George Thomas Little.

Genealogical and family history of the state of Maine; (Volume 3) online

. (page 128 of 128)
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fillment of the duties of any office, he named
the man whom he thought suitable for the po-
sition, and his judgment was invariably ap-
proved by the electors. He was an enthusiastic
Republican, and a staunch member of the
Baptist church. He married, November ii,
1851, Sarah Jane Curtiss, born April 2"/, 1830,
died December 22, 18 — , daughter of Feleg
and Jeanette (Jordan) Curtiss. Children:
Polly Sprague, Alcott James, John A., and
Washingon Irvine.

(V) John A., third son of Alcott S. and
Sarah J. (Curtiss) Merriman, was born
March 16, 1855, in Harpswell, and was edu-
cated in the common school and academy of
his native town ; also attended the city schools
of Portland one year. Soon after attaining
man's estate he bought out a general store at
Harpswell Center, which he conducted. A
year subsequent to this he pursued a special
course of study at Bowdoin College, and sub-
sequently went to New York, where he was
employed as private secretary by W. II. Par-
sons, who was at that time one of the largest
paper and pulp mill operators in the country.
For about twelve years Mr. Merriman contin-
ued this engagement, and during the greater
part of the time he was manager of the pulp
and paper mill at Saugerties, New York, later
going to Lisbon, Maine. Rising from this
service, he organized with the Jay Paper Com-
pany of that town, which he managed for six
years. At the end of this time he took up
the study of law and was admitted to the
Franklin county bar in 1892, and to practice
in the United States courts in the succeeding
year. He was later admitted to the Andros-
coggin bar. and engaged in practice in that
county, being now located at Livermore. Mr.
Merriman has taken an active part in the po-
litical movements of the county, acting with
the Republican party, by which he was elected
as representative to the last legislature, and
is now ( igo8) its nominee for re-election. He
is interested in several local institutions, and
is active in furthering the interests of the
county and his home state, in every proper



direction. He is a member of Farmington
Lodge, F. and A. M., ind of the local chap-
ter of the same fraternity. He is a Methodist
in religion. Mr. Merriman married, Febru-
ary 23, 1884, Lydia Augusta, daughter of
Jacob Henry and Mary J. (Weber) Merri-
man (q. v.) She was born December 22,
1857, in Harpswell.

(III) Jacob, youngest child of James and
Hannali (Blake) Alerritnan, was born Sep-
tember 20, 1793, in Harpswell, where he died
July 29, 1866. He married Elizabeth Clark,
born in February, 1793, and died July 12,

1883, in Harpswell, daughter of Josiah and
Marian (Rodrick) Clark. Their children
were : Simon, Charles, Hannah, Lydia, Lu-
cinda, Captain Josiah Clark, Jacob Henry
and Mercy Ellen.

(IV) Jacob Henry, fourth son of Jacob and
Elizabeth Clark Merriman, was born Decem-
ber 25, 1832, and died December 25, 1899, in
Harpswell, where he was a farmer and a
blacksmith. He married (first) May 15, 1855,
Mary Jane Weber, born October 18, 1831,
died August 7, 1875, daughter of Phineas and
Lydia A. (Beals) Weber; (second) January
21, 1883, to Matilda Allen, March 9, 1846.
daughter of Elisha Allen. Children of first
wife: Frank, Ernest, Lydia Augusta, Mary
Ellen. Susy E. and Kate D. There was one
daughter of the second wife :

(V) Lydia Augusta, eldest daughter of
Jacob Henrj' and Mary J. (Weber) Merri-
man, was born December 2^, 1837, in Harps-
well. and was there married, February 24,

1884, to John A. Merriman, of Harpswell.
( See Merriman V.)



The first record of which
RUNDLETT we have knowledge of a

person of this name in
.\merica is that of Charles Runlet, who ap-
pears among the early settlers of Exeter, New
Hampshire, in the year 1675. The name has
been variously spelled Runlet, Rundlet, Rand-
let and Rundlett. There is a well settled tra-
dition in the Maine branch of the family that
the Rundletts were French Huguenots who
crossed from Lyons, France, about 1590, and
after a sojourn in the south of England some
thirty-three years landed at Rye, New Hamp-
shire, in 1623. The genealogy of the Rund-
lett family in the archives of the New Eng-
land Historic-Cenealogical Society gives a de-
tailed account of the Massachusetts and New
Hampshire branches of this family. Na-
thaniel Rundlett, grandson of Charles, was



STATE OF MAlNli.



2283



born in Exeter, New Hampshire, about 171 2,
anil settled in Wiscasset (Povvnalboro),
Maine, in 17,^4. lie married Mary Mitchell,
of Falmouth, in 1737, and from this pair arc
descended the I\Iaine branch of the Rundlett
family that has attained to so much distinc-
tion in the slate. I'wo of Nathaniel's sons,
Charles and Nathaniel Jr., became large land
owners and prominent in the affairs of the
town of Wiscasset. They were zealous patri-
ots, and were in attendance at town meetings,
even before the Declaration of Independence,
in support of resolutions which might have
cost them their heads or their liberty had the
cause of the colonists failed of its fulfillment.

Nathaniel Rundlett Jr. served two enlist-
ments in the revolutionary war, and was of
the expedition against "iiragaduc." His
name appears upon the roll of i\Iassachusetts
soldiers at the State House.

With the rise of shipbuilding on the Maine
coast the fortunes of this family are particu-
larly identified and many a famous ship was
launched from its yards. Oakes Rundlett Sr.,
grandson of Nathaniel, settled at Sheepscot-
bridge, and either alone or in company with
others built upwards of eighteen sail of ves-
sel for the foreign trade. lie carried on large
operations in lumber in addition to his ship-
building. He was famous for his open-
handed hospitality, and his large colonial man-
sion was seldom without a guest. The dis-
tinguished men of the state who visited that
section and the representatives of the Mas-
sachusetts general court, whose official duties
took them into Maine, all found gracious wel-
come at this country seat and frequently pro-



longed their stay beyond the demands of their
business.

Of his sons, Warren and Oakes inherited
the ability of their father. Warren graduated
at IBowdoin, and was easily the leader of the
Lincoln county bar, when that county em-
braced, in addition to its present confines, the
counties of Kennebec, Sagadahoc and Knox.
Warren Rundlett was a rare wit. and the
stories of the days when he rode the circuit
still linger in the traditions of court and tav-
ern. Oakes Rundlett Jr. settled in Wiscasset,
married Mary Tuckerof, that jilace, and was
engaged in shipbuilding.

Captain Gustavus Rundlett, the youngest
son, served in the Fourth .Maine Regiment
during the civil war.

Of Oakes Rundlett's daughters, Nancy
married Robert Murtay Jr., Clara married Dr.
John T. Achorn, Abby married Isaac Jack-
son of Plymouth.

Of the ])resent generation of the descend-
ants of Oakes Rundlett, Leonard, son of War-
ren Rundlett, graduated at Bowdoin, and has
been for many years the superintendent of
public works of the city of St. Paul. Isaac
M. Jackson, son of Abby Rundlett Jackson, is
a graduate of Yale, a lawyer, and a resident
of Plymouth. Massachusetts.

Dr. John W. .Achorn and Edgar O. Achorn
Esq., both of P>oston, are sons of Clara Rund-
lett Achorn, elsewhere mentioned in these col-
umns. (See .Achorn.)

Captain Richard Rundlett, of Wiscasset,
son of Oakes Jr.. after retiring from the sea,
sat in the Maine senate, and was collector of
the port.



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Online LibraryGeorge Thomas LittleGenealogical and family history of the state of Maine; (Volume 3) → online text (page 128 of 128)