Georgia Confederate Veterans' Association of Fulton County.

History, Confederate Veterans' Association, of Fulton County, Georgia (Volume 2) online

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QoN FEDERATE V^ TERA1
© © ASSOCIATION. © 1




FULTON COU




THE CONQUERED BANNER.

BT FATHER RYAN.

Furl that Banner, for 'tis weary,
Round its staff 'tis drooping dreary;

Furl it, fold it, it is best;
For there's not a man to wave it,
And there's not a sword to save it,
And there's nut one left to lave it
In the blood which heroes gave it,
And its foes now scorn and brave it —

Furl it, hide it, let it rest.

Take that banner down— 'tis tattered.
Broken is its staff and shattered.
And the valiant hosts are scattered

Over whom it floated high.
Oh ! 'tis hard for us to fold it,
Hard to think there's none to hold it,
Hard that those who once unrolled it

Now must furl it with a sigh.

Fnrl that banner, furl it sadly—
Once ten thousands hailed it gladly,
And ten thousands wildly, madly,

Swore it should forever wave;
Swore that foeman's sword could never
Hearts like theirs entwined dissever,
Till that flag would float forever

O'er their freedom or their grave.

Fnrl it! for the hands that grasped it.
And the hearts that fondly cla-ped it.

Cold and dead are lying low;
And the banner, it is trailing,
While uround it sounds the wailing
Of its people in their woe.

■ugh conquered, they adore it,
eold, dead hands that bore it,
those who fell before it,
who trailed .ml tore it.
deplore it,
I



Fnrl that banner, softly, slowly,
Treat it gently— it is'holy—

For it droops above the dead ;
Touch it not, unfold it never,
Let it droop there, furled forever,

For its people's hopes are dead.
•♦« ■

THE SWORD OF ROBERT LE

BY FATHER STAN.

Forth from its scabbard, pure and bright,

Flashed the sword of Lee!
Far in front of the deadly fight,
High o'er the brave, in the cause of right,
Its stainless sheen, like a beacon-light,

Led us to victory.

Out of its scabbard, where full long,

It slumbered peacefully—
Roused from its rest by the battle song,
Shielding the feeble, smiting the strong.
Guarding the right, and avenging the wrong

Gleamed the sw.ird of Lee!

Forth from its scabbard, high in air,

Beneath Virginia's sky—
And they who saw it gleaming there,
And knew who bore it, knelt to swear.
That where that sword led they would dare

To follow and to die.

Out of its scabbard! Never hand

Waved sword from stain as fr.-e.

Nor purer sword led braver bind,

Nor braver bled for a brighter land.

Nor brighter land had a cause as grand,
Nor cause, a chief like Lee!

Forth from its scabbard! how we prayed

That sword might victor be!
And when our triumph was delayed,
And many a heart grew sore afraid,
We still hoped on, while gleamed the blade
Of noble Robert Lee!

Forth from its scabbardl all in vain!

Forth Hashed the sword of Lee!
'Tte. shrouded now in its sheath again,
■leep of our noble s.ain,

ted, yet without a stain,

Pioudly and peacefully.



R



RESTAUEANT AND LUNCH COUNTER.

K. REDUS & CO., No. 9 East Alabama Street.

QUICK AND SATISFACTORY SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO.



"Our Cooks and Waiters are the best in Atlanta, besides we give
personal attention to all the details of our business. A call is all we
ask. Don't forget the place.

Joseph F. Kempton. Malcolm Cunningham.

KEMPTON & CUNNINGHAM,

REAL ESTATE AGENTS,
No. 6 EAST ALABAMA STBEET.

^oS-Office Union Building and Loan Association.

J. F. KEMPTON. Secretary.



JNO. A. F1TTEN.



h^= — ^— —

THOS. M. CLARKE & CO.

"TTTIIOLESALE HARDWARE, GULLETT S MAGNOLIA GINS,
VV OLIVER CHILLED PLOWS, HOWE SCALES,

RAILROAD SUPPLIES, ETC.

CORNEK EDGEWOOD AVENUE AND PeACHTREE Sts. ATLANTA, Ga.




f(euj Improved

Pi




Writing •Maeljigc



THE TYPE-WRITER OF THE AGE.



rpVERY ONE WARRANTED. OVER 40,000 IN DAILY USE.

JJj "IT STANDS AT THE HEAD."

Whenever you receive a proposition for a Typewriter, kindly bear in

fcnind that the "Caligraph" is the best all-round machine, for the

kfollowinir reasons:



SHORTEST STROKE.

Su\ ing iime and labor.

MOST Dl RABLE.

Only machine goat nteed two years,

STEEL Tl 1'E.
No rubber bands or type to rive oat.
NO UPPER-CASE "SHIFT. '
Hard to make two motions as easily as one.
If no local agent in your town, ai



HIGHEST SPEED.
Always ready to prove it in a fair test.
LIGHTEST RUNNING.
Xo paralysis for our champions.
BEST MANIFOLDING.
Toronto, August 13th, 30 per rent, ahead.
LEAST Noise.
One reason telegraph operators prefer it.
JASILY LEARNED— $85.00, popular price.

TORBETT & McCANDLESS, General Agents Georgia and Alabama.

No. 22 Kimball House, Decatur Street, Atlanta, Ga.



Henry P. Scales Tobacco Co.

WHOLESALE
TOBACCO,
CIGARS

and SNUFF.

Authorized Capital $200,000.

Paid in Capital $50,000.

26 Peachtree St.



W. T. MOYERS,



T AWYER_

48 S. Pryor Street.

P. O. Box 3.



A. S. ROBBINS. J- W " ROBBINS -

ROBBINS BROS.

Marble,
GRANIT ^ ND LIMESTONE.
GRANITE FOR gU^^AND CEMETERY

Office and Works, 50 Loyd St.



W. L. REEDER,

manufacturer of homemade

SADDLES and HARNESS,
33 S. Broad Street.



W. C. BOGGAN,

GATE CITY NATIONAL BANK
SAMPLE ROOM.

FINE LIQUORS, WINES,
and CIGARS,

Corner Pryor and Alabama Sts.



1 '.a n k of The State of Georgia.

/CAPITAL, $100,000.

(J SURPLUS, $200,000.

Purchase-Money Notes a Specialty.

Interest Paid on Time Deposits.

17 Loyd Stref.t.



E B1 UJLISHED 1861 lv 0RF0KATED 1887.
rpliK I.uWKY I'.ANKING COMPANY,

A 1 1 ASIA, 0a.

Successors to W. M. ..Y R. J. Lowry, Bankers.

Capital paid in - - $300,000
Surplus • - • • $30,000

mmenced under Stat e Charti t May l, IE

s. T. GRADY'S

1) All.Ki >AD ll« >USE,
^ 63 Alabama Strri r.

FOREIGN ami DOMESTIC

Wines, Ales, Liquors, Cigars,
( Ihampagne ( Jider, Etc.

< )■ Geni .i Qln f"i the Kidneys,



H. C. GRUBB,

-TTTHOLESALE AND RETAIL

BOOKSELLER

AND

STATIONER,

38 S. Broad St. next to Alabama St.

PICTURE FRAMES

■A /TADE TO ORDER

AT THORNTONS,

28 Whitehall St., Atlanta, Ga.

BOOKS AND "STATIONERY.

T. B. Neai., President. Mrs. John Keely, V. P.
E. H. Thornton, Cashier.

N"EAL
LOAN and BANKING CO.

34 S. Broad Street.



BOSCHE & DUGGAN,

gIGN ^p A i N TERS.

GLASS SIGNS A SPECIALTY.

50 South Broad Street.




John Conway, London, Ohio—" I was wounded in the leg at the battle of Stone
River, December 31st 1862. My blood was poisoned from the effects of the wound,
and the leg swelled to double its natural size, and remained so for many years.
The poison extended to my whole system, and I suffered a thousand deaths
Nothing did me any good till I took Swift's Specific, w



of my blood, and enabled me to feel myself a man again,
for blood poison."



hich took the poison out
S. S. S. is the only remedy



G. W. Welch, Mobile, Ala.— I have been using Swift's Specific (S. S. S.) for
blood diseases, and in every instance with the best results. About twenty five
years ago I had my leg hurt in an accident, and the wound never entirely healed.
1 tried various remedies without success. I was finally induced to try 8. S. S. The
medicine healed it up — healed it after twenty-five years of suffering had been
endured, and much money had been thrown away in the purchase of worthless
medicines.

8ES"Treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mailed free.
Copyrighted by S. S. S. Co. THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., Atlanta, Ga.



N. J. & T. A. HAMMOND,

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW.

Rooms Nos. 41 and 42 Gate City Bank
Building.

T. A. Hammond, Jr., Commissioner for
taking Depositions in Fulton county.

THOMAS KIRKE. J DERBYSHIRE.

THOS. KIRKE & CO.

DEALERS IN
STOVES and TINWARE,
HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS,

Headlight Kerosine and Gasoline Oils
Southern Agents for the National Vapor C'ookin;*
Stoves, Adams & Westlake's Gas Stoves, American
Oil Stove Co., Oil Stoves, etc.

57 and 59 Peachtree St.

WELLBORN M. BRAY,
^T T O R N E Y

AT LAW.
21i Marietta Street.



Geo. W Parrott, Pres. Jacob Haas, Cashier.
Capital and Surplus, $485,000.

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
ATLANTA, GA.
Transacts a General Banking Business.

Approved Commercial Paper Discounted.
Domestic and Foreign Exchange

Bought and Sold.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.



o



CAPITAL, §100,000.

PEN FROM 8 to 4 o'Ci.o. k.



J. H. & A. L. JAMES, Bank k us.

Lend Money, Buy and Sell Exchange, Re-
ceive Deposits from any one, large or small.
g^~Pay more interest on timr deposits than any
other strong bank. We own property 1ft, 18 and U
Whitehall, and 2 to 10 Alabama Streets.



L. MEYER,

DEALER IN GENTS' FURNISHING
GOODS,

HATS AND SHOES,

UMBRELLAS AND WALK I Mi CANES,

No. 4 Marietta Street.



AWIIOLEREGI-
ment of men and
women might form a
dress parade in our
main aisle. That fact
is worth remembering
This also, they could
move "fours right"
into the Shoe Store,
and each be fitted
with a becoming and
proper Keely Leader
Shoe for $2. They
outrank, at all points,
any $3 Shoe in the
world. Every local
and visiting Veteran
should mingle in our
Bargain Carnival and
capture one of the
Keely trophies.

KEELY CO.




THE Increased
attention to our
ShoeStore is telling —
greatly growing sales,
more salesmen, belter
serviec, more stock
and finer. Store fre-
quenters see and feel
it. No person need
discount his or her at-
tire with bad or bulky
Shoes. Witness the
wealth of handsome
Kangaroo, Patent
Leather and Calf
Shoes for men, and
French Kid for wo-
men, that we display.
All the Summer styles
are r e a dy — artistic,
sensible — a head of
even our doings in
other seasons.

KEELY CO.



KEELY COMPANY.



LEADERS OF
LOW PRICES.



N

EYKKY \Y< 'MAN
desiring i<> econ-
omize in trading
should seek her pur-
chase from the aggre
gation of Dress Goods
Bargains always on
our counters. Tlie
1 .1 1 excitement
nds them is

inspii 'y hv

I js phenomenally

low. 1 if course you

are debating about a

ih-w BlacV Silk. The

is al its fullest.

larg-

mplete

■-. in tow n

neath Nol

a rubbishy quality

[uerading under

a l.il <• lustre in the

housi . All grades

reliable.

Kl 1 I A CI '.



'^k;




THE GREAT
army of Parasols
and Fans, Gloves and
Hosiery, Corsets and
Underwear, are ready
for review. They ap-
peal to your prudence
by their ever present
cheapness. Don't be
content with a hasty
run-through. You
can't catch their beau-
ty by a hop, skip and
jump look. Careful
examination, precise
comparisons are ne-
cessary to select such
trifles with exact con-
formity to taste, and
their intended use.
Courteous service is
here afforded you.
Take your own time
and choose with ease.
KEELY CO









HISTORY




&w%



CONFEDERATE VETERANS



OCPON,



* *



OF FULTON^ COUNTY, GEORGIA.



* *




COMPILED BY ROBERT L. RODGERS,



HISTORIAN C. V. A.



ATLANTA. GA.
v. !•. sisso.n, PUBLISHER.

1890.



©






INTRODUCTORY.



In presenting this epitome of the History of the Con-
federate Veterans' Association of Fulton County, Ga.,
it is but an acknowledgment of the sense of duty in the position
to which they have assigned me as a member of the Association.

Some of the matter herein has been previously printed in the
"Constitution" or the "Journal," but as such is merely the relation
of current events of the Association, I have not deemed it neces-
sary to specially mark such parts. In giving notices, and reports
of meetings, and addresses of various persons, these papers have
been uniformly kind to our Association.

If the facts herein related may serve to interest the old
soldiers concerned in them, or if they may give any light upon
the merits of our service, I shall be exceedingly glad that I have
thus compiled them.

With sincere regard I am

Faithfully Your Comrade,

ROBERT L. RODGERS.



Report of tt|e Hi^toriaii.



To the President and Commander, Officers and Members

of the Confederate Veterans' Association :

With my best wishes I salute you all! In my undertaking to perform the
duty of my office, as Historian, to which you have heretofore called me, I
must beg leave to say that it was with serious diffidence that 1 assumed the
duties, and I come to the task with much doubt of my own ability to render
such service, in good and full measure, as the station requires, and as the various
pertinent matters deserve. But I am ever willing to try to do whatever task
my comrades may assign forme, and so I present to you this report, in the
hope that in some way it may be of interest to you.

In the consideration of things, I have deemed it unnecessary to make any
elaborate statement of facts as causes for the late war. Those things are not
in the purview of my duties, and I leave them to be narrated by others, who
may have more time and inclination for speculation upon events previous to the
war. We might theorize in various ways, and yet our theories might not have
any real or any 'relative bearing upon the fact of our being what we are as
Confederate Veterans. It is a duty that we owe to ourselves and our posterity .
that the record may be made and preserved correctly, and to perpetuate the
memories of lives devoted to our cause.

If we should go to the genesis of things, we mighl ask of Mnemosyne,
the ancient goddess of memory, and the mother of the Muses, which one of her
daughters is most to be admired, or esteemed most highly by men? and
methinks we could hear her say that Clio should be the favorite muse. While
the others might be admired for their gifts of various kinds— good or ill— they
are but ephemeral, evanescent, and they would fall into oblivion were it not so
that Clio preserves them by the record, to give us the pleasures of memory
long after the facts have passed away.

In taking an account of ourselves as Confederate Veterans, we need not
speculate about facts before the war. A "Confederate Veteran* was not a fad
before the war. We frequently hear of things which existed "before the war."
Some people were rich before the war. Some people were slaves before the
war. Some men were born and lived before the war who are living yet. There
were governors, senators, judges and "militia majors," but never a "Con
federate Veteran" before the war. A. Confederate Veteran is to-day a unique
figure in life, and will ever be unique in history. Unique? Fes, sir, that is
the single word which may define him, signifying incomparable, atom '.



Nothing else, and nobody else on earth to-day like a Confederate \ eteran. He
h an evolution of the revolution-* relic of the "Lost Game. -
-" I':,,,,. llIlfl nii „s of his defeat he stands like Napoleon, Jar*

;• •• ,i.,>„o-i, fhP veteran is not by any means a fossil. A C on-

,„.,„-,,. ul, of the war. he is grand in his heroic courage, gloomy in
i , VI .,, k of fortune, and peculiar in being solitary n his own genera-

'" a^nguo predecessor of his kind, he likewise can have no successor.
^fSerTe Veteran" is a rank and position of distinction. It is an honor
which oo p«»wer on earth can take away.

Confederate Veterans are, one by one, passing away ; and as each goes out
we [rather at his bier to give a final farewell, to drop a tear as we listen to the
dull thud of the clods upon his coffin, and think of the fact that we are one
less in our numbers. Fewer and fewer they become as we leave them in their
graves and we feel sad to contemplate that soon the last one must go from
( .. irlh and then there can never be another "Confederate Veteran.

The last one must be the last of the kind. Holding firmly and
conscientiously as we do vet to the correctness of the principles for which we
fouehl in our great defeat there must ever be with us a shadow of that heavy
sorrow which 'never Hitting, still is sitting, still is sitting," in our households ;
bu , we may take sue), consolation in our "Lost Cause" as we may find in
praising the valor and cherishing the memories of those who died to make it
otherwise and the realizing consciousness in those who yet live, of having done
their duty as well and as fully as they could. Giving honor to whom honor is
due too much praise cannot be given to our braves who died in the din of
battle yielding up dear life as a holy sacrifice to the principles of freedom for
which they contended, and in which they honestly and conscientiously believed
they were right. A v. indeed, they were right ! It was the right they dared
to defend and maintain, and for which they died willingly, with an approving
conscience, Bealed with their blood, and sanctioned in high Heaven.
'O, if there be on this earthly sphere,
A boon, an offering Heaven holds dear,
'Tis the last libation Liberty draws
From the heart that bleeds and breaks in her cause."

For the losl comrades we have ever kept a tender memory. Though we
bave not been able to do for them their full meed of justice, yet wehave

silently revered them, and our g 1 women have wept over them while they

bave strewn garlands on their grave-.

The l.adic^ Memorial Associations in the South-land have been the chief
mediums for outward demonstrations of sympathy and love for the departed
beroes together with Buch encouragemenl and assistance as the survivors could
render in anj unorganized waj . In some places they bave erected stately and
beautiful monuments in memoriam, in bonor of the noble dead. In some

,,!:„ , In simple -t,mc- mark the lasl resting place of the sleeping warriors.

[„ manj other places onlj a little hoard is set up to indicate the place of burial,
and soon the board decays, falls down, and the spol becomes neglected, save
onh in the annual decorations, when a Eew flowers are placed on it. They in



turn soon wither, and die, and disappear. In many, aye, far too many, there are
no signs to mark the plaee of rest of our dear departed comrades. Hut such
as these may rest as quietly, sleep as gently, and as peacefully await the coming
of the resurrection morn, as any of those who may be under the more preten-
tious marbles and monuments. Only drop a tear upon their sod as you pass
on their way, and it will be accepted — the good will as a good deed— and be
approved and applauded by their angels as well.

"When my soul wings her flight to the regions of night,
And my corse shall recline on its bier,
As ye pass by the tomb where my ashes consume,
Oh ! moisten their dust with a tear.

May no marble bestow the splendor of woe,
Which the children of vanity rear ;
No fiction of fame shall blazon my name;
And all I ask — all I wish — is a tear."

The Ladies' Memorial Association has been a very important factor in the
preservation and perpetuation of the events and memories of the war. Had it
not been for the devotion of our noble women in the days of defeat, the dark-
ness of despair would have settled upon our men, and much of our glory as
soldiers might have never been observed — for in circumstances like ours then
it required extraordinary fortitude to bear defeat even witli the sustaining
encouragement as given by our brave women. I could not desire to be
invidious in any special notice, but it seems to be appropriate here to give the
names of a few who have been active and prominent in tins way of preserving
our Confederate memories, and giving honor to our Confederate dead. Let us
mention Mrs. Geo. T. Fry, Mrs. Johnson, Mrs. John Milledge. Others have
been as earnest and devoted, but these have been forward as leaders in every
good work in our memorial celebrations. Mrs. Milledge has been for a number
of years the President of the Ladies' Memorial Association in Fulton county.
She is a most estimable lady, wife of our comrade and compatriot. Col. John
Milledge. With him she lias a most zealous adjutant in her glorious work.
For many years after the war, while our excellent women were thus organized
as a Memorial Association, our men were busy in their various vocations in
efforts to reestablish their homes and business on a good living basis. They
were content to act as aids to the good women in their memorial services. As
time rolled on many of our old soldiers grew old and infirm, They were not
able to cope with the rushing progress of events. Hut still the love of the
dear ones at home impelled them onward. A time came when it was announced
by one of the youngest of veterans, the immortal Grady, that the great chief-
tain of the Confederacy would visit Georgia on the occasion of the unveiling
of the monument of our great statesman, Hon. H. II. Hill. The announce
ment was like a greal tocsin to call up the scattered and weary old soldiers.
They were again aroused with the old time pride in the memories, of the cause
for which they had sacrificed so much of treasure and blood, and in which
they were willing to give their lives. To hear that Jefferson Davis, die Presi
dent, was coming to Georgia, was sufficient for a grand rally. Then it \\a>



thai the old veterans bethoughl themselves of the necessity of some organized
concert of act ion. The apparent necessity for organization was hardly per-
ceived before a movemenl was made. The suggestion of it was but to realize
the need. Ai nine several of our veterans resolved on making an effort for
organization. We may mention that amongst the foremost was Colonel John
Milledge. He was active and sanguine, as he always is in such matters. He
was the first to draft the call which brought us together at the first meeting for
the purpose of making the - organization of Confederate Veterans. The notice
given first was as follows :

NOTICE.

Every ex-Confederate soldier in Atlanta is earnestly requested to
meet in the basement of the Court House, on Friday night, April 20th,
for the purpose of organizing a "Camp of Confederate Veterans."

This notice appeared in the "Constitution" newspaper about the 15th day
of April. 1886. There was no official order or name in it. The idea seemed
lo he to give notice, and appeared to be a motion to establish some sort of a
"Camp" after the style of the "Grand Army of the Republic." Upon a casual
discussion en passant the Confederate Veterans did not seem to fancy the idea
of a "Camp" as a name for their organization, which was then in embryo.

Our Colonel Milledge then drew a different notice, to which he obtained
several signal ure-, and he gave it to the •'Constitution." audit appeared in that
paper on April 20th, 1886, as follows :

MEETING OF EX-CONFEDERATE VETERANS.

Atlanta, Ga., April 19, 1886.
We, the undersigned Confederate Soldiers, having held an informal
meeting yesterday afternoon, resolved to unite in this call for a full
attendance of old soldiers at the Court House to night, for the purpose
o( organizing a Confederate Veterans' Camp in our city, and also to
arrange for all visiting soldiers on 1st of May, to rendezvous on that
morning at <> jo o'clock at some central point, there to organize in
line, and attend the reception of Jefferson Davis in a body. Let every
old comrade come out to-night, and let us get in sh?pe to extend a
heartfelt greeting to that grand old man, that has given his all for the
cause we loved.

C. T. Furlow, W. T. Wilson,

W. W. Hulbjert, E. P. Black,

L. I'. Thomas, W. L. Calhoun,

M. T. Castlbberry, E. P. Howell,

W. A. Hemphill, j. E. Joyner,

I'm 1 Romare, K. C. Divine,

John M ii 1 EDGE,

During that day, many of the old soldiers were discussing the matter of
the notice. All were in favor of it. and in hearty sympathy with the object
indicated i>\ the notice,



In pursuance of this call, that night there was a considerable gathering of
veterans in the Fulton County Court House.

On motion, Colonel John Milledge was selected to preside over the meeting.
So he was first chairman in the first meeting for our organization. A commit
tee was appointed to obtain the names of those who were present at that
meeting.

The names of those who were in that first meeting were as follows, viz. ;

1. R. C. Young, co. F, 19th Georgia Regiment.

2. J. F. Callaway, co. E, 9th Georgia Battalion Artillery.

3. W. J. Maddox, co. B, 35th Georgia Regiment.

4. B. II. Catchings, Mississippi Volunteers.

5. J. F. Fuss, co. A, 3d Georgia Regiment.

6. S. J. Moncrief, co. I, 16th Georgia Regiment.

7. T. II. P. Bloodworth, 4th Georgia Battalion S. S.



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