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MUNICIPAL BUI CO



OF SPRINrGF^TEUP



WHERE SPRINGFIELD'S HISTORY CENTERS.




COLOXIAL FIRST CHURCH FACING CULUT SyUAKE.

A portion of the foreground of SPRINGFIELD'S NEW MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS AND CAMPANILE.

Tfie history of Springfield centers around the First Church, this society being formed in 1037, one year after
the town's settlement. The present building was erected in 1819, when Court Square was laid out as a public park,
and is the successor of three others, the first being erected in 1645.



©Ci.A3 4 5;



01



progressive ^prtngftelD

A picture conducted tour of sixty views showing the leading features that make this

City of Homes attractive for business, residence and pleasure.

GEORGE S. GRAVES, Publisher

21 Besse Place, Springfield, Massachusetts

Graves.



Copyright 1913, by George S
All rights reserved.



FIFTEEN CENTS A COPY.



THE METROPOLIS OF WESTERN NEW ENGLAND

ON THE BEAUTIFUL CONNECTICUT RIVER.

GROWING EVERi' DAi' IMPROVING ALL THE TIME

A CLEAN, PROGRESSIVE. THRIFTV CITV" OF 100,000 PEOPLE. THE TRADING CENTER FOR
300,000 PEOPLE. STEAM AND ELECTRIC ROADS RADIATE IN ALL DIRECTIONS.

THE UNITED STATES ARMORY ESTABLISHED HERE 118 YEARS AGO GAVE SPRINGFIELD
THE IMPETUS FOR ITS PRESENT MARVELOUS GROWTH, AND THE SPRINGFIELD RIFLE HAS
MADE ITS FAME WORLD-WIDE.

THE THINGS THAT COUNT FOR SPRINGFIELD



A HEALTHY PUBLIC SPIRIT and
CIVIC PATRIOTISM.

AN EFFICIENT CITY GOVERNMENT which
aims to keep abreast with the best of modern mimici-
pa! practices.

ITS CLASSIC PUBLIC BUILDINGS elevate the
standard of architecture; teach new and beautiful
ideas.

THE PUREST FILTRATED WATER supplied
from the Berkshire Hills.

ITS FIRE DEPARTMENT LEADS every Ameri-
can city in use of motor equipment.

1.50 MILES OF TREE LINED STREETS
finished like a state road. A RIVER FRONT of .5
Miles.

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS covering 600
acres valued at 3 Million Dollars.

A MODEL STREET RAILWAY Si'STEM of 137
miles which radiates through an unrivalled picturesque
region.

SPRINGFIELD PRODUCTS valued at 40 million
dollars are yearly sold from' its 330 factories, employ-
ing 15 thousand skilled mechanics.

THE TAX R.ATE for 1912 was .S15..50 per .Sl.OOO.
Of 18 leading cities in New England, only two have a
lower rate of .S15.00

AT THE FRONT IN EDUCATION AND ART.

ITS NEW CITV LIBRARY, built at a cost of
355 Thousand Dollars, has a capacity for 500 thousand
books, free for all to use.

ITS ART MUSEUM is celebrated throughout the
world.

THE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL teaches the
useful trades.

THE COMMERCIAL HIGH SCHOOL gives our
youth a business training.

THE KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL SVSTEM
originated here.



A THRIFTY CITY
RAPIDLY BECOMING WEALTHY.

ITS GENERAL ATAIOSPHERE INDICATES
THRIFT.

ITS BUSINESS AMOUNTS TO A MILLION
DOLLARS A DAl'.

ITS SAVINGS BANKS hold 3-1 :VIillion Dollars
for 85 thousand depositors.

ITS NATIONAL BANKS and Trust Companies
hold 26 Million Dollars for 40 thousand depositors
and have abundant resources for the promotion of
any legitimate business.

1.-.2 MILLION DOLLARS was Springfield's assessed
\ .iluiii loll III 1912. This is an increase of 54 million
<ImII:ii. Ill I Ncars, 75 million dollars in 10 years, 100
iiiilliMii il.>ll:irs in 20 years.

NO OTHER EASTERN CITY SHOWS
SUCH A GAIN.

SPRINGFIELD'S VALUATION PER CAPITA
of $1,500 compares favorably with the finest cities
of New England.

HARTFORD, our nearest neighbor, with 110,000
population, is generally supposed to be a wealthier
city, but its per capita valuation is only 909 Dollars.

WORCESTER, with 160 thou.sand population,
shows 955 Dollars valuation per capita.

PROVIDENCE, with 230 thousand population,
shows 1095 Dollars valuation per capita.

THE CITY FOR CONVENTIONS.

OUR M.\GNIFICENT AUDITORIUM is now
open. Seating 4,500 people and witli 22,000 square
feet of exhibition room, it offers convention facilities
superior to any New England city outside of Boston.

OUR NUMEROUS RAILROADS AND FINE
HOTELS offer abundant and good accommodations
for thousands.

THE TWELVE THE.ATRES and amusement
places are of a high class. Its big stores are the equal
of those of larger cities.



The "GARDEN SPOT OF THE EAST," where life's worth living.




„^,VrEW T<;) BrSV main street from municipal group this is THP ST4Rtimp
POINT FOR ELECTRIC CARS GOING TO MOST POINTS IN GREATER SPRINGFreS







ADMINISTRATION BUILDING OF THE CLASSIC MUNICIPAL GROUP.

tere7KrSj5hl,it'l,>.l°'S^°'^ir^'^"°*'l-'' ^'^} ^u°"''vi'^- business departments of the city which have been scat-
lerea m various buildings since the destruction of the old City Hall in 1905.




Gil. -MOKE'S COURT SCjUARE THEATRE FACING COIRT SQUARE AXD MUNICIPAL GROUP.
Thi.s is not only the city's largest theatre, accommodating an audience of 2000, but is the largest busine.ss block,
and its owner, Mr. Dwight O. Gilmore, is Springfield's largest taxpayer. This block extends to State Street, which
side is occupied by COURT SQUARE HOTEL.




WEST STATE STREET LOOKING TO NAYASSET CLUB, ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANY
AND MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
At the left is COURT SQUARE HOTEL.



THE EVOLUTION OF 277 YEARS.



FOUNDER OF SPRINGFIELD.



FIRST CIVIC CENTER.




WILLIAM PVN-
CHON, Founder of
Springfield, Massachu-
setts, 1636. The only
citizen of the first cen-
tury the likeness of
whose face is known.
He was the leading man
in the town until 1651,
when he returned to
England. A memorial
t(^ William Pvnchon has
been placed in tlte High
School hnll.




IN 164.5 this little
meetinghouse of the
First Church Society
was erected, and being
used for town purposes,
was really the civic
center. It cost $400.

FROM THE SIX-
TEEN FOUNDERS of
this Church have come
thousands of descend-
ants, through each line
of which runs THE
DISTINCTIV E
MIND and heart that
was THE MAKING
OF SPRINGFIELD.



Here's to the town that Pynchon founded;
Could he know
How we've grown
Wouldn't he be astoun le 1!







OLD CIT\ H\LL.

SPRINGFIELD S FIRST TOWN H\LL was opened in 1828 and still
st inds at the corner of State and Market Streets In 1855 the City Hall was

)p( n( d iiid It til it I t II ) 1 w IS thf most important structure ever erected in
\\ t 111 M liii It It t Mdoodil the clock tower was 130 feet high

III I I I I I II I tu I I H 1^1 I III) people could be seated in the hall.

DuMii^ 1 I I II 111 1 III nil I I \ II inonke\ saw fit to upset a lamp —

I ult 1 MIIUUIH) lilt tud ^pIIn^h 1 1 uunus a cit\ hall.

Now on the old site Court Street thf nev\ $2 000,000 municipal build-
ings are erected that will make Springfield famous.

rh buildings rank in architecturil circlfs with the classic buildings of

I I ill ind are t^ pical of PROGRESSIVE SPRINGFIELD. With
liHMKHi I ] le li\ing here and a triding population of 300,000, the city is

\Mi _ u \er before — no mushroom growth but substantial and enduring.

III 111 I istorv of all large cities that the\ never go back after once gaining
till position Springfield his attained Its citizens can "look backward" with
I ri le but SPRINGFIEID WILL NEVER GO BACKWARD.



Old Ciiy Hall



SPRINGFIELD'S NEW MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS AND CAMPANILE.

Estimated cost of this classic group is .|2,()()0,0()U— AND WORTH IT.
Pell & Corbett, Architects; A E. Stephens Co., Builders.

Width of Municipal Building and Auditorium, each 115 feet. Depth, 175 feet. Corinthian
columns 41 feet high. Height to apex of pediments 75 feet. Campanile, 300 feet high.
Materials, Indiana limestone, brick, steel and concrete.

The AUDITORIUM on the left, which was opened February 18, 1913, has a seating
capacity of 4, .500, and 22,000 square feet of floor space for exhibition purposes.

The ADMINISTRATION BUILDING on the right will house the business departments
of the city, which have been scattered in various buildings since the destruction of the old City
Hall in 1905.

THE UNIQUE FEATURE of the group is the CAMPANILE reaching skyward ,300 feet
and of which any city might justly be proud. Elevators will carry visitors to the landings,
from which grand views can be enjoyed of the unequalled Connecticut Valley. On the 200
foot level, a clock is to be installed with illuminated hands, and a set ofchimes in the tower
will radiate sweet music throughout PICTUREvSQUE SPRINGFIELD. At the apex, an im-
mense glass globe is placed, inside of which powerful electric lamps will throw their rays of
light for miles around to remind all that "SPRINGFIELD is on the map."

COME TO SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS, THE CITY OF PROGRESS AND
"SEE SOMETHING WORTH WHILE."



THE MAGNIFICENT CITY AUDITORIUM NOW OPEN.



In its CLASSIC AUDITCJlUrM Springfield has
one of the finest places of assemblage in the world.

TEN GREAT FLUTED LIMESTONE PILLARS
line the front, giving the building a majestic appearance.
SEVEN ENTRANCES lead to the lobby, each
entrance guarded by two sets of doors, the outer set
being of bronze, the inner set of oak. From them one
steps into the main lobby with its marble floor.

From the lobby you enter the main floor of the
auditorium through anv of five double doors. These
doors are FIRE AND PANIC PROOF, swinging
inward and outward. The auditorium floor is of hard
maple and 16 pillars around the sides support the
balcony.

FROM THE BALCONY, reached by four sets of
stairs, one gets a full impression of THE BEAUTY
AND MAJESTY OF THE GREAT AUDITORIUM
with its seating capacity of 4500 people. The color
scheme is French grey and gold. The balcony seats
are of brown plush, gold window hangings and brown
velvet carpets.

THE GOLDEN CEILING has a wide Grecian
frieze, above which are classic faces and Grecian l.\-res.



electroliers furnish the light, and
fans insure perfect circulation of
are provided for the main floor.



THE MAHOGANY AND GOLD SALON

on the balcony floor is the GEM OF THE WHOLE
GROUP. The walls are solid African mahogany and
the ceiling is all gold. The fluted mahogany pillars
and square and oblong panels are wonderf\illy put
together, not a nail being used. Each piece is held
together by wooden pins, all the work being done by
the highest class cabinet workers from New York.
The ceiling is a mass of gold elaborately decorated and
relieved with narrow strips of blue." NO PUBLIC
BUILDING IN NEW ENGLAND has a room to
COMPARE WITH THIS IN MAGNIFICENCE.

THE BIG EXHIBITION HALL, with 22,000
square feet of floor space, is large enough for a ban-
quet of 1,000 persons. It is fully equipped with
kitchens, coat rooms, toilet rooms, etc. Fourteen
flights of stairs lead to the auditorium.



UNSURPASSED AMONG PUBLIC BUILDINGS.



''-2h.




SPRINGFIELD'S NEW MUNICIPAL GROUP AND CAMPANILE.



SPRINGFIELD'S UNEXCELLED LOCATION.




LOOKING FROM MEETING HOUSE HILL, WEST SPRING! li: 1.1 ). \ u\v tn Kivmlalc Hoarl, Gminec-
ticut River, showing college race course and PROGRESSIVE SPRINGFIELD. Its WONDERFUL CAMPANILE,
300 feet high, is easily seen, and in the background the Wilbraham Mountains. This view gives an idea of the scenic
effects to be obtained from "our tower."




41




.MEADOW BLII I
«l]ne 4I),(1()0 ptopk



liiwii the river is River-



WHAT YOU CAN SEE FROM SPRINGFIELD'S CAMPANILE.




PlCTUKK.scn
foreground is the < Ud
tance are the North ]
Hill, with its old Col,



AXl) CONNECTICUT HIVEK as seen from Springfield. In the
li\ the proceeds of a lottery, and B. & A. R. R. Bridge. In the dis-
rciiiiiianding views of the beautiful Connecticut, also Meeting House



Have lived in many,

Liked a few,

Loved only one — Here's to ^-ou, Springfield!




VIEW NORTH TO SPRINGFIELD FROM LONG HILL AT SOUTH END.
THE CONNECTICUT RIVER IS SPRINGFIELD'S MOST ATTRACTIVE PHYSICAL FEATURE.




COURT SQUARE EXTENSION. This is an addition of Court Square adjacent to the Connecticut River,
now being developed. Twenty thousand people came here April 25, 1912, to hear President Taft speak.

In the background is seen the COUNTS COURT HOUSE and HALL OF RECORDS. The INSTITUTION
FOR SAVINGS, at the right, is Springfield's largest savings bank, holding about $20,000,000 for 52,000 people-
more than half the city's total population.




SPRINGFIELD'S RIVER FRONT NEAR THE BUSINESS CENTER.
THIS OLD TOLL BRIDGE, connecting Springfield and West Springfield, was built in ISIG to replace the first
bridge over the Connecticut built in 1.S05. Tolls were collected until 1S72.




COURT SQUARE KXTUXSloN ABUTTING ON THE CONNECTICUT KI\ER AND NEW HAVEN
RAILROAD, WHERE PRESIDENT TAFT ENTERED SPRINGFIELD APRIL 2:,, 1912.
THE EXTENSION IS NOW BEING IMPROVED FOR A PUBLIC PARK.




SPRINGFIELD'S RIVER FRONT NEAR THE CIVIC CENTER AND COURT SyUARE EXTENSION.

THE PROPOSED NEW BRIDGE WILL PROBABLY BE LOCATED IN THIS VICINITY
WHERE IT IS ALSO PLANNED TO HAVE A RIVER FRONT PARK.




I I'-ld-l) Vri-: FLYING SQUADR(J.\ ..f Fire Department Headqii n Im - ni.l its §10,000 MOTOR LADDER
TRUCK, the first of its kind, goes twenty miles an hour and cUmbs any lull m the eity.

Springfield has 24 pieces of motor driven apparatus and was the first city to use motor trucks. Boston has just
woke up on this subject.





^■^ la, «a, ^|,||




NEW HEADQUARTERS STATION of Fire Department, on Court Square Extension.
No citv has a more up-to-date fire department and headquarters station than Springfield. The new station on
Court Street cost $110,000.. Its apparatus is all motor-driven and has modern conveniences for the force. Ihe top
floor houses the new fire alarm system installed at an expense of $30,000. The flying squadron shown above con-
sists of autos for Chief and Assistant Chief, the Electric Aerial Ladder Truck, Combmation Electric Wagon and
Hose and Water Tower with Gasoline Tractor. The city expends about $240,000 a year on this department.




SPHIXGFIELD'S L'XIOX STATION, Lyman Street, where 2(111 trams a aa\- arrive and depart. One (,f the
most cununodious in the country for handUng hirt?e crowds, having over 'JUO feet of phitform room. Its platform
extends nearly to the granite arch over Main Street, which is shown elsewhere.




NEW YORK CENTRAL FREIGHT YARDS, WEST SPRINGFIELD.

They are the MOST IMPORTANT EAST OF BUFFALO. It's a GREAT CLEARING HOUSE for the
immense business of the New York Central lines.

Here are FORTY-ONE MILES OF SIDE TRACKS on which 5400 CARS CAN BE STORED Here also
are two round houses for engines, and the big shops for repairing engines and cars, for all the New England Unes ot
the New York Central system.




MEMORIAL CHURCH AND TRIAXOLP: AT 'I



UK



On the Left Pa
Holvoke, Hartford



;ing Under the Wide-si
nd the Berkshire HiU-



.\l»RTl

y Ehns. th.' Road Le:
he Right, the Road



...111.- \\.-,>l S|
eopee, our w



Here's to it and from it and to it again

What? Springfield! say all the Commercial Men

\i you ever get to it and don't do it.

You may never get to it and do it again.

So: Here's to it.




MAIN STREET LOOKING NORTH FROM CLINTON HALL. This, the business section of Ward One, is
the only business street in the city blessed with a green in its center. May it always remain a green.



■^^^^


^ • - M




-;&i??* ■; ' ;t sue;,,:




^^Hj^^^v ^ H



A SECTION OF THE OFFICE, CLINTON HALL.



To the fairest and the rarest happyland in which we dwell.
Where there's always something doing and the doing is done well!
Where there always is a welcome for the strangers as they pass,
In the dear old home we love so well — Springfield, Mass.




CLINTON HALL AT MAIN AND CLINTON STREETS. One of Springfield's newest hotels, catermg to
commercial and tourist trade, located three blocks from UNION STATION. Trolley cars for all points can be taken
right at the door. There are accommodations for 300 guests. Conducted on the European plan only.




[E LOBBY. COULEE'S HOTEI



To Springfield, —

May her greatness be measured not by mere numbers
But by the character of her citizens and the
Nobility of their achi




MAIN STREET AT COOLEi'S HOTEL AND RAILROAD ARCH. NEXT UNION STATION.
COOLEY'S i.s conducted on both American and European plan, accommodating 400 guests. A three minute
k takes you to the Post Office and the heart of the shopping district.



All lines of trolley cars pass the door.




BUSY ]MAIN STREET, WEST SIDE.
View NORTH from LYMAN BUILDING and THIRD NATIONAL BANK
to Besse-System Building, Haynes Block, Hitchcock Building and Whitney Building.




MAIN STREET, WEST SIDE.

Looking south from the POST OFFICE and CUSTOM HOUSE to the WHITNEY BUILDING and the
HITCHCOCK BUILDING. These two oflBce buildings are among the largest in the city.




COLONIAL DINING ROOM OF HOTEL WORTH i'.

Here's to the city that gave us our birth;

No finer exists on God's blessed earth.
May we dwell in her borders through all of our days

And continue to tell and to sing of her praise.




HOTEL WORTHY, MAIN STREET, L(JI)K1NG UP WoRTHINGTON STREET.
HOTEL WORTHY, catering to commercial travelers and tourists trade, is centrally located opposite Post
OflBce and Custom House in the shopping and theatre district, two blocks from L'nion Station. Trolley cars going
to all points are constantly passing. Conducted on the European plan, and accommodates 500 guests.




BUSY MAIN STREET, EAST SIDE.
View north to Albert Steiger & Co.'s Department Store, FuUer Building, Phoenix Block and Hotel Worthy.
"The Lambs' " Parade passing Third National Bank, May .31, 1912.




MAIN STREET, EAST SIDE.
View from HOTEL WORTHY, at corner Worthington Street, to Masonic Building at State Street, the shopping
district where 300,000 people trade.




LOBBY OF HOTEL KIMBALL.
LOOKING TOWARD BANQUET HALL AND MEZZANINE FLOOR.

Here's to our city with beauty so rare

None other on earth is so peaceful and fair,
May the strong one reach out the weak brother to save

And the banner of love o'er her citizens wave.




an in^Si;wf^S?00^0^00^'^Si?^^.°H°.^ AND CHESTNUT STREETS. The city's newest hotel, representing
who desi^? Quiet amiTS,, nf*"^ ^^'° ^'°'4' ^^'^ ^^^'° ®*'^5*' ■'^'^^^ ^^^ residential section, it caters to thosi
pean plan? luxunou.-, surroundings. There are accommodations for 500 guests. Conducted on the Euro-




a^



m^M.




BUSV MAIX STREET. EAST SIDE.

View south from the Big Store of Meekins, Packard & Wheat. This store employ.s .350 people and has eight
acres of floor space. Its business is not confined to this section, large hotels and public buildings all over the East
having been equipped by this firm.




BUSV MAIN STREET, WEST SIDE.

View south from Lyman Building to Forbes & Wallace's and Nelson-Haynes Hotel.

The crowd in front of the THIRD NATIONAL BANK is patiently waiting to join the Christmas Savings Club
8300 persons joined this club in five davs. One fifth of Springfield's population have accounts in the THIRD
NATIONAL BANK.




BUSY MAIN .STREET, WEST SIDE.

View north from Gilmore's Opera House and Nelson-Haynes Hotel. The Nelson-Haynes, now conducted by
D. H. & E. L. Buckley, is refitted and newly furnished; operated on the European plan, and accommodating three
hundred guests.




BUSY MAIN STREET, EAST SIDE.
View south from Riker-Jaynes Co. to Flint & Brickett, opposite Court _Square.




.MAIN AUSEN \i„ 1 sill I) ^TVTES ARMORY GROUNDS, STATE STREET.
Established for military purposes in 179.'), when this section was mostly a primeval forest. It is now in the
center of the citv— one of its MOST ATTRACTn'E FEATURES and known the world over for the Spnngfield
Rifle, made here." The arsenal built in 1840 is modeled after the East India house in London. Five hundred thousand
rifles can be stored within its walls, and an equal number in other arsenals.




SPRINGFIELD'S NEW CITY LIBRARY, STATE STREET.



Built at a cost of .S3.55,000, it is ideal for usefulness and attractiveness.
1,000 pictures all for the free u.se of the public.



It hou.ses 200,000 books and





THIS STATUE OF "THE PURI-
TAN " is the gift of the late Chester W.
Chapin, founder of the Boston & Albany
Railroad, and in his time, the great
captain of industry of Western Massa-
chusetts. It is erected in honor of
Deacon Samuel Chapin, the ancestor
of a large and important family, whose
name and accomplishments are perpetu-
ated throughout the country.

Deacon Chapin was one of the foun-
ders of Springfield, one of the first
selectmen, a deacon of the First Church,
and with John Pynchon and Elizur
Holyoke, one of the magistrates.

But with all his good works it is noted
that on April 11, 166.5, Deacon Chapin,
being absent from Town Meeting, and
giving no sufficient excuse was fined
sixpence. Such was discipline in
Puritan Days.

This statue is no portrait of any
Chapin, but a composite in the sculp-
tor's mind of the family type. A cast
in the Luxembourg ranks it in France
with the foremost sculptures of the day.



BRONZE STATUE OF "THE PURITAN" by St. Gaudens, located in Merrick Park, State Street.




ART MUSEUM, LIBRA in
^^^^ -"^^i.^ ..j.i.oi|,uiti la laiiieu not only in this country, but throughout European capitals an
It houses the mvaluable art collection of George Walter Vincent Smith, whose life has been devoted to the accumu-
Art°Museum '^''^'' "^ collection of art works from all parts of the world, a considerable part of which are now in the




TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL, ELLIOT STREET.

Where pupils are taught the useful trades. Springfield was one of the first cities to adopt this method of education.




CENTR.\L HIGH SCHOOL, STATE STREET.

SPRINGFIELD'S EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGES have given the City a N.A.TIONAL REPUTATION.
Our TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL for teaching useful trades, and our COMMERCIAL HIGH SCHOOL are
examples of advance in this line. A New Commercial High School is soon to be built on upper State Street to relieve
the crowded condition of the present building.



A poet's dream come true,
Springfield, The Beautiful!



The fairest city beneath the skii
A branch office of Paradise.




:\\ DOWN STATE STREET, FROM CORNER OF BYERS STREf



State Street is the finest example of a picturesque thoroughfare to be seen in Springfield. From the banks of the
Connecticut River it extends the length of the city. In colonial days it was the "Old Bay Path" and stage road to
Beautiful Elms and Maples line its borders for miles.




MAPLE STREET



CUt.SCEM HILL.



Not only on this street, but on the streets leading from it, the maple and elm trees are a feast to the eye. From
Crescent Hill at the upper end of Maple Street, may be had splendid views of the river, city and valley.



IN FOREST PARK. TEN MINUTES' RIDE FROM COURT SQUARE.




THE mi: \



CREST PARK.




UPPER LAKE AND DRIVEWAY, FOREST PARK.

These views are tj^pical of Springfield's wonderful Forest Park, a large portion of which
left in a natural state, with fifteen miles of modern roads and walks which make it accessible



the dense woods




AT SUMNER AVENUE ENTRANCE OF FOREST PARK.

ONE OF THE NUMEROUS TENNIS COURTS,

WHERE A THOUSAND PEOPLE A DAY CAN ENJOY THE GAME.



FOREST PARK is the largest recreation spot and playground in this section. The park
comprises 476 acres of natural forest, picturesque lakes and beautiful ravines. It is valued at
$1,400,000, but it cost Springfield nothing for the land, being presented by public spirited
citizens. It is considered one of the finest natural parks in the country. Kept in prime con-
dition and constantly being improved.




THREE PRETTY ROADWAYS AND WAI.IvS W



WHICH FOREST PARK ABOUNDS.




SICATING POND AT FOREST PARK, where this exhilarating sport can be enjoyed without danger.



The good that is done bv playgrounds cannot be denied. Their place in the community and their value in
molding the character and lives of the future citizens who play ball and run races upon them, is forcefully summed
up in the following verses by Denis F. McCarthy, the Boston poet, which have been frequently used in connection
with appeals for support of the playground movement: —

GIVE THEM A CHANCE TO PLAY.

and dens (glitter and glare



Plenty of room for div

and sin!)

Plenty of room for prison pens, (gather the crimi-
nals in!)
Plenty of room for jails and courts, (willing enough

to pay!)
But never a place for the lads to race; no, never a

place to play!
Plenty of room for shops and stores, (J^Iammon must

have the best!)
Plenty of room for the running sores that rot in the

city's breast!
Plenty of room for the lures that lead the hearts of

our youth astray,
But never a cent on a playground spent; no, never

a place to play!



Plenty of room for schools and halls, plenty of room

for art;
Plenty of room for teas and balls, platform, stage


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