George R. Wilson.

History of Dubois County from its primitive days to 1910 online

. (page 1 of 42)
Online LibraryGeorge R. WilsonHistory of Dubois County from its primitive days to 1910 → online text (page 1 of 42)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


I




m



Ic ^■•'1 C^

977.237

W69h

1217087



fo^



A



, ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY



3 1833 00094 6654



Gc 977.201 D85w

W1LBON7 George R. , 1863-

1941.
History of Dubois County

from its primitive days,



HISTORY



OF



DUBOIS COUNTY



3^^-'^'-^



FROM



ITS PRIMITIVE DAYS TO 1910



INCLUDING BIOGRAPHIES

OF

CAPT. TOUSSAINT DUBOIS

AND THE

VERY REV. JOSEPH KUNDECK, V. G.



TO WHICH ARE ADDED

The Military, School, and Church History of the County,

Geological Observations,

Natural History and Plant Life

AND THE

County's Pioneer, Political and Institutional life.



BY

GEORGE R . WILSON , C. E.

ILLUSTRATED.



Copyright 1910,

BY

GEORGE R. WILSON.

AM Rights Reserved.

Price, prepaid, $4.00. Published by the Author, Jasper, Indiana.



Allen County Public Library
ii* Wayne, Indiand



1217087




i^Mn^



DEDICATED TO MY DAUGHTER,

ROBERTA GEORGINE WILSON.



PREFACE.

The writing of this history has been a self-assigned, pleasing task. If
the reader gains from it as much satisfaction as the author has enjoyed in
gathering and compiling the material he will consider himself amply repaid.

For more than twenty-five years the author has, at every opportunity,
secured and preserved data with a view of preparing a history of his
adopted county that would accurately set forth not only its present condi-
tions, but also the dominant factors that have developed them.

The period covered is not far from a century. On its pages are the
names of the builders of the county. Not only is it an epitome of the
silent past — it is also a story of the splendid life of an ambitious, growing
■county, hardly yet conscious of its ever expanding strength.

In presenting this history the author desires to say that the work has
been performed with extraordinary care, and at no small expense. The
writer has been upon practically every farm in the county, and in every
church and school house. He has penetrated its mines, explored its caves,
and followed the meanderings of its principal rivers. Within its confines
he has traveled over every highway. He knew personally hundreds of its
pioneer families, from whom much valuable information was obtained.
He examined thousands of pages of its local official records, original muster
rolls, famih^ Bibles, wills, newspapers, old personal letters, passports, com-
missions, land patents, deeds, and scores of inscriptions upon gravestones
and monuments. He surveyed mile after mile of its original boundary
lines, traversed thousands of its acres, and ran the level of many of its
streams.

Add to this, his researches into the original official treaties, records and
documents, at Frankfort, Vincennes, Springfield, Bardstown, Indianapolis,
and Washington, and the reader will have a fair idea as to the means by
which the writer arrived at his conclusions.

If this opportunity should not be improved, a large amount of interest-
ing data concerning Dubois county might be lost.

This book contains twenty-one chapters. Each chapter is a unit in
itself, covering one subject, or one line of thought upon a subject. In a
sense each chapter is a separate book.

In the writer's opinion the book should be read as the chapters are
numbered, but any one chapter treating of a specific subject may be read
without reading: the others.



8 WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

The chapter on Military History, after covering the record up to iS6i,
considers the record made in the Civil War, by regiments, and this is, in a
measure, self-indexed. The chapter on Church History, after covering the
county as a unit, takes up, in detail, the local church history by townships ;
hence, this is also, in a measure, self-indexed. The same plan prevails in
a few other chapters. An examination of the book will soon show that it
may be readily used as a local book of reference.

The philosophy of the local history, as well as the history itself, is often
considered. The institutional life of the people has been given special
consideration.

To many people, history is a dull, dry study. It is a difficult task to
arrange a mass of data in such a manner as to hold the reader's atttention,
unless the reader himself is a student of history, and searching for informa-
tion.

This history is from the pen of one who knows his county at first hand,
and interprets its story in a spirit of sympathy.



Jasper, Indiana, April i, 1910.



Primeval forests

Animals

Waters ......

Rocks



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

The Origin of Dubois County.

PAGE.

25

25

25

25

Scenery 26

Settlers. 26

Traces 27

Settlements 28

Hosea Smith 29

Indiana Gazette 29

Western Sun 29

Gen. Washington Johnson 32, 29

Early citizens 34, 3°, 36, 37. 38, 39

McDonalds 30, 38

Piankishaw Indians 30

Fort Butler 31

Fort Farris 31

Dubois county created 31

Portersville, the count}' seat 32

John Niblack 33

Jasper, the county town 33

Dr. Simon Morgan. 33

Dubois county library 34

Seal 34

Organization day 34

List of land owners 34

Census of 1820 35

Record of McDonald family 3^

Captain John Sherritt 39

Coroner Robert Stewart 39

CHAPTER II.

Local Geology.

Knowledge of natural objects add to our appreciation of them 41

Exact location of Dubois county 4^

Of the soldiers' monument 42

Size of Dubois county 42

Altitudes of a few places 42



lo WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

PAGE.

Patoka river receives the surface drainage 42

Slope of hills; cause . 42

Report of State Geologist Cox 43

Of State Geologist Blatchley 43

The highland home of Mrs. L. L,. Cooper in Boone township 43

Level tract northwest of Jasper 43

The glacial drift 43

Probability of oil and gas in Boone and Madison townships 43

Patoka river during pre-glacial times; high banks of river on the south and

probable cause 44

Frog Island 44

Enlow's mill 44

Patoka Lake Plain 45

Government ditches 45

Lime stone deposits in Columbia township 45

Stone coal 45. 4^

The great book of Nature, open and free, in Dubois County 46



CHAPTER 111.

Local Geological Observations.

Patoka mound. 47

Infusorial earth 47

Sand stone • • 47

The Silver Well 47, 48, 49

Annuity salt 48

David Dale Owen appointed State Geologist 481 49

Report of 1838 4S

Vowell cave in Columbia township; mouth and interior 50

Description of Vowell cave 50, 51. 52, 53

■Geological data 53. 54- 55, 56. elc.



CHAPTER IV.

Natural Scenery in Dubois County.

An ideal spot for the artist, the poet, the scientist, and the novelist 63

Buffalo trace and Buckingham's base line 63

Southern railroad ; unfair to judge county from car window 63

Totem rocks and Saltpeter cave with Indian relics 64

Raven rocks near the line between Columbia and Hall townships ; size and

color, nests of ravens 65

Raven rock near the line between Dubois and Martin counties; discovered in

1804 66

Description of Wild Cat rock 67

Blue Bird rock 68

Han ging rock 68

Piankishaw rock 69

Indian Kitchen rock in Hall township 69

Indian relics and mortars 69

■Cliffs in their winter beauty 70



The Barren. . .
Buffalo Trace



WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY. n

CHAPTER V.

Dubois County as a Primeyal Forest.

PAGE.

71

. . , 71

•Gigantic iceberg _ ^

Three peculiar discoveries _2

Cooper hill -2

Patoka Lake Plain -,

Yalue of county's original timber -2

Topography of county _2

Natural forest trees 79 7-

Tulip poplar -,,

Thick, dark forests. -,

Forest undergrowth -^

Swamp land in Madison township -j^

■Corduroy roads -^

Forests of Dubois count)- one hundred years ago j4

List of indigenous trees . 74, 75

Milk sickness; cause 76

A day of public prayer -6

List of smaller varieties of vegetation 76, 77

Effect on climate of the removal of vegetation ; on health 77

Abraham Lincoln

Daniel Boone



/'



CHAPTER VI.

Early Bird and Axi.^ial Life ix Dubois County.

Forest birds 79

Water birds 79

Eagles 79

Swans 80

Ducks 80

Woodpeckers 80

Turkeys 80

Ravens 80

Paraquets 80

Pigeon roosts at Huntingburg; at St. Henry 81

Bee hunting 82

Honey 82

Bee habits 82, 83

■Survival of the fittest ^i

Deer 83

Deer paths ^3

Black bears ^3

Wolves ^4

Wild hogs ^4

First entry on existing official records 84

Other entries 84, 85

Native products °5

Fox hunting ''^



12



WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY,



Pioneer liunters

Indian burials . . .
Piankisliavv Indians.



PAGE.

86
87
87



88
88
88



CHAPTER Vll.

Indian Titles and Original Surveys.

CO

Piankishaw

Patoka

Chipkavvkay

Vincennes tract

Indians and French at Vincennes 89

Wabash Land company 89

William Rector's base line. . . 9^

Government surveys 9^

Buckingham's base line 9^

Second principal meridian.. 92

Initial point 9^

Rectangular system 93

Printed instructions given the government deputy surveyors 93

Government's knowledge of Dubois county land 94

Surveyors 94

Flagmen 95

Surveyor's compass 95

Blazed tree 95

Surveyor's blaze 9^

Congressional townships 96

Area of Dubois county 97

Donations 98

Three flags in Dubois county , 98

CHAPTER VIll.

Epitome on Pioneers and their Ethnography in
Dubois County.

Life in Dubois county 99

Water, the great highway upon which pioneers traveled 99

Creeks bear the names of early settlers 99

Blazing a path through the forest 99

The Buffalo trace and its importance as an overland route 100

Buffalo Pond 100

The first paper in Indiana loi

Corduroy roads, forts and taverns ... loi

Buckingham's base line loi

The settlers in the north half of Dubois county loi

In the south half of Dubois county loi

Neglected graveyards loi , 102

Religious history of Harbison township 103

Piankishaw Indian villages : 103

Isolation of Dubois county 103

Wedding invitations 104

German accent 104



WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY. 13

CHAPTER IX.

The Pioneers of Dubois County. Their Homes, Social
Life, Labors, Characteristics and Nativity.

PAOE.

Building sites 105

I louse raising 105

Dinner at house raising time 105

Puncheons 106

Clapboards 106

Divorces 106

Neighborly calls 107

Spinning 107

Industry of pioneer women 107

Homespun clothing 107

Stick chimneys 108

The sugar camp loS

Spelling matches 108

Block houses 108

Fort McDonald, Fort Farris, Fort Butler loS

Oldest map of Dubois county 109

The character of the pioneer of the Irish settlement 109

Courts 109

Judges 109

Hon. Wm. E. Niblack no

The pioneer doctor no

Pioneer doctors at Jasper, Huntingburg, Ferdinand, Holland, Haysville, in

Madison township I lo-i 1 1

Fear of Indians before War of 1812 in

Friendship . . i n

The first adopted Red Man in Dubois county 112

Pioneer merchants 112

Court house at Jasper destroyed by fire 112

Territorial penal laws 1 1 2-1 1 3

Negroes 113

The first newspaper in Dubois count}' 114

Fires destroy valuable papers. 114

The six townships and population of each nS

Exports of county. n 5

Our pioneers came from Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia,

Tennessee, Maryland, Georgia, Ohio and Pennsylvania 115-116



CHAPTER X.

Pioneer Life, Pastimes and Sports.

Christmas festivity n?

New Year n7

The first Thanksgiving Day proclamation n 7

Independence Day 117

The spirit of 1776 117

Revolutionary pensioners n 8

Indian wars nS



14 WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

PAGE

Observance of the Fourth at Jasper i ■ 8

Program of the day ^ ' 9

Father Kundeck's guards ii9

Vigo, the fire engine ' ^9

Natal Day celebrations by the German settlers 1 19

Log rollings 120

Quilting bees ; names of patch work 120

Corn husking 120

Dancing >20

Early fiddlers and some of their selections 120-121

Character of the pioneer fiddler 121

Games. 122

Shooting matches ' 22

Drill days for the local militia J 22

Militia laws 122

Militia officers 122-123

Election day at Jasper 123

Fights 323

The pioneer politician 1 23

County clerk and recorder 1 24

Goodlet Morgan's letter 124-125

Jonathan Walker 125

Two-wheeled vehicles 125

First white boy born in Dubois county — Allen McDonald 126



CHAPTER XI.

Pioneer Ways and Customs. Incidents of
Pioneer Days.

Character of the local pioneer 127

The dress of the pioneer hunter 128

Charms 128

Cooking 12S

Light 128

The mansion house 1 29

Wedding costumes of 1 840 129

Wedding feasts 129

Coffins 129

Extract from a German book 129

Friedman 1 29

Horse-back riding 1 30

Mills 130

Brick houses 130

Frame houses 1 30

Beds 131

Extract from Morgan's letter; schools, pupils, mail, Irish settlement, popula-
tion, lawyers, physicians, various occupations, religious denominations, flat

boats, log court house at Jasper, whiskey 131, 132, 133

Apprentices 133

Character of the pioneer blacksmith 133-134

Products of the blacksmith 1 34



WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY. 15



PAGR.



Charcoal burning 134

Pioneer blacksmiths in Dubois county 135

Pioneer daj^s at Huntingburg 135-143

CHAPTER Xll.

Pioneer Highways and Means of Transportation.

Natural land marks as guides to travelers 144.

Buffalo trace 1 44

Ox teams 145

Caleche 145

State roads 145

Old Troy road 145

Taverns . . . .' 145, 146

Mail routes 146

Revenue for State roads 146

Road tax 146

Ferries 147

Patoka river, a highway 148

Navigation in Dubois county 148

White river 148

Flat boats 149

Products carried on flat boats ] 49

Trips made 149

Stories told by flat boat men.. 150

Difficulty of travel 150

Early citizens of Dubois county who owned flat boats 151

Flat boat pilots 151

Dangerous points in the Mississippi river ;' 15 r, 152

Steamboats .' 152

Jokes 152

Pork 153

Indentured servants 153

CHAPTER XIII.

When, Why, and How Jasper Became the County

Town. Complete LIvST of Real EvSTate

Owners Up to December 31, 1830.

Removal of the county seat from Portersville to Jasper 154

Copy of the Act appointing commissioners to re-locate the seat of justice in Du-
bois county 154

Supplement to said act 157

Population of Portersville in 1830 15S

Jacob Drinkhouse, the pioneer hatter I59

Reasons why Jasper was made the county town i59

The original town of Jasper 159, 160

Court house fire 160

Survey made of the county seat 160

The Enlows 161



i6 WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

PAGE.

Why the name "Jasper" was chosen i6i

Writing sand i6i

Erection of the first house in Jasper i6r

Mrs. Nancy Weathers i6i

Record of Testitnony 162

Court held at the house of James H . Condict 162

At the Cumberland Presbyterian Church 163

First two story brick residence in Dubois county 163

Real estate owners in Dubois county up to 1S31 163

B. B. Edmonston, Sr. and Benj. R. Edmonston 167, 16S

Esquire Henry Bradley's account of early days at Jasper 169



CHAPTER XIV.

Educational Work in Dubois County.

The early schools, teachers and pupils 170

Early books, methods and educational opportunities 171

Rev. A. J. Strain and other school officials 173

Old licenses 177

Township libraries 179

Legislative enactments . 180

Graduates 1S4

Prominent teachers 1S4

Education in general 185

Parochial schools 185

Jasper College 185

Ferdinand Academy ; 187

Hon. A. M. Sweeney 191



CHAPTER XV.

Very Rev. Joseph Kundeck, Vicar-General of Vin-
cENNEs, Missionary to Dubois County.

General appearance of Father Kundeck ; birth, education, missionary work in

America; received by Dr. Brute, of Vincennes ; sent to Jasper 197

St. Joseph's Hall 199

First German Catholic church in the State of Louisiana 200

Ferdinand; deed for the town of Ferdinand; engraved map 200

Celestine 20 1

Court house at Jasper; petition; price paid for labor 203

Board of school examiners 204

Sisters of Providence 204

Visit to Europe; result 205

St. Meinrad 205

Death of Rev. Kundeck ; burial 206

Loss to the community 206



WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY. 17

CHAPTER XVI.

Church History of Dubois County.

PAGE.

Early church services 207

Early ministers 208

Earl}' church houses 209

The Rev. A. J. Strain 210

List of early ministers of various denominations 210

The Rev. John Strange 210

The Rev. AVilson Thompson 210

Earh- church deeds 211

Impressive language used in church donations 212

William Clark Kendall on pioneer daj'S 213

Kundeck, Strain, Shively, Goodman, Nix, etc., leaders of their church creeds. . 214

The Baily church house 216

Origin of the Reformed Methodist church 218

The Rt. Rev. August Bessonies, V. G 219

St. Joseph's Cross at Jasper 220

Early Catholic services 220

The Sheritt graveyard 221

Moral, religious and educational forces of pioneer ministers 222

Detailed history of various churches in Dubois county arranged by townships —

Columbia 222

Harbison 224

Boone 225

Madison 227

Bainbridge 230

Marion 236

Hall 237

Jefferson 239

Jackson.. 240

Patoka 241

Cass 247

Ferdinand 253



CHAPTER XVII.

Dubois County— Her Courts, Officials and Quasi-
Officials for One Hundred Years.

County court organized 255

Early county officials 255

Early court scenes .... 255

Jury spring 255

Early president judges 256

Fines remitted . . 256

Early prosecutors 256

Early law terms 256

Mill dams 256

Common law forms 256

Adoption of the code ^S"



i8 WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

PAGE.

Pioneer officers' salaries 257

President judges, side judges, squires 257

Court attractions 257

L/ist of early lawyers 257

Biographies of early judges 258

Names of judges 260

Probate courts 261

Common pleas court 261

List of prosecutors in the court of common pleas 261

Walker murder trial 262

Death of Sheriff Woolridge 262

Weaver and Thurman trials 262

A death penalty verdict 262

Death of deputy sheriffs ; the Reeves case 262

White Caps 263

Judge Welborn 263

List of prosecutors 263

List of attorneys 263

County officials 264

John McDonald, a justice 265

Early elections 265

Republican county officials 265

Voting power of the county in 1849 266

Associate j udges 266

Probate judges 266

Notaries public 267

Swamp land officials, 267

Sheriffs 267

Clerks ... 268

Recorders 269

Coroners 270

Overseers 271

Surveyors 271

Treasurers 272

Auditors 273

Councilmen 274

Justices 274

Commissioners 278

School officials 278-280

Appraisers 278

Assessors 278

County Board of Health 279

Judges 279

Superintendents 280

Truant officials 280

State Senators 280

Representatives 281

State officials 283

Congressmen 283

Elections 284

Leading Democrats of 1850 284

Voting power of the county 284



WIIvSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY. 19

CHAPTER XVIII.

The Military History of Dubois County.

, ,. PACE.

Revolutionary soldiers 287

Early guides and rangers. 287

Military roads 288

A fight with the Indians 2S9

The militia of Dubois county under Indiana's first constitution 289

The pioneers' " Forty-third regiment" 291



Mexican War record .



294

Civil War record 295

Home guards 296

Names of soldiers 297-302

Original six townships 297

Flag of the Twenty-seventh 309

Medals for Lieut. W. W. Kendall 320

Sword for Brig. Gen. Mehringer 3 ;o

High Rock 337

Bounties 338

Relief 338

Loyal Legion 33S

Spanish War 340

The monument 342

CHAPTER XIX.

Detailed Town and Township History of
Dubois County.

Columbia township 346

Hillham 347

Crystal 347

Cuzco 347

Harbison township 348

Thales 349

Kellerville 349

Haysville 349

Dubois 349

Boone township 35^

Portersville 353

Wm. B. Sherritt 354

Madison township 354

Millersport 354

Ireland 355

Bainbridge township 35^

Jasper 356

Maltersville 359

Marion township 359

Hall township. 360

Celestine 360

Ellsworth 36 1



20 WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

PAGE.

JeflFerson township 361

Birdseye 361

Schnellville 362

Mentor 363

Jackson township 363

St. Anthonj' 363

Bretzville 364

Kyana 364

St. Marks 364

Patoka township. 364

Huntingburg 365

Duff 367

Cass township 368

Zoar 368

Johnsburg 368

St. Henry 369

Holland 369

Ferdinand township 370

Ferdinand 371



CHAPTER XX.

Dubois County. Its Modern, Political, Social, Fraternal, and

Commercial Life.

Its growth into civil and political sub-divisions 372

Public buildings ; past and present 373

The New Court House 373

Public and quasi-public institutions or associations 374

County Fair 376

County Medical society 376

Mortuary statistics 377

List of physicians 377

Farmers' Institute 378

Teachers' Institute 379

List of postmasters 379

Newspapers, past and present 379

Courier 380

Signal. ... . . . , 380

Argus 381

Independent 381

Herald 382

News 382

Banks, state and national 382

Secret, benevolent, fraternal, and social orders 385

G. A. R 385

W. R. C 387

0. E. S 389

F. O. F 387

1. O. R. M 3S8

A. S. E 388

F. & A. M 389



WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY. 21

PAGE.

Secret, benevolent, fraternal, and social orders — continued:

I. O. O. F 389

Rebekahs 390

C. K. of A 391

Y. M. 1 391

R. & A. M 392

K. of P., etc 387

Twentieth century club 392

Music, band 392

Transportation 394

Resources 394

Occupations 395

Characteristics 395

CHAPTER XXI.

Military and Civil History of Captain Dubois.

PART I.

Toussaint Dubois, a native of France, disinherited by father 396

Went to Lower Canada 397

Came to Indiana Territory 397

Became an expert at fur trading 397

Gen. William Henry Harrison gave Dubois the rank of Captain in the Tip-
pecanoe campaign 39^

Tecumseh and his brother, the Prophet 39^

The Prophet's Town 399

Indians commit depredations 4°°

Extract from Dillon's History of Indiana 399> 4oo

Extract from Beard's Battle of Tippecanoe 399

Annuity salt 399

Dubois and the Prophet 4°°

Mr. Barron and the Prophet 4°°

Gen. Harrison's army at Vincennes 4°°

Roll of Capt. Dubois' company of spies and guides 40i

The march, the camp, the desire of Gen. Harrison to prevent hostilities 401

The battle 4oi

Absence of Tecumseh 402

Burial of dead 402, 403

Result of battle 403

Tippecanoe battlefield 403

Dubois county named in honor of Capt. Touissant Dubois 403

Counties named in honor of faithful soldiers of Tippecanoe campaign 404

Indian names 4^4

PART II.

Religion, occupation and property of Capt. Dubois 405

Citizens of Vincennes 405

Member of board of trustees of Vincennes University 4^5

Use of lottery 4o6

Copy of patent issued to Toussaint Dubois by Thomas Jefferson 406



22 WILSON'S HISTORY OF DUBOIS COUNTY.

PAGE.

First marriage of Dubois 407

Death and burial of first wife; her grave. 407

E.'ctract from English's Conquest of Northwest Territory 408

Children of Mrs. Dubois 40S

Second marriage of Dubois 408

Three sons 408

Senator Fred. T. Dabois, of Idaho 408

Estate of Jesse K. Dubois, near Springfield, 111 40S

Oil painting of Dubois 409

Silverware 409

Mrs. Ophelia Dubois McCarthy 409

Children and grandchildren of Capt. Dubois 409

Last will and testament 410

Provisions made for wife, children and slaves 410

Arpent 411

Signature 41 1

Bond of Mrs. Dubois 411

Tragic death of Capt. Dubois 412'

Extract from the Western Sun 412'

No record of burial 412

Dubois county, his monument 412

FINALE.



LIST OF ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE
ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE.

Alles, Capt. John J 322

Atkiuson, James H 355

Brademeyer, John S 33.>

Berger, Henry 33^

Bridge over Patoka river 151^

*Baily Church m Hall Township 217

='-Beatty Log schoolhouses 178

Block, John SUj

Bretz, Hon. John L -jgl, 279

Buchlein, John B 35y

Cabin in the Clearing 92

Calumet Lake (Courtesy Jasper Herald) 358

Comingore, Henry 114

Convent of the Immaculate Conception 188

Cooper, Rev. George C 175

Corn. George P 340

County Poor Asylum 376

Court Houses

*Portersville, 1S18 25, 373

*Jasper, 1830 161

Jasper, 187 b— 1909 202

Jasper, 1910 374

Cox, Hon. William E 283

Cox, Rev. Sampson 215

Dall, Henry 370

Deinderfer, J. M 273

I'epotat Jasper {CouTtesy Jasper Herald) 357

Di)ane, Clement (Courtesy Jasper Courier) 380

Dubois, Capt. Toussaint •■'20, 390

•'Will of 410

'■'Signature of 411

Dubois. Mrs. T.

*Graveof 407

*Early Means of Transportation 147

Eckert's Mill 102

Edmonston, Hon. Benj. R 168

'•'Signature of 168

Edmonston, Col. B. B 266, 292

Edmonston, Mrs. Col. B. B 38

El v, Judge E. A 279

Erny, William 356

Fisher, Ben 363

Flag of (Jo. "K," 27th Regiment 309

*Plag of Co. "K," after Antletam 309

Fisher, Capt. Morman 332

'■Port McDonald J08

Friedman Pioneer Home (Courtesy Jasper Herald) 130



Online LibraryGeorge R. WilsonHistory of Dubois County from its primitive days to 1910 → online text (page 1 of 42)