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is situated 3^ miles above the village of Lau-ye-miau at entrance, just
before arriving at the first very sharp bend, where there is a shoal of
6 feet, and the position of the. channel, said to be 2 fathoms in depth, is
not known. The second shoal spot, of 9 feet, is about 2 miles below
Tieh-mun-kwan. At entrance the river is 800 yards broad, but at Tieh-
mun-kwan it has decreased to 525 yards. This place is described at page
511. The summer rise here is about 4 feet, and the current in November
runs from 2^ to 3 knots.

TXBB-Mnnr-xwiLir to kx-tsxit is 27 miles. Above the long straight
reach^ at the lower part of which Tieh-mun-kwan stands, the river becomes
very winding, with a breadth of 300 yards, and a depth varying from 3 to
6 fathoms ; there are shoals off all the points and also in several of the
bights. The aspect of the country through which the river runs, up to
within a few miles of Li-tsin, is that of a bleak, swampy, treeless waste,
scarcely fit for man to dwell in. Nevertheless, on the banks are villages
at short intervals, occupying a belt of land on either side which is fairly
habitable, and off which the annual flood drains naturally. A few miles
below Li-tsin the country begins to change its character, the boundless
tracts of mud and marsh, but poorly cultivated and thinly inhabited, giving
place to a well- wooded and well-cultivated district above.

Ki-tsin (hien), which is 42 miles from the sea, appears to be of no great
importance as regards trade. The river has here made a remarkable
inroad into the city. Situated on the left bank, on the concave side of a
sharp bend, the swift current has cut its way through the foreshore and
carried away some hundreds of feet of the south-west angle of the city
wall, some of the ruins of which and outlying buildings were in 1868

♦ Abridged from Notes of a Journey to the New Course of the Yellow Hiver, with
chart, by Ney Elias, Esq., F.R.G.S., published in the " Journal of the Boyal Geo-
graphical Society " for 1870, vol. XL. The distances of the principal places from the
bar are given at page 584.



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683 APPBNDIX.

Yi*:hlc fthore water in tho middle of the rirer, but they are no obstacle io
na>igaiioiif there being a 7«fathom8 channel within a few yards of the
niifuiy towards the right bank.

lil-VBtV to &0-XAV.— Eleven miles above Li-tsin is the village of
Snu-clia, on th<* ^outh bank. In this stretch of river the bights are very
ai:$;ular, and are oAen ahoal as well as the points. The depths are &om

3 to 9 fathumi*, and the river is abont 250 yards wide.

Ten mil(^ a^Mivc San-cha is Pa-tai. In the intervening portion of the
river the dcpthit vary from 5 to 16 fathoms.

»m*tal (hirn), on the south bank, is a small and apparently poor place
of trade, and were it not the site of the principal custom house on the
ri ret it would «ciircely be worth notice.

At 7 miles nU)ve Pu-tai the summer rise is about 15 feet. The bights
now ccaAc to \n* angular and shoal, the depths in the channd are 5 to 9
fathoms, and the river contracts to 200 yards. Tsing-ho-chin stands on
the north bank 41 miles above Pu-tai ; the depths between them are 6 to .
H fiit horns.

9^imm9 Sttpld is 2| miles above Tsing-ho*chin. The passage, which is

4 fathoms dee)), is, according to the map, close south of the northern rock
or i^let of the rapid. Above and below, the depths are from 6 to
10 fathoms, and the river's breadth 180 yards.

TiUtwiC (^i^n)* on the north bank, is 14^ miles above Tsing-ho-chin.
It is a large, busy, and apparently thriving place, and would probably
rank next to the ci4>ital in the matter of trade, although it certainly sur-
passes Lo*kau in every attribute of a port. There are four consecutive
sharp bends commencing 5 miles above Tsi-tung.

Tsi-yang (hien), on the north bank, 25 miles above Tsi-tung, is a
place of no importance whatever. Between the two towns the depth of
the river is 4 to 12 fathoms^ and its breadth 180 to 200 yards. Above
Tsi-yang and up to Lo-kau the depth is from 8 to 10 ^thorns, and there.
are four sharp bends conmiencing about 10 miles above the former. At
6 miles below Lo-kau is seen the first hill near the river bank ; it is about
200 feet high, on the south side, and a short distance inland. From 2 to

5 miles above this several low hills are seen on both banks, and Lo-kau
lies between them. The mountain ranges seen to the southward, 7 miles
from the river, continue as fiu* as Yu-shan. Up to this from below Pu-tai
the river has run through a low, level, but well wooded and cultivated
country.

TSX-VAir m and &o-XAir. — Tsi-nan fu is the capital of the province
of Shantung. It stands about 4 miles from the river, to the south, and
not far from Ihe foot of the main range of hills, which hereabouts average



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THE TA-TSING HO OE YELLOW RIVER. 683

from 800 to 1,200 feet in height, and form a rather picturesque back-
ground to the low, thickly-wooded plain upon which the city is built, and
which extends for many miles on both sides of the river. This plain is
alluvial, but there rise from it here and there in this neighbourhood
several small, wedge-shaped, jagged hills or masses of rock.

Lo-kau, 24^ miles above Tsi-yang, is the seaport of the capital. It is
a long, straggling, unwalled town on the south bank. The trade of
Tsi*nan fu is said to be of great importance, and carried on chiefly by
means of cart roads. The number of boats seen at Lo-kau was not large,
and many of them appeared to be only passing to the Grand canal. The
only article of commerce noticed in any quantity was salt, which had come
up the river from Tieh-mun-kwan. Coal is met as an article of trade
both here and at other places on the Yellow river ; it is of a rather bitu-
minous nature, and is sold at 1,200 cash the picul. The principal mines
are said to be at Tsan-fan, a place in the hiUs, 90 li to the eastward, where
the coal is sold at a much lower price than at Tsi-nan fu.

&o-XAir to TU'SBAX, — ^Above Lo-kau the breadth of the river increases
again to 250 and 300 yards, the rate of the current is about 4^ knots in
October, and the sammer rise is estimated at from 15 to 18 feet.

Tsi-bo-bleii Brtd^ and siioaL — Tsi-ho-hien, 8^ miles above Lo-kau,
a small, newly-walled, unbusiness-like looking place, is the site of a serious
obstruction in the river. This consists of the ruins of a stone bridge of
some seven arches, which at one time spanned the Ta-tsing, but would
now only reach about three-quarters of the distance across the river.
There is a space between the left bank and one extremity of it of about
100 yards, the deepest channel being close under the bank, where was a
depth of 5 feet on October 21st, 1868, and no stones to be felt with the
lead. The outer portion of the 100-yards channel would probably not be
practicable even at 3 feet. The bridge evidently stands in deep water,
6 fathoms having been obtained immediately above it, and 5 fathoms a
short distance below it. The right bank is naturally the steep one, and
the left (near which is the channel), the shelving one, and the shallow side
of the reach. This bridge being now nothing but a wreck is due to the
additional force and volume of water in the river for the last 15 years,
which it has been unable to withstand.

It is evident that the ruins of this bridge might be removed, and if no
other obstruction existed, the river rendered navigable as far as Yu-»han,
or within 19 miles of the Grand canal. Unfortunately, however, about 3
miles below this there occurs another, though a less formidable, obstruction
in the shape of a shoal extending right across the river. In this case, too,
the deepest side of the reach is the right, and here on the 21st October
only 11 feet was found, the bottom rising gradually towards the left bank.



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584 APPENDIX.

On the 6th Novemberi when the spot was passed a second time, there waa
but 6 feet of water in mid-stream, and allowing for a fall of 4 or 5 feet in
the level of the rirer in the interval, there would be only 6 or 7 feet in
the deep passage near the right bank. The shoal was estimated at 200 to
300 yards in length, and was the only place aboye the bar where less than
2 fathoms was found in the deep channel of the river.

Xsaaff-eHvaaff is 18 miles above Tsing-ho-hien, and the depths 6 to 7
fathoms throughout. Here the river is 200 yards broad, and the current
runs 4j^ to 6 knots.

Mar-7lii-iit«B Slioaia are 17 miles above Euang-chuang. They are
marked 2 fathoms on the map, but there is no description of them. Hua-
kau is a town 7 miles above the shoals. A little above Hua-kau are three
small elevations on the north bank, and 8 miles above it is Yushan.

TV-SBAV, 19 miles from the Grand canal, is the point where the waters
of the Yellow river, expanded and spread over the plain some 90 miles
south-westward, without a channel deeper than 3 feet even in the season
of inundation, but ever moving with a swift onward current, converge,
and the deep, narrow, clean-cut river bed, which receives them and leads
them to the sea, is the same which fifteen years ago formed only the bed
of the Ta-tsing, in which there are many indications of its becoming each
year both wider and deeper.

The following are the distances of the principal places and shoals of the

river from the sea :—

Bar to Lau-ye-miaa

„ Tieh-mun-kwan

„ la-tflin (hien)

„ San-cha -

„ Pu-tai (hien) -

„ Tsing-ho chin -

„ Pelatig rapid

„ Tsi-tung (hien) -

„ Tsl-yang (hien)



HAITAN ISLAND.



. . 4 mUes.


Bar to Lo-kaa (i>ort)


- 16S miles.


- 15 „


„ TM-nan(fu)


- 172 „


- 42 „


„ Tsi-ho shallows -


- 174 „


- 68 „


„ Tai-ho-hien bridge


- 177 „


- 68 „


„ Kuang-chaang


■ 195 »


- 104 „


,, Ping-jin-hien shoals


- 212 „


■ 106i „


„ Hua-kau


-219 „


- US „


„ Tu-shan


- S27 „


- 144 „


f, Grand caoal


-W6 „



Bouttk Baat Coast.

AVCBOXAaa. — There is very good anchorage under Hai
head in the N.E. monsoon. The bay south-westward of the head runs in
much further than was formerly represented. The soundings decrease
gradually up to the villages on the bay, and the fishermen report the
anchorage to be free of rocks other than those close to the shore. H.M.
gunboat Dwarf in 1872 anchored in 3J fathoms, with the outer point
S.E. by E., and the easternmost village on the bay N.N.E. This anchor-
age is frequented by junks.



i



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NING-PO. 585

TREATY PORT OF NING-PO.

Foreign Settlement, &o. — The site occupied by the residences of
foreigners at Ning-po is the promontory formed by the junction of the
Tsie-kie branch with the Yung river, which lies opposite the northern face
of the city, and is known as t^e Pih-ngan or North bank. The foreign
consular and mercantile establishments occupy the two sides of this pro-
montory, both above and below the junction, a mile either way, but no
special limits have ever been defined as at the other treaty ports. The
British consulate stands at a little distance from the river bank, opposite
the Salt gate of the city, on which account the river flowing past the walls
at this point is termed the " Consulate Creek." Postal arrangements are
conducted at the consulate. The U.S. and French consulates also face the
city. Several public-houses and taverns exist for the convenience of the
shipping, and two medical men are established in the settlement.

No direct communication exists with Hong Kong, but steamers run daily
to and from Shanghai at moderate fares. Steamers also run between
Shanghai, Ning-po, and Foochow.

Ning-po fu was thrown open to foreign commerce by the treaty of
Nanking in 1842. It is situated in Chekiang^ the smallest of the 18
provinces of China, which occupies the southern and terminal portion of
the great central plain. Within the limits of Chekiang, which enjoys a
favourable climate and varied soil, all the most celebrated staples of China
are produced, besides the advantage of means of intercommunication,
natural and artificial. Silk, tea, cotton, rice, dye-stuffs, drugs, and minerak
(including iron and coal) are among its principal natural productions.

Tbe Climate and meteorology of Ning-po differ in no important respects
from those of Shanghai, which will be found fully treated of under the
head of that place {see pages 367 and 577). A greater degree of salubrity
prevails here, owing probably to the water in the river being salt instead
of fresh, and consequently less conducive to malarial exhalations. Its
advantage over Shanghai as a place of residence for Europeans is its
proximity to the sea, and the neighbourhood of numerous, hilly regions^
where pure air and moderate temperature can always be enjoyed.

•applies. — ^Native shops established in various parts of the settlement
supply foreigners with provisions at prices more moderate than at Shanghais
Game is plentiful during the winter, and fish, including mackerel, is
obtained of superior quality and in great abundance.

a *Ning-po fu was occupied by a detachment of marines and British
troops during the winter of 1841, and the vessels of the squadron anchored
off the north-east and eastern parts of the city. To prevent an attack
from fire junks an expedition of troops and blue jackets, under the com-

* John W. King, Master of H.M.S. ModeMU, 1841.



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686 APPEypix.

nund of Vice-Admind Sir W. Paricer and Gknerai Lord Gougb, em-
baited in Deoeoxber 1841, in H.EXC. steamers Se$o$tri$^ Phle^eihoM^
and NemesUf and proceeded with the boata of the squadron up the Yajao
branch, clearing the river of su^icious junks, and making the Chinese
troops evacuate the city of Yujao."

ELM. despatch vesseU of 900 tons and drawing from 12 to 13 feet, can
lie at Ning-po, and during the war in 1841 the SesostrU, drawing 17 feet,
anchored about 3^ miles below Yujao.

SHANTUNG PROMONTORY.

•aajrmra aicnbt*— There is in course of construction, on the NJEL
extremity of the Shantung promontory, a lighthouse 64 feet in height^
from which there is expected to be exhibited, in October 1874, a>£sMif light
at an elevation of 200 feet above the sea, and in clear weather the white
light should be seen from a distance of 21 miles. The illuminating appa-
ratus is dioptric, of the first order. The light will show white to seaward,
and red to the westward and southward to warn vessels when they approach
the coast.

A temporary yS!recf white light of the sixth order is at present exhi-
bited near the above lighthouse, visible between the bearings N«N.E. f £.
round by west and south to S.S.E. ) £, This light is, from some posi-
tions, obscured by a point of the mainland and Alceste island between
S. by E. f E. and S.S.E. ^ E. It is elevated 160 feet above the sea, and
in clear weather should be seen from a distance of 8 miles.



RIVER MIN.
Buoys of Vorfh dtannel.

Ontor or sro. 1 Buoy is a fairway buoy in 8 fathoms off the northern
entrance of North channel, and is about 3 miles N.W. ^ W. from the outer
part of Outer Min roef. It is a large buoy, 10 feet in diameter, painted
in red and black horizontal stripes, and surmounted by a black cage 18
feet above the water. From the buoy Sharp peak bears W. | N., and
Rees rock S.W. J W.

Middio or sro. 2 Bttoy is a fairway buoy in 4 fathoms, and about 2\
miles S.W. by W. | W. from Outer buoy to which it is in all respects
similar, except that its cage is in the form of a truncated cone. From it
Sharp peak bears W. by N. | N., and Rees rock S.W. i S.

nmer or iro. 3 Baoy is also a fairway buoy in 7^ fathoms, and lying
about 2^ miles W. J S. from Middle buoy, with sharp peak bearing
N.W. ^ W., and Round island S. W. | W. It is precisely the same as Outer
buoy.



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687



TIDE TABLE
For the Coasts of CnmA, Formosa, and opp-lting Islands ; the North
Coast of Luzon and Bashes Channel ; the Eastern and Yellow
Seas ; and the Gulps of Pe-chili and Lla.u-tunq.*



Place.



High

Water,

PuU

and

Ghange.



Rise.



Place.



High
Wafer,

Pull

and
Change.



mae.



h. in.



ft.



ft.



h. m.



ft.



Bashee and Balintang Channels,

Babuyan islands (Fort> a a
SanPioQuinto) - .; ** "

Babuyan islands (Port")
Mu8a» Puga islfuids) • S
Bashee islands, Batanes - — 4

Pratas shoal- - - 4 6

Formosa Island,
Takau harbour.
Port Kok-si-kon -
Wanckan Banks -
Tongsiau

llakung (Pescadores)
Tamsui harbour
Ke-lung harbour -
8au-o bay -

Islands N,E, of Formosa,



Canton and West Rivers — c'ont.
I 71
Lankeet island 11 20



Oanton'river.Pan-si-ak 1
channel 'S



10


8


11 80


8


10


10


10


8-10


10 80


91


11 45


7-10


10 80


3


6 60


8-e



MeiacoSima, Port Had-*)
dington - - -i

Luchu islands



6 45
6 88



Canton and West Rivers,
11



LUi' '\

ng ">
ifu



West river entrance, or")
Broadway - - -J
West river, Sam-shui '
„ Shao-king
„ Wu-chu
Canton river entrance

„ the Broadway

„ Typaanchor-")

age •}

„ ISacauo
„ Cumsingmum
„ TJrmstone bay

,, Lintin island



In Peb.

10

11

10

10
6
10 80
noon



7
6J

7\

I"
Li-ii

. 8
7i

7

7
7*



6t



Chuen-pee 1
point -J



Whampoa
docks



Euper island
o£F Canton



Western branches of Can^
ton river, Junk-fleet en-
trance

Western branches of Can-
ton river, Wang-mun
channel -

Western branches of Can-
ton river, Tai-lung
channel -



Western branches of Can-



ton river. Junction >



channel



noon

March
1 40

April

1 16

May

80

June

80

March

2 40

May

1 40

June
1 40



11 60



11 60



2



8*
7*

7-8

7-8

7-8

7-8

64

61

64

84

64

84

64



East Coast of China,



Ladrone islands
Hong Kong harbour
Ninepin group - ' -
Tide Cove (Mirs bay)
Tuni-ang island (Bias bay)
Tsang-chau island „



ft.

6
64



64



64



9 40


44


10 15


4f


10


6


10


64


8




8 SO





* The height of the tide in this Table is calculated from the mean level of the low water of
ordinary springs, because the soundings expressed in most charts are reduced to that leveL The
height, therefore, which is given at each place is the actiial rise of high water above the mean low-
water level of spring tides. I

The highest tides take place, generally, two transits after the new and full moon. In many places
the diurnal inequality is great.

On page 98 of the Admiralty Tide Tables (for 1874), will be found a convenient method of de-
ducing, from them, the height of the tide at anv intermediate hour between high and low water, and
this voll be found very useful, if not a necessity, when approaching the Tanitse kiang or Pei Ho,
where the rise of tide is great. See also " Admiralty Manual," Chapter on TidM.



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588



APFEin>IX.



Tid« Tftble for the Coaste of China, Fonnosa, kc'^eontinued.



WM«r,
Full



I



PUoe.



High
Wator.

FuU

and
Change.



Rise.



I



I h.



ft.



EmM Coati of CAmo— eont



H'<w-halti^
Km-^tamr mat (ll>a di e
rhiQ b«jr)

(lllIM ll^ •

C"upehi pfjuit
Ua**ibuu ta^ •
OMH*of Ooo4 Hop«
•vmUiv, Douhk L



:)



10

7

7

8





•s •



nipp«rraital(.\amaaUiaad); U Ifi



Chauaa baj • • •

Tuocmnic harhuur •
Cbunm^y Mland (EMtptat)
Amo)'. inner harbour
» Chiamr-chin, Weat]

Hu-i«Uu bi^

rhtmmo baj

Cbincbu harbour

MtfirhflO aoond

Uaitan strait, Paas island -

Whlt4 Doff islands •

Bir«r Mln. T«mp1e point •

M Losingialand •

Channrbi island •

Spider island

Lishan baj • • -

Nani-<iuan harbour

Namki islands

Pih-ki-shan islands

Fomr-whang fnnoop (Bal-'>
lock harbour) - -i

Wan-chn rifer, entranoe -

dtj

Chin-ki island

Tai-chow islanda •

St. 0«orfre island (San-')
man bay) - • -J

Kwesan islanda

Nimrod sound



11
U SO
11 30
noon

8 40

15

10 90

85

30
noon



10 46



• 80

10

10 15

10

8 80

8 80

8 80

• JO

9 80
9 90
9

10 90

9 80

10 80



CftMsoii Arehiptiago,



Vernon channel
Tinff-hai harbour
Poo-too island
Laosewbi^ -
Volcano island



9 40

11

8 16

10

11 80



61
61

6-7
61
6i
H
9
7
61

11

18



16
16
17
17
18
18
19
17
17
17
16
17
17
17

17

m

18
14

16

14
90



141



Fog islands
0hi4>nraad

Yangt$e Kiang,



U


14


11 20


m


1


9


11 45


14


11 46


17


noon


25



h. m.

CkuBon Arehipdago—QOTiX,
Bast Saddle ishnd-
Toug rirer, Chin-hai
„ Ning-po
Hang-ehn bi^, Seshan is-)



15
16
U
13
10
12
SI
i



ft.



Qatalaff island
LIgfatahip at entnmce
Wosung B. entrance

M Pheasant point
., Shanghait



Ching-kiang, Dec to Feb.
Klen-Uen „ „
Ohing-kiang, summer rise
Nanking « „

Kinkiang « „

Hankow „ „



U 80
noon
80
85

40

1 40



Yellow Sea,



Wang-kia-tai bay

Kyaa-ebanbaj

Ching-tanbaj

Lo-shan-kan -

Tsing-haibaj

Staunton ishmd

Wangkiabaj

Shih-tanbaj

Sang-tanbaj

Aylenbaj -

Idtanbaj -

Shantung promontoiy

Wei-hai-wei harbour

Lung-mun harbour

Chi-fu harbour

Hope sound (Miautau
group) - - -

Depdt bay C^o.)

Koreak South coast •

„ BasU bay >

„ Hajoribanks har-)
bour - -i

„ Seoul rlTor -



6

5

6
4 80
8

1 80

2 30
30
56
30





80





10 84
10 24
10 86



11
10

8

7

8

21
k



6

12

40 to 84

60 to 42



51



9

7
8

61

6

lU
18



6i



* The times of high irater at Swatow must be 8 or 8 hours earlier.

t From tidal observations made at Shanghai by the engineer to the Customs for the last six
months of 1878, the night tides in July and in the following three months, average considerably
higher than the day tides. The reverse ocenrs in the months of November and 0eoember.^2%9
IforthCkiuaUercad,



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TIDE TABLE.



589



Tide Table for the Coasts of China, Formosa, Ac^^conHnwd.






High

Water,

PuU

and

Change.


Eise. I


Place.


Pull

and

Change.


Eise. II


Race.




1




1





h. m.


ft.


ft.




h. m.


ft.


ft.


Yelhw 5ea— cont.




Gulf of Pc-cAt7t— cent


t.


Korea, Boisee island
„ Saleeriver «


6 20
6 40


87
21


16-27
11


Peh-tangHo

Sharlui-tien banks, west part


8 88
2 60


10
10


7*
8


„ TaTong river


6 80


18




ChingHo - - •


1 20


81




„ Chodo island

„ PingTanginlot -


6 20

7 46


12
21


14


Gidfof Liau-tung.




Thornton haven
Chang-zu island -
£vang-lo island •
Ta-lien-whan bay •
Encounter rook


9 80
9 80
9 66
10 47
10 44


12
12
12

io»

11


8
8
8
8
8


Lau-muHo -
Tai-choHo •
Yang Ho
Ning-faai -

N.W. Head of golf -


1 SO
16
16

noon

4 60 .
6 80


6 r

6
6
6
7
10


4i

7*


GulfofPe^hili.




Society hay (SoUvan boy) -
Port Adams (Maiy island)


16
2


8
10


7


Tartsing Ho,or Yellow river


4 10


m


8


Hulu Shan bay •


2 80


8


6


Chi Ho


4


101


8


Vansittart Saddle -


4 20


10


Bk


Pei Ho entrance -


8 40


10


7i


Liau Ho, The Bar -


4 80


lU


n


„ Tientsin -


7


41




„ Yin-koa -





12





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690



TABLE OF POSITIONS'

02r THB

COASTS OF CHWA AND OFF-LYING ISLANDS; NORTH 00A8T OP LUZON;
BASHEE CHANNEL I FORMOSA AND ADJACENT ISLANDS; THE YELLOW
SEA ; AND THE GULFS OF PE-CHILI AND LLAU-TUNG.



Place.



Pifftlcu]«r Spot



Latitiide,
North.



Longitude,
But.



Authoritiet.



CHINA, EAST COAST.



Macao
Homo Kovo

Raleigh rock
Gap rock -
Leme heed
Nincpin rock
Single island
Tunl-eng iiland
Mendoaa island
Pedro Blanco rock -
Pauk Piah rock
Chino peak
Cupchi point -
Breaker point -
Cape of Good Hope
Swatow - - -
Brothen ialeU -
Tongaanff harbour -
Chapel idand -
Amot . • -
High Lamock •
Dodd island -
Chin-chu harbour
Pyramid point -
Sorrel rock
Ockaeu islands •
Lam-yit island -
Hungwha channel •
Hai-un island •
Turnabout island
Pescadores islands -

n Makung haibour



White Dogs islands
River Min
Alligator island
Tung-ying island
Cony island
Double Peak island
Pih-seang islands
Dangerous rock
Tae islands
Pingfong island



Fort San Francisco
Wellington battary
Cathedral -



East summit
Sununit



HiU on it



Double island
South-east islet •
Fall peak - -
Light on summit -
Hanseu island pagoda
Light ...
Sunmiit
Pisai island -



Western island

High cone peak <



Online LibraryGreat Britain. Hydrographic OfficeThe China Sea directory: Comprising the coasts of China from Hong Kong to ... → online text (page 67 of 72)