Grace Greylock Niles.

The Hoosac Valley, its legends and its history online

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King of the Abenakis Democracy.
He located in Housatonac Valley in
1664 and was discovered by the Eng-
lish missionaries, Jonathan Sergeant
and Samuel Hopkins, in 1734.



Nana-apenahican Creek



A small stream rising about "Monu-
ment Mountain." King Aepjen's
national Wekowohm (wigwam or
castle) was built on this stream. The
prefix. Nana, is the plural for bears
and wolves, Aepjen (bear) and
Hican (wolf) denoting that the
Mahican warriors of the west bank
of the Hudson joined Aepjen's
bears on the east bank.



Wampanicksepoot
(Green River)



Mah-kee-nac
(Stockbridge Bowl)



The place of wampum or small bugle-
shells, used as the Abenakis Democ-
racy's money or as coins interwoven
in peace belts.

A small lake christened by Catherine
Sedgwick, as the "Bowl,"



522



The Hoosac Valley



Wawanaquassick
Wachankasigh
Mauswaseekhi
(Monument Mountain)

Deowkook
(Rattlesnake Mountain)

Skoon-keek-moon-keek
(Lake Pontoosac)



The "Hill of the Great Stone-
heaps," known as "Fisher's-Nest"
and commemorated in Bryant's poem,
Monument Mountain.

Wolves' Hill, occupied by the Mahi-
can or wolf warriors.

King Aepjen's hunting-ground for
winter deer, now Pittsfield neighbor-
hood.



Lake Pontoosac
Lake Onota



The "winter hunting-ground for
deer," in Pittsfield.



Tawasentha
(Burial-field)



Kokapot



The Abenakis king's Tawasentha
(Vale of the many dead) was located
in both the Hoosac and Housatonac
valleys. About Hobbamocko's or
Devil's Chimney on the Hoosac and
about Indian Hill near Lake Onota
many "weapons of rest" and mould.
ering bones have been unearthed.

Successor of King Aepjen (?). He was
of the lineage of Ukhkopeck-Snake
and Turtle grandfathers of Great
Unami.



Yokum
(Soquon) ?

Umpachene



Occum
(Uncum)



The Uk-hooh (?) (Owl, or Orator, of
Great Soqui).

The Maquon-pauw, or Hero, of the
Abenakis Nation, successor of Ma-
quon of the Hudson and Hoosac
valleys.

The Unnuhkankun, or Runner (?), a
messenger.



ANCIENT NAMES OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY



Hodesanne



Traditional native country of the
Iroquois Confederacy.



Notes



523



Kayingehaga



The Valley of Leaping, Laughing
Waters, between Cohoes Falls on the
Mohawk and Niagara Falls, on the
St. Lawrence River.



Aquinoshioni
Koneoshioni
Angiehorons
(Iroquois)



Wyandottes
(Mochomes)
(Great Antinathin)
(Great Maquaas)
(Great Enanthayonni)



Angiehorons
Angiers
Mohaquas
(Great Maquaas)

Maquaas

Mohogs
Mohawks

Cahohaisenhonone
(Great Maquaas)
(Great Enanthayonni)



The name of the Iroquois Confeder-
acy arose from a French Jesuit term
adopted to distinguish the Warriors
of Flint, whose Owl began his palaver
with Iliro — I say or have said, — com-
bined with the affix, Kone, expressing
joy or sorrow, indicated respectively
by the long and by the short accent.

The "original and unmixed people"
of Great Antinathin or Turtle
fathers. They resided about Lakes
Huron and Erie and became the
grandfathers of the Noochwissacs —
grandchildren of Great Maquaas and
Great Enanthayonni or Bear and
Wolf warriors, occupying the Mo-
hawk and Hudson basin.

The French and Algonquin designa-
tion for the Warriors of the FUnt,
occupying the Mohawk Valley above
Cohoes Falls.

The Dutch and English designations
for the Bear and Wolf warriors of the
Iroquois Confederacy.

Agonerrhorons and Cahohaisenhonons
— the Bear and Wolf warriors of the
Fhnt. The Iroquois king and his
councillors resided between Cohoes
Falls and Cohohahoohra Falls, now
known as Trenton Falls on West
Canada Creek, a north branch of the
Mohawk River. The Gahahoohpauw,
or Owl, of the Confederacy occupied
the Cohohahoohra hunting-grounds
between East and West Canada
Creek, known as the Royal Grant.



524



The Hoosac Valley



Ganeagaono

Gahahoose or Cohohaose

Agoncrrhorons

Gahahoose

Skohare



Canassatiego

Canassishoro
Canastagiowna



Co-ho-hah or Cahoh
Gahohahoose
(Cohoes Falls)



The Maquaas' hunting-ground of the
Mohawk Valley above Cohoes Falls.

Names of the villages and castles of
the Iroquois king and councillors of
the Bear and Wolf races, about
Schonowe Meadows, known to the
Dutch as Great Flats, on the site of
Schenectady.

The Gahahooh-pauw (Owl or Orator)
of Great Maquaas.

The valley of the Gahahooh, or Owl.

The great maize-fields of the Gaha-
hooh-pauw, or Owl.

Cradle-hollows, pot-holes, or rocking,
leaping, laughing motion of a canoe
leaping the Cohoes Cataract with a
warrior and his squaw. The legend
led to the name Cohoes Falls, sig-
nifying "ship-wrecked canoe, " of the
Mohawk Falls.



Great Antinathin
(Huron Mochomes)



Tharony-i argon
(Hiawatha)



Legend of the Iroquois Confederacy
(Huron-Mohawks)



The Master of Life,— God of Thun-
der. Fabled Wyandotte Turtle
grandfathers.

The Holder of the Heavens, control-
ling the lightning weapons of the sky,
and the Moodus, or jargon, upheavals
during earthquakes, and the thunder
during hurricanes.

The Iroquois myth claimed that their
fabled Turtle grandfathers of Great
Antinathin, like the giants of Roman
mythology, were confined beneath the
mountains — the Laurentian High-
lands, near the site of Niagara Falls
and Oswego Falls, until St. Hiawatha
released the old Huron Wyandotte



Notes 525

and Erie Turtles. A jargon upheaval
followed and the ancient Cambrian
Sea receded south and west. Hia-
watha^ then bade the Six Nations of
the Confederacy march down the
Valley of Leaping, Laughing Waters
until they met their enemies — the
Wappanachki Men of Great Unami
— at Chescodonta, the site of Albany
Capitol on the Mahicansac River,
now known as Hudson River. Here
the Hoosac Bears of the Abenakis
Democracy and the Mohawk Bears
of the Iroquois Confederacy fought
for their right to hang their kettles
and kindle their national council-fires
until dispersed by the invading
Christian armies between 161 5 and
1815.

II

[Pages 121, 130]

LIEUT. JOHN CATLIN'S LETTERS ABOUT FORT MASSACHUSETTS

SUPPLIES^

Fort Massachusetts.
Augt ye 3, 1745.

Hond Sir These are to informe that I have perseuant to your desire ben
Down to ye Duch and in the first place made up a Counts with Mr Vanasee &
find deu to him 2-4-6 in there money he hath disposed of but tow hids and the
tallow Sir I pos to informe you the Surcomstances we are in I carried With me
258 lb Weight of Pork and found ye Stores thirtee pounds of Beef and Brad to
last to ye 22 of July I found three Skipel of flour in the Stores and sence found
Whare Bardwell had brought 20 Skipel more we have fetched up 17 all Ready
Sir I find that the Rum hath ben very Slipry trade but how much hath ben
Sold to perticulr men I Cant yet tel. Sir the ox we kild on ye 29 July the
Weight 475 lb the quantity of Pork that Bardwell Spake of I have ben to see



' Longfellow's iJiowaZ/m of the Iro- (Holder of the Heavens— Huron
quois, similar to Bryant's OnetJio in Turtles.)

his Legends of the Delawares and (Master of the lightning-arrows of
Mahicans. the sky of Delaware Turtles.)

* Perry, Origins in Williamstown, pp. 109, no, 113.



526 The Hoosac V^alley

and find that thare is about 400 lb weight Which is the Whol I can Sight of att
preasant the price three pence half peny per pound Mr Vanness will let me
have 800 lb Weight in December att the same price further I have tried the
best of my skill to git Wheat and shall now Let you know how I can have it Mr
Vanness demands 29 per Skipel he giting it ground & delivering it att his house
the pay may be made to his Son att New York in Rum or any other att the
markit price, further Mr Hawks att the firt house will Let me have one 100
lb skipel of old Wheat att 2 s 6 d per skipel and Will git it ground and brought
to his house a mile nier to us his pay must be in mony Saveing 2 pare of stock-
ings and 2 pare of Shoes: Sir I now Wait for your orders which to take the
last Whet mentioned is Chepist but thare is no man that Can Supply in all we
want like Vanness; Sir the price of Rum I Cant yet know but in a fornits time
Vanase Son will be up from New York and he will then let me know, the
Want of money oblidges me to stand with my finger in my mouth ware the
money here things might be had much chepier Plese to send Bardwell as soun
as possiable for the Care of the work att the fort and giting the provisions I
find is hard Sir there id difficulty Respecting ye Wheat that Bardwell Bought
f orsbury sayeth that he was to take the wheat before it was ground and Charges
3 pence per Bushil for giting it ground & brought to his house Salt cant be had
on this side of Albany and brought one horse Sir we are in healt & yours att
command

John Catlin 2nd.



Fort Massachusetts.
Augt ye 5. 1745.

Sir Since I wrote the account of my procedings consarning the wheat Mr.
Vanness has been with me, and tels me that if you will take all the wheat you
want of him that he will take our money and the same price as mentioned
before. Sir, I have this day a large family from the Duch, and one man offers
me whete for 2 :5 per skipel ither one or 200 skipel to be delivered in flower at
the first house (undoubtedly Van Derrick's house a mile south of Peters-
burgh Junction). Another of them will let me enough to pay for a sute
of broad cloth for 2 : 6 per skipel to be delivered at the same house in
flower.

As good care of the beare hath been taken as if your honour were here, bot
for the want of salt I feare some of it will spile. One skipel of salt is the howle
we can git till we go to Albany for it.

We are informed by an Indian from Crown Point that one of the sculks that
kiled Phips at the greate meadow received his death wound and died att
Crown Point. We are all well and in good spirits, and make tho we scout
every day no discovery att present.

Sir, I am yours to serve

John Catlin 2D.



Notes



527



III

[Page 130]
FIRST MUSTER-ROLL OF FORT MASSACHUSETTS'



A Muster Roll of the Company in
Command of Ephraim Williams,
1745, TO June 9, 1746



His Majesty's Service under the
Jun'r, Captain, Viz., December 10,



Jonathan Bridgman


Cent'l


Dec


'no


June 9


Moses Scott


it




a


11


John Perry


i<




11


It


Eben'r Dickinson


14




It


Feb. 28


John Danelson


«




It


'*


Elijah Graves


it




It


June 9


Samuel Goodman


«




44


ii


Joseph Kellogg


l<




44


tt


Aaron Kidder


U




44


((


Zebulon AUin


U




44


n


Nath'l Ranger


n




44


n


Jonathan Stone


u




44


Feb. 27


John Guiford


«




(4


June 9


Stephen Stow


«




44


n


Daniel Smead


«




44


ti


Samuel Taylor


«




«


Feb. II


David Warner


i(




44


Feb. 24


Luke Smith


f<




4<


Feb. 20


Elear Hawks, Jun'r





Online LibraryGrace Greylock NilesThe Hoosac Valley, its legends and its history → online text (page 35 of 41)