Grand army of the republic. Dept. of Massachusetts.

Journals of the encampment proceedings of the Department of Massachusetts G.A.R. frm 1881 to 1887 inclusive online

. (page 31 of 64)
Online LibraryGrand army of the republic. Dept. of MassachusettsJournals of the encampment proceedings of the Department of Massachusetts G.A.R. frm 1881 to 1887 inclusive → online text (page 31 of 64)
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288 HISTORY DEPT. OF MASS., G.A.R.

Annual Report of the Inspector of the Department of



Name of Post.



Timothy Ingraham. . .

E. P. Wallace

Parker

Justin Dimick

W. W. Rockwell

George K. Sayles

T. h. Bonney

Gen. James Appleton.
William H. Freeman.

James II. Sargent

George H. Thomas

Cliarles Chipman

George H. JNlaintien..

Robert A.Bell

E. A. Andrews

Geo. C. Marshall

Samuel Sibley

Isaac Davis

Willard C. Kinsley

Hubbard V. Smith...
Frank D. Hammond..

Burnside

C. L. Chandler

Chas. W. Carroll

Wm. A. Streeter

Robert G. Shaw

E. M. Stanton

A.D. Weld

Maj. G. L. Stearns

Armstrong :

Major Boyd

O. H.P. Sargent

Oilman C. Parker

Martha Sever

Marcus Keep

James A. Perkins

Elbridge D. Piper

E. S. Dresser

John A. Hayes

Alanson Hamilton. . .

Woburn

Manton E. Taft

Gen. J. G. Foster

Francis A. Clary

Wm. Wadsworth

Geo. C. Strong

Jesse L. Reno

Malcolm Ammidown

George K. Bird

John Rogers

Henry H. Johnson. . ,

G. K." Warren ,

Albert S. Johnson

Edwin E. Day

Washburn ,



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> g K






NINETEENTH ANNUAL ENCAMPMENT.



289



Mass. G.A.R,, for Year Ending Dec. 3i, 1884: — Continued.



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290 HISTORY DEPT. OF MASS., G.A.R.

I heartily congratulate the members of this Department on
the increased accuracy with which the work of the Order is per-
formed by the Posts, and on the greater interest manifested by
the officers and comrades in bringing their Posts up to the high
standard of discipline so long maintained by this Department.

I wish to thank all the comrades who have acted as Assistant
Inspectors for the prompt, faithful, efficient and intelligent
manner in which they have performed their duties.

I wish also to tender my cordial thanks to Aides-de-Camp
B. Read Wales and W. L. Gage for assistance rendered on
several occasions at the formation of new Posts.

To my fellow-members of the official Staff I would say that
their fraternity and good-fellowship have rendered the past year
one of the pleasantest in a somewhat long connection with the
Grand Army, and have in many ways lightened the sometimes
perplexing duties of my office.

I have the honor to remain,

Yours fraternally,

S. A. GUSHING, Jr.

Inspector.



REPORT OF CHIEF MUSTERING OFFICER.

Headquarters Deft, of Mass., G.A.R. ,
Boston, Jan. 29, 1885.

A. C. Monroe, Assistant Adjutant-General.

Comrade : In compliance with the Rules and Regulations, I
have the honor to respectfully report, that during the past year I
have assisted at the organization of eight Posts, have attended
four meetings of the Council of Administration, and have offici-
ated at the installation ceremonies of Post 165 of Duxbury.
The applications for installing officers have been filled, and com-
rades so designated have creditably performed the duties assigned
them.

In closing this brief report, I beg leave to assure the many
comrades whose acquaintance I have formed, and whose kind
hospitality I have so much enjoyed, that no greater pleasure can
befall me than to have the opportunity to reciprocate those many
favors ; and also to express my heartfelt thanks to the Depart-
ment Commander and his Staff, for the courtesies extended in
the performance of my duties.

Yours in Fraternity, Charity and Loyalty,

GEORGE 11. BONNEY, Jr

Chief Mustering Officer.



NINETEENTH ANNUAL ENCAMPMENT. 291



KEPORT OF JUDGE ADVOCATE.

Headquarters Dept. of Mass., G.A.R.
Boston, Jan. 24, 1885.

Alfred C. Monroe, Assistant Ad j atant- General .

Comrade : I herewith submit my report for the past ^^ear.
I have given eight opinions upon various questions arising upon
appeal or other matters submitted to me by order of the Depart-
ment Commander. I have been detailed and acted as Judge
Advocate in one Department court-martial, which resulted in a
verdict of acquittal upon all the charges preferred against the
comrade accused.

Yours in F., C. and L.,

JOHN H. HARDY,

Judge Advocate.

REPORT OF COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION.

Headquarters Dept. of Mass., G.A.R.

Boston, Jan. 29, 1885.

Commandei' and Comrades : The Council of Administration,
in presenting their report to this Convention, feel that the full
and elaborate reports from the several Departments already
received leave little for them to add to which your attention has
not already been called.

We have held four regular meetings and one special meet-
ing, all of which have been very fully attended, showing a grati-
fying interest in the work of the Department by its elective
offlcers.

At the meeting of February 16, the action of the Commander
in sending S25 to the Department of Kentucky in aid of the
sufferers by the floods was approved.

At the meeting of July 12, the Council voted, on recom-
mendation of the Department Commander, to revoke the charter
of I. D. Paull Post No. 55 of Taunton.

October 25, the Council approved the action of the Com-
mander at the National Encampment, in subscribing for this
Department the sum of $100 to the fund raised for Comrade
Johnson of Dakota, who lost his leg by a railroad accident.

At the special meeting held December 20, arrangements
were made for the convening of this Encampment.

The large increase in the luimber of Posts, with the general
desire to receive an official visit from the Commander during his
term of office, makes so loud a call on that otlicer's time and
purse as to practically place the ofliee out of the reach of many
able and worthy comrades. To lighten the duties in a measure,



292 HISTORY DEPT. OF MASS., G.A.R.

your Council would recommend that the sum of $300 be appro-
priated by this Encampment, the same as last year, to be used in
paying the travelling fares of the Commander while on official
visits, and of the Senior and Junior Vice-Commanders when
acting for him on official business, such payments to be approved
by the Elective Council ; also that the travelling fares of the
Commander and the Assistant Adjutant-General to the National
ICncampment be paid by the Department.

The rapid growth of this Department shows most conspicu-
ously in the financial statement of the Assistant (Quartermaster-
General, and there seems to be no good reason now apparent
why this most gratifying increase of receipts over expenditures
should not continue for several years to come, when the receipts
must begin to diminish, and so continue until the balances appear
on the wrong side of the ledger. It would seem to be the part
of prudence and wisdom to provide while we can for that future
sure to come, and thus insure the continuance (without embar-
rassment) of the Assistant Adjutant-General's ofKce until the last
Post has sent in its charter, and the records of this great organiza-
tion shall be completed. The Encampment of 1884 created a
reserve fund of one thousand dollars. We would recommend
that this fund be increased by the addition of one thousand dol-
lars from the funds now in the hands of the Assistant Quarter-
master-General.

Your Council would suggest that some definite financial
policy be adopted by the Department, and recommend the
appointment of a committee to consider the matter fully, and
report, as soon as practicable, some plan to the Council of
Administration for their adoption.

We have, through a committee appointed for the purpose,
carefully examined the books and accounts of the Assistant
Adjutant-General and the Assistant Quartermaster-General,
together with the bills, vouchers, funds, and supplies on hand,
and can vouch for the correctness of their reports now in your
hands.

In closing, your Council desire to express their appreciation
of the faithful, earnest and efficient service rendered by our
retiring Commander in his efforts to maintain and improve the
high standard of excellence already attained by this Department;
also to thank his efficient Assistant Adjutant-General for the
courteous treatment and ready assistance received from him dur-
ing our term of office.

Respectfully submitted in F., C. and L.,

W. W. SCOTT,

J. GUSHING THOMAS,

JOHN Mcdonough,

EDWARD McKAY,
CHAS. H. TRACY,

Council of Adininistration .



NINETEENTH ANNUAL ENCAMPMENT. 293



REPORT OF MEDICAL DIRECTOR.

Headquarters Dept. of Mass., G.A.R.,
Boston, Jan. 29, 1885.

Alfred C. Monroe, Assistant Afljutuht- General.

Comrade: The abolition of Form F, and the duties of
inspecting Posts being now confined to the Aides-de Camp, make
the position of Medical Director simply an honorary one. It is
a position complimentary to the Medical Department of the
Army, and as such I am proud to have represented that corps of
surgeons sent out by Massachusetts in the days of the Rebellion,
to treat the sick and care for her wounded soldiers.

I had the pleasure of accompanying the Department Com-
mander, John D. Billings, and the Massachusetts delegates to the
National Encampment, held at Minneapolis, but the exemplar}'
and regular habits of the party gave the Medical Director no
opportunity to exercise his medical skill. That the Medical
Department of the G.A.R. may be better utilized, I would most
respectfully recommend that ex-army surgeons, wherever possible,
be chosen Post Surgeons, and that the Medical Director of the
Department shall be e.i- officio President of a Grand Arm}' Medi-
cal Organization, composed of the Post Surgeons of the Depart-
ment of Massachusetts ; that the object of this organization shall
be lo get at the medical and surgical history of our Massachu-
setts regiments and our Massachusetts soldiers, and by papers
and discussions bring out the experiences of her army surgeons.

Such an organization should meet annually, the same week
as the Department Encampment; the president to make arrange-
ments for place and time of meeting, for papers and discussions,
and such literary work as would best advance the objects of the
organization.

Believing that here is an important field to cover, and that
the ex-army surgeons of Massachusetts are ready to contribute
their experiences as medical otticers of the war for the benefit of
future generations,

1 have the honor to remain yours in F., C. and L.,

JAMES OLIVER, Jr.

Medical Director.



294 HISTORY UEPT. OF MASS., G.A.R.



REPORT OF CHAPLAIN.

Headquarters Dept. of Mass., G.A.R.
Boston, Jan. 29, 1885.

Commander and Covirades : At the close of this official year
I greet you in Fraternity, Charity and Loyalty, giving thanks, as
is first becoming and due, to the great and good Father, who
has preserved us and brought us again together in annual session.

I have no vital statistics to lay before you, although it is
quite certain that births, marriages and deaths have not been
infrequent among us, but no detailed returns have been presented
to me, and no general knowledge on the subject is at my com-
mand.

Among those who have served you in the past, and have now
joined the "silent majority," we must name Past Assistant Adju-
tant-General Comrade Solomon Hovey, Jr., whose military service
during the Rebellion was in the Twenty-first Regiment Massa-
chusetts Volunteer Infantry, where he attained the rank of lieu-
tenant-colonel. His military record was honorable, his loyalty
and devotion to his country were assured by his long and patriotic
service in the field, and his true comradeship in the Grand Army
of the Republic is too well known and too recent to need any
words of mine to recall. He passed from earth early this winter.

The past year, as the preceding reports show in full detail,
has been a remarkably prosperous one in the enlistment of recruits,
the strengthening and encouragement of long existing Posts, and
the organization of new Posts. Although we have, during this
time, passed through a political campaign haviug in it some
extraordinary features of excitement, every comrade it is believed
has had his partisan preferences respected, and we have been able
to demonstrate that, while the Grand Army of the Republic is in
the best sense a political organization, pledged to uncompromising
loyalty to the Union, it is in no sense partisan, nor can it be used
for partisan purposes. Camp-fires, the exchange of visits among
Posts, dedications of Post halls, and other occasions which have
brought comrades together in fraternal counsel and cheer, have been
frequent, enjoyable, and productive of great good. They have
kept the memories of the past from becoming dimmed, have been
the means of attracting many honorably discharged veterans into
our ranks, and have made our future outlook more pleasant and
hopeful.

Memorial Day, with its touching appeals to the soldier's
heart, bringing back, moie than all the other days in the year, the
realities of life in the field, — simple in its ceremonies, but touch-
ing the tenderest chords of our being, — grows in the affectionate



NINETEENTH ANNUAL ENCAMPMENT. 295

appreciation of the citizens at large. We may well be grateful to
the Commonwealth that it has been recognized as a day when busi-
ness and labor should be suspended ; but we should not forget
that this very recognition of its significance exposes it to abuses,
against which every comrade and every Post should sternly set its
face. While it is not a day for gloom nor for hopeless sorrow,
but rather for thankfulness that, through the sacrifices made by
those whose " low green tents" we visit with floral offerings, our
nationality has been made forever secure, and for the Christian
hope of immortality, giving us assurance that consciousness of
what has been accomplished is also theirs, its hours are unworthily
used and sadly desecrated when employed in mere holiday sport,
and especially is its beautiful significance forgotten when the sol-
dier makes it a day of dissipation. Intemperance, which is brutal
at all times, is doubly damning in its disgrace when it occurs on
the day that belongs to our dead.

Our Soldiers' Home continues to be well managed, and its
occupants are contented, and as happy as their physical condition
will allow, there not being an able-bodied man among them, but
all affected with more or less painful disabilities. Their appre-
ciation of what is done for them is heartfelt, their confidence in
and respect for the superintendent are unbounded, and their love
for his excellent wife is enthusiastic. It has been my privilege to



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