, 381; personnel,
38a; annual cost, 386. Wealth and debt
of, 393; annual income and foreign in-
vestments of, 39 3 ; financial arrangements
for war, strengthening the banking re-
serves after 1911, 410-4 11, 415; in-
crease of paper currency, 41 2, 415, 416 j
metallic treasure in the Julius Turm the
basis for treasury-notes, 413-414; re-
serves of the Imperial Bank, July 23,
1914, 414; the Imperial Bank's loans to
the government, 415; condition of Im-
perial Bank, 416 ; Kriegsdarlehenskassen
established, 416; KriegskreJiibanken,
417; the first public war-loan, 417;



appeal to capitalists, 418-419; martial law
proclaimed, July 31st, 443; mobilizes
her army, 443 ; great enthusiasm over
mobilization, 446; headquarters of army
corps, 454.

Ghent, 74.

Giesl, Baron, 10, 11, 12.

Giolitti, G. , I 30-1 3 1.

Givet, 79, 83.

Gladstone, W. E., 89.

Gold Coast, The, 141.

Goltz, General Kolmar von der, 252.

Goschen, Sir William Edward, 39, 55, 56,

63, 459-467-
Great Britain, popular sentiment in respect-
ing Serbia and Russia three decades ago,
2 ; proposes mediation of Austro-Serbian
question, 12, 19, 21, 46; rejects Ger-
many's proposal to respect neutrality of
Holland and integrity of domestic France
on condition of British neutrality, 39; is
assured by Germany that Belgian terri-
tory will not be annexed, 54; presents
ultimatum to Germany, 55; insists that
solemn obligation of treaty demands
British support of Belgium, 56; declares
in 191 3 her attitude as to Belgian neu-
trality, 72; inquires intention of France
and Germany as to neutrality of Bel-
gium, 76; pledges support to Belgium,
if asked for, 87, 88; pledges conditional
support to France, 120,157; entente with
France, 137; agreement with Russia,
137; efforts of to secure understanding
with Germany in 1912, 139, 142; de-
clines to expose France to attack, 14a;
intimates willingness to retard naval
augmentation in 1913, 145; public sen-
timent is opposed to war as late as
August I, 1914, 146-149, 155; notifies
Germany of her freedom of action in
case of conflict between France and
Germany, 150; declines pledge of sup-
port to France on July 30, 154-155;
receives notice of Germany's ultimatum
to Russia and of her message to France,
155; monster peace and war meetings
in, 1 5 5 ; the Foreign Secretary reports the
status of international affairs, 157-163;
opposition and Irish parties enthusias-
tically support government, 163-165;
Laborite party condemns the war policy,
165-166, 167; the Premier notifies



Index



491



Parliament on August ;th of a state
of war with Germany and of invasion
of Belgian territory, 174.; Parliament
votes war credit of ^100,000,000,
i8j; king offers to mediate between
Germany and Russia, 189. The Army:
beginnings of her military establisfunent,
167; famous organizations and regi-
ments, 269-173; development of the
Staniling Army, 273-176; the Indian
Army, 276-279; Canadian forces, 279-
281; defence forces of Australia, New
ZeaUnd, and South Africa, 2S1-282;
the Regular Army, 283; the Militia,
284-285; Volunteer and Yeomanry,
285; Territorial Army, 285; term of
service, officers, 287; the Expeditionary
Force, 287-289; its concentration and
transportation to France, ++8, 453. The
Na-Tjy: "capital" ships, 374, 376-377;
earlier type battleships, 378; muzzle
energy of battleship heavy guns relative
to those of Germany, 378-379; other
naval constructions, 379; auxiliary crui-
sers, 380; dockyards, 381; personnel,
382; annual cost, 386; review off Ports-
mouth, July 18, 1 91 4, 387, 447; dis-
position of fleets, 387-388; dispersal of
fleets reviewed postponed, 447; mobi-
lized August 2d, 162, 448. Estimated
wealth and national debt of, 393; an-
nual income and foreign investments,
393-394; financial status at outbreak of
war, 394-395; banking system, 396-
398 ; financial stringency at opening of
the war, 399-400; the moratorium en-
acted, 400 ; issue of small denomination
banknotes, 401; government maritime
insurance, 402 ; government guarantees
bills discounted by the Bank of Eng-
land, 40 2 ; the Bank' s condition strength-
ened, 404; treasury notes issued, 405.
Grey, Sir Edward, 54, 55, 59, 71, 76,1 33,

134, 135. 136-137. 143. '5°. '5", 15*.
'5 3. I 54-. •57-163. '66, 167, 168, 169,

'76, 439. 440. 443-

Hague Neutrality Conference, The, 67, 89.
Haldane, Viscount, 139, 140, 14.4, 282,

283.
Hardie, J. Keir, 115, 156.
Henry, the Fowler, 200.
Henry, Prince, of Germany, 36.



Hereditary Estates of Austria, The, 132.

Herzegovina, annexed by Austria, 234,
348; annual contingent of recruits for
the Austro-Hungarian army, 237, 239;
part of Serbia in thirteenth century, 345.

Hohcnburg, Duchess of, i, 2.

Holland, CJermany offers to respect neu-
trality of as a condition of Great Britain's
neutrality, 39, 172, 173, 175; Germany
pledges to respect neutrality of, 54;
proposes to fortify Flushing, 59.

Holy Roman Empire, The, 229-232.

Honved, The, 234.

Hungary, acquires nationality, 233; anny
of, 233; opposition to military strength-
ening of Dual Monarchy, 234, 235,
^43-

Italy, military status on the fall of Napo-
leon, 360 ; the armies that made a United
Italy, 361; army of 1914, organiza-
tion, service, strength, officers and train-
ing, equipment, 362-36S; estimated war
strength, 368; "capital" ships of, 374,
376, 377; battleships of earlier type,
378; other naval constructions, 380;
auxiliary cruisers, 380; dockyards of,
381; personnel of navy, 382; annual
cost of navy, 386; wealth and debt of,
393; recent phenomenal trade increase
in, 424; improved national finances, 425;
bank circulation reserves and liabilities,
426 ; financial measures for the war, in-
crease of bank-note issues and treasury
notes, 427; war-loans, 427.

Jager, 219, 239, 240, 241.
Jagow, Gottlieb von, 36, 39, 54, 55, 56,
60-62, 63, 70,71,74,92,97, 432, 441,

444. 446-

Janissaries, The, 247, 248, 250, 251.

Japan, "capital" ships of, 374, 376, 377;
battleships of earlier type, 378; other
naval constructions, 379; auxiliar)'
cruisers, 380; dockyards of, 381; per-
sonnel of navy, 382; cost of new con-
structions, 1914-1915, 386.

Jaures, Jean Leon, 104-105, io8, 113,115;
116-117.

Kaiser Wilhelm Canal, The, 59,388,442.

Kamerun, 141.

Kiel Canal (See Kaiser Wilhelm Canal).



492



The Great War



Kitchener, Earl, 137, 177.
Kriegsdarlehenskassen, of Germany, 416;

notes of, 41 6 ; of Austria, 419; notes of,

420.
Kriegskreditbanken, 417.

Landsturm, of Germany, 210, 211, 217,
221, 223, 429; of Austria and Hung-
ary, 235, 237, 238, 241, 434.

Landwehr, of Germany, 210, 217, 218,
221; 223, 226,429, 449 ; of Austria and
Hungary, 233,234, 235, 236,237, 239,
240, 241, 242,434.

Law, Andrew Bonar, 163, 178-179.

Lawson, Sir Wilfrid, 180.

Leopold I, first king of the Belgians, 68.

Leopold n, second king of the Belgians,
68, 72, 73.

Lichnowsky, Prince Karl Max von, 151,
153, 168.

Liege, 66, 70, 73, 74, 92, 93.

Lloyd George, David, 133, 137,400,401,
402.

Longwy, 101.

Lorraine, 99, 100.

Luxemburg, notifies entrance of German
troops into, August 2d, 76; protests
against German violation of her neu-
trality, 77.

Maria Theresa, 232,

Max, M., Mayor of Brussels, 69.

Maximilian I, 230.

Mechlin, 66.

Metz, 100.

Meuse, The, fortifications of, 73, 76, 79,
So, 83, 93.

Millerand, Alexandre, 104, 107.

Mines, laying of, 384; the Leon, 384.

Mobilization, what constitutes, 430; its
diplomatic significance, 430; process
of, 429, 449-45 I ; by Belgium, 447 ; by
Serbia, 430; by Russia, 434-440; by
Germany, 440-444; by France, 446-
447; service of French railroads in,
451-454; headquarters of French army
corps, 452; transportation to France of
the British Expeditionary Force, 448,
45 3 ; mobilization of the British fleet and
concentration of Expeditionary Force,



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